The L.A. plastic bag ban

posted at 8:41 pm on June 8, 2012 by Dustin Siggins

In late May, the city of Los Angeles banned plastic bags. Pushed by Hollywood liberals who were allegedly concerned about the environmental and economic impacts of plastic bags, the ban will take place over the next year. From the LA Times (which supported the ban):

Egged on by actress Julia Louis-Dreyfus and an array of environmental groups, the City Council voted 13 to 1 to phase out plastic bags over the next 12 months at an estimated 7,500 stores. Councilman Bernard Parks cast the lone no vote.

From another Times article:

The City Council voted 13 to 1 to phase out plastic bags over the next 16 months at an estimated 7,500 stores, meaning shoppers will need to bring reusable bags or purchase paper bags for 10 cents each.

The phase-out discrepancy aside, the irony of it all is the utter inaccuracy of various statements by supporters of the ban. From one such individual:

“Plastic bags are an environmental and economic threat,” said Sarah Sikich, director of coastal resources for Heal the Bay. “Heal the Bay applauds Los Angeles for becoming the largest city in the nation to take a stand against plastic pollution. We hope this decision catalyzes the state of California and the rest of the nation to take action.”

There are at least three basic reasons this ban shouldn’t be in place, and certainly shouldn’t be expanded to the state and nation:

1.  Californians use 12 billion plastic bags per year, according to advocates of the ban. If this policy was expanded to the entire state, this would cost citizens $600 million per year, or over $30 per person. Is this really an ethical policy, charging people via government fiat merely to shop? Or is it more like New York’s new soda restriction proposals, where Bloomberg has said he’s not taking away freedoms even as he does so?

(Note: The cost per citizen was calculated using the following math: 12 billion divided by 2 divided by 10 divided by half of California’s 2011 population of 37,691,912.)

2.  Second, jobs could be lost. Local businesses are fighting back with a newly released ad highlighting testimony by local workers about the risk to their jobs. The ban’s supporters say no businesses have closed in Santa Monica, Calif. — which implemented a plastic-bag ban — but as one woman pointed out in the ad, the reusable bags are made in China.

3.  The environmental impact of plastic bags is debatable at best. My good friend and Just Facts President Jim Agresti recently r eported on a study related to just this subject. From his blog post:

In 2011, the United Kingdom’s Environment Agency released a study that evaluated nine categories of environmental impacts caused by different types of supermarket bags. The study found that paper bags have a worse effect on the environment than plastic bags in all nine impact categories, which include global warming potential, abiotic depletion, acidification, eutrophication, human toxicity, fresh water aquatic ecotoxicity, marine aquatic ecotoxicity, terrestrial ecotoxicity, and photochemical oxidation.

And later:

Critics of plastic bags frequently argue that they “take hundreds of years to decompose” . . .

Such logic ignores reality in two key respects . . .

First, modern-day landfills are generally benign because they have composite liners, clay caps, and runoff collections systems. As explained in a 1999 paper in the Journal of Environmental Engineering, modern landfills have “minimum odor nuisance,” “pose few problems after they are closed,” and “are a tribute to sanitary engineering.” Moreover, after being closed, landfills can be used for parks, commercial development, golf courses, nature conservatories, ski slopes, and airfields.

Second, even organic materials in landfills commonly take hundreds of years to decompose . . .

A study of landfills sponsored by the University of Arizona found that the tightly compacted contents of landfills create low-oxygen environments that inhibit decomposition. The details of the study were published in the book, Rubbish: The Archaeology of Garbage (2001), which explains that:

• “the dynamics of a landfill are very nearly the opposite of what most people think.”

• landfills “are not vast composters; rather, they are vast mummifiers.”

• “almost all the organic material” from the 1950s in a Phoenix landfill “remained readily identifiable: Pages from coloring books were still clearly that, onion parings were onion parings, carrot tops were carrot tops.”

• much of the organic material in an ancient Roman landfill that was twenty centuries old had not fully decomposed.

So, in short, the same rich Hollywood liberals who claim to want to help the environment actually may not be doing so. They also are harming the non-rich people who make plastic bags by potentially causing them to lose jobs through government-mandated outsourcing. Finally, they are pushing for legislation that would cause the little guy and gal extra money merely to get groceries for their families.

Perhaps the Occupiers are at the wrong location . . .

[Originally posted at the National Review Online Planet Gore blog.]

This post was promoted from GreenRoom to HotAir.com.
To see the comments on the original post, look here.


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meaning shoppers will need to bring reusable bags

 

I will right after you are done sucking me off sis.
 

Uppereastside on June 6, 2012 at 12:35 PM

rogerb on June 8, 2012 at 8:42 PM

…are those for SJP’s head?

KOOLAID2 on June 8, 2012 at 8:43 PM

…Hollywood is running the country!
No wonder!

KOOLAID2 on June 8, 2012 at 8:45 PM

It is a zoo here in Southern California.

GaltBlvnAtty on June 8, 2012 at 8:46 PM

Egged on by actress Julia Louis-Drey ufus

….fixed!

KOOLAID2 on June 8, 2012 at 8:47 PM

DC banned plastic bags (actually put a $.05 tax on them) in the name of cleaning up the Anacostia River. Money has disappeared into the corrupt DC government and the river is still a cesspool. No surprises. Same will be true in LA. They’ll get rid of plastic bags and make life more like the Soviet Union each and every day. Couldn’t happen to the bastards that are bankrolling Obama.

Happy Nomad on June 8, 2012 at 8:48 PM

It is a zoo here in Southern California.

GaltBlvnAtty on June 8, 2012 at 8:46 PM

No, a zoo has animals that people care about and want to watch. SoCal is more like a freak show, an auto accident, or Jersey Shore. Things people know they shouldn’t be looking at but can’t help themselves.

Happy Nomad on June 8, 2012 at 8:50 PM

This has been enacted in Long Beach, Calif. for over a year now forcing everyone to buy paper bags or reusable bags for an additional cost. What a PITA.

Remember when the eco-weenies prevented paper bags due to killing too many trees and forced us to buy plastic bags? They can’t have it both ways…….ahhh, apologies to John Travolta.

dthorny on June 8, 2012 at 8:51 PM

“almost all the organic material” from the 1950s in a Phoenix landfill “remained readily identifiable: Pages from coloring books were still clearly that, onion parings were onion parings, carrot tops were carrot tops.”

Wow. Next time you’re unhappy with your job, just take a moment to be grateful that you’re not paid to dig into and analyze 60-year-old landfills. Urk.

Fabozz on June 8, 2012 at 8:54 PM

My how times have changed. Used to be Jews railed against those who told us they knew what was best for us, and when it was an absence of Jews, they did not care for that. Funny how the same tactics are used by those people.

Zelsdorf Ragshaft on June 8, 2012 at 8:55 PM

Just wait until the local store owners figure out that nobody will go shopping on rainy days, if they have to carry their purchases home in a paper bag.

My personal boycott of Hollywood Liberals continues!

wren on June 8, 2012 at 8:55 PM

Reused bags are unsanitary. Heard about the girl scouts in Oregon who all got sick. Yuck. Dirty, filthy old bags, with chicken dripping in them being reused. Great.

hestrold on June 8, 2012 at 8:56 PM

My recommendation for LA residents and shoppers is to go to some place like Uline.com and order plastic grocery bags. It looks like 500 bags costs about $44. When you go shopping, take 10 or 15 with you when you go shopping. Seems a small price to pay to make a very large point. Note: I’m not advertising for them and am not affiliated with them, I have received catalogs from them and print the link just to show there are options. I’m sure there are other options out there as well if you do a Bing search.

AZfederalist on June 8, 2012 at 8:56 PM

It would be better to demand that all plastic bags be 16 ounces or less..

Electrongod on June 8, 2012 at 9:02 PM

“almost all the organic material” from the 1950s in a Phoenix landfill “remained readily identifiable: Pages from coloring books were still clearly that, onion parings were onion parings, carrot tops were carrot tops.”

I’m not really sure that research of a Phoenix, Arizona landfill is exactly a representative study. The study picked a landfill in an arid desert in which very little rainfall penetrates deeply into the soil except in washes and low-lying areas. Thus, it is entirely reasonable to believe that the contents of a desert landfill would be mummified rather than decompose. Just look at the plane crashes found in the desert from WWII or even some mummified remains of Native Americans in various caves in South America. A more representative study would look at what happens in landfills in more lush regions.

AZfederalist on June 8, 2012 at 9:02 PM

Many cities and towns in Australia are ‘plastic bag free’ and you get very dirty looks if you take them in yourself instead of fabric ones. However, when I point out all the plastic packaging around the products and styrofoam cheezels I have to put in my bin and ask the store people why my single plastic bag is the problem, they look at me blankly and have no answer.

Ozwitch on June 8, 2012 at 9:03 PM

Why don’t the stores give out the paper bags for free, as they’ve done for 100 years?

Why are people being charged? And who gets the money?

cane_loader on June 8, 2012 at 9:03 PM

Most plastic bags these days contain a large quantity of cornstarch and begin to fall apart after only a few days exposure to the elements. Even sunlight will cause them to start falling apart without any exposure to moisture.

Modern plastic bags are engineered to begin falling apart very quickly if exposed on the surface.

crosspatch on June 8, 2012 at 9:05 PM

FURTHER:

Those bags that people are bringing from home are a HARBOR FOR BACTERIA AND DISEASE.

People don’t necessarily WASH those bags thoroughly, they don’t use a bleach or other antibacterial agent when they do wash them. These bags could and do readily harbor and spread e-coli, salmonella, and botulism, as well as viruses such as influenza and roto virus, germs, and bacterial infections.

Recently several girls on a school sports outing were all made ill because the reusable grocery tote that had been used to purchase cookies for the team, and was subsequently passed around from girl to girl on the team was infected with a virus that was found to have infected the handle of the bag. Apparently the first person to handle the bag had been ill and had transferred the virus from their hand to the handle of the bag, and later to the hands of every girl on the team as she handled the bag to get a cookie. All of the girls subsequently recovered, however, depending on the virus or bacteria that was on any given bag, the results could be different.

One needn’t directly handle the bag to become contaminated, either. An infected bag that was placed on the counter at the super market or grocery store as it was being emptied or loaded would suffice to pass along the infection, either infecting other bags as they passed along the same counter, infecting food stuff that came into contact with the counter, or transferring directly onto people’s hands as they handled the packages of food stuff that had passed along the counter.

By the same means of contact with a counter where packages of meats and poultry which may have been leaking ,or been in contact with packages that were leaking, or egg containers, as they have passed along the counter before being loaded into any given bag, e-coli, salmonella, and botulism can readily be passed along. Although this particular occurrence might happen with plastic bags, the prospect of contamination and cross contamination is greatly increased using re-usable bags and totes brought in by the customer.

Plastic bags provide for far more sanitary means of grocery shopping, and, when properly recycled, don’t end up in a land fill at all. They end up in PVC fencing and other composite plastic products made from recycled plastics. Plastics in general are eminently recyclable.

thatsafactjack on June 8, 2012 at 9:06 PM

Anyone buy already popped popcorn in a plastic bag?

Electrongod on June 8, 2012 at 9:06 PM

The ban on plastic bags is insanity, and a triumph for noisy leftist activists.

If you are on foot, and decide to make a quick trip to your local store without a canvas bag, and you want to get something from the freezer or the meat counter, you really need those terribly handy, altogether convenient plastic bags to make it possible. And if you’re reusing canvas bags to carry something from the meat counter, well, you could get sick.

There’s been lots of negative response to this idiotic action by the leftists on LA radio, but I’ve heard only one councilman’s name mentioned–Dennis Zine, a former policeman who should apparently know better.

ALL the council members need to be listed, and information on what it would take to recall them also needs to be laid out. I don’t know why articles and programs on this subject aren’t including the information necessary to respond to these leftist politicians by voting them out.

LIST their names, and their contact information, and tell us how to remove them from office, preferably before the next regularly scheduled election.

Allendundit on June 8, 2012 at 9:07 PM

Why don’t the stores give out the paper bags for free, as they’ve done for 100 years?

Why are people being charged? And who gets the money?

cane_loader on June 8, 2012 at 9:03 PM

The tax on paper bags IS the entire POINT of this. It isn’t about the environment, it is about collecting an additional tax. People intuitively believe plastic is “bad” so they have some political capital to ban plastic bags then charge for paper. But just wait until these bag bans have been in place a while in Los Angeles and you start seeing people getting sick from reusable bags.

Reusable bags are one of the most unsanitary things you can have in your home if you do not wash them after every use, which most people do not do.

crosspatch on June 8, 2012 at 9:08 PM

The ban is an absolute disaster in our town. Not only are ‘plastic’ bags cheaper by far, but the paper bags take up 100 times the space in a landfill and actually take longer to decompose. Modern plastic bags have decomposers incorporated. Then there is the leakage, the broken bags with wine bottles, and the need to buy far less than one does usually thus resulting in more trips.
The ultimate irony is plastic bags are not made from oil. They are made from natural gas. And a tiny amount makes a huge amount of bags. No dead trees. No heavy shipping. Stores that used to buy plastic bags from local manufacturers now now ship in paper bags from Canada. Orders used to be placed a few times a year. Paper bags have to be shipped in monthly. Insanity. Typical liberal insanity.

pat on June 8, 2012 at 9:09 PM

You go into Walmart, Bed & Bath or Kohls with a reuseable bag and see how useful it is.

pat on June 8, 2012 at 9:11 PM

Will that include the Rodeo Drive shops?

Wander on June 8, 2012 at 9:11 PM

Going back to old brown paper bags? Neither economical nor green. Have to chop down trees and concurrently displace rare animal and plant species-plus chemicals and processes involved in brown bag manufacture (no doubt to be subcontracted out to China) is more polluting than those plastic flimsies.

But it’s probably irrelevant-by the time these nuts and fruitcakes get through building their high speed railroad, their won’t be any money left to buy food and merchandise let alone the bags which encase them.

MaiDee on June 8, 2012 at 9:11 PM

This has been enacted in Long Beach, Calif. for over a year now forcing everyone to buy paper bags or reusable bags for an additional cost.

dthorny on June 8, 2012 at 8:51 PM

I live in Long Beach. I think a lot of people are also just going over to Lakewood to do their grocery shopping.

malclave on June 8, 2012 at 9:12 PM

there not their of course!

MaiDee on June 8, 2012 at 9:13 PM

“almost all the organic material” from the 1950s in a Phoenix landfill “remained readily identifiable: Pages from coloring books were still clearly that, onion parings were onion parings, carrot tops were carrot tops.”

I’m a lifelong SoCal resident. Years ago, the local newspapers would print articles about archeology professors taking their classes to a landfill. They’d dig down and find perfectly readable newspapers from the Eisenhower administration, partially eaten, but fully recognizable hotdogs, etc., etc. But the liberal press doesn’nt want THAT info leaking out, does it?

I’m also still anxiously awaiting a picture on NBC/CBS/ABC/CNN/MSNBC/PBSLATimes?NYTimes/etc. that shows that tremendous mass of floating plastic waste drifting around in the Pacific Ocean the size of Texas…or was it the Atlantic…or the Indian Ocean….or…..whatever.

Here in LA County, if they implement the bag ban, I’m telling the box boy/girl to just put my stuff back in the cart. I’ll push it out to my car and bag it there myself. Enuff already.

crankybutt on June 8, 2012 at 9:13 PM

Anyone been to LA in the last 20 years? It looks like Tijuana with 5 times the Mexicans. They’re not worried about paper bags costing more…the state will pay that tab along with their education, health care, housing, food stamps and voting instructions. In California, every welfare application packet comes with a voter registration card…in Spanish of course.

repvoter on June 8, 2012 at 9:15 PM

nobody will go shopping on rainy days

wren on June 8, 2012 at 8:55 PM

It never rains in Southern California.

John the Libertarian on June 8, 2012 at 9:15 PM

Will all of her plastic surgery, that means that bag Nancy Pelosi will have to be cremated rather than buried, correct?

hillsoftx on June 8, 2012 at 9:16 PM

Pretty soon the shopping baskets on our heads will be required to match the bones through our noses required to match the thatch on our mud huts… “for the children.”

viking01 on June 8, 2012 at 9:16 PM

It never rains in Southern California.

John the Libertarian on June 8, 2012 at 9:15 PM

Oh great!

Now I have that tune in my head…:)

Electrongod on June 8, 2012 at 9:18 PM

*Will* =With.

hillsoftx on June 8, 2012 at 9:18 PM

Many cities and towns in Australia are ‘plastic bag free’ and you get very dirty looks if you take them in yourself instead of fabric ones. However, when I point out all the plastic packaging around the products and styrofoam cheezels I have to put in my bin and ask the store people why my single plastic bag is the problem, they look at me blankly and have no answer.

Ozwitch on June 8, 2012 at 9:03 PM

They have no answer because they don’t yet realize that banning plastic bags is only step one.

As a friend who recently returned from Europe told me, in Europe they started by banning plastic bags.

Then they added a tax on garbage, so that people started reducing their garbage by removing the outer packaging of products and leaving it at the store.

And pretty soon stores started reducing the packaging on products to absoolute minimal levels.

And she thought this was a great improvement.

I thought it was the beginning of a process that was going to make shopping very inconvenient in the not too distant future.

wren on June 8, 2012 at 9:18 PM

My recommendation for LA residents and shoppers is to go to some place like Uline.com and order plastic grocery bags. It looks like 500 bags costs about $44. When you go shopping, take 10 or 15 with you when you go shopping. Seems a small price to pay to make a very large point. Note: I’m not advertising for them and am not affiliated with them, I have received catalogs from them and print the link just to show there are options. I’m sure there are other options out there as well if you do a Bing search.

AZfederalist on June 8, 2012 at 8:56 PM

Thanks for posting this. I suggested this same thing a few weeks ago. I will not buy a reusable bag. It’s stupid! Even if you wash them, it takes resources. Water, soap, electricity. But none of that matters. Reality never does. And, it’s not about the stupid bags. It’s about controlling our lives. No detail or activity is too small.

Funny… Hollywood celebrities telling us our plastic bags are destroying the environment. Celebrities are the most useless people on earth. All they do is consume and waste. They live in mansions, ride in expensive big cars, eat lavishly and need to do crap like this to feel important. When it comes right down to it, a man or woman who makes plastic bags is more valuable to society than a celebrity. The cashier who is checking you out performs a better service to the nation than a hundred celebrities do. The very act of making a useless movie wastes more energy and resources than your average neighborhood could ever try to.

JellyToast on June 8, 2012 at 9:19 PM

I’ll push it out to my car and bag it there myself. Enuff already.

crankybutt on June 8, 2012 at 9:13 PM

You DRIVE to the store????

How much damage does that cause to Mother Earth?

Can’t people who WALK to the store put their purchases in a platic bag PLEASE???

wren on June 8, 2012 at 9:22 PM

But, the best part is that bacteria may grow in reusable grocery bags. So, after they have killed paper bags and now plastic bags, they are risking the health of their citizens with reusable bags.

LoganSix on June 8, 2012 at 9:22 PM

My recommendation for LA residents and shoppers is to go to some place like Uline.com and order plastic grocery bags. It looks like 500 bags costs about $44. When you go shopping, take 10 or 15 with you when you go shopping. Seems a small price to pay to make a very large point. Note: I’m not advertising for them and am not affiliated with them, I have received catalogs from them and print the link just to show there are options. I’m sure there are other options out there as well if you do a Bing search.

AZfederalist on June 8, 2012 at 8:56 PM

I just recently bought a large box of plastic grocery bags at Costco. I just looked at it, it’s a box of 1000. It cost me about $20. Don’t know if the law in Cali will prevent their bulk sale in warehouse clubs or not but as you said they can certainly be ordered online.

Oldnuke on June 8, 2012 at 9:22 PM

But, the best part is that bacteria may grow in reusable grocery bags. So, after they have killed paper bags and now plastic bags, they are risking the health of their citizens with reusable bags.

LoganSix on June 8, 2012 at 9:22 PM

Don’t worry, we have ObamaCare.

JellyToast on June 8, 2012 at 9:24 PM

What are we going to use to pick up or dog deuce?

Rio Linda Refugee on June 8, 2012 at 9:24 PM

It never rains in Southern California.

John the Libertarian on June 8, 2012 at 9:15 PM

It certainly rains in Northern California. And the liberals have already banned plastic bags there.

wren on June 8, 2012 at 9:24 PM

Do the Latinos have follow this law or do they get another exemption?

BTW, do they need drivers licenses to drive? How about insurance? Does their car have to be registered?

Prolly they don’t have to get their car smog tested either. Can they vote more than once?

Must they recycle or can they forget about that also? Oh that’s right only real Americans cause global warming.

SparkPlug on June 8, 2012 at 9:25 PM

This is just another example of discrimination.

In the interest of equal rights for all bags if you are going to ban plastic bags your should ban all bags to be fare.

SparkPlug on June 8, 2012 at 9:27 PM

Fair

SparkPlug on June 8, 2012 at 9:28 PM

Anybody familiar with Mount Trashmore? Wonder if any plastic bags are buried there?

Oldnuke on June 8, 2012 at 9:28 PM

The plastic bag argument is the distracting hand while we miss the real motive. Most plastic bags are built using Polylactic acid. Polylactic acid is made from corn. The real motive is E15 fuel which competes with plastic bags over corn.

ericdijon on June 8, 2012 at 9:29 PM

I’m not really sure that research of a Phoenix, Arizona landfill is exactly a representative study. The study picked a landfill in an arid desert in which very little rainfall penetrates deeply into the soil except in washes and low-lying areas. Thus, it is entirely reasonable to believe that the contents of a desert landfill would be mummified rather than decompose. Just look at the plane crashes found in the desert from WWII or even some mummified remains of Native Americans in various caves in South America. A more representative study would look at what happens in landfills in more lush regions.

AZfederalist on June 8, 2012 at 9:02 PM

The amount of water added to a landfill, whether rain or man-induced has absolutely nothing to do with the decomposition of the sub-surface contents. Does a sunken ship decompose? Modern landfills have a thick, impenetrable membrane at the bottom to prevent leaching toxic or bio-hazardous material into the groundwater. Each time a load of trash is dumped, it is covered with a layer of dirt, and then watered. This prevents odor, but does not initiate decomposition. Any rainwater just creates sludge, but only near the surface. Percolation below is a long process, but the fact that little or no decomposition takes place is proof that modern landfills are benign.

crankybutt on June 8, 2012 at 9:29 PM

The LA Times wastes enormous quantities of paper by putting meaningless ink marks on it.

SparkPlug on June 8, 2012 at 9:31 PM

What are we going to use to pick up or dog deuce?

Rio Linda Refugee on June 8, 2012 at 9:24 PM

Oh yeah, we reuse our bags for a hundred different things. Everybody does. We use them for picnics, to throw stuff in like forks, spoons, whatever. Kids toys. They have endless uses. Everybody knows this.
The plastic bag industry should have gotten head of this and marketed these things for what they are… “Re-usable Green bags!” Color them all green and then start the commercials! Seriously!

Hey.. but as for that dog doodoo… activists suggest the re-usable eco-friendly soft paper tissues. Use it to pick up your doodoo, scrape the doodoo off into a plastic garbage bag then just allow the re-usable eco-friendly dog paper tissue to dry in natural sunlight and presto–it’s ready to be used again and again.

JellyToast on June 8, 2012 at 9:34 PM

Anybody familiar with Mount Trashmore? Wonder if any plastic bags are buried there?

Oldnuke on June 8, 2012 at 9:28 PM

I see your playground and raise you a Wisconsin Ski Slope

LoganSix on June 8, 2012 at 9:37 PM

99.999% of all environmental crises, problems, messes, imminent disasters, etc. are not supported by real, reasoned, classical application of pure science, but rather only supported by the liberal mind. Uhh,……wait “liberal mind” – that’s an oxymoron!!

crankybutt on June 8, 2012 at 9:38 PM

The L.A. plastic bag ban

Meh.

Now a Hollywood plastic surgery ban, that would be something else…

Bruno Strozek on June 8, 2012 at 9:39 PM

If they ban them around here.. I will have fun with it. I will take plastic bags into the grocery store that are either colored green or spray painted green. If anyone asks or makes any remarks, I will say “You don’t have to worry about these bags, they’re “Green” plastic bags. Totally re-usable.

You know there will be an enormous number of ignorant mindless robots who will go “Oh.. how cool. These are green re-usable ones. Not like those other ones. We should get those.”

JellyToast on June 8, 2012 at 9:42 PM

The LA Times wastes enormous quantities of paper by putting meaningless ink marks on it.

SparkPlug on June 8, 2012 at 9:31 PM

+1

I was an LATimes subscriber for well over 40 years – most recently it became just casual entertainment and was merely my benchmark for discerning the liberal viewpoint. I also used it to supplant the household supply of toilet tissue. It isn’t Charmin’, but is there a better way can you sh*t on a liberal?

crankybutt on June 8, 2012 at 9:45 PM

activists suggest the re-usable eco-friendly soft paper tissues. Use it to pick up your doodoo, scrape the doodoo off into a plastic garbage bag then just allow the re-usable eco-friendly dog paper tissue to dry in natural sunlight and presto–it’s ready to be used again and again.

JellyToast on June 8, 2012 at 9:34 PM

Please tell me that was just sarcasm and you being funny.

/I’m sorry, nothing is too strange anymore

AZfederalist on June 8, 2012 at 9:48 PM

Would you rather have a federal-standard on grocery bags? This is precisely the type of headache that should be left to the locals. It’s basically a zoning issue.

I live in Long Beach. I think a lot of people are also just going over to Lakewood to do their grocery shopping.

malclave on June 8, 2012 at 9:12 PM

Empirically speaking, what makes you believe that? Do you track shopping activity? Why would anybody drive that far out of their way rt just to get plastic bags? Also stores like Trader Joes and Whole Foods already use paper.

Paper bags have handles too.

Capitalist Hog on June 8, 2012 at 9:50 PM

Somebody should ask her how many plastic bag equivalents of plastic are in all her over-sized homes and in all the Seinfeld cd sets sold.

Over50 on June 8, 2012 at 9:56 PM

the same rich Hollywood liberals

Hire illegals to do their shopping for them.

GarandFan on June 8, 2012 at 10:00 PM

The study found that paper bags have a worse effect on the environment than plastic bags in all nine impact categories

Yeah but paper is better for the environment than plastic. /liberal mind

Paul-Cincy on June 8, 2012 at 10:08 PM

Paper bags have handles too.

Capitalist Hog on June 8, 2012 at 9:50 PM

But now they cost 10 cents each.

crosspatch on June 8, 2012 at 10:19 PM

I live in Long Beach. I think a lot of people are also just going over to Lakewood to do their grocery shopping.

malclave on June 8, 2012 at 9:12 PM
Empirically speaking, what makes you believe that?

Capitalist Hog on June 8, 2012 at 9:50 PM

Just anecdotal evidence… I probably should have said “some people” instead of “a lot of people”.

This anecdotal evidence is almost certainly influenced as well by the fact that I don’t live too far from Lakewood, so it’s not really inconvenient for people in my neighborhood. If we don’t want to buy canvas bags or pay 10 cents a bag for paper, it’s not too far to a store that still bags groceries for free.

malclave on June 8, 2012 at 10:23 PM

I love it when the errant beliefs about the dynamics of landfills and the dangers of plastic bags are debunked. And if they’re really taking a stand against “plastic pollution” out there in LA-LA land does that mean there will be a major reduction in the instances of particular cosmetic bodily implants and enhancements?

stukinIL4now on June 8, 2012 at 10:23 PM

Liberal-left d1cks in Toronto just did the same thing this week coming into effect in the New Year.

andycanuck on June 8, 2012 at 10:24 PM

The L.A. plastic bag ban

LA did NOT ban the plastic bag.The adopted motion was only to approve a Citywide policy to examine a project that would ban plastic single-use carryout bags in retailers. It says “the City is considering moving forward with a plan to reduce and phase out the use of single-use carry-out bags”. It was not a motion to implement a ban. There is no ban in place. Plastic bags are still available.

scrubjay on June 8, 2012 at 10:35 PM

Reusable bags should be sold in the toilet paper aisle since putting your food in one is about as safe as licking a toilet.

Capitalist Hog on June 8, 2012 at 10:44 PM

It certainly rains in Northern California.

wren on June 8, 2012 at 9:24 PM

My reference was to the song. Of course it rains down here.

John the Libertarian on June 8, 2012 at 10:45 PM

Toronto just passed the same ban. No bags at stores at all after Jan. 2013.

Now I will search out Liberal front lawns for the doggie poopies and let them have a intimate physical reminder of their enviro-do-goodery.

mojowt on June 8, 2012 at 10:46 PM

But now they cost 10 cents each.

crosspatch on June 8, 2012 at 10:19 PM

I suspect that my favorite chains will not pass this cost on, not immediately at least.

Also look for enterprising corrugated box companies to develop a box-bag meeting the limits of the ban and the needs of the people.

Capitalist Hog on June 8, 2012 at 11:00 PM

If they really want to protect the environment from old bags, they should convince SF not to re-elect Nancy Pelosi

phreshone on June 8, 2012 at 11:05 PM

Waxed paper!

That’s the ticket!

Or stone buckets!

Even better!

Or perhaps hemp sacks!

The best!

profitsbeard on June 8, 2012 at 11:14 PM

I’m planning on sending my son a goody box of plastic bags just in case his part of California outlaws plastic bag also. Perhaps a blackmarket on bags will crop up. I can see it now. Just outside the supermarket a woman hears a hiss. “Hey, lady, I will sell you 4 plastic bags for $1.”

lukjuj on June 8, 2012 at 11:26 PM

If they really want to protect the environment from old bags, they should convince SF not to re-elect Nancy Pelosi

phreshone on June 8, 2012 at 11:05 PM

Alas, that’s not gonna happen.

As of the June 8th ballot count, Nancy Pelsosi had 74.9% of the vote in San Francisco’s June 5th Open Primary election.

http://www.sfelections.org/results/20120605/

Pelosi was running against 3 other Democrats, a Ron Paul “Liberty” Republican, and a member of the Green Party.

The better strategy is to drain Nancy Pelosi of her power by electing a HUGE Republican Majority in the House of Representatives in 2012.

We all need to be fighting hard in Congressional races across the country to make sure Nancy Pelosi never becomes Speaker of the House again!

wren on June 8, 2012 at 11:29 PM

The LA Times wastes enormous quantities of paper by putting meaningless ink marks on it.

SparkPlug on June 8, 2012 at 9:31 PM

And when the Winter months bring the wet season, they wrap that paper and ink waste in… what?
#DOH

Kenosha Kid on June 8, 2012 at 11:37 PM

I’m planning on sending my son a goody box of plastic bags just in case his part of California outlaws plastic bag also. Perhaps a blackmarket on bags will crop up. I can see it now. Just outside the supermarket a woman hears a hiss. “Hey, lady, I will sell you 4 plastic bags for $1.”

lukjuj on June 8, 2012 at 11:26 PM

For the past year or two, a friend of mine has been bringing me her surplus plastic bags from Southern California.

Don’t know what we are going to do once she can no longer get plastic bags either.

I may have to import bags from family on the east coast.

I have been forced to submit to bringing reusable bags when I shop (and washing them regularly).

But I need plastic bags for other uses, such as throwing away trash or protecting things from getting wet.

wren on June 8, 2012 at 11:41 PM

Glad I don’t live in California anymore.
Sadly…I have a feeling the ban will be coming here soon. After all, I live in Illinoyed!

balkanmom on June 9, 2012 at 12:05 AM

LA did NOT ban the plastic bag.The adopted motion was only to approve a Citywide policy to examine a project that would ban plastic single-use carryout bags in retailers. It says “the City is considering moving forward with a plan to reduce and phase out the use of single-use carry-out bags”. It was not a motion to implement a ban. There is no ban in place. Plastic bags are still available.

You must have had your LATimes subscription cancelled. The motion was approved:

From the LATimes, May 24, nutjob:

Los Angeles became the largest city in the nation to approve a ban on plastic bags at supermarket checkout lines, handing a hard-fought victory to environmentalists and promising to change the way Angelenos do their grocery shopping.

The next time you post, make sure you’re in the right century.

crankybutt on June 9, 2012 at 12:06 AM

Lefties are never liberal, nor for the little people.

Schadenfreude on June 9, 2012 at 12:18 AM

The next time you post, make sure you’re in the right century.

crankybutt on June 9, 2012 at 12:06 AM

Read the motion. I was there in City Council Chambers when they voted.

scrubjay on June 9, 2012 at 12:45 AM

And, all those baggers count as green jobs!!!!

jbinnout on June 9, 2012 at 12:55 AM

This is the kind of law you get when minority issues are all that matter in a government. This city seems determined to erase the ex-majority population that actually BUILT it. The mindset here is simply ignorance on a platter. These 35-IQ residents can’t see any other way.

leftnomore on June 9, 2012 at 2:15 AM

That motion also stated that there would be an oversight person who would make recommendations in two years to review results to “Strengthen and expand” the ban. That’s the attitude already in place– it must be EXPANDED before even reviewing the consequences! There isn’t a single person on that council with a lick of decency… they must grease the various cultural palms– blacks, the Mexis, the gays, the media… hmm, did they leave one out?

leftnomore on June 9, 2012 at 2:20 AM

But, the best part is that bacteria may grow in reusable grocery bags. So, after they have killed paper bags and now plastic bags, they are risking the health of their citizens with reusable bags.

LoganSix on June 8, 2012 at 9:22 PM

Darwinism in action. I always make sure to ask for double bags if anyone around me has reusable bags.

JackofNoTrades on June 9, 2012 at 4:27 AM

Even though the summers have sucked in Alaska the last 5-6 years I am so glad to not be anywhere near the looney morons in more populated places. They are here too, but in a much smaller quantity. I still throw all of my garbage in one can–imagine that!!

tbear44 on June 9, 2012 at 5:14 AM

So, if the clerk is bagging your groceries with a paper bag made from a tree, would that make him a tree bagger?

bbordwell on June 9, 2012 at 7:21 AM

Looks like the real problem is littering, not the bags themselves. Maybe the city should teach people to pick up their trash instead of forcing them to use bags that aren’t as easy to use. Or, even better, make all the people on welfare actually clean up their neighborhoods in order to get their benefit cards.

spudmom on June 9, 2012 at 7:51 AM

My husband is active duty Air Force and we live in Germany. While we can still get plastic bags on base, everywhere we shop off base requires us to bring or buy reusable bags. Most of the time, I prefer the reusable bags because they’re more sturdy than plastic or paper, but I do have to wash them from time to time when I buy meats or anything that may have spilled. I don’t know how many people wash theirs, but I have to chuckle every time I do wondering if that’s also something that the German gov’t would have a problem with as it “wastes” water and energy. They’re pretty over-the-top here with recycling, not letting your car idle, not allowing air conditioners, etc.

jtownsley on June 9, 2012 at 7:55 AM

I still throw all of my garbage in one can–imagine that!!

tbear44 on June 9, 2012 at 5:14 AM

Ha! That is hard to imagine now-a-days. They might lock you up for doing that in Europe!

jtownsley on June 9, 2012 at 7:59 AM

When we outlaw the use of plastic bags, only outlaws will use plastic bags.

Paul-Cincy on June 9, 2012 at 8:02 AM

Will that include the Rodeo Drive shops?

Wander on June 8, 2012 at 9:11 PM

Regulations are for the little people.

SubmarineDoc on June 9, 2012 at 11:04 AM

I always thought the most interesting point from the book Rubbish was when he said how to recognize that we have achieved REAL Recycling.

Unless and Until they begin to Pay You for the Resource that is your garbage, what you are engaging in is Reclaimation, not Recycling. Only when they begin to view your cast off as a Resource will they be willing to Pay for it and therefore be Recycling it. (Paraphrased)

jaydee_007 on June 9, 2012 at 11:46 AM

I’m not really sure that research of a Phoenix, Arizona landfill is exactly a representative study. The study picked a landfill in an arid desert in which very little rainfall penetrates deeply into the soil except in washes and low-lying areas. Thus, it is entirely reasonable to believe that the contents of a desert landfill would be mummified rather than decompose. Just look at the plane crashes found in the desert from WWII or even some mummified remains of Native Americans in various caves in South America. A more representative study would look at what happens in landfills in more lush regions.

AZfederalist on June 8, 2012 at 9:02 PM

I’ll tell you what happens: Union Pacific Railroad nearly strokes out when their old, discarded business files are uncovered by a bulldozer readying a former landfill for construction. Ten years or so ago, a piece of property catty-corner from Rosenblatt Stadium (former home of the College World Series) and Henry Doorly Zoo (recently voted the best zoo in the US) was being leveled and pounded and whatever else needs to be done to prep an old landfill for construction. One of the ‘dozers accidentally managed to uncover gobs of old UP business files. Lacking paper shredders and computers, businesses used to store their old files for x number of years, then send them to the land fill. Business files from way back to the 50s were found in pristine condition.

Now, while Omaha might not be a rain forest and we do have the occasional drought, some years we get lots and lots and lots of precipitation. And those files were as readable as the day they were printed or typed. UP had a world champion hissy fit.

catsandbooks on June 9, 2012 at 11:47 AM

Just walked down the “water” aisle in a grocery store here in a S.Cal community adjacent to LA.

I was shocked at the sheer number of plastic water bottles available. Flavored water, colored water, energy water, and plain old filtered, distilled or spring water.

I wonder if I am the only one left who drinks tap water–filtered by PUR, of course, since my water bill does not include actual potable water.

So, if you buy a supply of water in plastic bottles, you cannot carry it home in a plastic bag–even though you could use the plastic bag multiple times if you were careful, but the Nannies caution us not to reuse plastic water bottles.

These hypocrites really do not understand how how stupid they appear.

Oldflyer on June 9, 2012 at 2:17 PM

I just recently bought a large box of plastic grocery bags at Costco. I just looked at it, it’s a box of 1000. It cost me about $20. Don’t know if the law in Cali will prevent their bulk sale in warehouse clubs or not but as you said they can certainly be ordered online.

Oldnuke on June 8, 2012 at 9:22 PM

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But… If you are caught with any of those bags that will lead to arrest and a warrant to search your car and house (boat and travel-trailer too if you have those).

You will then be made an example of with ‘per-bag fines. And because you were obviously attempting to skirt the law, additional penalties will be imposed.

Once this system they are constructing is fully implemented (w/soda bans, texting while walking bans, light bulb bans… etc) they will have to begin releasing violent criminals from the jails to make room for all the people who have stocked up on the banned items. It’s call “premeditation”.

It almost makes me want to go but some more incandescent bulbs… I plan on mentioning those in my will btw… “And to my favorite… I leave mt stash of pre-Al Gore style-eco-insanity incandescent bulbs”.
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RalphyBoy on June 10, 2012 at 10:19 AM