Counter-revolution: Egyptian court invalidates parliamentary elections, affirms Mubarak PM’s place on presidential ballot

posted at 6:41 pm on June 14, 2012 by Allahpundit

Critics are calling it a de facto military coup and … yup, that’s pretty much what it sounds like. If you can spare five minutes, the NYT’s story is superb in explaining how severe the legal consequences are of today’s decision, including casting doubt on the legitimacy of the panel chosen by parliament to write the country’s new constitution. If you can’t spare five minutes, here’s the nutshell version. Two-thirds of the seats in parliament were set aside for parties, the other third was set aside for candidates who won individual races. E.g., in one part of the voting, voters were asked to choose their favorite party; whatever percentage of the vote a party got, that’s what percentage of seats they’d get among the two-thirds set-aside in parliament. (The party gets to fill the seats with candidates of their own choosing.) In the other part of voting, voters had to choose among individual candidates to fill the other third of parliamentary seats. The Muslim Brotherhood and other parties ended up running some of their own candidates in the “individual” elections in order to maximize their representation. Today’s supreme court decision held that that was unconstitutional. Result: The country’s historic parliamentary elections are now null and void, the newly chosen constitutional congress is likely also invalid, and the Muslim Brotherhood’s presidential candidate might end up being disqualified — conveniently leaving the military junta’s preferred candidate, Mubarak’s former prime minister Ahmed Shafik, as the only “choice” left on the ballot.

Oh, did I mention that parliament’s attempt to ban Shafik from running because he was a toady for Mubarak was also declared unconstitutional? And that the military coincidentally reimposed martial law over the country just 24 hours ago?

What are the odds?

The high court, packed with sympathizers of the ousted president, appeared to be engaged in a frontal legal assault on the Muslim Brotherhood, the once-outlawed organization whose members swept to power in Parliament this spring and whose candidate was the front-runner for the presidency as well…

The ruling threw into doubt the status of the presidential election runoff, originally set for Saturday and Sunday, and means that whoever is eventually elected will take power without the check of a sitting Parliament and could even exercise some influence over the election of a future Parliament. It also raises questions about the governing military council’s commitment to democracy, and makes uncertain the future of a constitutional assembly recently formed by Parliament as well.

Although the court did not invalidate Mr. Shafik’s candidacy, some argued Thursday that it may have raised new questions about the candidacy of his opponent, Mohamed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood. The ruling may have had the effect of invalidating Mr. Morsi’s nomination, which relied on his party’s presence in Parliament.

Presumably Morsi will now end up being thrown off the ballot too. After all, if the point of this move is to clear the way for restoration of military/authoritarian rule, then it makes no sense to leave him on there and risk him riding a wave of public outrage over the court decision to a presidential landslide. In fact, according to CNN, the ruling military junta reacted to the decision by saying that “it now has full legislative power and will announce a 100-person assembly that will write the country’s new constitution by Friday.” If they’re prepared to make that move, they’re obviously not about to provide the Islamist opposition with a figure to rally around. Or maybe they’ll use the old-school approach of leaving Morsi on the ballot and just rigging the election for Shafik? Either way, impossible to imagine the MB winning the presidency now.

What’s bizarre about this power play is that it comes at a moment when the Brotherhood’s popular support had slipped a bit. Read this Marc Lynch post from late last month on how the MB’s recent political missteps, including/especially their decision to field a presidential candidate despite initially promising not to, has made some Egyptians leery of granting them more power. (That’s one of the reasons why Mubarak’s stooge Shafik made it to the run-off. Some Egyptians, the Copts most notably, prefer the old regime to an Islamist hellhole.) I can only assume that the military/judicial coalition had held off on taking drastic measures to neutralize the Brotherhood in hopes that Shafik’s candidacy would gain momentum and he might win the election semi-legitimately, but now for whatever reason they’ve decided that that’s unlikely and they need to step in with a power grab. In a new post today, Lynch can’t figure out their logic either:

Anyone who sees this as the culmination of a devious, effective SCAF [i.e. military] master plan needs to take a step back and look at what they have “won,” however. The SCAF could have been approaching the end of a process that created reasonably legitimate, elected political institutions and restored confidence and security to the country without fundamentally threatening their core interests. Instead, their great success stands to be placing Shafik on an empty, wobbling throne. He will preside over a country in economic collapse, with little prospect of restoring investor confidence any time soon. The legitimacy of the judiciary has been burned, probably decisively. The dissolution of Parliament would remove any possible alternative source of democratic legitimacy. And the process by which Shafik comes to power ensures that he will provide no buffer for the SCAF since he is transparently their creature. This is “victory”?

The SCAF, in other words, may look to have won this seemingly decisive round. But it’s not the endgame. It’s only the beginning of a new phase of a horribly mismanaged “transition” that is coming to its well-earned end. What’s next? A replay of Algeria in 1991? A return to Jan. 25, 2011? Back to 1954? A return to the petulant slow fail of latter-days Mubarak? An alien invasion using nano-weapons and transgalactic wormholes in the Pyramids? Nobody really seems to know…

The Brotherhood won’t take this lying down, obviously, especially since they can use public outcry over thwarted democracy to rebuild their popularity. But what’s their next move? They could force a constitutional crisis by refusing to dissolve parliament, which would put the military in the position of possibly needing to expel them physically. They could, as Lynch notes, try to organize new mass protests of the sort that knocked over Mubarak. Or they could try … other measures. Khairat al-Shater, one of the group’s leaders (and for a time their presidential candidate), told David Ignatius that Egyptians won’t accept Shafik as president and that “It may be difficult to control the streets…. Some parties, not the Muslim Brotherhood, may resort to further violence and extremism…. When people find that the door to peaceful change is closed, it is an invitation to violence.” Exit question: What does the White House do now? Shrug and effectively rubber-stamp the court decision that’s benefited their military allies or pound the table in the name of democracy and risk further empowering the Brotherhood?


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

You loved the the Arab Spring? Just wait for the Arab Winter.
Pops corn and waits.

CherryBombsBigBrownBeaver on June 14, 2012 at 6:43 PM

Exit question: What does the White House do now? Shrug and effectively rubber-stamp the court decision that’s benefited their military allies or pound the table in the name of democracy and risk further empowering the Brotherhood?

Obviously blame Bush.

rbj on June 14, 2012 at 6:44 PM

As I said in the Headline thread:

This should be amusing.

From a distance…

JohnGalt23 on June 14, 2012 at 6:45 PM

I demand Israel apologize for the Gaza flotilla! Clearly that’s the root of all evils in the mid east.

rob verdi on June 14, 2012 at 6:51 PM

Thank you president Obama, no thanks to GOP.
 
lester on May 26, 2012 at 2:57 PM

rogerb on June 14, 2012 at 6:52 PM

Exit question: What does the White House do now? Shrug and effectively rubber-stamp the court decision that’s benefited their military allies or pound the table in the name of democracy and risk further empowering the Brotherhood

He already invited the Muslim Broterhood to the White House. Obama will tout this is what democracy looks like while crying lie a baby on CNN to Anderson Cooper AC/DC.

CherryBombsBigBrownBeaver on June 14, 2012 at 6:52 PM

This could cost Obama th election! Along with all the the things he mentioned in his speech today.

Curtiss on June 14, 2012 at 6:55 PM

“Egypt’s highest court on Thursday ordered the country’s Islamist-dominated parliament dissolved and ruled that the last prime minister to serve under Hosni Mubarak could stay in the presidential race, twin blows to the Muslim Brotherhood”

…WOW – you can almost hear the rage from OBOZO at this treatment of his radical, islamic, jihadist extremist pals.

TeaPartyNation on June 14, 2012 at 6:58 PM

New elections on what time frame?

Enough to build up opposition political parties?

Speakup on June 14, 2012 at 6:59 PM

Well, don’t we want the military to win because they are crazy but not crazy at us? We just can’t say it publicly. If we had an adult for president, he could have told the Egyptian people “Hey, sure Mubarak isn’t all that great to you but if you kick him out you will make things worse”. He was a friend of ours after all. We could have gave him that much support and that was an easy prediction anyway. I’m not Monday morning quarterbacking. I said this when it started. So then they get mad at us and kick him out anyway. We could have sat back and waited to say “told you so”. Then we would have credibility to stick our noses in it now. Now I’d just sit back and eat popcorn. Nothing we do now will be seen as positive to a majority there.

MechanicalBill on June 14, 2012 at 7:01 PM

The Muslim Brotherhood and other parties ended up running some of their own candidates in the “individual” elections in order to maximize their representation. Today’s supreme court decision held that that was unconstitutional. Result: The country’s historic parliamentary elections are now null and void, the newly chosen constitutional congress is likely also invalid, and the Muslim Brotherhood’s presidential candidate might end up being disqualified — conveniently leaving the military junta’s preferred candidate, Mubarak’s former prime minister Ahmed Shafik, as the only “choice” left on the ballot.

Oh, did I mention that parliament’s attempt to ban Shafik from running because he was a toady for Mubarak was also declared unconstitutional? And that the military coincidentally reimposed martial law over the country just 24 hours ago?

What are the odds?

Allahpundit

.
Yep, “long odds” indeed.

But it’s better than still having Mubarak as the sitting President, right? (crickets chirping)

Just another Middle-East crisis to drive the price of oil back up,
again. : (

listens2glenn on June 14, 2012 at 7:03 PM

Clearly it is not over yet in Egypt. Will all this culminate into a civil war with the military against he Muslim Brotherhood?

SC.Charlie on June 14, 2012 at 7:03 PM

And thus it has been in Egypt since the Arabs first invaded back in 639AD.

Corruption, instability, political ruination combined with class rigidity and religious extremism.

Islam: The worst thing that can happen to your country.

Zombie on June 14, 2012 at 7:05 PM

Nothing we do now will be seen as positive to a majority there.

MechanicalBill on June 14, 2012 at 7:01 PM

.
Yep. That’s a burden Mitt doesn’t need, to start his Presidency off with.
: (

listens2glenn on June 14, 2012 at 7:06 PM

Meet the new boss. Same as the old boss.

Corporal Tunnel on June 14, 2012 at 7:07 PM

Well, I think this outcome was pretty much inevitable. This is only the beginning of a new and probably bloody phase in the post-Mubarak era.

Shogun144 on June 14, 2012 at 7:07 PM

I thought little Bammie boxed up and sent them a liberal democracy kit package last Summer; what happened, did FedEx lose it?

slickwillie2001 on June 14, 2012 at 7:10 PM

Obama is really pissed that the military doesn’t much like him here, otherwise…

profitsbeard on June 14, 2012 at 7:11 PM

Been to Egypt, it’s a third world nation and will always be one. What a sh!t hole.

LynnB74 on June 14, 2012 at 7:13 PM

Maybe The Arab League could step in?

slickwillie2001 on June 14, 2012 at 7:16 PM

Egypt’s army apparently fears ending up like its counterpart in Turkey, and the MB will probably give way to more extreme factions – which means a civil war that the Islamists will probably lose. Btw, know which other famous political party slipped a bit at the polls just before taking power?

Seth Halpern on June 14, 2012 at 7:21 PM

MSM analysis of Arab Spring, and President Blame’s foreign policy success in 5…4…3…2…

KOOLAID2 on June 14, 2012 at 7:23 PM

U.S. Intervenes to Save Muslim Brotherhood
Sixth Fleet Commences Kinetic Activity in Egypt

In a nationally televised address, President Obama today announced that in accordance with United Nations and Arab League resolutions United States naval and air forces would join in the enforcement of a No-Fly Zone in the areas of Cairo, the Nile Delta, and most of Zionist-occupied Palestine. “The attempt by the Egyptian military to stifle the Muslim Brotherhood and reverse the progress achieved in the historic ‘Arab Spring’ cannot be allowed to continue. In the name of the Prophet, Blessings and Peace be upon Him, I have therefore ordered the initiation of Operation Cute Little Kitty…”

spiritof61 on June 14, 2012 at 7:25 PM

Hey I’m rooting for pretty much anything that keeps da BruthaHOOD out of power – in Egypt, here, or anywhere else for that matter.

I’m sure the Egyptian military guys could pretty much predict what the Islamists wanted to do to Egypt, and wanted no part of it. They will probably have to put down a rebellion now, in a messy and bloody fashion. The beat goes on.

We should stay as far away from it as possible.

Harbingeing on June 14, 2012 at 7:32 PM

I’m sure that somehow, someway, either Cheney, Halliburton, the CIA, the Koch Brothers, George Bush or The 1% is behind this.

Just give me a few days to figure it out and I’ll be a star on Talking Points Memo!

Zombie on June 14, 2012 at 7:38 PM

Dude, the whole revolution was just the military getting rid of the current legislature because the legislature was attempting to move the country way from socialism, and the Egyptian military owns a third of the Egyptian economy through that socialism.
In order for it to have been a coup, the military would have had to have not been in full control at some point.

Count to 10 on June 14, 2012 at 7:40 PM

New elections on what time frame?

Enough to build up opposition political parties?

Speakup on June 14, 2012 at 6:59 PM

Enough time to build a couple of new pyramids.

the_nile on June 14, 2012 at 7:41 PM

And thus it has been in Egypt since the Arabs first invaded back in 639AD.

Corruption, instability, political ruination combined with class rigidity and religious extremism.

Islam: The worst thing that can happen to your country.

Zombie on June 14, 2012 at 7:05 PM

I’m not sure that is any change from anything in their long history.

Count to 10 on June 14, 2012 at 7:48 PM

“What’s next?”

Why don’t we ask these two…

WND’S JERUSALEM BUREAUWorldNetDaily Exclusive

Ayers, Dohrn stir chaos in Middle East
Obama’s friends join protesters attempting to enter Gaza

Published: 01/01/2010 at 2:41 PM

Seven Percent Solution on June 14, 2012 at 7:49 PM

Call my a cynic, but I don’t think a bunch of guys whose idea of a fun night out is gang raping women in the town plaza will take the court’s decision seriously.

Checks and balances, a good thing, if it’s not accompanied by murder.

PattyJ on June 14, 2012 at 7:49 PM

Oh no! The military brutes seized power, usurping nice peaceful groups like… er…. the Muslim Brotherhood?

Mr. Prodigy on June 14, 2012 at 7:50 PM

It’s all part of the plan.

It was a military coup from the hour that Mubarak left the office and it was also under military control even with him there for the most part. They have had slowly growing power from the time of the treaty with Israel in the 70′s and the billions that they get as part of it. They knew the time was right as Mubarak was dying and did not have a good successor so they allowed the useful idiots to create the illusion of a revolution when they had all the power and did not give it up for one second. The MB did not play nice as their in mosque vitriol did not mellow when in front of the world (you can yell death to Jews all you want, just don’t do it so people hear it) so they lost their chance to be the puppet government of Egypt like Mubarak was the puppet of the Military. Now they have a open Military Junta that will and can save the world. The real bad guys do not have the guns only sort but pragmatic bad guys have the guns that they will not use.

Now they will try again to get a more moderate puppet government but the government will not get free control of the military to attack anything that is not in the military’s interest. They will remain a separate branch of government with no check on.

Egypt to Obama is what Iran was to Carter. Fall to military control, with either a Islamic leaders or a simple power and control generals.

tjexcite on June 14, 2012 at 8:00 PM

@Count to 10: Under the pharaohs they had beer.

Seth Halpern on June 14, 2012 at 8:02 PM

@Count to 10: Under the pharaohs they had beer.

Seth Halpern on June 14, 2012 at 8:02 PM

Also, under the pharaohs, women had rights to own property and divorce their husbands readily. In fact, they had a formal legal status nearly identical to men.

Mutnodjmet on June 14, 2012 at 8:06 PM

The Egyptian Armed Forces are the only thing holding that country together.

The alternative…had they not intervened?

Open street warfare among the Moslem Brotherhood, AQ-Egypt-Africa and an assortment of Hezbollah types from across the Middle East, all hell bent on being the first to usher in the Grand New Caliphate of Cairo.

Having known a few of the senior military out there over the years, they did not take this step lightly.

Had those shortsighted progressives (to include the cheerleaders here in the US) not shoved Mubarak aside with so much glee and mirth perhaps the gradual transition to something very much other than an Islamofascist state would already be well underway in Cairo.

The gild came off that lily of an Obama Cairo Speech and that “Arab Spring” thing in a real hurry, didn’t it?

coldwarrior on June 14, 2012 at 8:06 PM

Exit answer: Blame Eisenhower, of course.

locomotivebreath1901 on June 14, 2012 at 8:07 PM

Can I ask a stupid question ?

How can something be declared “unconstitutional” when no constitution has yet been written ?

Wasn’t the previous iteration of the Egyptian government effectively overthrown ?

I don’t know if the Egyptian people have “Arab Spring fatigue”, but as much as WE might not like it, if the Egyptian people want to be ruled by lunatic islamic fundamentalists like the Muslim Brotherhood, its going to happen one way or another.

deadrody on June 14, 2012 at 8:17 PM

While they’re doing all of this stuff, there’s a great big crisis coming real soon now.

Egypt imports about half the calories needed to prevent widespread starvation. That food has to be purchased with hard currency, and Egypt’s stockpile of hard currency is dwindling fast. At the rate they’re burning it, they’re going to run out by the end of the summer.

Egypt’s main source of hard currency is tourism, but the tourism industry has collapsed, and it’s hard to see how it could be seriously revived any time soon.

What happens when they run out of hard currency, and the food stops arriving?

No matter WHO is in charge, it isn’t obvious how this gets solved.

Steven Den Beste on June 14, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Seven Percent Solution on June 14, 2012 at 7:49 PM

Too bad there wasn’t a D-9 with their names on it.

slickwillie2001 on June 14, 2012 at 8:21 PM

Exit question: What does the White House do now?

How about secretly arming the Brotherhood? You could win many hearts and minds among the largely secular Brotherhood that way. Maybe make the modern moderate Salafists smile a little too. Next thing you know, they will be happy to take your money.

BL@KBIRD on June 14, 2012 at 9:01 PM

Always said the military were not going to tolerate fundamentalist idiots running the country. They literally own or control all the country’s assets. And they have the guns. Only an idiot would think they’d go all Smart Power and surrender to a bunch of 7th century reprobates.

In truth a junta is a better result for the locals and their neighbors.

CorporatePiggy on June 14, 2012 at 9:30 PM

How about secretly arming the Brotherhood? You could win many hearts and minds among the largely secular Brotherhood that way. Maybe make the modern moderate Salafists smile a little too. Next thing you know, they will be happy to take your money.

BL@KBIRD on June 14, 2012 at 9:01 PM

At the point of the weapons you just gave them.

Steve Eggleston on June 14, 2012 at 9:31 PM

Exit question: What does the White House do now? Shrug and effectively rubber-stamp the court decision that’s benefited their military allies or pound the table in the name of democracy and risk further empowering the Brotherhood?

If Obama decides to go all Libya on Egypt, that will mean they will need several years to rearm to the point where they might be able to challenge Israel.

Prediction – he votes present.

Steve Eggleston on June 14, 2012 at 9:36 PM

U.S. Intervenes to Save Muslim Brotherhood
Sixth Fleet Commences Kinetic Activity in Egypt

In a nationally televised address, President Obama today announced that in accordance with United Nations and Arab League resolutions United States naval and air forces would join in the enforcement of a No-Fly Zone in the areas of Cairo, the Nile Delta, and most of Zionist-occupied Palestine. “The attempt by the Egyptian military to stifle the Muslim Brotherhood and reverse the progress achieved in the historic ‘Arab Spring’ cannot be allowed to continue. In the name of the Prophet, Blessings and Peace be upon Him, I have therefore ordered the initiation of Operation Cute Little Kitty…”

spiritof61 on June 14, 2012 at 7:25 PM

I don’t even want to think of that particular backstab.

Steve Eggleston on June 14, 2012 at 9:41 PM

I am so happy about this decision. Muslim Brotherhood and the Salafis would have slaughtered the Coptic Christians. All I can say is that God works miracle for his people in times of extreme adversities.

CoolAir on June 14, 2012 at 9:58 PM

Some parties, not the Muslim Brotherhood, may resort to further violence and extremism

Hopefully they will stand out enough for the military to exterminate them.

iconoclast on June 14, 2012 at 10:07 PM

CorporatePiggy on June 14, 2012 at 9:30 PM

This!!!

iconoclast on June 14, 2012 at 10:08 PM

Egypt imports about half the calories needed to prevent widespread starvation. That food has to be purchased with hard currency, and Egypt’s stockpile of hard currency is dwindling fast. At the rate they’re burning it, they’re going to run out by the end of the summer.

Egypt’s main source of hard currency is tourism, but the tourism industry has collapsed, and it’s hard to see how it could be seriously revived any time soon.

What happens when they run out of hard currency, and the food stops arriving?

No matter WHO is in charge, it isn’t obvious how this gets solved.
Steven Den Beste on June 14, 2012 at 8:18 PM

As always, SDB gets to the point. There will be no tourism. We can’t afford to bail them out, and even though I am sure he wants to try, even Obama knows that would be electoral suicide. The EU can’t afford to bail itself out, though it is trying. China’s economy is slowing down in response to the US and the EU going economically TANGO UNIFORM. Russia is more interested in fecal agitation than anything else. The only one who can try is perhaps the Saudis. But do they want to take the Egyptians to raise?

Another motivating factor for the Egyptian military is the MB wants war with Israel, breaking the Sinai Treaty. The Egyptian military knows that Israel will clean their clock AND given its besieged status with no allies, probably is not going to be held back from finishing the job by diplomats.

There are no good answers. Thank you Obama.

Subotai Bahadur on June 14, 2012 at 10:38 PM

Exit question: What does the White House do now? Shrug and effectively rubber-stamp the court decision that’s benefited their military allies or pound the table in the name of democracy and risk further empowering the Brotherhood?

Shrug and look away. President Romney can blame any fallout on his predecessor. If President Obama somehow scores a second term, he can blame preoccupation with Europe, Syria, and re-election as the reason he couldn’t further interfere in Egypt.

The bottom line is that we have no duty to intervene on behalf of the Muslim Brotherhood, and the Saudis and Israelis would both think us insane for doing so.

Lawdawg86 on June 14, 2012 at 11:09 PM

Yeah, it’s not really bizarre at all, considering this is Egypt. Mubarak’s only real attempt at “elections” (around 1989, I think) kind of self-destructed through the same dictatorial invalidation of Islamist advantages in the polls.

We really are going to have to wait and see what happens. The senior ranks of the military and holdovers from the old regime really, really doesn’t want Islamists in power — and frankly, I can’t disagree with that. There are two competing questions:

- Should the vote of the people be invalidated against their will?

- Can anything good come of an Islamist takeover of Egypt?

I hate to see the effective coup, as a big fan of consensual government and an opponent of dictatorships. Can a sort-of despotic government offer Egyptians a better opportunity to modernize peacefully than the Islamists would have? Don’t know. Would the Islamists have been able to radicalize the people as rapidly and effectively as outside observers fear? Don’t know that either.

Will Egyptians riot and destroy because of this? I don’t think they’ll blow the lid off. One thing we can be sure: whatever happens this summer, it won’t be America’s doing. If we’re at fault at some point, it will be for continuing to stand idly by and bleat weak platitudes. No declaration of interests on our part will impress the actors in Egypt with a sense of boundaries on how far they can go — because we won’t make any such declaration.

J.E. Dyer on June 14, 2012 at 11:33 PM

I miss the Bush administration.

Mason on June 15, 2012 at 12:12 AM

As Barry Rubin points out over at PJ Media, there are a lot of parallels here with Algeria, where Islamists won the first democratic elections in 1991, only to have the results overturned by the military, leading ultimately to more than a decade of gruesome civil conflict. The Algerian civil war was one of the nastiest and dirtiest in recent memory, with widespead atrocities perpetrated by both sides, and somewhere in the neighborhood of 200,000 dead.

Another parallel with Algeria is that the violence there was fueled in part by jihadists returning from Afghanistan, where they had spent years fighting the Soviets. Nowadays, I’m sure the Muslim Brotherhood can call upon a good number of Egyptian jihadists who’ve spent part of the last decade learning the craft of insurgency in Iraq and, well, Afghanistan. Granted, a lot of the foreign jihadists who went to those places to fight the U.S. were killed or captured, but it stands to reason that those who survived are among the smartest, toughest, and most experienced.

Bottom line: Egypt has the potential to get real ugly.

Hayabusa on June 15, 2012 at 1:10 AM

I don’t know why that whole second paragraph turned into one big hot link. I kind of suck at the HTML I guess.

Hayabusa on June 15, 2012 at 1:12 AM

The military has controlled Egypt since the 1950s. How exactly is their reassertiion of control a coup?

RobertE on June 15, 2012 at 10:25 AM