DOJ suddenly interested in FLA voter rolls

posted at 8:01 pm on June 3, 2012 by Jazz Shaw

Our friend Andrew Malcolm, over at Investors Business Daily, highlights an interesting story coming to us from Washington, but involving the Sunshine State. It seems that Florida’s recent efforts to conduct a thorough review of their voter rolls and purge the ineligible or the … er… dead, have drawn the Attorney General. And what might the Department of Justice have to say about this record-keeping audit? Clearly, this has to be stopped.

Washington has ordered Florida to end its effort to remove ineligible voters from the state’s voter rolls. This is breathtaking. It couldn’t be clearer that the government is actively promoting voter fraud.

Somehow, the DOJ has determined that purging illegal voters — felons, noncitizens, the deceased — from the rolls is a violation of the 1965 Voting Rights Act as well as the 1993 National Voter Registration Act. According to the Miami Herald, the department’s lead civil rights attorney, T. Christian Herren Jr., sent the state “a detailed two-page letter” on Thursday demanding that Florida’s elections division shut down its pursuit.

So… it’s a violation of the Voting RIGHTS Act to make sure that everyone voting is actually eligible and has the RIGHT to vote, eh? But if Florida is running around purging a bunch of eligible people from the rolls and depriving them of their fundamental rights, I can understand how Eric Holder would feel the need to intervene. So, Andrew, how many people are being purged from the rolls thus far?

What’s missing from Herren’s complaint is the fact that no one is actually moved off the rolls until they are found to be ineligible. Simply sending names to county elections supervisors to confirm eligibility, which is what Florida officials are doing, discriminates against no one. Either the person is eligible to vote or not.

No one is harassed or summarily tossed off the voter rolls. There is no poll tax or literacy test.

Groups on the left could find “discrimination” on Mars. So of course they declare that Florida’s attempt to certify the integrity of its voter rosters is discriminatory. They lament that requiring the voters in question to prove they are eligible is a burden on voters rather than on government.

Florida has responded, saying they’ll answer Washington in the coming week.

I had pretty much the same discussion with a liberal correspondent on Twitter this weekend and I always find it frustrating. Believe it or not, I understand some of the concerns and fears expressed by people objecting to both voter ID and a review of voter rolls. It’s far too easy for government at any level to attempt to “fix” a problem and wind up making it worse through incompetence or overreach. I would hope that nobody wants to see a Poll Tax imposed on voters or revoke the voting rights of those eligible to participate. But at the same time, could we not all agree that if someone casts a fraudulent vote a crime has been committed? And does the government not have the authority – and obligation – to prevent the commission of said crime? These are the answers I can never seem to get from people crying about Republican efforts to “suppress the vote” or “keep minorities from the polls.”

One last point is that this discussion in Florida highlights a key issue which the various states and the nation will have to address sooner or later. We do a fairly good job of recording citizens who are born, when they enter the work force and where they live. (At least every ten years.) What we don’t seem to have any mechanism for, however, is recording when they die. I’m not sure how we tackle that or how such a process would be viewed in terms of constitutional law. But I’m open to suggestions.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2 3

They know they can not win if it is an honest election, just as O would not have won last time if not for Acorn and Black Panthers. All Holder has to do is prevent an honest election, especially in swings states.

HOOLiBAR6 on June 4, 2012 at 11:21 AM

It’s so blatently obvious what they’re doing. They’re practically anouncing that they intend to cheat. Disgusting the way the LSM gives them a pass on this.

Tomolena1 on June 4, 2012 at 11:34 AM

GWB on June 4, 2012 at 10:18 AM

I just checked Florida’s fees (http://www.flhsmv.gov/DHSMVFees.htm) and a regular ID here is $25. (Same cost for renewal licenses, apparently.) Not sure if it lasts 8 or 9 years, so roughly $3/year or so.

Not a bad price, all in all, but a cost is a cost. Make some voting-only ID if you want, fund it however you want, but make voting free for every “end user” or I’ll not only vote against the measure but probably campaign against it too. (Not from any parsimonious impulse – I paid for my state ID and later driver’s license and fully expect to do so when it’s time to renew – but a fundamental belief that voting in America shouldn’t cost a dime.)

Aquarian on June 4, 2012 at 11:40 AM

As for legitimacy, I would suggest that if you want to be taken seriously about voter ID laws – and it should always be a serious subject in this country – you should push to make State IDs free… either that or some other voting-only ID; whatever y’want so long as legitimate voters can get what they need to exercise their rights without too much hassle. Once you get that established, you can move on to stuff like purging the voter rolls every year/two years/whenever.

Aquarian on June 3, 2012 at 9:22 PM

In case nobody else said it. There’s no such thing as “free”. Either the individual pays for it ($20 – $40 in most states) or we all pay for it thru taxes. Personally it’s not my responsibility to make sure you’re exercising your constitutional rights. (you’re and your used in th elarger collective sense not directed specifically at you aquarian)

StompUDead on June 4, 2012 at 11:52 AM

but a fundamental belief that voting in America shouldn’t cost a dime.)

Aquarian on June 4, 2012 at 11:40 AM

Again, we pay for voting thru taxes. Voting booths, electronic voting machines, paper ballots et al are not free. The ID requirement isn’t a pay to vote, it’s a pay to verify who you are. A pittance considering the damage a fraudulent election could cause

StompUDead on June 4, 2012 at 11:54 AM

“Just look at what is happening to these Florida voter rolls… No, no, wait, not at the Fast and Furious gunwalking!”

socalcon on June 4, 2012 at 12:01 PM

Holder is a racist and a disgrace to the legal profession. His job should be assuring all elections are equal and performed according to the law. That is not how democrats and racists think which is completely obvious. Without racial hatred and class warfare, they have no chance of existing. What makes this more nauseating is the cowards in the GOP allow this actual perversion of the law by the Justice Department go unquestioned. Crybaby Boehner and Eric Cantor are eunuchs that must go.

volsense on June 4, 2012 at 12:08 PM

This man has conviction.

Now, if the House did …

We’d have a conviction.

Joe Mama on June 4, 2012 at 12:17 PM

We do a fairly good job of recording citizens who are born, when they enter the work force and where they live. (At least every ten years.) What we don’t seem to have any mechanism for, however, is recording when they die. I’m not sure how we tackle that or how such a process would be viewed in terms of constitutional law. But I’m open to suggestions.

Dunno how this is/could be used for voter rolls, etc., but have you looked at the SSDI as one source of central info re: deaths?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_Security_Death_Index

cs89 on June 4, 2012 at 12:43 PM

Not a bad price, all in all, but a cost is a cost. Make some voting-only ID if you want, fund it however you want, but make voting free for every “end user” or I’ll not only vote against the measure but probably campaign against it too. (Not from any parsimonious impulse – I paid for my state ID and later driver’s license and fully expect to do so when it’s time to renew – but a fundamental belief that voting in America shouldn’t cost a dime.)

Aquarian on June 4, 2012 at 11:40 AM

Voting costs. It’s just a question of who pays for it. Or, are you one of these people who believe that when the gov’t does something, it is “free”?

The voting apparatus cost money, the locations for voting cost money, preparing the ballots cost money, etc., etc. The idea that it was ever free is among the other nonsense the left throws around with regard to the issue.

And, the idea that obtaining a state photo ID is too costly for some is beyond nonsense. When you have a true and valid point to make, make it – otherwise stop with the absolute and utter nonsense.

Monkeytoe on June 4, 2012 at 1:00 PM

Monkeytoe on June 4, 2012 at 1:00 PM

Regardless, almost every (if not every) voter ID law that has been passed or proposed has allowed for free photo id from the state to those who cannot afford it. So, even if this were a true argument against voter ID laws, it is not a valid one as it was already dealt with.

Again, there is no valid reason to oppose voter id laws. There just is not. The idea that anyone cannot obtain a photo ID is absolute nonsense on stilts.

Thus, that means the left has only a ulterior motive to be against requiring photo identification.

Monkeytoe on June 4, 2012 at 1:04 PM

At this point, the Obama Administration may as well come all the way out of the closet and tell everybody they are in favor of illegal immigration and in favor of unqualified people voting for Democrats in elections – felons, dead people, out-of-state residents, whatever.

Hey, I’m a former resident of Florida and I was registered to vote. If I send a letter by certified mail to my former county board of elections requesting that they eliminate my name from the voter rolls, would they comply with my wishes or would this felonious Holder DOJ order override my request? Just askin’…..

CatchAll on June 4, 2012 at 2:01 PM

I think it’s unbelievable that anyone who claims to support democracy would not be concerned about the process happening in Florida. The government is threatening to deny citizens their most basic democratic right based upon what is clearly a flawed process. This is not theoretical, this is happening. Plenty of eligible voters, including WW2 veterans, have been identified as non-citizens.

The claim in this article that “no one is actually moved off the rolls until they are found to be ineligible” is disingenuous. The way the process works is that a registered voter is sent a letter saying the state believes that they are not an eligible voter, and gives them 30 days to prove their citizenship. If they don’t send sufficient proof in, then they are removed from the voter rolls. The same argument that’s made with regard to voter ID laws can be made here, that this is no huge burden, and anybody should be able to comply. But to me that misses the point. The point is that hurdles are being put in front of our most basic democratic right, in the face of little if any actual evidence that ineligible voters are actually voting.

Chunktronic on June 4, 2012 at 3:58 PM

Some comments on liberal blogs are just hilarious if they weren’t idiotic. Some demand that Holder use US Army to force FL into compliance with his demand.

Time to buy a gun and ammo if you still haven’t.

riddick on June 4, 2012 at 8:13 PM

I took a quick glance at that picture of Holder and all I could think was they had ‘shopped in an image of Emperor Palpatine.

Take a look and see what I mean.

Parabellum on June 4, 2012 at 8:30 PM

Comment pages: 1 2 3