Romney: I expected to be booed by the NAACP when I mentioned ObamaCare

posted at 6:31 pm on July 11, 2012 by Allahpundit

Everyone expected it, no? When you’re addressing a group that’s supporting the other guy to the tune of 95 percent, bet on there being a few awkward moments.

I doubt he’ll win any votes for showing up but it’s worth his while to do it anyway for two reasons. One: It’s a gesture of outreach. The left will, as always, demagogue him more viciously on race the closer we get to election day (especially if O starts to fall behind); this is Romney’s way of trying to show good faith and inoculate himself against the charge. Liberals won’t care but some swing voters might. Two: It’s catnip for the media. An event that’s guaranteed to end with a black audience criticizing the Republican nominee for president is as good as it gets if you’re among the 98 percent or whatever of reporters who are liberal. BuzzFeed’s clearly enjoying it bunches, and Think Progress is being as Think Progress-y as you’d expect. But look at it this way: How often is a Romney speech the big news story of the day? This is a windfall of earned media for his stump speech at a moment when The One has nothing much going on to distract from it. Romney knows how unpopular ObamaCare is with most of the public and he knows that the media would go nuts if he got booed by the NAACP for criticizing it, and so he did it. And now every newscast in the country tonight will have footage of him talking about how bad the boondoggler-in-chief’s big health-care program is. The press gets what it wants and Romney gets what he wants. Great.

“We expected that [the booing],” Romney told Fox Business Network’s Neil Cavuto in a interview set to air later in the day. “I am going to give the same message to the NAACP that I give across the country which is that Obamacare is killing jobs, and if jobs is the priority, we are going to have to replace it with something that actually holds down healthcare costs, as opposed to something that causes more spending for the government and more spending for American families.”

In a statement after his address, NAACP President Benjamin Todd Jealous called Romney’s positions “antithetical” to the organization’s interests in a statement.

“While we are glad that Governor Romney recognized the power of the black electorate, he laid out an agenda that was antithetical to many of our interests,”said Jealous. “His criticism of the Affordable Care Act — legislation that will improve access to quality health care for millions — signals his fundamental misunderstanding of the needs of many African Americans.”

This has to be the only event in American political life where a candidate is cordially invited — and accepts — full in the knowledge that he’ll be denounced by the organizers immediately afterward as antithetical to their agenda. Emmanuel Cleaver, chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, said flat out after Romney’s speech that he shouldn’t have bothered going. But he had to go, of course: Turning down the invite would be spun as prima facie proof of racism. Better to go, make your pitch, and then be judged a racist. That way, at least you get some news coverage and some grudging respect from the media for having engaged an audience that’s voting against you.

As for the bigger picture, wise words from J.C. Watts:

“With all due respect to Governor Romney, he’s probably doing it to check the box,” Watts told CBS News. “Having a Republican candidate speak at the NAACP convention is like trying to build a house starting at the roof. If you don’t have a foundation, the roof isn’t going to stand.”

Watts argues that the Republican Party is not serious about dedicating the time and money necessary to establishing serious ties with leaders in the black community. He wonders why, for example, the GOP isn’t working harder to form strong relationships with southern black religious leaders. “Republicans think that the NAACP is the only voice in the black community. It is a voice in the black community. But it’s not the only voice.”

“The establishment wonders why we can’t get more of the black vote,” he added. “It’s because it’s not doing the things necessary to establish a deeper relationship with the black community. Most black people don’t think alike. Most black people just vote alike.”

Ben Jealous’s perfunctory condemnation notwithstanding, the audience was gracious to Romney for most of the speech, with some attendees saying afterward that they respected him for coming even though they disagreed with him on basically everything. (The speech ended with a standing ovation.) In fact, via Mediaite, there was a notable applause line during the speech itself. Watch this and you’ll see what Watts means.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2 3 4

Pragmatic on July 11, 2012 at 7:09 PM

Thank goodness I was sitting down when I read your response. You saying something negative against Romney – it’s just so unheard of.

gophergirl on July 11, 2012 at 7:17 PM

Boo Cano, bad. Boo Romney, good. Got it.

faraway on July 11, 2012 at 7:11 PM

faraway:I will flogg myself pronto.My jaw dropped when I had seen the
title…oy!:)

canopfor on July 11, 2012 at 7:17 PM

he’s using one brush to paint the who NAACP organization as well as black people in general….

Pragmatic on July 11, 2012 at 7:14 PM

96% of blacks voted for Obama so that is probably the assumption he was using and why he expected to be booed.

sharrukin on July 11, 2012 at 7:18 PM

Standing O? Why isn’t that the headline?

Syzygy on July 11, 2012 at 6:58 PM

….I’ve been flipping around on the radio…everyone reported the boo birds…none the standing ovation…
Maybe Mitt has something hanging below his belt…he didn’t pander.

KOOLAID2 on July 11, 2012 at 7:18 PM

I respect JC Watts. I can also understand why Republicans remain lukewarm in their outreach to African-American organizations. However, if Mr Watts truly believes his own words I would challenge Mr Watts himself to personally introduce Mr Romney to those black leaders he really and truly believe would listen to Mr Romney with an open mind.

DaveDief on July 11, 2012 at 6:45 PM

Maybe emailing your suggestion to J.C. Watts would be helpful. I think your idea is a good one and it would be a start.

bluefox on July 11, 2012 at 7:18 PM

Heeere’s racism:

NAACP leader accuses Romney of favoring white people after speech

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2012/07/11/naacp-leader-accuses-romney-of-favoring-white-people-after-speech/#ixzz20MK1fr6R

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 7:19 PM

Gotta be five oclock somewhere. *clink!*

Bmore on July 11, 2012 at 7:09 PM

Bmore:You must be two states or so,away from California,
er,to the east of!:)

canopfor on July 11, 2012 at 7:14 PM

*clink*

*clink*

:)

Seven Percent Solution on July 11, 2012 at 7:19 PM

Del Dolemonte on July 11, 2012 at 7:16 PM

yep, there are ass***les in every organization. No doubt.

You did note that the group today gave Romney — possibly the whitest, or at least most white bread, presidential candidate in decades — a standing o.

urban elitist on July 11, 2012 at 7:20 PM

*clink * Canopfor

cmsinaz on July 11, 2012 at 7:20 PM

he’s using one brush to paint the who NAACP organization as well as black people in general….

Pragmatic on July 11, 2012 at 7:14 PM

You’re such a tool who will spin anything into a negative for Romney.
You do realize it only takes one person to boo right? You’re a dimwit.

CW on July 11, 2012 at 7:22 PM

*clink * bmore

cmsinaz on July 11, 2012 at 7:23 PM

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 6:51 PM

“Community” = Blacks who have not strayed off the “Victim” Plantation.

VorDaj on July 11, 2012 at 6:54 PM

Sounds better than faction or division would be my guess:-)

bluefox on July 11, 2012 at 7:25 PM

My son never knew what racism was until Obama got elected.

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012 at 7:25 PM

the GOP isn’t working harder to form strong relationships with southern black religious leaders

What does that even mean? Are you supposed to wine and dine them? What a twisted way of thinking, that a political party needs to come to you instead of vice versa.

Buddahpundit on July 11, 2012 at 7:25 PM

The NAACP crowd that boo’d Romney is exactly as racist as a crowd of Tea Partiers who would boo a black big-government liberal. More racist, really, because the Tea Party is not based on race.

jaime on July 11, 2012 at 7:25 PM

http://www.latimes.com/business/money/la-fi-mo-free-slurpee-day-7eleven-20120711,0,3930966.story

ted c on July 11, 2012 at 7:11 PM

ted c:Excellent PR!:)

canopfor on July 11, 2012 at 7:26 PM

96% of blacks voted for Obama so that is probably the assumption he was using and why he expected to be booed.

sharrukin on July 11, 2012 at 7:18 PM

Well that and the fact that they are and have been a liberal organization for many years and in fact more liberal than blacks in general. Prag’s just willfully thick.

CW on July 11, 2012 at 7:27 PM

My son never knew what racism was until Obama got elected.

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012 at 7:25 PM

Hit enter too soon. After the election of Obama, for the first time ever, my son was exposed to black v white racism. Fortunately, he and his friends are still friends and fortunately they all stayed together and now brand obama as the joke that he is.

Obama tried to divide, and he failed. Miserably. We’re all still together down here on Earth, getting along just fine.

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012 at 7:27 PM

Ace is calling the speech a hit plus a stolen base, to use a baseball metaphor (back when we could afford tickets to a baseball game).

ted c on July 11, 2012 at 7:29 PM

…there has been no budging him from his over-arching loyalty to the Democrat party.

This I do not understand, so I ask him about it. And the answer, so far as he can articulate and as far as I can interpret (for there is a literal GULF there that disappears under any other circumstances): It’s a cultural thing, not a political thing. His family worships a photo of JFK. His screen savers are of people that I have never even heard of. He perceives zero outreach from the Republican Party, much less benefit to his race.

My conclusion: Whites (or mongrels like me) can connect one-on-one, but Blacks cultivate, participate, and militantly guard a sub-culture all their own. Probably better for all if we accept this and figure out how to live in an America where this is the reality, even as we shed a tear for the Melting Pot that should have been.

Mongerel on July 11, 2012 at 7:04 PM

Tell him about how the Republican Party was started by Blacks in Texas, and how the KKK was started as a domestic terrorist organization by the Democratic Party.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 7:30 PM

Romney really should have channeled his inner Hillary…

… It would have been a hoot!

Seven Percent Solution on July 11, 2012 at 6:58 PM

Seven Percent Solution:Never gets tired,hearing that one,haha!:)

canopfor on July 11, 2012 at 7:32 PM

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012

I deal with people of all colors on a daily basis and until the left makes hay of race it rare that I even realize it. It is in general used for power and not much more. They have abused the words racist and racism to the point you know you better read the whole story or watch the whole show because very often it is not what they pretend.

CW on July 11, 2012 at 7:32 PM

Mongerel on July 11, 2012 at 7:04 PM

I also think you should ask him to be specific as to WHY there’s that “worship” of JFK going on. Try discussing JFK’s actual character and his behaviors in the Presidency and then ask what about “that” man is to be adulated and “worshipped”.

It sounds like your employee is from a very, very gullible “community”…unfortunately.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 7:32 PM

the GOP isn’t working harder to form strong relationships with southern black religious leaders

What does that even mean? Are you supposed to wine and dine them? What a twisted way of thinking, that a political party needs to come to you instead of vice versa.

Buddahpundit on July 11, 2012 at 7:25 PM

Well, in their defense, all our party has really done is free the slaves, pass the civil rights act and be the party of life and traditional marriage. Other than those minor quibbles there’s probably nothing a black pastor might be interested in.

Kataklysmic on July 11, 2012 at 7:33 PM

canopfor on July 11, 2012 at 7:14 PM

*clink*

*clink*

:)

Seven Percent Solution on July 11, 2012 at 7:19 PM

Seven Percent Solution:———–:)

canopfor on July 11, 2012 at 7:36 PM

Tell him about how the Republican Party was started by Blacks in Texas, and how the KKK was started as a domestic terrorist organization by the Democratic Party.

It wouldn’t matter. Honestly, if the KKK were a democratic caucus in congress and passed an entitlement bill, many blacks would vote for them too.

BacaDog on July 11, 2012 at 7:36 PM

*clink * Canopfor

cmsinaz on July 11, 2012 at 7:20 PM

cmsinaz:—-:)

canopfor on July 11, 2012 at 7:37 PM

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012

I deal with people of all colors on a daily basis and until the left makes hay of race it rare that I even realize it. It is in general used for power and not much more. They have abused the words racist and racism to the point you know you better read the whole story or watch the whole show because very often it is not what they pretend.

CW on July 11, 2012 at 7:32 PM

I blame ongoing implementation of Affirmative Action.

Because though that plan was necessary for a short while, it’s long since served it’s purpose and has remained in effect only due to the racism involved by those who profit from it as opposed to others with whom they are not required to compete on their own qualifications.

It’s allowed if not also encouraged these phony-concept, false-statement expressions such as “the Black community” and “fairness” and “you’re a racist” IF and WHEN demands are not met, “feelings” are not induled or anyone who may be of their race, Black, is not indulged or is held accountable for their individual actions, at least politically and certainly economically.

Affirmative Action has created several generations by now of persons who presume that certain goods, services and conditions belong to them (“they’re entitled”) by the color of their skin and not by their character or any other achievement of worth.

So there’s a lot of resentment when their expectations and demands are not fulfilled or someone challenges them. When you grow up “believing” your race merits extra-special circumstances and conditions of merit alone for your race, and that competition is “hate,” then you’re resentful, angry when you’re confronted with the reality of life and that is, every individual is on their own and you make or break your life by your own industry.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 7:38 PM

Having a Republican candidate speak at the NAACP convention is like having a Republican candidate speak at the recent Socialist convention in Chicago. Why is it “like” that? Because it pretty much is that.

Dirt McGirt on July 11, 2012 at 7:39 PM

Treacher summed it up on Twitter:


@jtLOL
When Obama gets heckled, the heckler is a racist. When Romney gets heckled, HE’S a racist. Keep it straight, cracker.

Dark Star on July 11, 2012 at 7:42 PM

Well, in their defense, all our party has really done is free the slaves, pass the civil rights act and be the party of life and traditional marriage. Other than those minor quibbles there’s probably nothing a black pastor might be interested in.

Kataklysmic on July 11, 2012 at 7:33 PM

You, sir, win the Interwebz today.

sockpuppetpolitic on July 11, 2012 at 7:42 PM

Tell him about how the Republican Party was started by Blacks in Texas, and how the KKK was started as a domestic terrorist organization by the Democratic Party.

It wouldn’t matter. Honestly, if the KKK were a democratic caucus in congress and passed an entitlement bill, many blacks would vote for them too.

BacaDog on July 11, 2012 at 7:36 PM

Yeah, realistically, I agree with you, BacaDog.

Remember recently how Michelle Obama was going on about how/why it was noble to be politically organizing “in Black churches”?

Well, that’s why: it’s not about Christianity, it’s about Stories of Why Forty Acres and a Mule should be Send Whitey Back to Europe But First Take His Property.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 7:43 PM

the GOP isn’t working harder to form strong relationships with southern black religious leaders

What does that even mean? Are you supposed to wine and dine them? What a twisted way of thinking, that a political party needs to come to you instead of vice versa.

Buddahpundit on July 11, 2012 at 7:25 PM

I think J.C. Watts is a pastor. And due to that he most likely has relationships with other pastors and churches. Perhaps he’s suggesting that Romney would have a better chance in talking with them, rather than political leaders.

bluefox on July 11, 2012 at 7:43 PM

Wow. You guys are obsessed with the mentality of black people. We disagree politically so we are stuck on a plantation? I wonder why Blacks aren’t running to the Republican party.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 7:43 PM

Gutsiest move I ever saw, Mav.

taternuggets on July 11, 2012 at 7:46 PM

With all due respect to JC Watts, I entirely disagree with his advice to the GOP, and it saddens me that he has fallen in line with what I view as the ongoing infantilization of blacks — that they need someone to come along and take their precious little hands, translate all the big words, and help them to understand what conservative principles can offer them, because the poor, pitiful souls cannot possibly figure that out for themselves. The “serious ties” that Watts speaks of with the black community, ties the democrats have forged in steel over the past 40 years, are not serious at all. They have been bought with graft, handouts, and corruption. That is how one approaches the leaders of this voting block, or one does not gain their support. That is a simple, ugly truth.

Conservative principles offer them freedom. That’s all.

Rational Thought on July 11, 2012 at 7:47 PM

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012

I deal with people of all colors on a daily basis and until the left makes hay of race it rare that I even realize it. It is in general used for power and not much more. They have abused the words racist and racism to the point you know you better read the whole story or watch the whole show because very often it is not what they pretend.

CW on July 11, 2012 at 7:32 PM

I agree.

Once when I was out running early one morning and I’d taken off up a steep hill across an empty pasture, going upward, another runner appeared coming my way from out of the pasture going downhill.

I had just at that moment he appeared also stopped to hug my side because I had a breathing glitch (runners will understand that).

I’m White, the other runner, the guy running toward me from uphill going downhill, was Black.

When he saw me stop and grab my side, he yelled out sarastically, “you’re safe, YOU’RE SAFE, just a Black guy out for a run, you’re safe!”

I said in reply, “no, I’m out of shape.”

He didn’t get that. I had no objection about his race, or had no thoughts about my safety (was a well known, nice area, guy didn’t look creepy or threatening, of any race in that regard, I made little to no notice that he “was Black” in that circumstance, other than he was, in fact, Black, so what)…

But the guy lapsed by default into assuming that because me, a White person, stopped simultaneously to his appearance, that I was “responding to his Blackness” and as some “safety” concern.

All I had done was stop because my side was glitching and I couldn’t keep running.

So WHO was racist there?

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 7:49 PM

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 7:43 PM

When white people start voting monolithically for a single political party, you’re free to speculate on the dearth of independent thinkers among white people.

As a white guy, I won’t mind.

KingGold on July 11, 2012 at 7:51 PM

So there’s a lot of resentment when their expectations and demands are not fulfilled or someone challenges them. When you grow up “believing” your race merits extra-special circumstances and conditions of merit alone for your race, and that competition is “hate,” then you’re resentful, angry when you’re confronted with the reality of life and that is, every individual is on their own and you make or break your life by your own industry.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 7:38 PM

I take solace in the fact that all of the kids that gather round my home are just friends. They are totally NOT into the racism crap. They’ve been hanging around eachother since grade school and not ONE of them has left the group, despite Obama’s rhetoric. Yes, they hear it, they see it but they laugh at it. They think he’s a fool and they openly say it out loud.

When it all comes down to brass tacks, all children of the 90′s and 20′s see how their parents lived “back then” and see how their parents are living in the “now”. Parents are struggling, but we’re all sticking together. Black, White, Indian, Hispanic, Asian.

FUBO 2012 tee shirts are all the rage.

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012 at 7:53 PM

With all due respect to JC Watts, I entirely disagree with his advice to the GOP, and it saddens me that he has fallen in line with what I view as the ongoing infantilization of blacks — that they need someone to come along and take their precious little hands, translate all the big words, and help them to understand what conservative principles can offer them, because the poor, pitiful souls cannot possibly figure that out for themselves. The “serious ties” that Watts speaks of with the black community, ties the democrats have forged in steel over the past 40 years, are not serious at all. They have been bought with graft, handouts, and corruption. That is how one approaches the leaders of this voting block, or one does not gain their support. That is a simple, ugly truth.

Conservative principles offer them freedom. That’s all.

Rational Thought on July 11, 2012 at 7:47 PM

Excellent comments.

My thoughts often, too. But what these ongoing spokespersons are saying when they refer to “the Black community” with it’s special needs and our special obligations to service them with special hand-holding and such, is that they’re displaying the inherent racism of the whole concept of “the Black community”: the line goes as you explain there, that everyone must provide for them special theatrics, services, all that.

It really drives home, that message, that “blacks” meet the lowest common denominator about which they object: that they can’t or won’t or are unable UNLESS they get special assistance that others don’t require to act well on their own behalf.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 7:54 PM

Wow. You guys are obsessed with the mentality of black people. We disagree politically so we are stuck on a plantation? I wonder why Blacks aren’t running to the Republican party.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 7:43 PM

Oh get off it. People can’t form an anti-tax rally or criticize the Presidents economic policies without being called a racist, that is a sick mentality which deserves scorn.

Daemonocracy on July 11, 2012 at 7:55 PM

All I had done was stop because my side was glitching and I couldn’t keep running.

So WHO was racist there?

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 7:49 PM

Obama’s rhetoric. That’s what is racist.

Those of us here on the ground, raising our families, living day to day beyond the gangland of Chicago (that’s all O knows) are doing just fine. We, our neighbors, our children, our poor and downtrodden are going to be fine.

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012 at 7:57 PM

I take solace in the fact that all of the kids that gather round my home are just friends. They are totally NOT into the racism crap. They’ve been hanging around eachother since grade school and not ONE of them has left the group, despite Obama’s rhetoric. Yes, they hear it, they see it but they laugh at it. They think he’s a fool and they openly say it out loud.

When it all comes down to brass tacks, all children of the 90′s and 20′s see how their parents lived “back then” and see how their parents are living in the “now”. Parents are struggling, but we’re all sticking together. Black, White, Indian, Hispanic, Asian.

FUBO 2012 tee shirts are all the rage.

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012 at 7:53 PM

Nice. And very encouraging. Let’s continue to hope that the younger generation just now coming up have more maturity and wisdom than some in those in-betweens “90′s and 20′s”…

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 7:58 PM

Wow. You guys are obsessed with the mentality of black people. We disagree politically so we are stuck on a plantation? I wonder why Blacks aren’t running to the Republican party.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 7:43 PM

Question: Why do you disagree with us politically?

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012 at 7:58 PM

Nice. And very encouraging. Let’s continue to hope that the younger generation just now coming up have more maturity and wisdom than some in those in-betweens “90′s and 20′s”…

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 7:58 PM

We’re fine. All of our children have been raised in decades of excellence. It is obama that is attempting to introduce decades of decadence, decline, decimation and despair.

The kids know better. Have faith in them.

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012 at 8:00 PM

Wow. You guys are obsessed with the mentality of black people. We disagree politically so we are stuck on a plantation? I wonder why Blacks aren’t running to the Republican party.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 7:43 PM

You got it wrong, kid. Any strong Black man that dares to stray off the Liberal Plantation is called an Uncle Tom.

kingsjester on July 11, 2012 at 8:01 PM

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 6:51 PM

“Community” = Blacks who have not strayed off the “Victim” Plantation.

VorDaj on July 11, 2012 at 6:54 PM

Sounds better than faction or division would be my guess:-)

bluefox on July 11, 2012 at 7:25 PM

As used (and invented) by the Left, the expression, “the Black community,” is a balkanization method to separate, and keep separated, a group of person by race and race alone.

Which is incentivized by racial animosity for others. They form this concept of a “block” that others are inherently excluded from and it fosters two things: the unrealistic egoism (with related demands and assumptions of entitlement) AND the exclusion by race of everyone else (no one but those of the “Black” race can be included in it, can’t change one’s race, thus, everyone not born into it is excluded).

It’s a deceptive, deceiving term that encourages people falsely to believe there’s some monolith iron-clad organization there that they are a part of while no one else is qualified to “join”…

…the castle-mentality, or, maybe, Island or to use that other word, “Plantation” land idea…they’re there, no one else can be there, and it’s rosey and closed except to the railroad leading in with the goods that are owed them.

I really do think the phrase is not well intended. Not only is it not sincere or meaningful in reality terms, but it’s intentionally, politically misleading.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 8:07 PM

How retrograde and racist of this organization to have the name COLORED PEOPLE in its title.

profitsbeard on July 11, 2012 at 8:08 PM

As used (and invented) by the Left, the expression, “the Black community,” is a balkanization method to separate, and keep separated, a group of person by race and race alone.

Which is incentivized by racial animosity for others. They form this concept of a “block” that others are inherently excluded from and it fosters two things: the unrealistic egoism (with related demands and assumptions of entitlement) AND the exclusion by race of everyone else (no one but those of the “Black” race can be included in it, can’t change one’s race, thus, everyone not born into it is excluded).

…like “mosque”. It’s the same perimeter-creating concept, “the Black community” or Nation of Islam when taken into more expanded territory of “exclusivity” that excludes and not in a good way.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 8:09 PM

Well played, Mitt.

No, it’s not enough to convince me that he’ll stand strong to repeal Obamacare under political pressure, but this at least suggests he understands how important it is to the rest of us.

tom on July 11, 2012 at 8:11 PM

Romney should say he went to the NAACP conference because he always wanted to see first hand how a prejudiced audience would act.

viking01 on July 11, 2012 at 8:16 PM

Romney: I totally expected my speech to tank. Yes. I planned to fail. It’s all a part of the plan.

casuist on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

“The establishment wonders why we can’t get more of the black vote,” he added. “It’s because it’s not doing the things necessary to establish a deeper relationship with the black community. Most black people don’t think alike. Most black people just vote alike.”

George Bush tried that with his faith based initiative, and he was still treated like a racist.

Terrye on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

You did note that the group today gave Romney — possibly the whitest, or at least most white bread, presidential candidate in decades — a standing o.

urban elitist on July 11, 2012 at 7:20 PM

Yup. I’m sure most of the NAACP rank and file are very nice people. Benny Jealous, however, is a race-baiting cretin.

Good Solid B-Plus on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 7:43 PM

When white people start voting monolithically for a single political party, you’re free to speculate on the dearth of independent thinkers among white people.

As a white guy, I won’t mind.

KingGold on July 11, 2012 at 7:51 PM

Very true. To be frank, I have the same criticism about the Mormon tendency to vote monolithically.

Although it at least makes more sense for people who share the same religion to vote alike than for people who just happen to share the same race.

tom on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

When white people start voting monolithically for a single political party, you’re free to speculate on the dearth of independent thinkers among white people.

As a white guy, I won’t mind.

KingGold on July 11, 2012 at 7:51 PM

You are creating a false argument. If the Democratic party was called the Black party and it was filled with nothing but black representives, then you’d have a legit argument; but we both know that this isn’t the case. Blacks have traditionally voted democratic, but they’ve also overwhelmingly voted for 14 White Presidents and countless white representitives. Meanwhile, white people have overwhelmingly voted for other white people throughout the history of this nation; of course the exception being 2008, so that obviously means that the white people of this country up until 2008 were racist. Pretty ignorant argument to make isn’t it?

As far as the “concern” shown by HA commenters for the black community and it’s plantation language:

As a black guy, I mind.

Oh get off it. People can’t form an anti-tax rally or criticize the Presidents economic policies without being called a racist, that is a sick mentality which deserves scorn.

Daemonocracy on July 11, 2012 at 7:55 PM

Completely irrelevant to what I just said; just a whole lot of projection.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Romney: I totally expected my speech to tank. Yes. I planned to fail. It’s all a part of the plan.

casuist on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

His speech did not tank…he was just booed because he said the same thing there he had said before..that he wants to repeal Obamacare..I am sure that he knew this audience would not be receptive to that. It is not as if they are open minded or anything.

Terrye on July 11, 2012 at 8:21 PM

Republicans absolutely should make inroads with the NAACP, though. We’ll never get a majority of the black vote, but if we can get even 20%, it’ll be a monumental shift in the American electorate.

Just like Latinos, many black families are receptive to the message of social conservatism, but they’ve simply never had the experience of doing anything but voting Democrat.

Good Solid B-Plus on July 11, 2012 at 8:21 PM

With respect to JC Watts, the GOP message only really resonates with un-hyphenated Americans.

The Count on July 11, 2012 at 8:21 PM

Romney: I totally expected my speech to tank. Yes. I planned to fail. It’s all a part of the plan.

casuist on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

He was an invited guest at a convention. He was asked to speak and he did. He gave a speech that some in the audience did not agree with. He stood up to the hecklers and stood his ground. In the end, he got a standing ovation.

Where is Obama?

Oh. That’s right…. he’s entertaining Hollywhite with his minstrel act in the hopes that they’ll throw him some money.

Compare and contrast.

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012 at 8:22 PM

Meanwhile, white people have overwhelmingly voted for other white people throughout the history of this nation; of course the exception being 2008, so that obviously means that the white people of this country up until 2008 were racist. Pretty ignorant argument to make isn’t it?

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Show me the white candidate who got over 90% of the white vote. I’ll be waiting.

Good Solid B-Plus on July 11, 2012 at 8:22 PM

To be frank, I have the same criticism about the Mormon tendency to vote monolithically.

tom on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Do a higher percentage of Mormons vote Republican than say Southern Baptists? I would be interested to see those stats.

Kataklysmic on July 11, 2012 at 8:24 PM

Tell him about how the Republican Party was started by Blacks in Texas, and how the KKK was started as a domestic terrorist organization by the Democratic Party.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 7:30 PM

The democratic party no longer needs the KKK, the other democratic party organization Planned Parenthood has been more successful at killing blacks than the KKK ever dreamed of.

slickwillie2001 on July 11, 2012 at 8:26 PM

You are creating a false argument. If the Democratic party was called the Black party and it was filled with nothing but black representives, then you’d have a legit argument; but we both know that this isn’t the case. Blacks have traditionally voted democratic, but they’ve also overwhelmingly voted for 14 White Presidents and countless white representitives.

Actually blacks are not traditionally Democratic. In fact in the South for generations it was the Democrats who kept the poll taxes in place.

Dwight Eisenhower actually did pretty well with blacks…and during the 60s northern Republicans were the ones who pushed through Civil Rights legislation. Johnson signed it, but it was their votes that made it possible.

Blacks began to vote Democratic when Barry Goldwater parted with a majority of his party and refused to support the Civil Rights Act..and Martin Luther King opposed his position.

Terrye on July 11, 2012 at 8:27 PM

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 7:43 PM

14.4% unemployment rate, lousy schools for inner city black kids because the NEA doesn’t want school vouchers, black babies being killed by the thousands by Planned Parenthood? Tell us about the thought process that supports and votes for all that.

a capella on July 11, 2012 at 8:28 PM

f course, the many commenter who call NAACP members racist or suggest that their only interest is more handouts — this of a group that’s probably done more for the freedom of American people than any organization since the original Tea Partiers, with the possible exception of the suffragettes — shows why blacks don’t vote vote Republican. A vocal minority of the movement is frankly racist as hell.

urban elitist on July 11, 2012 at 7:07 PM

You’re right, the NAACP has a proud history, which is why I don’t begrudge the standard members. However, lil’ Ben Jealous is a far cry from the likes of W.E.B. DuBois.

There’s a reason why the NAACP is marginalized nowadays, and it’s because they were so successful earlier in their history. Regardless of what people like libfreeordie say, the real heavy lifting in the cause of eliminating honest-to-goodness institutional racism has already been done. Ben Jealous stands on the shoulders of giants, but he himself is a gnome.

Good Solid B-Plus on July 11, 2012 at 8:30 PM

To be frank, I have the same criticism about the Mormon tendency to vote monolithically.

tom on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Do a higher percentage of Mormons vote Republican than say Southern Baptists? I would be interested to see those stats.

Kataklysmic on July 11, 2012 at 8:24 PM

That is a good point.

Terrye on July 11, 2012 at 8:30 PM

There’s a reason why the NAACP is marginalized nowadays, and it’s because they were so successful earlier in their history. Regardless of what people like libfreeordie say, the real heavy lifting in the cause of eliminating honest-to-goodness institutional racism has already been done. Ben Jealous stands on the shoulders of giants, but he himself is a gnome.

Good Solid B-Plus on July 11, 2012 at 8:30 PM

There was a time when they were non partisan. That is hard to believe today.

Terrye on July 11, 2012 at 8:33 PM

StonedClam has some sand in his crack.

SparkPlug on July 11, 2012 at 8:38 PM

Question: Why do you disagree with us politically?

Key West Reader on July 11, 2012 at 7:58 PM

What a loaded question. :) But I’ll make an attempt. I’m an atheist, so that alone already puts me at odds with a good portion of the right. I’m completely cool with gay marriage; I know it’s difficult to believe, but some of my gay friends actually love each other. I think abortion sucks, but should be allowed in cases of rape and incest, or if the mother runs a serious risk of dying while giving birth. Abortion because you weren’t ready I don’t support, tough luck. What else…foreign policy, I don’t think we should play world police ever again. There are other military’s completely capable of taking care of situations abroad other than ours. We lose too many lives and spend too much money, and they still hate us. Illegal Immigration…I don’t support the whole, “if you look illegal thing” in Arizona, but agree that the border should sealed off and we work out a real plan to get people who are here illegally out of the country, without kicking in the door and dragging families out that have been here for 30 years. I’m not a representitive, so I’m not sure how to accomplish this in a civil manner, but I am definitely open to honest debate about it. “Just get rid of em’!” doesn’t sit well with my conscious. I could go on and talk about economic policy, but I think these are enough topics to set us apart. I hope I answered your question well enough.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 8:39 PM

NAACP has gotten more blacks in jail than were ever slaves. That is progressive.

Mormontheman on July 11, 2012 at 8:43 PM

Good Solid B-Plus on July 11, 2012 at 8:30 PM

Terrye on July 11, 2012 at 8:33 PM

Their reason for existence has all but disappeared, but they need to sew the seeds of discord in order to justify their existence.

Syzygy on July 11, 2012 at 8:43 PM

What a loaded question. :) But I’ll make an attempt. I’m an atheist, so that alone already puts me at odds with a good portion of the right. I’m completely cool with gay marriage; I know it’s difficult to believe, but some of my gay friends actually love each other. I think abortion sucks, but should be allowed in cases of rape and incest, or if the mother runs a serious risk of dying while giving birth. Abortion because you weren’t ready I don’t support, tough luck. What else…foreign policy, I don’t think we should play world police ever again. There are other military’s completely capable of taking care of situations abroad other than ours. We lose too many lives and spend too much money, and they still hate us. Illegal Immigration…I don’t support the whole, “if you look illegal thing” in Arizona, but agree that the border should sealed off and we work out a real plan to get people who are here illegally out of the country, without kicking in the door and dragging families out that have been here for 30 years. I’m not a representitive, so I’m not sure how to accomplish this in a civil manner, but I am definitely open to honest debate about it. “Just get rid of em’!” doesn’t sit well with my conscious. I could go on and talk about economic policy, but I think these are enough topics to set us apart. I hope I answered your question well enough.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 8:39 PM

With the exception of gay marriage you could easily be a Republican.

sharrukin on July 11, 2012 at 8:44 PM

Show me the white candidate who got over 90% of the white vote. I’ll be waiting.

Good Solid B-Plus on July 11, 2012 at 8:22 PM

The absurdity of my argument completely went over your head. Let me simplify it. If two white people are runnning against each other in a Presidential race, what race gets the most votes?

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 8:46 PM

this of a group that’s probably done more for the freedom of American people than any organization since the original Tea Partiers

urban elitist on July 11, 2012 at 7:07 PM

Well, they’ve changed – sort of like how the Democratic Party used to be the party of Jefferson, Truman and JFK. It’s now been overrun by European-style socialists with an identity disorder. The NAACP has become nothing more than a racial front group for the DNC.

Besides, what exactly does the NAACP have to gain from racial harmony and equality? You think they want to advance themselves out of business? Think again. It’s 2012, and there’s a black man in the White House. I think it’s time to close shop. If you want to tear down racial divisions, it’s time to stop thinking of yourself as hyphenated Americans and aligning yourself with race-based special interest groups.

The Count on July 11, 2012 at 8:48 PM

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 8:39 PM

Atheist? Don’t you mean gaytheist since you believe in the love of the gays. Ha

Mormontheman on July 11, 2012 at 8:53 PM

To be frank, I have the same criticism about the Mormon tendency to vote monolithically.

tom on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Do a higher percentage of Mormons vote Republican than say Southern Baptists? I would be interested to see those stats.

Kataklysmic on July 11, 2012 at 8:24 PM

Mormons tend to vote for fellow Mormons in the range of 90 – 95%. Most of the time, this involves voting for a Republican, but there are Mormons who are Democrats — like the current Senate Majority Leader — and Mormons who are “squishy” Republicans, like Mitt and Jon Huntsman.

So it’s not necessarily Mormons all voting Republican. In the case of primaries, it’s Mormons voting for the Mormon Republican rather than another Republican.

This has been observed in the 2008 primaries and the 2012 primaries. It probably dates back to at least the time of Joseph Smith, when the Mormons were welcomed into Illinois at least in part because the local politicians were hopeful of getting a consistent voting bloc.

tom on July 11, 2012 at 8:55 PM

And now every newscast in the country tonight will have footage of him talking about how bad the boondoggler-in-chief’s big health-care program is.

That remains to be seen. I have no doubt they’ll make a big deal about him being boo’d. I doubt seriously that they’ll a) also say he got a standing O at the end, or b) go into much detail – much less soundbites – of the actual reason for the boos.

Midas on July 11, 2012 at 8:55 PM

the black community and it’s plantation language:

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Define “the black community” if you wouldn’t mind.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 8:56 PM

How Fluked is the media to take this?

How idiotic is the land?

Schadenfreude on July 11, 2012 at 8:59 PM

Actually blacks are not traditionally Democratic.

How about telling some of your fellow HA commenters that, because Blacks are racists you know and stuck on the Liberal plantation.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 9:02 PM

Just like Latinos, many black families are receptive to the message of social conservatism, but they’ve simply never had the experience of doing anything but voting Democrat.

Good Solid B-Plus on July 11, 2012 at 8:21 PM

Well, that’s another myth. That claim may be made, and it is, but it doesn’t reflect reality, or, rather, reality does not reflect that.

By far the highest abortion rates are among people who are Black. Unwed mothers. Absent fathers, meaning, what childre are born are by high numbers raised without fathers present or active in their lives. Drug and substance dependency highest among Blacks by perccentages to their population numbers, same as with violent crimes against one another.

Show me where there are people “receptive to the message of social conservativsm” and I’ll show you how that is a mythical assumption or promotion that is defied by reality.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 9:05 PM

Define “the black community” if you wouldn’t mind.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 8:56 PM

Would you prefer I just say Blacks, Black people, or African-Americans? It’s all the same. It’s a race of people. A lot of these comments are about Blacks, or the Black community.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 9:05 PM

We disagree politically so we are stuck on a plantation?

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 7:43 PM

No, you’re stuck on a plantation because you continue to willfully put yourselves there. Has nothing to do with disagreement, has everything to do with *your* behavior and objective reality.

It’s not us that keeps voting for the people that tell blacks that they’re incapable of making it on their own.

It’s not us that keeps voting for the people that have put in place programs that are known to destroy the black family and make them further dependent on the government plantation owner.

That’s the black voter doing that – sorry if that’s an uncomfortable truth for you.

Feeble strawman you have there – best you got? Really?

Midas on July 11, 2012 at 9:06 PM

To be frank, I have the same criticism about the Mormon tendency to vote monolithically.

tom on July 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Mormonism isn’t a race. The motivation among Mormons to vote is most likely due to shared references, shared beliefs, not upon the color of one’s skin.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 9:06 PM

Atheist? Don’t you mean gaytheist since you believe in the love of the gays. Ha

Mormontheman on July 11, 2012 at 8:53 PM

stay classy sir. :)

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 9:07 PM

The absurdity of my argument completely went over your head. Let me simplify it. If two white people are runnning against each other in a Presidential race, what race gets the most votes?

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 8:46 PM

Well, you certainly got that one right – that’s a pretty absurd argument.

Midas on July 11, 2012 at 9:08 PM

tom on July 11, 2012 at 8:55 PM

Ah, I see. You aren’t saying Mormons vote monolithically for one political party, you are saying Mormons tend to vote overwhelmingly for other Mormons even when there are dramatically better candidates running including candidates whose values are closer to those Mormons espouse. Thank you for the clarification.

I am a Mormon and I agree with you. I can confirm this phenomenon exists and it has been the source of a lot of frustration to me. I am a believer of LDS doctrine but fairly far removed from Mormon subculture. I would chalk this issue up to there being roughly the same number of politically illiterate members of the Mormon church as that are within society at large and when you don’t understand politics, blood is thicker than water. I have yet to come across another Mormon who holds anything but disdain for Harry Reid, but they obviously exist. I hope to run into a few someday…with my car.

Kataklysmic on July 11, 2012 at 9:11 PM

Define “the black community” if you wouldn’t mind.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 8:56 PM

Would you prefer I just say Blacks, Black people, or African-Americans? It’s all the same. It’s a race of people. A lot of these comments are about Blacks, or the Black community.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 9:05 PM

I’d prefer you express yourself however you want to as long as it’s not unduly crude or personally maligning.

I would be interested in knowing just how the expression, “the Black community” is defined. Where is it, and thus, why is “it” called a “community” and why is it called such based upon race and one race at that?

If you’re implying in your comments there (@9:05) that it’s a random expression intended to refer to “black people”, then why the misleading term, “community”? From the amouny of discord associated with the race itself, I hardly think of that as “a community” in any reasonable, civilized way such as the word implies (coordinated mutual communications, well being shared and enjoyed among people of a common interest, ownership and/or resource — my definition off the top of my head here).

While I’m at it, what’s with “African American”? You’re either “American” or you’re from or in Africa.

It’s the insistence on antiquated if not strangely misleading self-identification that’s the issue here. I can understand ancestors back in the early 1880′s claiming to be “African” but even the later descendents of theirs refused to identify with “Africa” and claimed proudly to be American.

So why the retrogressive movement back into antiquated and misleading identities? I don’t walk around proclaiming myself to be a “Viking American” or “Swiss American” or such.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 9:14 PM

StoneKrab: what a loser, McLiberalFancyPants!

the new aesthetic on July 11, 2012 at 9:14 PM

At first I was skeptical about his even appearing before this bunch, but looking back, Mitt scored well, (and NAALCP did also). A standing ovation from the NAALCP for a GOP person is nothing to sneeze at. :)

Credits to Mitt.

Credits to NAALCP, also.

petefrt on July 11, 2012 at 9:15 PM

No, you’re stuck on a plantation because you continue to willfully put yourselves there. Has nothing to do with disagreement, has everything to do with *your* behavior and objective reality.

I’ve never been arrested, don’t have a speeding ticket to my name all of my children are from one woman whom I’m still married to (7 years whoop!), never been on welfare as an adult, and I’m in the military. My behavior is fine. We just vote differently.

It’s not us that keeps voting for the people that tell blacks that they’re incapable of making it on their own.

complete and utter nonsense.

It’s not us that keeps voting for the people that have put in place programs that are known to destroy the black family and make them further dependent on the government plantation owner.

That’s the black voter doing that – sorry if that’s an uncomfortable truth for you.

Feeble strawman you have there – best you got? Really?

Midas on July 11, 2012 at 9:06 PM

more nonsense, projection, and assumptions.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 9:19 PM

Kataklysmic on July 11, 2012 at 9:11 PM

Interesting comments, thanks.

I USED to assume that voting for a Catholic was the way to go, what with SUPPOSED shared views, but that assumption is long past retired, after the Kennedy messes. And certainly without a doubt after the Pelosi, Sebelius, Dodd, Biden, Kerry disasters — it’s erroneous to assume at face value that anyone asking for votes is anything like who you expect them to be based upon labels, best to pay close attention to who they actually are instead and abondon the generalizations.

It’s that sort of resoluteness, however, to stick with the generalized assumptions by some such as voting by race that makes no sense today, and if anything just illustrates people who aren’t thinking very clearly or astutely about serious issues.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 9:20 PM

I USED to assume that voting for a Catholic was the way to go, what with SUPPOSED shared views, but that assumption is long past retired, after the Kennedy messes. And certainly without a doubt after the Pelosi, Sebelius, Dodd, Biden, Kerry disasters — it’s erroneous to assume at face value that anyone asking for votes is anything like who you expect them to be based upon labels, best to pay close attention to who they actually are instead and abondon the generalizations.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 9:20 PM

So true. And yes, in another time in America some faith could be put in labels, religious and otherwise. Sadly, no longer.

Kataklysmic on July 11, 2012 at 9:23 PM

Mormontheman on July 11, 2012 at 8:53 PM

Gaytheist. Heh.

SparkPlug on July 11, 2012 at 9:24 PM

more nonsense, projection, and assumptions.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 9:19 PM

Yet you aren’t explaining why you allege such, upon what, specifically.

The other person there (“Midas”) explained his views citing specific conditions in reality that explain aspects of his life and behaviors.

You denigrate him without mentioning any specifics, by not explaining anything to support why you would.

So it’s really just specifics people are asking about. If you continue to respond by calling others “racists” and such (your earlier remarks about the Tea Partiers as to what you think about them but you don’t cite anything specific to support your allegations about them, either == same as to your remarks about the “Republican Party”), then you’re simply fulfilling the lowest common denominator of why there’s criticism in the first place, as to why some people vote by race for their own race motivated by race and claim some sort of success in doing so despite the results being liabilities for them by race.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 9:24 PM

Well, you certainly got that one right – that’s a pretty absurd argument.

Midas on July 11, 2012 at 9:08 PM

Yes, but that’s the exact same argument some here are making. (see below)

When white people start voting monolithically for a single political party, you’re free to speculate on the dearth of independent thinkers among white people.

As a white guy, I won’t mind.

KingGold on July 11, 2012 at 7:51 PM

StoneKrab: what a loser, McLiberalFancyPants!

the new aesthetic on July 11, 2012 at 9:14 PM

Seriously? What does that even mean? Where are the adults around this place?

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 9:25 PM

Seriously? What does that even mean? Where are the adults around this place?

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 9:25 PM

Adults? The only thing you have done is call people names directly, or by implication.

sharrukin on July 11, 2012 at 9:29 PM

Define “the black community” if you wouldn’t mind.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 8:56 PM

Would you prefer I just say Blacks, Black people, or African-Americans? It’s all the same. It’s a race of people. A lot of these comments are about Blacks, or the Black community.

StoneKrab on July 11, 2012 at 9:05 PM

ALSO, adding to earlier comments
– Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 9:14 PM –

…why not just state “Blacks”…what’s with the supplemental descriptor, given it’s hugely undefined, misleading quality (“Community”).

Another point: I also don’t walk around calling myself “a White American,” or introducing myself as “a White” or “White” so whatinheck IS it with needing to refer to onesself as “Black” in just about every possible context?

P.S.: most visually capable people have already noticed in real time that you’re “Black,” so don’t need to be told that you are, indeed, “Black” while I do note a consideration of such in writing when the race issues are being discussed, as here.

Lourdes on July 11, 2012 at 9:30 PM

Comment pages: 1 2 3 4