The legend of the Battle Saint

posted at 2:01 pm on May 27, 2012 by Jazz Shaw

While watching the news, I happened across a really nice story which seems appropriate to share on this Memorial Day weekend. It was the tale of Cynthia LeMay, a Georgia resident who, like many, worries about the safety of loved ones and family members serving in harms way, and is reaching out to help them – and every other service member she meets – in the best way she knows how.

She calls herself a ‘combat mom’; a local mother who, like so many families, tries hard to stay connected to loved ones serving in the US armed forces. Although separated by the miles, Cynthia LeMay stays connected with a small token — a simple bracelet designed to offer support from home and above.

The mother of two sons who have served in the military is no stranger at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport in Atlanta. She’s often there passing out her Battle Saint bracelets.

“My son has been wearing it since he went over,” LeMay told a soldier at the airport who was getting ready to depart for his assignment.

The inspiration for the wooden bracelets came after a family gathering two years ago.

“I knew I wanted to do something to make a difference,” LeMay said.

She creates and hands out these wooden bracelets to the troops she meets at the airport getting ready to go overseas. (You can order some at her web site if you wish.) Each one has the pictures of a number of Saints on it, all specifically selected for their significance in protecting warriors going into harm’s way. The full list can be found here, but they include:

  • St Barbara, known as the patron saint of artillerymen, military engineers and those who work with explosives.
  • St Pio of Pietrelcina, known as a symbol of hope to people in the aftermath of WW1.
  • St Michael the Archangel
  • St. Martin of Tours, known as the patron saint of soldiers, chaplains, quartermasters and the cavalry.
  • St Philip Neri, known as the patron saint of the Special Forces.
  • Joan of Arc
  • St Sebastain, known as the patron saint of archers, athletes and soldiers

It’s a great idea, and I’m sure it provides a lot of comfort to service members and their families. Give her site a look and see for yourself. And if you’re looking for something else to do online for the holiday, be sure to check out The Virtual Wall, part of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. It provides a nice tour of the memorial, as well as allowing you to browse or search for names of the fallen and see their names engraved on the wall. Their most recent news updates indicate that ten more names will be added to the list this Memorial Day.


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St Peter, patron saint of paratroopers

ted c on May 27, 2012 at 2:05 PM

what a great cause!

these funds go to support the Center for the Intrepid, a standalone and state of the art rehabilitation facility located at Ft Sam Houston , TX that is co located with the former Brooke Army Medical Center, now renamed San Antonio Military Medical Center.

ted c on May 27, 2012 at 2:07 PM

In the East, Sts. George and Theodore were venerated by the armies of Byzantium.

DRPrice on May 27, 2012 at 2:12 PM

U.S. Bishops Prepare Catholics for Civil Disobedience: ‘We May Need to Witness to the Truth by Resisting the Law’

“Every effort must be made to repeal them,” the bishops say in the document, which is already posted on the website of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. “When fundamental human goods, such as the right of conscience, are at stake, we may need to witness to the truth by resisting the law and incurring its penalties.”

I wonder how a “community organizer” handles being on the receiving end of protests.

J_Crater on May 27, 2012 at 2:16 PM

I wonder how a “community organizer” handles being on the receiving end of protests.

J_Crater on May 27, 2012 at 2:16 PM

I believe it involves a very significant amount of Chooming…

SWalker on May 27, 2012 at 2:21 PM

I’ll pray that Ms. Cynthia LeMay is blessed for her faith.

I know with certainty that miracles happen and they happen through and with the prayers of the faithful, which includes saints, all.

My list of miracles received is lengthy. God hears our prayers and He does honor them from the faithful and the hopeful alike.

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 2:25 PM

…thank you Jazz Shaw!
…I’m not Catholic…and I only remember a few of the Saints and what they represent…but God Bless people like LeMay, the people on Hot Air… and God Bless this country! There is hope for this country!

KOOLAID2 on May 27, 2012 at 2:26 PM

Saint Michael, my thanks.

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 2:26 PM

Thank you, Jazz Shaw, for providing this link.

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 2:38 PM

Thank you Jazz for this wonderful post.

May God bless you Ms. LaMay for your wonderful work for our military.

God please put Your arms around all men, women, and yes even the four legged kind serving our Republic. And please give the families of those serving help with dealing with their absence.
L

letget on May 27, 2012 at 2:41 PM

Was hoping you guys would find it useful. My nephew Danny is in Afghanistan with the Rangers right now. We’re sending him one.

Jazz Shaw on May 27, 2012 at 2:41 PM

Was hoping you guys would find it useful. My nephew Danny is in Afghanistan with the Rangers right now. We’re sending him one.

Jazz Shaw on May 27, 2012 at 2:41 PM

May god bless your nephew and keep him safe Jazz…

SWalker on May 27, 2012 at 2:46 PM

Don’t want to be a wet blanket on this Memorial Day, nor would I want to disparage heartfelt and sincere intentions but, why go through middlemen? The “saints”? A bracelet? Kind of smacks of superstition, no?

Why not go direct?

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:00 PM

Thanks for posting this, Jazz, and may God bless and keep your nephew Danny.

What a beautiful tribute from Cynthia LeMay. This is a great thing she is doing.

In case anyone is interested, this is the St. Michael the Archangel prayer:

Saint Michael the Archangel,
defend us in battle.

Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil.

May God rebuke him, we humbly pray;
and do Thou, O Prince of the Heavenly Host -
by the Divine Power of God – cast into hell,
satan and all the evil spirits, who roam
throughout the world seeking the ruin of souls.

Amen.

In 1994, Pope John Paul II asked that although this prayer is no longer recited at the end of Mass, he asked that everyone not forget it and to recite it to obtain help in the battle against forces of darkness and against the spirit of this world.

I feel a particular urgency to recite this prayer as often as I can for this country and its citizens.

PatriotGal2257 on May 27, 2012 at 3:04 PM

I rotate the candles that I light between St Michael, Patron of Soldiers; St Barbara, Patron of Artillery; and St George, Patron of Armor and Cavalry. I like to think that it helps those serving.

DAT60A3 on May 27, 2012 at 3:04 PM

A Prayer For Those in the Military

Almighty God, we stand before you in supplication,
Asking Your Divine mercy and protection,
To envelop with Your invincible armor,
Our loved ones in all branches of the service.

Give them courage and strength
Against all enemies,
Both spiritual and physical,
And hasten their safe journey,
Back to their homes and families.

If it be Your Holy Will
That they be gathered to Your bosom,
With the eternal vanguard of the saints,
Let their journey to Your everlasting arms
Be swift and painless,
Where they may stand in honor and glory,
Praising You for all eternity. Amen.

RBMN on May 27, 2012 at 3:05 PM

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:00 PM

Here’s a brief explanation of this Catholic belief for you:
The Intercession of the Saints.

PatriotGal2257 on May 27, 2012 at 3:07 PM

There should be something like this for we who do not believe in Catholic “Saints.”

Warner Todd Huston on May 27, 2012 at 3:08 PM

Jazz Shaw on May 27, 2012 at 2:41 PM

You must be very proud. I hope he stays safe!

People like this lady are “saints”. I still have every little silly nick-knack that random strangers handed to me at the airport while wishing us all luck. Some things, like little hand-made quilts, make me get a little “emotional” every time I pick one up again. There is certainly more than one way to serve your country.

I’ll always remember one old lady in particular. I always wished I had asked her name, but I was wasted on painkillers so I never thought to. She gave me a blanket, right off her back if I remember right, because I was shivering on the stretcher as they wheeled us by. I’m pretty sure it was those people in Maine that have been maintaining a presence at the airport since 2001 so no soldier would leave or come home without a welcome. I still have it and I swear that it’s warmer than it should be.

Mord on May 27, 2012 at 3:10 PM

I had a chance to meet Cynthia when she was in Phoenix about a year ago… She gave me a bracelet, which I passed on to my nephew – a pilot in the USAF.

He’s just recently returned from his third deployment to Afghanistan.

Hill60 on May 27, 2012 at 3:10 PM

Don’t want to be a wet blanket on this Memorial Day, nor would I want to disparage heartfelt and sincere intentions but, why go through middlemen? The “saints”? A bracelet? Kind of smacks of superstition, no?

Why not go direct?

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:00 PM

It changes a solitary prayer into a group prayer, and it’s a pretty good group to be praying with. Catholics don’t ask the saints to do anything beyond praying for us, and with us.

RBMN on May 27, 2012 at 3:13 PM

I wonder how a “community organizer” handles being on the receiving end of protests.

J_Crater on May 27, 2012 at 2:16 PM

.
I believe it involves a very significant amount of Chooming…

SWalker on May 27, 2012 at 2:21 PM

.
How much chooming would it take for him to handle a fire-fight in a hostile zone, in combat?

listens2glenn on May 27, 2012 at 3:16 PM

How much chooming would it take for him to handle a fire-fight in a hostile zone, in combat?

listens2glenn on May 27, 2012 at 3:16 PM

For him, I think that’s more a three-day meth jag process.

RBMN on May 27, 2012 at 3:24 PM

Warning ! Very OT !
Abortion Queens husband just won the 500 .
At least my boy TK came in 3rd !

Lucano on May 27, 2012 at 3:29 PM

splink on May 27, 2012 at 3:25 PM

Ain’t freedom of speech grand? :)

PatriotGal2257 on May 27, 2012 at 3:29 PM

Not judging either way, I just find it amusing.

splink on May 27, 2012 at 3:25 PM

I noticed that too. Apparently, many on the political right are very devout. Not really my thing, but you got to admit that they are generally good people. Most of the “atheist” stuff on the front page comes from AP, but I really like having two different ways of being outraged at the same problem.

Mord on May 27, 2012 at 3:31 PM

why go through middlemen? The “saints”? A bracelet? Kind of smacks of superstition, no?

Why not go direct?

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:00 PM

…for companionship. For comradery. The saints — all who have gone on before us in faith and fidelity to God — provide us with living companions, even when our physical senses can’t prove they’re ‘there.’

The prayers are not TO the saints, but appeals for prayers to God. It’s the same thing as asking someone you fellowship with in this lifetime to pray for you. If you believe in eternal life, then you realize that we live on after our physical death and that some of us (in this case, saints in enternity) have particular fondness of prayers for others.

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 3:31 PM

…this is the St. Michael the Archangel prayer:

Saint Michael the Archangel,
defend us in battle.

Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil.

May God rebuke him, we humbly pray;
and do Thou, O Prince of the Heavenly Host -
by the Divine Power of God – cast into hell,
satan and all the evil spirits, who roam
throughout the world seeking the ruin of souls.

Amen.

In 1994, Pope John Paul II asked that although this prayer is no longer recited at the end of Mass, he asked that everyone not forget it and to recite it to obtain help in the battle against forces of darkness and against the spirit of this world.

I feel a particular urgency to recite this prayer as often as I can for this country and its citizens.

PatriotGal2257 on May 27, 2012 at 3:04 PM

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 3:33 PM

why go through middlemen? The “saints”? A bracelet? Kind of smacks of superstition, no?

Why not go direct?

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:00 PM

…for companionship. For comradery. The saints — all who have gone on before us in faith and fidelity to God — provide us with living companions, even when our physical senses can’t prove they’re ‘there.’

The prayers are not TO the saints, but appeals for prayers to God. It’s the same thing as asking someone you fellowship with in this lifetime to pray for you. If you believe in eternal life, then you realize that we live on after our physical death and that some of us (in this case, saints in enternity) have particular fondness of prayers for others.

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 3:31 PM

And in the case of the Archangels, we know they exist because that’s what God’s Word tells us.

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 3:35 PM

Don’t want to be a wet blanket on this Memorial Day, nor would I want to disparage heartfelt and sincere intentions but, why go through middlemen? The “saints”? A bracelet? Kind of smacks of superstition, no?

Why not go direct?

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:00 PM

What’s wrong with backup? :)

arnold ziffel on May 27, 2012 at 3:35 PM

It changes a solitary prayer into a group prayer, and it’s a pretty good group to be praying with. Catholics don’t ask the saints to do anything beyond praying for us, and with us.
RBMN on May 27, 2012 at 3:13 PM

I do note the Biblical precedent for the “saints” interceding for those of us still on this side of eternity (Peter’s promise) but I don’t see any precedent for them hearing us or our invocations in the matter. For that I only see the “direct route”, if you know what I mean.

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:36 PM

What’s wrong with backup? :)
arnold ziffel on May 27, 2012 at 3:35 PM

Heh.

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:37 PM

/kidding

splink on May 27, 2012 at 3:35 PM

HA!

Mord on May 27, 2012 at 3:37 PM

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 3:31 PM

I hear what you’re saying.

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:40 PM

The prayers are not TO the saints, but appeals for prayers to God. It’s the same thing as asking someone you fellowship with in this lifetime to pray for you. If you believe in eternal life, then you realize that we live on after our physical death and that some of us (in this case, saints in enternity) have particular fondness of prayers for others.

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 3:31 PM

I’ve had this discussion with non-catholics before as well. I ask them if they have prayer-cicles (people who pray in groups whom prayers are asked for) and most do. I tell them “the intercession of Saints” is no less the same thing, that we ask the Saints, who are close to God, to pray for us as we would pray for them.

On subject, this is a beautiful gesture, a momento carried by the soldiers in harm’s way that states there are those at home and in heaven who love them and pray for their safety. A great idea.

itsspideyman on May 27, 2012 at 3:41 PM

It changes a solitary prayer into a group prayer, and it’s a pretty good group to be praying with. Catholics don’t ask the saints to do anything beyond praying for us, and with us.
RBMN on May 27, 2012 at 3:13 PM

I do note the Biblical precedent for the “saints” interceding for those of us still on this side of eternity (Peter’s promise) but I don’t see any precedent for them hearing us or our invocations in the matter. For that I only see the “direct route”, if you know what I mean.

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:36 PM

One prays for others, and the prayers are to God for His aid and assistance to them. Asking the Saint or all Saints to also pray for same is what this is. God’s the only Supreme Being, the Creator, Father of us all, including the Saints.

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 3:41 PM

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:36 PM

Some persons now gone before us are more committed in their faith and prayer life for others than the rest of us. If you’ve ever enjoyed the prayers of others on your behalf, then you’ve been visited by “the Saints” spiritually.

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 3:44 PM

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:00 PM

If you don’t want to be a wet blanket, you could try going away.

Dubya Bee on May 27, 2012 at 3:44 PM

Sorry I OT’d on this thread . However , I was half reading and half
praying for my saints to interseed and get a prayer to God .
I always get too nuts at the end of the race to watch or really
watch .
Sorry for the interruption to commentors and Jazz .

Lucano on May 27, 2012 at 3:46 PM

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 3:31 PM

I hear what you’re saying.

Cleombrotus on May 27, 2012 at 3:40 PM

:)

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 3:47 PM

itsspideyman on May 27, 2012 at 3:41 PM

That’s a great way to put it. I’ll have to remember it the next time it comes up.

PatriotGal2257 on May 27, 2012 at 3:52 PM

Thanks for posting this. What a great service this lady is doing for our Military. A good work is always to be honored, no matter the person’s Faith. As she states: “It’s just to provide that little sense of, ‘We’re with you, we’re behind you and thank you for what you’re doing.” This is her way and I’m sure all who receive one of these bracelets appreciate it and the sincere loving thoughts behind it.

In addition to that, just look at the fruit of this lady’s Faith:

these funds go to support the Center for the Intrepid, a standalone and state of the art rehabilitation facility located at Ft Sam Houston , TX that is co located with the former Brooke Army Medical Center, now renamed San Antonio Military Medical Center.

ted c on May 27, 2012 at 2:07 PM

I’ve read that we who stand and pray also serve. This is a good work that we all can participate in!! God Bless those that serve and those that support them.

bluefox on May 27, 2012 at 4:04 PM

Don’t forget Saint James, Santiago in Spanish, The patron Saint of Spain. Tradition has it that he miraculously appeared to fight for the Christian army during the Reconquesta at the battle of Clavijo.
Santiago y cierra España (“St James and strike for Spain”) has been the traditional battle cry of Spanish armies.
“St James, “El Matamoros”, one of the most valiant saints and knights the world ever had … has been given by God to Spain for its patron and protection.” Cervantes, Don Quixote

NM Oso on May 27, 2012 at 4:06 PM

Put your faith in God, gold and guns — in that order.

logis on May 27, 2012 at 4:12 PM

Here’s where I’m confused. Let’s say three devoutly religious conservatives – a lifelong Roman Catholic, a Mormon bishop and a Bible only Protestant pastor – are approached with the idea of joining together in prayer. Each of them KNOWS that, according to his deeply held convictions, the other two guys are not actual Christians (i.e., believers) because they believe a different salvation message than he does

Great question splink. I can only tell you my beliefs, not others. I have this in my own family, my brother went from Catholic to Pentecostal.

In truth, I DON’T KNOW what another person believes. I can’t look into the heart of another and know what God speaks to them. I know what their religions says, but our prayers to God are a very personal reaching to Heaven.

What I believe (and only my opinion) is that God finds many ways to speak to each of us, in ways given our culture and faith that we may understand. When I grab a person of another faith and pray, I pray in sincerity for them to have a fulfilled commitment to God.

I am sure others don’t feel this way. I can’t speak to them. I only know this is the way that I am driven by faith to respond to others who may or may not share my beliefs. I love my brother and I know that I don’t share his faith. But he’s a good person and this is how God has found a way to shape his life.

I’m reminded of Balthasar in “Ben Hur”. I saw this when I was 10, and I remember the passage. Balthasar tells Ben Hur “there are many paths to God”. I believe God finds many ways to touch people, and I accept that it’s possible there are many paths to Him.

itsspideyman on May 27, 2012 at 4:15 PM

splink on May 27, 2012 at 3:59 PM

Wow …

I’m at a loss as to how people put aside their contradictory beliefs of their respective faiths myself. Perhaps part of the miracle of it is that they are able to do so and come together for that higher purpose.

PatriotGal2257 on May 27, 2012 at 4:16 PM

splink on May 27, 2012 at 3:59 PM

You do ask a great question. I don’t have any examples from my own family, but I can tell you that in our community, we’ve had some events and memorials over the years that brought together every church and synagogue in our area to offer as one our prayers in our own ways to God.

Specifically, I recall a memorial my pastor orchestrated the year after the Sept. 11th attacks. All the members of all our area’s churches were invited, as well as the police, fire, EMS personnel and the mayors and other city officials. I belong to a small quartet within my church choir and we sang a hymn that we only ever sing as part of the Good Friday liturgy during Holy Week. We sang the verses and everyone was encouraged to sing the refrain with us. Everyone did. It was beautiful, as was the tribute as a whole.

In other years, we’ve also had community choir events, where every church in our area with a choir presented one or two of their favorite hymns, some of which reflected the specific denomination. That was fun and also humbling, as we got to hear some very good voices, as in, “that person and/or choir should have a recording contract.”

What I’ve always heard as a member of a church choir is that those who sing pray twice. So for those evenings when we sang not only as members of particular churches but as a community, we were all lifting our voices as one to God.

PatriotGal2257 on May 27, 2012 at 4:37 PM

The dead cannot hear our prayers, those in Heaven are focusing on one thing only, worshipping God.

Pray to God/Christ alone. He is more than sufficient.

Ask the living to pray for you to God.

All who are believers and followers of Christ are saints.

The underlying sentiment of this endeavor above I understand, but many Christians will balk at it with doctrinal and theological reasoning.

Logus on May 27, 2012 at 4:47 PM

I assume you know what I’m talking about here so if you can explain the reasoning that seeks to get around the (what would seem to me to be) inevitable cognitive dissonance I’ve described above, I’m all ears. Thanks…

splink on May 27, 2012 at 3:59 PM

Well, when I have difficult questions and issues, I search the Scriptures. And I always defer to the Lord and His Word.

“Judge not according to the appearance, but judge righteous judgement.” Jn 7:24
“For the Lord seeth not as man seeth; for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart.”
“For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, saith the Lord.”

We are to judge the fruit, but the Lord judges the thoughts and the heart of man and motive. Any man can pray, but it is the Lord that makes the judgement on how He answers.

That’s how I look at it anyway:-)

bluefox on May 27, 2012 at 4:49 PM

I’m no believer, but I do hope her gifts provide comfort to our men and women in uniform. It’s s nice gesture and I thank her for it.

MJBrutus on May 27, 2012 at 5:38 PM

Pray to God/Christ alone. He is more than sufficient.

Ask the living to pray for you to God.

All who are believers and followers of Christ are saints.

Logus on May 27, 2012 at 4:47 PM

Pray to God/Christ alone. He is more than sufficient.

– That is, indeed, what most here have been saying and reiterating.

Ask the living to pray for you to God.

– “(We) are alive in Christ Jesus.”
That doesn’t have a time limit on it.

All who are believers and followers of Christ are saints.

– Yes, indeed, and the saints have received eternal life. Not death.

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 7:37 PM

Lourdes on May 27, 2012 at 7:37 PM

As you avoid the elephant in the room, praying to Saints.

A quick perusal of Catholic sites and Catholic prayers to/for Saints specifically states/calls it “praying to Saint X” and within the body of the prayer, making promises to said Saint and asking that Saint to intercede in fellow prayer for the petitioner.

There is only one intercessor. And yes, while we are alive spiritually in Christ forever, once we leave this mortal coil, our concerns will not be with anything on this earth except possibly in remembrance – as Revelation infers – but certainly not in “real” time as if we can hear or see the living, much less them calling out to us.

On the whole I’ve come a long way from where I used to stand as a young believer. I used to not believe any Catholics were really Christians. Time and a bit of common sense has mellowed me, but there’s still plenty about Catholicism that theologically does not sit well, if not run contrary to a lot of core Christian theology.

Be that as it may, I’ve said my peace. We worship and follow the same Lord.

Logus on May 27, 2012 at 9:23 PM

One day I come to HA and it’s an (apparently) atheist-leaning site. Next day, it promotes Catholic traditions. Not judging either way, I just find it amusing.
splink on May 27, 2012 at 3:25 PM

I noticed that too. Apparently, many on the political right are very devout. Not really my thing, but you got to admit that they are generally good people. Most of the “atheist” stuff on the front page comes from AP, but I really like having two different ways of being outraged at the same problem.
Mord on May 27, 2012 at 3:31 PM

The ideals that unite us are greater than the practices that divide us.

AesopFan on May 27, 2012 at 10:05 PM

RBMN on May 27, 2012 at 3:05 PM

Your posted Prayer reminded me of the song by Disturbed: Indestructible

John Kettlewell on May 27, 2012 at 11:58 PM

oh and if you look up the song on youtube, make sure you choose lyrics

John Kettlewell on May 27, 2012 at 11:59 PM

The dead cannot hear our prayers, those in Heaven are focusing on one thing only, worshipping God.

Logus on May 27, 2012 at 4:47 PM

You are wrong. The saints are very attentive to our prayers. And it is because they are in perpetual worship. St. Paul says, “Imitate me, as I imitate Christ.” St. Paul was constantly praying for his flock during his life and ministry, because he loved her as Christ loves the Church. Why would that change now that he is in heaven? Not only does it not change, but it surely is even more true. Paul’s (and any saint’s) imitation of Christ is fully perfected in heaven. So if Christ hears our prayers and presents them to the Father, surely the Saints in heaven do to as they continue to imitate Our Lord. Beyond that, if I’m not mistaken, Paul also says in one of the epistles, that it will be better for his flock if he should die because his prayers will be more efficacious. Hopefully someone knows which chapter and verse that is.

Goldenavatar on May 28, 2012 at 10:06 AM

A story about St Michael.
I found this story when my kid was in training to become a combat corpsman.
Be forewarned have a hankie.
http://www.tldm.org/News10/MarineNamedMichael.htm

The words to taps.

Day is done, gone the sun,
From the hills, from the lake,
From the sky.
All is well, safely rest,
God is nigh.
Go to sleep, peaceful sleep,
May the soldier or sailor,
God keep.
On the land or the deep,
Safe in sleep.
Love, good night, Must thou go,
When the day, And the night
Need thee so?
All is well. Speedeth all
To their rest.
Fades the light; And afar
Goeth day, And the stars
Shineth bright,
Fare thee well; Day has gone,
Night is on.
Thanks and praise, For our days,
‘Neath the sun, Neath the stars,
‘Neath the sky,
As we go, This we know,
God is nigh.

Thank you to the families of those that gave all.
And to end on an up note.
The Warrior Song.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTs6a0ORdQU
For me its very motivating.

ColdWarrior57 on May 28, 2012 at 11:05 AM

In before “I’m more Christian than you are” posts get entirely out of hand. On Memorial Day.

Caustic Conservative on May 28, 2012 at 11:50 AM

Love the idea. However, no mention of St. George? He is the patron saint for soldiers and was my son’s confirmation name for that reason. I know you can’t put them all on there, but just struck me as odd as it’s who I pray to for keeping soldiers safe.

tammyloc on May 29, 2012 at 12:27 AM