Bravo: Google stickin’ it to the communist-man in China

posted at 3:43 pm on June 4, 2012 by Erika Johnsen

Besides the many disgusting physical human rights violations that occur on the regular in China — forced abortions and live organ harvesting and whatnot — the Chinese regime also keeps a lockdown on its people’s intellectual activity with various technological holds. The things you can do on that wonderful, highly powerful network of human idea-sharing, the Internet, are pretty well restricted in China, as the government doesn’t tolerate much of anything that could subvert people’s loyalty away from the state. (Hey, give ‘em a break, right? Communism is hard.)

A couple of years back, Google found itself in a major pickle when they were trying to expand their service to China: Abide by the Chinese government’s censorship rules, to which most Americans are morally opposed, or deprive the Chinese people of a useful service that makes people’s lives more efficient and convenient. Google decided to go for it, but it’s been an uphill battle — they had to move their web search and other services to Hong Kong to avoid working with the Chinese regulations.

Last week, Google announced that they’re implementing a way to let Chinese users know — without actually letting them know — what’s going on with their failed searches. This was news on Friday, but it is much too awesome to let pass without comment. Totally brill:

Google has begun notifying Chinese users when they are using search terms that can trigger China’s Internet blocks, in its boldest challenge in two years to Beijing’s efforts to restrict online content.

The search giant unveiled on its Chinese site this week a new mechanism that identifies political and other sensitive terms that are censored by Chinese authorities.

For example, when users search for keywords like “carrot” — which contains the character for Chinese president Hu Jintao’s surname — a yellow dropdown message says: “We’ve observed that searching for ‘hu’ in mainland China may temporarily break your connection to Google. This interruption is outside Google’s control.”

Google acknowledged on its official blog Thursday that users in China are having trouble accessing its services, saying failed searches can impair performance on the site. “Users are regularly getting error messages like ‘This webpage is not available’ or ‘The connection was reset,’ ” the post said.

Google says it hopes the alerts “will help improve the search experience in mainland China,” where Google’s search and other services have been unstable since it entered a public spat with Chinese authorities over censorship over two years ago. A Google spokesman declined to comment further.

Chinese officials do not discuss their Internet restrictions, and its search terms are treated as state secrets. In its post, Google said the trigger terms were identified based on reviews of the outcomes of the 350,000 most popular search queries in China, not an official list.

The post does not mention censorship, or explicitly say Chinese authorities are the cause of the blocks.

Nice one, Google. Who knows whether the Chinese government will let this continue — when the freedom-parties get too crazy, they tend to shut things down pretty quickly — but in the meantime, beating China at their own game feels like a brief, shining moment of poetic justice. Heh.


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I like your writing style, new girl.

CTSherman on June 4, 2012 at 3:48 PM

Another country that loves abortion for sex selection….

Oil Can on June 4, 2012 at 3:48 PM

I’ve had problems with Google’s sketchy privacy protection but this is a great move by them, kudos

MyImamToldMeToDoIt on June 4, 2012 at 3:48 PM

Google s/b hated for many things, incl. for intruding in people’s lives, selling information, but especially for colluding with the Obama adminsitration on info sharing. They are likely, along with Yahoo, Facebook and Twitter, some of the most dangerous companies around.

On China they are not clean, not by far. This is just a face-saving gesture. They betray you unknowingly, across the world.

Schadenfreude on June 4, 2012 at 3:48 PM

Maybe this gives Google some bravery?

“This case touches upon the Internet, twitter and the freedom of speech,” says his lawyer Pu Zhiqiang, who believes it’s a landmark case. “It also takes in criticism of Bo and his anti-mafia campaign. It also touches upon the system of re-education through labor. In the context of China’s constitutional government, the significance of this tweet is huge.”

MeatHeadinCA on June 4, 2012 at 3:50 PM

Schadenfreude on June 4, 2012 at 3:48 PM

Yep.

Bmore on June 4, 2012 at 3:50 PM

I look forward to the day when the residents of China can access Hot Gas.

aunursa on June 4, 2012 at 3:51 PM

Still evil.

novaculus on June 4, 2012 at 3:52 PM

Nice one, Google. Who knows whether the Chinese government will let this continue — when the freedom-parties get too crazy, they tend to shut things down pretty quickly — but in the meantime, beating China at their own game feels like a brief, shining moment of poetic justice. Heh.

Erika Johnsen

I thought China was our friend? You mean we are economically fueling a repressive regime?

DFCtomm on June 4, 2012 at 3:53 PM

Google should have a different name for users in Red China.

The Chinese version of Google should consist of two Madarin characters: the one for Communism and the one for Sucks.

Akzed on June 4, 2012 at 3:53 PM

“We’ve observed that searching for ‘solyndra’ in united states may temporarily break your connection to Google. This interruption is courtesy of the Obama administration.”

t8stlikchkn on June 4, 2012 at 3:53 PM

I look forward to the day when the residents of China can access Hot Gas.

aunursa on June 4, 2012 at 3:51 PM

If they jump the wall, they can.

MeatHeadinCA on June 4, 2012 at 3:54 PM

Pretty limp-wristed, given that they’ve been supporting the ChiComs for year. They also data mine emails you draft on gmail to direct ads at you, and drive vehicles covered in cameras up your private drive to post photographs of your living room on the Internet. I once Google Earth’d the public address of their CEO just out of curiosity, and all it showed was a locked gate. Seemed about right.

JeremiahJohnson on June 4, 2012 at 3:54 PM

I like your writing style, new girl.

CTSherman on June 4, 2012 at 3:48 PM

Yeah, she’s sassy!

JeremiahJohnson on June 4, 2012 at 3:54 PM

True, but it’s a start.

abobo on June 4, 2012 at 3:59 PM

But the Chinese are only doing it for their own good.

/Bloomberg

mankai on June 4, 2012 at 4:04 PM

DFCtomm on June 4, 2012 at 3:53 PM

Well, we can either destroy the world’s economy in an attempt to effect internal change in China externally

Or

We can just trade with them.

I mean, I don’t know man. I think maybe it’s up to the Chinese to determine the gov’t of China. If they find communism revolting, they should revolt.

If China decides to invade Taiwan on the other hand, we need to get involved.

apollyonbob on June 4, 2012 at 4:06 PM

Abide by the Chinese government’s censorship rules, to which most Americans are morally opposed, or deprive the Chinese people of a useful service that makes people’s lives more efficient and convenient.

Both options are the same thing.

Their options were to capitulate, or lose advertising business. After all, its not like censored Google is any better than Bai Du.

I’ve been living without Google for a long time and I don’t feel deprived.

bernverdnardo1 on June 4, 2012 at 4:06 PM

I mean, I don’t know man. I think maybe it’s up to the Chinese to determine the gov’t of China. If they find communism revolting, they should revolt.

If China decides to invade Taiwan on the other hand, we need to get involved.

apollyonbob on June 4, 2012 at 4:06 PM

Man, using your logic, shouldn’t we just leave it up to the people of Taiwan to build their defenses with their own money? National sovereignty by half is not sovereignty.

MeatHeadinCA on June 4, 2012 at 4:14 PM

Can Google do something about these 32oz. Cokes?

faraway on June 4, 2012 at 4:20 PM

I look forward to the day when the residents of China can access Hot Gas.

aunursa on June 4, 2012 at 3:51 PM

If they jump the wall, they can.

MeatHeadinCA on June 4, 2012 at 3:54 PM

Hot Gas isn’t blocked in China.

DarkCurrent on June 4, 2012 at 4:21 PM

apollyonbob on June 4, 2012 at 4:06 PM

How are people who are not allowed to arm themselves going to revolt?

mankai on June 4, 2012 at 4:22 PM

I suggested that Mitt Romney might choose Obama as his VP three times.

Each time my internet went down for about 4 hours.

Do they not get /s.

Steveangell on June 4, 2012 at 4:23 PM

If China decides to invade Taiwan on the other hand, we need to get involved.

apollyonbob on June 4, 2012 at 4:06 PM

You mean if the PRC controlled part of China decides to invade the ROC-occupied part. Why do you want to get involved in another country’s civil war?

DarkCurrent on June 4, 2012 at 4:23 PM

Takes the skeptical side of the fence.

Billions of hit makers….billions.

The number crunchers are gonna hold up a flag and wave it? Draw a line in the sand? I see the boardroom knuckles coming out.

Limerick on June 4, 2012 at 4:35 PM

I still don’t trust Google.

Fallon on June 4, 2012 at 4:45 PM

I once Google Earth’d the public address of their CEO just out of curiosity, and all it showed was a locked gate. Seemed about right.

JeremiahJohnson on June 4, 2012 at 3:54 PM

And Saverin of Facebook says he’s worried about privacy issues on…Facebook?…so is keeping a “low profile” there.

I’m down with free enterprise capitalism, but that doesn’t mean that I don’t think a lot of these guys are a$$****s.

Dr. ZhivBlago on June 4, 2012 at 4:45 PM

I like your writing style, new girl.
CTSherman on June 4, 2012 at 3:48 PM

+1.

Morrison is pretty stolid, and AP is just weird enough to be mildly entertaining from time to time — although he doesn’t quite seem to realize why. Most of the “new” people who keep popping up seem very interested in displaying their own (highly questionable) writing skills, at the expense of making a clear point.

Finally we have a host with the balls to baldly state the obvious and not waste any of her guests’ time apologizing for it. There is always an utterly inexplicable shortage of that in the media.

logis on June 4, 2012 at 4:47 PM

…GOOGLE will betray you……
(:->)

KOOLAID2 on June 4, 2012 at 4:50 PM

Google stickin’ it to the communist-man in China

…Ya mean, the same as they do to Americans who use their massive-profit-creating, privacy-destroying “services”?

Do-evil Governmentoogle at least shows that it is a total b-tard organization to everyone on Earth.

TeaPartyNation on June 4, 2012 at 4:52 PM

Google is so creative in the rotation of the word “Google” on their search page… perhaps we shall expect a Google staopping a tank in Tiananmen Square?

socalcon on June 4, 2012 at 5:00 PM

I’m sure China will love that. A search engine that automatically detects banned words. I wonder what’s their arrangement with Taiwan?

MrX on June 4, 2012 at 5:20 PM

How about, “The stinkin’ commies have blocked your search”?

Ward Cleaver on June 4, 2012 at 5:29 PM

Hot Gas isn’t blocked in China.

DarkCurrent on June 4, 2012 at 4:21 PM

So they can read this post and comments about censorship in China?

aunursa on June 4, 2012 at 6:43 PM

Hot Gas isn’t blocked in China.
DarkCurrent on June 4, 2012 at 4:21 PM

So they can read this post and comments about censorship in China?
aunursa on June 4, 2012 at 6:43 PM

Yes, “they” can. And this individual “they” has also been given complete freedom to Spam absolutely nothing but Pro-Communist propaganda in response to said comments regarding Chinese censorship.

Chinese censors refer to their agitprop employees as the “50 Cent Party.” Look it up.

logis on June 4, 2012 at 7:14 PM

I look forward to the day when the residents of China can access Hot Gas.

aunursa on June 4, 2012 at 3:51 PM

I’ve never had trouble accessing this site in China, and it always feels like “home” when I do so. You’ll need a VPN to access YouTube, Blogger, Facebook, though.

hoosiermama on June 4, 2012 at 7:40 PM

hoosiermama on June 4, 2012 at 7:40 PM

That’s good to hear! We will be in Shanghai during the November election. Can’t think of a better place to find out instant news.

CTSherman on June 4, 2012 at 8:32 PM

I have been in China twice in the last year (most recently in April) and have enjoyed reading Hot Air while there (in Shanghai) without any problems other than accessing any videos (those seem to be blocked) linked on Hot Air. It is annoying that Facebook is blocked and it is annoying that the Chinese government continues to block various other sites, but all of the conservative sites that I like are accesible, including Instapundit.

grimble grumble on June 5, 2012 at 4:45 AM

So they can read this post and comments about censorship in China?

aunursa on June 4, 2012 at 6:43 PM

Yes, I’m doing so right now.

I have been in China twice in the last year (most recently in April) and have enjoyed reading Hot Air while there (in Shanghai) without any problems other than accessing any videos (those seem to be blocked) linked on Hot Air. It is annoying that Facebook is blocked and it is annoying that the Chinese government continues to block various other sites, but all of the conservative sites that I like are accesible, including Instapundit.

grimble grumble on June 5, 2012 at 4:45 AM

If you get a US-based VPN account you can easily get to Facebook and YouTube from within China.

DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 5:24 AM

logis on June 4, 2012 at 7:14 PM

Buzz off ignoramus.

DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 5:25 AM

zz off ignoramus.
DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 5:25 AM

I’m not quite sure I’m following every single aspect of your self-proclaimedly “brilliant” (albeit scathing) critique of China’s Politburo here.

My own carefully considered and objective opinion is that the current regime is always a constant source of continual light and happiness to the world. But for some inexplicable reason, you always seem to take personal exception to everything I say.

‘Comon, out with it: How do you REALLY feel about Hu Jintao?

You’ve said before you thought he was a bit of a “scumbag,” and that you adamantly opposed him and his supporters. But you always stop just short of breaking down exactly which of your elected leaders’ policies you believe to be most “reprehensible.” Why is that?

logis on June 5, 2012 at 9:51 AM

I’m not quite sure I’m following every single aspect of your self-proclaimedly “brilliant” (albeit scathing) critique of China’s Politburo here.

My own carefully considered and objective opinion is that the current regime is always a constant source of continual light and happiness to the world. But for some inexplicable reason, you always seem to take personal exception to everything I say.

‘Comon, out with it: How do you REALLY feel about Hu Jintao?

You’ve said before you thought he was a bit of a “scumbag,” and that you adamantly opposed him and his supporters. But you always stop just short of breaking down exactly which of your elected leaders’ policies you believe to be most “reprehensible.” Why is that?

logis on June 5, 2012 at 9:51 AM

I’m not sure why you feel compelled to lie constantly. Apparently you have some mental health issues that make it impossible for you not to.

To my recollection I’ve never previously mentioned Hu Jintao on this site one way or the other. Perhaps you can link directly to an authentic comment of mine (not one of your lamely fabricated ‘quotes’)? No? That’s because you’re a shameless liar.

If I’d ever been inclined to call anyone a ‘scumbag’ it would have been you buddy.

DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 10:09 AM

‘Comon, out with it: How do you REALLY feel about Hu Jintao?

logis on June 5, 2012 at 9:51 AM

To my recollection I’ve never previously mentioned Hu Jintao on this site one way or the other.

DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 10:09 AM

What an absolutely astounding coincidence: your recollection of your lack of posting history critiquing China’s leadership matches my recollection perfectly!

And that’s even though I don’t bother reading most of your posts… Oh well, anything’s possible I suppose.

Perhaps you can link directly to an authentic comment of mine

Sorry, I’d love to help you out with that, but I’m drawing a complete blank too. All I seem to recall are a completely unbroken stream of unabashedly pro-Chinese propaganda posts from you.

Wow, what’s downright weird. For some utterly inexplicable reason, my recollection of your posting history once again happens to fall short at precisely the same point where yours does.

What are the odds of that?

logis on June 5, 2012 at 10:58 AM

logis on June 5, 2012 at 10:58 AM

Since you’re willfully ignorant when it comes to reality in China I suppose it may strike you as propaganda when I try to correct the faulty notions of befuddled fools such as yourself.

But consider my original comment in this thread. It was a simple statement of easily verifiable fact and was subsequently backed up by two other posters who actually know wtf they’re talking about. Yet apparently you have a problem with it, because it goes against your precious prejudices.

It’s about time for you to get out of your momma’s basement, get a passport and go learn something about the real world.

DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 11:13 AM

‘Comon, out with it: How do you REALLY feel about Hu Jintao?

logis on June 5, 2012 at 9:51 AM

I suppose it may strike you as propaganda when I try to correct the faulty notions of befuddled fools such as yourself.

DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 11:13 AM

In a word: du-uh!

OK, I suppose that might actually be two words, but anyway….

Once again: Exactly which PART of that ridiculously simple question are you saying that you can’t even begin to respond to?

logis on June 5, 2012 at 11:49 AM

Once again: Exactly which PART of that ridiculously simple question are you saying that you can’t even begin to respond to?

logis on June 5, 2012 at 11:49 AM

He seems to be a competent technocrat and less of a socialist in practice than say President Obama.

DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 12:05 PM

[China's current dictator] seems to be a competent technocrat and less of a socialist in practice than say President Obama.
DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 12:05 PM

So the only flaw in China’s leadership is that… Obama sucks?

Now was that really a such a hardline stance for you to take? Why is this like pulling teeth for you?

Oh, wait. I just remembered. That isn’t just your opinion, is it? You keep telling us — ad nauseum — that every Chinese citizen is perfectly free to express his opinions on the Internet.

You’re the only self-professed “non-imbecile” around here, so please check my facts very carefully: As I understand it there are actually HUNDREDS of people who live in Communist China — or possibly more than that, with estimates of Chinese population soaring into the thousands. And call me crazy (um, again) but I suspect there could even be MILLIONS of people living in China…

Yet, somehow, out of ALL those throngs of free-speaking individuals with (and once again please excuse me for paraphrasing your ham-fisted propaganda just tiny a bit here) absolutely unrestricted access to the Internet, you are thus far the most vociferous critic I’ve ever heard among all your countrymen toward the person you so scathingly compare to other world leaders as being relatively competent, freedom-loving and technologically savvy.

Once again… what are the ODDS of that?

I mean, at least one of you must have voted against his Party… right? And that guy must have voted FOR somebody who wasn’t Obama, right? So, obviously, he must have had an articulable reason for thinking Hu was a WORSE choice than his actual opponent in that hard-fought political race, right? Or does it not work that way over there?

Don’t get me wrong: I can actually see how “At Least He’s Not Obama” might end up a winning slogan in America this year. But how is it possible that’s really the most contentious poltical attack ad being run in China today?

logis on June 5, 2012 at 1:11 PM

logis on June 5, 2012 at 1:11 PM

Of course the internet is restricted to some extent in China. I’ve never said otherwise. It’s just not as restricted as commonly believed outside of China. It’s also quite easy for most people to circumvent those restrictions if they want to. See comments from others above that substantiate both of my claims here.

While China has by far the most Internet users in the world, you probably won’t see many residents of China commenting on HA because most Chinese prefer to use Chinese. While I can read Chinese, I’m American so I tend to frequent US sites much more than most people in China. You’ll find most of them on Chinese sites such as Weibo, where there is in fact quite a bit of criticism and sarcasm directed at the government (though not infrequently censored after the fact).

Certainly China isn’t as free as America with regard to internet usage. On the other hand it’s not nearly as restricted as you seem to believe.

As I keep telling you, get a passport and come see for yourself.

DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 1:30 PM

As I keep telling you, get a passport and come see for yourself.
DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 1:30 PM

Yeah, I suppose you’re right. It’s nothing personal; I just try to stay in touch with some Chinese friends, and they all act like a bunch of stuck-up dicks and never get back to me.

But it’s great to know that I can always trust YOU to show me everything there is to know about the REAL China. While I’m in town, maybe you can help me get in touch with a bunch of lying sacks of crap who won’t offer me the tiniest bit of help in understanding how truly wonderous and magnificent China’s government is.

Their names are:

Cai Lujun

Gao Zhisheng

Guo Quan

Hu Jia

Huang Qi

Jiang Lijun

Jiang Yanyong

Li Hai

Li Zhi

Liu Xiaobo

Lü Jiamin

Shi Tao

Tan Zuoren

Wang Dan

Wang Xiaoning

Wang Bingzhang

Wang Youcai

Wei Jingsheng

Yuan Hongbing

Zhao Changqing

Zeng Jinyan

Cheng Jianping

Frankly, I feel just a little silly now, but I was actually starting to get worried about these guys, and several thousand of their friends and family members.

You have no idea how very comforting it is to be so graciously assured that they’ve all just been “very slightly censored; after the fact.”

logis on June 5, 2012 at 3:47 PM

Of course the internet is restricted to some extent in China. I’ve never said otherwise. It’s just not as restricted as commonly believed outside of China. It’s also quite easy for most people to circumvent those restrictions if they want to. See comments from others above that substantiate both of my claims here…. You’ll find most of them on Chinese sites such as Weibo, where there is in fact quite a bit of criticism and sarcasm directed at the government (though not infrequently censored after the fact).
DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 1:30 PM

Yeah, I suppose you’re right. It’s nothing personal; I just try to stay in touch with some Chinese friends, and they all act like a bunch of stuck-up dicks and never get back to me.

But it’s great to know that I can always trust YOU to show me everything there is to know about the REAL China.

While I’m in town, maybe you can help me get in touch with a bunch of lying sacks of crap who won’t offer me the tiniest bit of help in understanding how truly wonderous and magnificent China’s government is.

Their names are: Cai Lujun, Gao Zhisheng, Guo Quan, Hu Jia, Huang Qi, Jiang Lijun, Jiang Yanyong, Li Hai, Li Zhi, Liu Xiaobo, Lü Jiamin, Shi Tao, Tan Zuoren, Wang Dan, Wang Xiaoning, Wang Bingzhang, Wang Youcai, Wei Jingsheng, Yuan Hongbin, Zhao Changqing, Zeng Jinyan, and Cheng Jianping.

Frankly, I feel just a little silly admitting this, but I was actually starting to get worried about these guys… and several thousand of their friends and family members.

You have no idea how very comforting it is to be so graciously assured that they, and everyone who has ever communicated with them, have all just been “not infrequently censored after the fact.”

logis on June 5, 2012 at 3:59 PM

Of course the internet is restricted to some extent in China. I’ve never said otherwise. It’s just not as restricted as commonly believed outside of China. It’s also quite easy for most people to circumvent those restrictions if they want to. See comments from others above that substantiate both of my claims here…. You’ll find most of them on Chinese sites such as Weibo, where there is in fact quite a bit of criticism and sarcasm directed at the government (though not infrequently censored after the fact).
DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 1:30 PM

Yeah, I suppose you’re right. It’s nothing personal; I just try to stay in touch with some Chinese friends, and they all act like a bunch of stuck-up jerks and never get back to me.

But it’s great to know that I can always trust YOU to show me everything there is to know about the REAL China.

While I’m in town, maybe you can help me get in touch with a bunch of lying sacks of crap who won’t offer me the tiniest bit of help in understanding how truly wonderous and magnificent China’s government is.

Their names are: Cai Lujun, Gao Zhisheng, Guo Quan, Hu Jia, Huang Qi, Jiang Lijun, Jiang Yanyong, Li Hai, Li Zhi, Liu Xiaobo, Lü Jiamin, Shi Tao, Tan Zuoren, Wang Dan, Wang Xiaoning, Wang Bingzhang, Wang Youcai, Wei Jingsheng, Yuan Hongbin, Zhao Changqing, Zeng Jinyan, and Cheng Jianping.

Frankly, I feel just a little silly admitting this, but I was actually starting to get worried about these guys… and several thousand of their friends and family members.

You have no idea how very comforting it is to be so graciously assured that they, and everyone who has ever communicated with them, have all just been “not infrequently censored after the fact.”

logis on June 5, 2012 at 4:00 PM

I’m afraid I don’t know them but will do my best!

Can you put me in touch with Ming Qu and Ying Wu?

DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 4:17 PM

Grow half a ball and get a passport and ticket already logis.

DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 4:17 PM

I’ll try to arrange meetings with everyone you’d like. You might even become old friends!

Click on my moniker here and follow till you find an email address.

DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 4:20 PM

I’m afraid I don’t know them but will do my best! Can you put me in touch with Ming Qu and Ying Wu?
DarkCurrent on June 5, 2012 at 4:20 PM

First you claim that you don’t recognize the names of even some of the most widely-known Communist dissidents who’ve recently been tortured, imprisioned and murdered for criticizing the current Chinese Communist regime. And then you feel it’s appropriate to make an incredibly sick joke about crime victims.

There is a very, very special place in Hell reserved for you and all of the people who support totalitarian dictatorships.

logis on June 5, 2012 at 7:26 PM

Logis

Follow Darkcurrent’s advise and go visit China. You will be amazed – I know I was the first time I visited, as well as the last time. Go to Starbuck (they are everywhere in Shangai) and notice all of the young people there hanging out just as people in North America do.

Yes there is censorship and repression in China, but it is not like we in North America (I am Canadian) seem to believe. My Shanghai gf and my Chinese friends still love China even though they prefer the freedom avaible to them in Canada.

grimble grumble on June 5, 2012 at 7:42 PM

Communist dissidents who’ve recently been tortured, imprisioned and murdered for criticizing the current Chinese Communist regime. And then you feel it’s appropriate to make an incredibly sick joke about crime victims.

logis on June 5, 2012 at 7:26 PM

recently murdered? Which one of those people is dead and died in government custody? The number seems to be zero. Again you’re full of it logis.

DarkCurrent on June 6, 2012 at 2:34 AM

Follow Darkcurrent’s advise and go visit China. You will be amazed – I know I was the first time I visited, as well as the last time. Go to Starbuck (they are everywhere in Shangai) and notice all of the young people there hanging out just as people in North America do.

Yes there is censorship and repression in China, but it is not like we in North America (I am Canadian) seem to believe. My Shanghai gf and my Chinese friends still love China even though they prefer the freedom avaible to them in Canada.

DarkCurrent on June 6, 2012 at 2:34 AM

Starbucks… Seriously? THAT is the basis of your amazing “worldly wisdom” regarding totalitarianism????

I don’t mean to imply that you are a complete moron — because Lord knows how incredibly painful the blatantly obvious is you people — but do you REALLY believe that, if Nazi German were around today and didn’t happen to be at war with them at the moment, that they would outlaw Starbucks? Or that there would be no “young people” “hanging out?” Or that — as long as you were careful to keep your politics to yourself — you couldn’t have a perfectly wonderful stay there?

Seriously, I want to hear this: Inside your minds, what, if anything, is the possible downside to totalitarianism? You think that red-leotarded aparatchicks are standing there, constantly sticking you in the butt with pitchforks?

Your claim (with all due respect, as fraudulent as it is impossible) that you have confirmed that all the people you never heard of have “only” been tortured and imprisoned, but not “recently murdered?”

Is THAT the defense that you and you are both trying to present?

I’m sure there are many, many reasons that China’s government has for choosing to keep its North Korean Province in its current condition. But China’s constant claim of “See, we are better off than ‘them’” is by no means the least important. Communism begins and ends with communal THOUGHT. The economics, torture, genocide and all the rest are merely a means of advancing the propaganda — not the other way around.

logis on June 6, 2012 at 10:34 AM