New youth voters are feeling oddly less enthusiastic about Obama now than in 2008

posted at 4:01 pm on July 2, 2012 by Erika Johnsen

As a member of the recently-graduated demographic crowd, I can attest that I’ve got a fair number of friends — well-educated, hardworking friends — who are currently living at home with their parents. (Not that I think having a college degree entitles you to a job, and certainly no more or less than anyone else, but I do hear that back in the good ol’ days, there was a solid market for such qualifications.) They’re underemployed, they’re working part-time, they’re volunteering, or they don’t have jobs at all.

It’s frustrating, and I’m frustrated for them — and it can’t be any less frustrating for their parents, who are now diverting their financial resources away from savings and retirement and into supporting their adult children. It’s all one big hot mess, and as economic ramifications start to hit home more and more, it looks like the next generation of voters may be starting to realize it doesn’t have to be this way.

Polls show that Americans under 30 are still inclined to support Mr. Obama by a wide margin. But the president may face a particular challenge among voters ages 18 to 24. In that group, his lead over Mitt Romney — 12 points — is about half of what it is among 25- to 29-year-olds, according to an online survey this spring by the Harvard Institute of Politics.  And among whites in the younger group, Mr. Obama’s lead vanishes altogether.

Among all 18- to 29-year-olds, the poll found a high level of undecided voters; 30 percent indicated that they had not yet made up their mind. And turnout among this group is expected to be significantly lower than for older voters. …

Experts say the impact of the recession and the slow recovery should not be underestimated. The newest potential voters — some 17 million people — have been shaped more by harsh economic times in their formative years than by anything else…

For 18- and 19-year-olds, the unemployment rate as of May was 23.5 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. For those ages 20 to 24, the rate falls to 12.9 percent, compared with the national unemployment rate of 8.2 percent for all ages. …

Yikes. Years of economic-related setbacks aren’t going to do much to energize the youths to flock (and I do mean flock — you know, like sheep) to the polls to vote for the incumbent president, at least not to the record-smashing, game-changing degree that they turned up to vote for Obama in 2008. Living on your parents’ couch or being continually discouraged in a summer job search really helps to remove some of the luster from the once-enticing promises of Hopenchange.

And with Obama at the helm, it isn’t looking like there’s an end in sight — as Jim Pethokoukis summarizes, several of our already-anemic growth indicators are starting to slow up even more. The hits just keep on coming (unexpectedly, of course):

New data suggests the three-year economic expansion — as anemic as it has been — may be at an end, or is at least perilously close. The Institute for Supply Management’s factory index unexpectedly fell to 49.7 in June from 53.5 a month earlier. A reading of less than 50 signals contraction.

Not one of 70 economists interviewed by Bloomberg thought it would be below 50.5. …

But these numbers are just the latest in a long string of worrisome reports including rising initial unemployment claims, slowing job growth, falling consumer confidence, and declining durable goods orders. Oh, and the rest of the global economy is slowing, too.

 

 


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Comment pages: 1 2

And in West Palm, a vote for Gore was really a vote for Buchanan.

Lanceman on July 2, 2012 at 9:24 PM

It’s frustrating, and I’m frustrated for them — and it can’t be any less frustrating for their parents, who are now diverting their financial resources away from savings and retirement and into supporting their adult children.

You don’t have to pity ME. I’m GLAD my daughter is here at home. You see, she runs the house for me and EARNS her keep 4 fold, thus I happily gave her my Turbo charged Riviera. This parent will not be happy when he loses this marvelous lil lady.

IMHO, the parents that taught their kids to be self sufficient have nothing to whine about since those are an asset, not a burden, and those who didn’t see the 0bama economy on the horizion have no one to blame except for themselves.

Good offspring will work to repay their parents, right? HMM!

How many of these people are getting signed up as volunteers in efforts to remove the 0bama Regime? My lil lady [a TEA Party Patriot] is doing so. They can too!

I’m sorry if I sound harsh but pity disgusts me, and I believe that everyone [not handicapped] can fend for themselves if they want to do so. Everyone in my family is a productive member of society. We must be special. /s

DannoJyd on July 3, 2012 at 6:07 AM

IMHO, the parents that taught their kids to be self sufficient have nothing to whine about since those are an asset, not a burden, and those who didn’t see the 0bama economy on the horizion have no one to blame except for themselves.

and I believe that everyone [not handicapped] can fend for themselves if they want to do so.
DannoJyd on July 3, 2012 at 6:07 AM

Hear, hear.

Cleombrotus on July 3, 2012 at 8:00 AM

Ask any magician about the hardest audience to fool and they will tell you, “Children”. The reason being they are concentrating on what you are doing, not what you are saying. Never lie to youth and our President is an example of what he was taught when he was a youth. There’s enough video of Obama telling false statements to fill a house and he got to the top house in the USA with lies and he wonders why most will not listen? The pathetic part is there are millions who believe him.

mixplix on July 3, 2012 at 8:58 AM

It’s amazing how bad economists are in predicting future numbers. This is particularly apparent in the fact that none of the 70 predicted an index below 49.7. I’m not saying the result ought to be a normal distribution, but you’d think just by chance (i.e. pure dumb luck) at least a few of them would make predictions below 49.7.

I’m reminded of the string of downward adjustments on unemployment numbers. There’s some incredible streak of 60 out of the last 61 weeks where the numbers have been adjusted down. (Someone help me here on the accurate figures.) How in the world haven’t they learned to adjust their models so that they end up closer to the real-world result?

Fafhrd on July 3, 2012 at 11:01 AM

Polls show that Americans under 30 are still inclined to support Mr. Obama by a wide margin.

This poll does not break out the number of college grads in that figure, but it is proof that youngsters are pretty F’ing stupid.

woodNfish on July 3, 2012 at 1:55 PM

I hope they have the sense to ask themselves if they want to elect a President who understands how business works because he’s been in business, or a President who rigidly clings to a failed ideologiocy

RebecH on 36 PM

fixed4u

cableguy615 on July 3, 2012 at 8:31 PM

Comment pages: 1 2