Cory Booker: The War on Drugs has failed

posted at 6:41 pm on July 16, 2012 by Dustin Siggins

Newark, New Jersey mayor Cory Booker is making news again — this time for commentary regarding the War on Drugs. Via Huffington Post:

Newark, N.J. Mayor Cory Booker took to Reddit Sunday to criticize the war on drugs, saying it was ineffective and “represents big overgrown government at its worst.”

“The so called War on Drugs has not succeeded in making significant reductions in drug use, drug arrests or violence,” the Democrat wrote during the Reddit “ask me anything” chat. “We are pouring huge amounts of our public resources into this current effort that are bleeding our public treasury and unnecessarily undermining human potential.”

Over at Reddit, Booker wrote the following:

Blacks make up less than 15% of our New Jersey’s population but make up more than 60% of our prison population. I can’t accept that facts like this one do anything but demonstrate the historic and current biases in our criminal justice system…People should not see these facts and this discussion as an indictment of any one race, sector, or occupation, it should be seen as a call to all of us to do the difficult things to make a change because this isn’t a “black” problem this is an American problem.

The so called War on Drugs has not succeeded in making significant reductions in drug use, drug arrests or violence. We are pouring huge amounts of our public resources into this current effort that are bleeding our public treasury and unnecessarily undermining human potential. I see the BILLIONS AND BILLIONS of dollars being poured into the criminal justice system here in New Jersey and it represents big overgrown government at its worst. We should be investing dollars in programs and strategies that work not just to lower crime but work to empower lives.

It anguishes me how we seem to be so content with national and state recidivism rates of around 60% and how a staggering number of young black men are involved in the criminal justice system.

My police in Newark are involved in an almost ridiculous game of arresting the same people over and over again and when you talk to these men they have little belief that there is help or hope for them to break out of this cycle.

And it is a dangerous world for people caught up in the drug trade for it is so associated with violence. Data from Rutgers University is chilling: Over 80% of Newark’s murder VICTIMS have been arrested before an average of 10 times.

There are few public policy areas where Democrats are right, but the legalization of marijuana is one of them. Last month I made a case for why social conservatives should consider supporting the legalization of marijuana, and Booker’s data above backs a lot of what I wrote about. The editors of National Review are also in agreement with Booker on both marijuana legalization and the failure of the War on Drugs.

Booker doesn’t just complain, however. He also offers solutions for those people currently on drugs, who have been arrested, and otherwise have been impacted by both their own poor life decisions and the War on Drugs:

  1. Reentry. We developed the state’s first office of reentry, raised philanthropy and other grant dollars to support it and have some impressive data. Our office has connected well over 1,000 men and women with work and a number of our programs are producing some great results. One I will mention here is our Fatherhood program. The recidivism rate for this program has dropped among participants from over 60% for nonparticipants to 7% for participants…Instead of condemning men for not being good fathers and preaching to them about how they should take care of their kids, this program looks to empower them in their fatherhood mission. The men are partnered with mentor dads, there are parenting classes, group activities with their kids and a partnership is created with the mother of the children. The men are helped with finding jobs and even with suits and more for interviews and work. All of this is so much cheaper than continued incarceration and it empowers participants (mostly black and latino) breaking the cycle of imprisonment…
  2. Court reform . . . I discussed this in another answer but by having youth courts, veterans courts, drug courts and more, we are finding that we can empower people to stay out of jail and turn their lives around as opposed to get chewed up in the system. Court innovation is critical and Newark is leading the way in New Jersey thanks to great partners like The Center For Court Innovation in NYC.
  3. Jobs. It is so critical that we find ways to rapidly attach people to work when they come out of prison even if they are minimum wage transition jobs. Newark has done a lot in this area. I’m particularly proud of our Clean and Green program taking men and women right from returning from prison and giving them jobs helping to clean and green our city.
  4. Treatment. This is critical. Our state is just recently stepping up to expand treatment and make it a mandatory alternative to incarceration. In Newark we have some great treatment options but they too need more funding. Treatment saves taxpayer dollars, empowers individuals, stops recidivism, heals families and helps us all.
  5. Legal Help. Our nation’s legal service and advocacy organizations are starving and so many people are getting chewed up by the criminal justice system just because they are poor and lack legal support. Newark New Jersey started our nations first ever pro bono legal service practice to support people coming home from prison. You would be amazed at the number of people who come out of prison, want to get a job and try to do the right thing but then their lives are entangled by countless legal problems and barriers that could be overcome with with some administrative legal support…
  6. There is much more I can list in terms of things happening in Newark that point to solutions…But for my final point…So much of this problem could be solved by strong education systems and other systems of support for our children before they get in trouble. So let me offer this as a final action item to heal our nation, end many insidious racial divisions and exalt our country’s highest ideals. Mentoring. It takes 4 hours a month to mentor a child, the amount of time most watch TV in a day. There are hundreds of kids in Newark on waiting lists for a mentor: a positive adult in their lives who cares. Mentoring has demonstrated a profound ability to dramatically lower incarceration for youth and even lower early unsafe sex practices. And it has shown to boost youth outcomes from self-esteem to dramatically increasing school performance. EVERYONE who is qualified should be mentoring a child who is not their own OR encouraging others to do so OR supporting mentoring organizations. If every so-called “at risk” kid in Newark had a mentor we could dramatically end future crime in our city.

Now, I’m just a lowly blogger with more opinions than he ought to voice, but even if Booker’s solutions aren’t right for every community they make a lot of sense. Rather than incentivize failure, encourage success. Preventive measures through mentoring. The value of employment, local solutions and citizen involvement. These are conservative principles to help improve society, and Booker seems to believe they are working.


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But all the drugs people are complaining about were legal before 1914. Pot didn’t become illegal until 1937. How did the nation survive. Look at opiate use in New England in the early 1800s. It was rampant. Why did it suddenly become a problem in 1914?

MSimon on July 17, 2012 at 10:54 AM

Not really. Most of the abused drugs we have today did not exist anywhere near 1914.
The differences between society and its values now and societies values now are numerous.
Opiate use became a problem after reality trumped theory and the social problems of opiate addiction became undeniable.

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 11:13 AM

Meh, I’m pretty sure the thread ended back on page one:

What we should do, is execute anyone caught transporting over 1 pound of any illegal narcotic, and do it right then and there.

SWalker on July 16, 2012 at 6:51 PM

RINO in Name Only on July 17, 2012 at 11:10 AM

You are right, I should have written reductio ad absurdum instead.

roy_batty on July 17, 2012 at 11:13 AM

You are right, I should have written reductio ad absurdum instead.

roy_batty on July 17, 2012 at 11:13 AM

Nope, still page 1, same quote:)

RINO in Name Only on July 17, 2012 at 11:17 AM

It fails because the CIA funds its Black Budget with drugs. Look up – McCoy “The Politics of Heroin in South East Asia”

MSimon on July 17, 2012 at 11:02 AM

And explains the power and wealth of the Hmong cartels in America today.

Kenosha Kid on July 17, 2012 at 11:22 AM

to minimize drug use

Legalize them all to take the money out of selling them

If you want to sell a class of drugs you have to buy a $20.00 license and the names of the license holders are posted.

If you sell or give to a person under 18, 20 years without parole

If your want to use, warn your neighbors, employer and the government by buying a $20.00 license and post the names on the net.

Selling and buying without a license, 20 years without parole.

License information may be used for any purpose by employers, the court system, insurers and government benefits and privileges.

tmitsss on July 17, 2012 at 11:24 AM

The differences between society and its values now and societies values now are numerous.
Opiate use became a problem after reality trumped theory and the social problems of opiate addiction became undeniable.

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 11:13 AM

Please. If you don’t know what you’re talking about, please don’t talk.

Drug use has been with us forever. In the U.S., we were terrible drunks before Prohibition. The problem with social conservatives is that they are just as bad, and ofttimes worse, than liberals in making an argument completely based on their feelings.

John the Libertarian on July 17, 2012 at 11:25 AM

Look at opiate use in New England in the early 1800s. It was rampant. Why did it suddenly become a problem in 1914?

MSimon on July 17, 2012 at 10:54 AM

So was dysentery and projectile diarrhea. You don’t suppose that opiates shutting it off like a valve had anything to do with that do you?

roy_batty on July 17, 2012 at 11:25 AM

The cost is due to the police protection required. I was thinking hot house tomatoes times ten. And for weed that is certainly true. Weed is easier to grow than tomatoes. If anything I exaggerated. Weed probably comes in at 3 cents a day.

MSimon on July 17, 2012 at 10:43 AM

How can the cost of police protection of medpot be equal to the costs of the wod?

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 11:29 AM

I’m completely done with being nice to proponents of legalization. You’ve clearly not lost over two dozen friends in your life to bad decisions made by people while under the influence of drugs you want to legalize.

If society promoted better self-control, and there weren’t so many ways for people to kill themselves and others through the inability to think clearly or quickly, then perhaps it would be a reasonable argument. The real world isn’t that way. Whether or not a government-run “war on drugs” has been effective (agreed that it has not), legalization is absolutely not the correct answer.

Calling drug use a “victimless crime” makes me see red. Destroying others’ lives because you can’t control your own appetite isn’t victimless.

Find another cause on which to spend your energy. Leave illegal drugs illegal.

Freelancer on July 17, 2012 at 11:31 AM

Please. If you don’t know what you’re talking about, please don’t talk.

Drug use has been with us forever. In the U.S., we were terrible drunks before Prohibition. The problem with social conservatives is that they are just as bad, and ofttimes worse, than liberals in making an argument completely based on their feelings.

John the Libertarian on July 17, 2012 at 11:25 AM

Practice what you preach…nice non sequitur you have there. Hate to see something happen to it.

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 11:33 AM

tmitsss on July 17, 2012 at 11:24 AM

What makes you think any of that would happen?…people willfully putting their names on a list of drug users??..sway a liberal court to uphold mandatory 20 yr sentences, etc.

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 11:38 AM

It suure has! I don’t know anyone who smoked pot! /s

DannoJyd on July 17, 2012 at 8:16 AM

If it was legal you would know a lot more.

The use of illegal drugs is higher now than it was in 1970, when Nixon declared the War on Drugs, and much higher than when the Harrison Anti-Narcotic Act was passed in 1914. One would think that the “minimum” you refer to would be the lower rate of usage. By which standard, the WoD is a colossal failure, and you appear to either be spectacularly ignorant, or trying to deceive the readers of this board by deliberately giving them incorrect information.

So, are you ignorant, or a liar?

JohnGalt23 on July 17, 2012 at 9:50 AM

Neither and no, the minimum I refer to is just that, the minimum. Usage now is reduced to those willing to a risk fines just to use. Take that away and use goes way higher. Is there a even a scintilla of doubt in anyone’s mind the use of any drug will increase once it’s legalized? You can argue drugs should be legal because people have that right, or that the cost is too high (doubtful IMHO because government cost don’t go down) but it’s ridiculous to suggest that the War on Drugs didn’t do about the only thing it ever could, which was to keep drug usage to it’s minimum. Comparing usage now to 1914 or 1970, with 1/5 to 1/2 the current population, is silly.

Rocks on July 17, 2012 at 11:40 AM

Not really. Most of the abused drugs we have today did not exist anywhere near 1914.
The differences between society and its values now and societies values now are numerous.
Opiate use became a problem after reality trumped theory and the social problems of opiate addiction became undeniable.

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 11:13 AM

Are you contradicting yourself or having 2nd, 3rd, thoughts?
Opium dens were well-known. Laudnum was the best pain reliever, and cocaine was abundant.
Social values? … And then there was the “Temperance Union” first, btw.
The “Reefer Madness” crowd is still with us unfortunately and hold sway over decisions best left to adults who can control themselves.
REAL Conservatives approve of marijuana legalization and taxation.
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on July 17, 2012 at 11:47 AM

tmitsss on July 17, 2012 at 11:24 AM

You are loving yourself some Big Brother aren’t you?

Legalize it all.

Allow hospitals and insurance companies to deny treatment to OD’s.

Problem Darwins itself away in a generation.

You cannot have legalized drugs with our current healthcare and legal environment.

Nathan_OH on July 17, 2012 at 11:49 AM

Problem Darwins itself away in a generation.

Nathan_OH on July 17, 2012 at 11:49 AM

You underestimate people. It is perfectly possible to lead a long and productive life addicted to say opiates, if the concentration and quality are controlled.

MetaThought on July 17, 2012 at 11:54 AM

I’m completely done with being nice to proponents of legalization. alcohol legalization.
Freelancer on July 17, 2012 at 11:31 AM

I lost 4 members of my graduating class, and several other friends to driving under the influence of alcohol.

However I accept some risk may occur; and I’m not trying to CONTROL YOUR AND EVERYONE ELSE’S LIFE FOR MY MORAL CRUSADE.

Thank you for trying to make this an emotional and not a rational argument; we all know we need more emotion and less rational thought in our laws… but I’m not buying it.

I’m sorry your friends died… but their death doesn’t mean you have a right to control the choices of every person in the country.

Or maybe I’m wrong; how many of my friends have to die from suicide after online bullying before I get to personally censor the internet as a dictator of all information flow?

that’s how it works, right? My friends suffer, then I get increased power, then I can silence you… right?

Or does the moral defense only work in your case?

How about we go back to rational reasoned arguments instead of plays for emotional distress?

gekkobear on July 17, 2012 at 11:55 AM

You are loving yourself some Big Brother aren’t you?
Legalize it all.
Allow hospitals and insurance companies to deny treatment to OD’s.
Problem Darwins itself away in a generation.
You cannot have legalized drugs with our current healthcare and legal environment.

Nathan_OH on July 17, 2012 at 11:49 AM

Hmmmmmmmmm …
How many people have over-dosed on marijuana?
Just Curious
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on July 17, 2012 at 11:56 AM

Are you contradicting yourself or having 2nd, 3rd, thoughts?
Opium dens were well-known. Laudnum was the best pain reliever, and cocaine was abundant.
Social values? … And then there was the “Temperance Union” first, btw.
The “Reefer Madness” crowd is still with us unfortunately and hold sway over decisions best left to adults who can control themselves.
REAL Conservatives approve of marijuana legalization and taxation.
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on July 17, 2012 at 11:47 AM

No I’m not.
What are you basing that on??
You named 2 drugs of abuse in the early 20th century. How many drugs of abuse are there now?

The social values I was referring to was the difference in tolerance of socially destructive and personally harmful behavior not to mention the current views by a lot of people regarding respect for laws and police.
Do you think there is much difference in those social values now and then?

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 11:57 AM

Hmmmmmmmmm …
How many people have over-dosed on marijuana?
Just Curious
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on July 17, 2012 at 11:56 AM

How do you define “overdosed”?
Barring death level overdoses, quite a few have overdosed on marijuana.
People who are brought to the emergency room for drug overdoses on other drugs, and don’t die, have still overdosed, have they not?

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 12:02 PM

How do you define “overdosed”?
Barring death level overdoses, quite a few have overdosed on marijuana.
People who are brought to the emergency room for drug overdoses on other drugs, and don’t die, have still overdosed, have they not?

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 12:02 PM

Name One.
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on July 17, 2012 at 12:04 PM

Name One.
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on July 17, 2012 at 12:04 PM

Medical records are private. That being said….Bob. Bob overdosed.
Seriously..do a search on emergency room admissions for marijuana.

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 12:31 PM

One time, I knew somebody who made a terribly poor decision and died as a result of it.

Ergo, the solution is to clamp down on the liberty of everybody else.

Jeddite on July 17, 2012 at 12:35 PM

Too bad Cherry Coke and chocolate-chip cookies arent illegal. I would never have become addicted to those drugs (street-name “C5″) if the government protected me from myself.

Tjord. :(

Jeddite on July 17, 2012 at 12:37 PM

Too bad Cherry Coke and chocolate-chip cookies arent illegal. I would never have become addicted to those drugs (street-name “C5″) if the government protected me from myself.

Tjord. :(

Jeddite on July 17, 2012 at 12:37 PM

But see, it’s okay for people to live on the taxpayer dime as a result of becoming 500lbs for eating nothing but crap, requiring huge amounts of health care that we eventually get the bill for. Government restriction on diet would be awful.

Now…if that same person wanted to smoke a joint, clearly that’s an egregious and horrific burden on taxpayers.

MadisonConservative on July 17, 2012 at 12:42 PM

Hmmmmmmmmm …
How many people have over-dosed on marijuana?
Just Curious
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on July 17, 2012 at 11:56 AM

Then they don’t OD and are not going to being a massive drag on the resources of the healthcare system as the “hard” drug users, or are you wanting to find a way to kill people via MJ?

Nathan_OH on July 17, 2012 at 12:55 PM

Name One.
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on July 17, 2012 at 12:04 PM

John Kaiser did…so did Sarah Begley…

right2bright on July 17, 2012 at 1:10 PM

John Kaiser did…so did Sarah Begley…

right2bright on July 17, 2012 at 1:10 PM

Prove it. A quick search shows nothing for either of those names related to marijuana.

MadisonConservative on July 17, 2012 at 1:22 PM

The social values I was referring to was the difference in tolerance of socially destructive and personally harmful behavior not to mention the current views by a lot of people regarding respect for laws and police.
Do you think there is much difference in those social values now and then?

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 11:57 AM

Back then the community did the policing of the harmful behavior, but they had the common sense to not give the federal government the power to ban certain things. Note that Prohibition and the outlawing of marijuana didn’t take place until the 20th Century, some 140-odd years into the nation’s existence.

And I’m interested to know the ratio of crooked cops and sheriffs to morally competent ones back then, compared to now. As one who was in high school when N.W.A. first gained notoriety, I’m guessing that a lot of people have no respect for law enforcement because police brutality.

TMOverbeck on July 17, 2012 at 1:24 PM

Prove it. A quick search shows nothing for either of those names related to marijuana.

MadisonConservative on July 17, 2012 at 1:22 PM

A quick search? That’s what you rely on “a quick search”…you think everything is on the internet? Really, a quick search of a lot of names wouldn’t show anything.
The poster asked for any names, and I gave him, HIM, two names, do your own research, I did mine.

right2bright on July 17, 2012 at 1:43 PM

Jonathon Grundy…

right2bright on July 17, 2012 at 1:45 PM

A quick search? That’s what you rely on “a quick search”…you think everything is on the internet? Really, a quick search of a lot of names wouldn’t show anything.
The poster asked for any names, and I gave him, HIM, two names, do your own research, I did mine.

right2bright on July 17, 2012 at 1:43 PM

Lameass excuse. Nearly all even remotely relevant news outlets are searchable on the internet. Both of those names searched exactly, alone with “marijuana”, “thc”, or “overdose” provide no relevant results whatsoever. If you’re going to throw out random names without any citation, then you’re going to be expected to back up your claim. Put up or shut up.

MadisonConservative on July 17, 2012 at 1:52 PM

Jonathon Grundy…

right2bright on July 17, 2012 at 1:45 PM

Was wondering when you’d get to that one. Yes, there is a single story from Australia that originated on a completely unknown blog, without a single actual news source to back it up. It was also an article of serious question, not least of which the manner in which he was described:

He was found slumped into a half eaten pizza, joystick still in hand. He had been playing World of Warcraft and taking hits from a bong.

Half eaten pizza and a bong? Apart from being ridiculous cliche, the article only says “apparently”. Why does it only say that? Because there is no report of an autopsy, nor any actual news citation to back up the story. Additionally, World of Warcraft has never been played with a joystick. The veracity of this story ranks slightly south of Pop Rocks and Coke killing Mikey from the Life commercials.

There. I went out of the way to link one of your pathetic, laughable “sources”. Now source the other two, or admit you’re full of s**t.

MadisonConservative on July 17, 2012 at 1:59 PM

Back then the community did the policing of the harmful behavior, but they had the common sense to not give the federal government the power to ban certain things. Note that Prohibition and the outlawing of marijuana didn’t take place until the 20th Century, some 140-odd years into the nation’s existence.

And I’m interested to know the ratio of crooked cops and sheriffs to morally competent ones back then, compared to now. As one who was in high school when N.W.A. first gained notoriety, I’m guessing that a lot of people have no respect for law enforcement because police brutality.

TMOverbeck on July 17, 2012 at 1:24 PM

Good points. But that was then and this is now.
With the plethora of lawyers and “rights” advocates, communities are not able to effectively police communities.

The ratio of corrupt cops and lawyers etc, is another topic.

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 2:04 PM

Legalize it all, let Darwin have his pound of flesh.

I see enough comments the “anti’s” whos brilliance to add to the conversation is “we know it doesn’t work, but legalizing it would be worse”. Really? That passes as intelligent discussion? “It doesn’t work, so keep doing it?” I thought the Left was supposed to be the side with all the tards.

Its a hundreds of $billion failure, with ATF/SWAT/DEA kicking in the wrong doors and shooting the wrong people frequently. Further, every one of your teenage kids knows where to score a joint, shrooms and LSD (and whatever else they want) – brilliant success.

What kills me is that at least in 1933 people had the sence to end a bad program when they saw how bloody it got. We got 40,000 dead Mexicans and Phoenix AZ becoming one of the kidnap capitals of the world and still morons on the Right think of every “what if” apocalyptic scenario to justify pissing away billions on an ineffective policy.

Legalize it and tax it. The taxes will pay for the pine boxes and cremations and otherwise fund the treatment centers for the people that want to get off the drugs.

John_G on July 17, 2012 at 3:03 PM

MadisonConservative on July 17, 2012 at 1:59 PM

Which is why it is useless to give you names, you just diss it and disregard anything that doesn’t fit your meme.

I stick by my other names…two people who overdosed than met their end violently.

Dig a little deeper, you must be using “Google” or “Bing”…

right2bright on July 17, 2012 at 3:14 PM

Lee Maisey…of course you will say that’s not real either…we can play this game all night.
I give you a valid name, and you pretend it isn’t valid…

right2bright on July 17, 2012 at 3:19 PM

Which is why it is useless to give you names, you just diss it and disregard anything that doesn’t fit your meme.

right2bright on July 17, 2012 at 3:14 PM

You gave me two names. I searched them. Nothing, because they mean nothing.

You gave me another name. I searched it. I linked the article and provided relevant analysis. Until you can source the first two names, you’re nothing but a liar.

MadisonConservative on July 17, 2012 at 3:41 PM

Lee Maisey…of course you will say that’s not real either…we can play this game all night.
I give you a valid name, and you pretend it isn’t valid…

right2bright on July 17, 2012 at 3:19 PM

A coroner in the UK claimed Maisey died of cannabis overdose, which was reviewed by the Federal Health Ministry of Switzerland and found to be full of s**t, just like you.

MadisonConservative on July 17, 2012 at 3:44 PM

MC,

This is why government gets bigger. The Republicans have no interest in the facts. As long as they can use the government to promote their agendas, they’re happy.

It does not matter to them that the war on drugs has failed on every level. To give up on it would mean a huge loss of power, as well as a reduction in the payrolls of law enforcement, and they don’t believe in that. They have no interest in justifying their position with logic.

When they figure out that Obamacare can be used to send people to jail straight from the hospital when tox screens come back positive, they’ll suddenly support the hell out of it.

angelat0763 on July 17, 2012 at 8:31 PM

“Opiate use became a problem after reality trumped theory and the social problems of opiate addiction became undeniable.”

Not true at all. The people who use hard drugs have always been a minority and they still are. The only reason there are more of them today is because it is illegal.

The government has no business regulating behavior and all vice laws are unconstitutional. The government only makes social problems worse which is a good reason to keep it out.

woodNfish on July 17, 2012 at 9:00 PM

When they figure out that Obamacare can be used to send people to jail straight from the hospital when tox screens come back positive….

angelat0763 on July 17, 2012 at 8:31 PM

What are you basing that claim on? Just interested in the facts don’t ‘cha know.

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 9:05 PM

When they figure out that Obamacare can be used to send people to jail straight from the hospital when tox screens come back positive, they’ll suddenly support the hell out of it.

angelat0763 on July 17, 2012 at 8:31 PM

I’m afraid you’re right. Hell…SWalker has clearly demonstrated that he’s unwilling to decry the tactics at Waco, were the situation a matter of marijuana laws rather than gun laws. Sickening.

MadisonConservative on July 17, 2012 at 9:06 PM

“Opiate use became a problem after reality trumped theory and the social problems of opiate addiction became undeniable.”

Not true at all. The people who use hard drugs have always been a minority and they still are. The only reason there are more of them today is because it is illegal.

The government has no business regulating behavior and all vice laws are unconstitutional. The government only makes social problems worse which is a good reason to keep it out.

woodNfish on July 17, 2012 at 9:00 PM

Isn’t that a non sequitur? You’re making and argument that doesn’t address the part of my post that you quoted.

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 9:12 PM

Legalize all of it.

Like cigarettes, legislate it to the fringes and tax the hell out of it. Start to punish public use that threatens others ( a la drunk driving laws) while heavier drugs should be supplied in a controlled fashion.

Treatment should be easily available.

Stop the insanity of prohabition.

rickyricardo on July 17, 2012 at 10:42 PM

Legalize bath salts! We need more zombies!

John the Libertarian on July 18, 2012 at 1:44 AM

nice non sequitur you have there. Hate to see something happen to it.

Mimzey on July 17, 2012 at 11:33 AM

Apparently “non sequitur” is your standard reflex defense. Do you even know what the term means? I addressed the content of your post directly. You were babbling nonsense, and I politely informed you it was nonsense.

I have studied drug addiction and its related toll on society for years. I have interviewed multiple proponents on both sides of the issue. And I have come to the conclusion that we will see peace in the Middle East long before we solve the problem of addiction. I have no problem with casual users who don’t hold positions of responsibility (e.g., airline pilots, parents, etc.)
But suicidal addiction points to a deeper problem of people who are self-medicating through emotional pain and past trauma, and that’s when I throw up my hands and say the problem cannot be fixed without therapy, religion and a strong will to survive.

Ball is in your court. Do you have another cutesy defense?

John the Libertarian on July 18, 2012 at 1:57 AM

It’s about damn time conservatives realize this government program is a massive failure and huge waste of money.

Fiscal conservatives (looking at YOU Tea party people) should have been talking about this years ago.

Now go ask Romney in person why he supports this big government boondoggle… and get it on video.

popularpeoplesfront on July 18, 2012 at 4:51 PM

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