Open thread: Lugargeddon; Update: Mourdock wins; Update: Lugar hits Mourdock’s “unrelenting partisan mindset”; Update: NC bans gay marriage and civil unions; Update: Massive GOP turnout for Scott Walker; Update: Obama facing stiff challenge in WV from … federal inmate

posted at 5:21 pm on May 8, 2012 by Allahpundit

The polls in Indiana close promptly at 6 p.m. ET. If you believe the latest numbers, we’ll get a call sooner rather than later. How did it come to this? WaPo:

At the start of 2011, Lugar met with senior party strategists who walked him through the mistakes made by the likes of Murkowski and Bennett — and emphasized how he too was vulnerable unless he took a far more aggressive approach to the possibility of a primary fight. Lugar chose not to heed those warnings.

Instead, the senator seemed to believe — wrongly — that his situation was unique, that his connection to voters in the Hoosier State went deeper and was, therefore, tougher to break than those of his losing colleagues…

“Conventional wisdom is that he should have gone nuclear early, but that would have killed him out of the gate,” said one Republican strategist who has worked in the state and is sympathetic to the incumbent. “Indiana would simply not have accepted that from him.”

The other problem for Lugar, according to the source, was that there was never a clean hit available on Mourdock that matched the incumbent’s support for the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP), his votes on judges, nagging residency questions, and, yes, the friendliness between him and President Obama. (Lugar has been floated as a possible Defense Secretary in the Obama Administration.)

Contrast Lugar’s lackadaisical approach with Orrin Hatch’s aggressive backstage maneuvering to make sure this year’s Utah GOP convention was more favorably disposed to him than the last one was to Bob Bennett. The result: Lugar’s headed for retirement while Hatch came within a whisker of clinching the nomination outright and will probably win the runoff against Dan Liljenquist. Assuming it plays out that way, the conventional wisdom among Republican incumbents will be set in cement. From now on, if you see a tea-party challenge coming, you follow the McCain/Hatch approach and confront it proactively and expeditiously. There’ll be no more Bennetts or Lugars who get caught napping in the primary; from now on, everyone’s awake. I’m not sure how grassroots conservatives will counter that but I’d bet on a bigger role for outfits like FreedomWorks and the rise of tea-party Super PACs which can aggregate funds and launch damaging broadsides against incumbents before they’ve consolidated a lead against their primary opponents.

As for why a nice man like Dick Lugar needs to be retired, James Antle sums it up:

Peggy Noonan also stressed family ties when making the case for sending Lugar back to the Senate: “What Washington needs is sober and responsible adults.” Noonan didn’t disclose who the children were in this relationship.

But it is the sober and responsible adults who have accumulated a national debt larger than the country’s economy. There are two ways to demonstrate one’s sobriety and responsibility in Washington: to be as supportive of druken sailor-style fiscal irresponsibility as possible or to be as timid as possible in opposition to it.

Over in the Greenroom, Karl reminds Noonan that she seemed to have a handle on this logic not so long ago. Simply put, if you’re bracing for a brutal political war over sustainability in the age of entitlements, you’re probably not going to get much from a genial grandfatherly type whose tenure has seen more than $14 trillion added in federal debt. (Same goes for Hatch, do note.) More from Dan McLaughlin:

As I’ve noted before, besides the various ideological and cultural divides within the GOP, a core dividing line is over a sense of urgency to contain the runaway growth of federal spending and the reach of the federal government. It is difficult to picture Lugar and Hatch, as a pair of courtly octogenarians, having the necessary energy not only to seek what is apt to be a difficult partisan confrontation over these issues, but to put pressure on a president from their own party. And while Utah voters will surely be excited to go to the polls for Romney, conservative voters in other states like Indiana will need more encouragement – not yet another message that the establishment has shut them out. That’s good news in Ohio, where a fresh face (State Treasurer Josh Mandel) is on the ballot facing accused wife-beater Sherrod Brown; it may be more difficult to manage in some other races. And building a critical mass of such candidates (Mandel, Liljenquist, Mourdock, Ted Cruz in Texas, Jeff Flake in Arizona, Don Stenberg in Nebraska, Mark Neumann in Wisconsin, possibly a few others who haven’t proven themselves just yet) will make it easier to convince conservatives nationwide that even with Romney at the top, and even with some Senate races where we are resigned to moderates (Dean Heller, Scott Brown, Linda Lingle) or establishment-minded conservatives (George Allen), the party has not completely lost touch with the lessons of its victories in 2010.

Beyond all of this, on a gut level, the careerism evinced by an 80-year-old pleading for one more term in the Senate after serving 36 years is simply grotesque. (Again, same goes for Hatch.) I used to oppose term limits on grounds that the people should be fully free to choose their representatives but over time I’ve come to think the greater danger than slightly limiting their choices is letting a permanent political class calcify. If you want bold solutions to grave national problems, one surefire way to encourage them is to free politicians from reelection considerations. Give ‘em two terms in the Senate and, let’s say, six in the House and you might finally see some movement on entitlements. Might.

Here’s the Google Elections page for tracking results. Two other important races tonight. First, in Wisconsin, Democrats will choose a recall challenger for Scott Walker. Labor’s candidate is Kathleen Falk but Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett is favored; the contest is bitter enough that a post-election party unity rally has been canceled, so sit back and enjoy as Trumka and his pals in Wisconsin fume. The other big contest is the North Carolina vote that would ban gay marriage — and civil unions. If the last poll is right, the vote won’t be close: It’s 55/39 in favor of the ban in a state O won in 2008, which helps explain why he’s keeping his head down on this subject this week. Gallup’s out with a new gay-marriage poll today too showing 50 percent support nationally versus 48 percent opposition, but the key is the demographics. Greg Sargent:

It’s been widely reported that Obama fears coming out for marriage equality because it could alienate culturally conservative Dems and independents in swing states. Perhaps, but sizable majorities of moderates and independents support it, making Obama’s stance all the more mystifying (though no one believes he actually opposes it).

That said, there is one other interesting data point: Gallup tells me that non-college voters oppose gay marriage by 56-43. This appears to include African Americans, but it also suggests blue collar whites — a demographic Obama has alienated and needs to win back — risk getting put off over the issue. (Incidentally, as Molly Ball points out, non-whites oppose gay marriage in almost exactly the same proportions as the rest of Americans do.)

That’s why President Gutsy Call makes his flack go out to the podium and give ridiculous non-answers like this. The polls in Carolina close at 7:30 ET. Stand by for updates, needless to say.

Update: Looks like the Google Elections link I gave you is following the by-now-meaningless presidential primary results. For Lugar/Mourdock returns, click here.

Update: That didn’t take long. Lugar’s Senate career is over.

NBC News has declared Richard Mourdock as the projected winner in the Indiana Senate primary. Mourdock defeated Republican foreign policy elder statesman Sen. Richard Lugar…

Looking toward the November election, National Republican Senatorial Committee chairman Sen. John Cornyn of Texas said two weeks ago that “it will probably make it more of a contest if Sen. Lugar is not the nominee, but I’m confident we’ll hold the seat.”

Not such a good night for this guy either, huh?

Update: What now for Lugar, then? He’s eager to work for another six years despite his advanced age, but he hasn’t been a private-sector guy for a long, long time. He’s friends with Obama so presumably The One will appoint him to something. Any ambassadorships open? Forget Pakistan; I mean something less stressful.

Update: Go figure that a careerist would turn bitter when finally forced to answer to his constituents.

Of Mourdock, Lugar says: “His embrace of an unrelenting partisan mindset is irreconcilable with my philosophy of governance.”

More:

Lugar: “Our political system is losing its ability to explore alternatives. … Voters will be electing a slate of inflexible positions.”

Jonah Goldberg joked earlier on Twitter that they’ll be wearing funeral attire tomorrow on “Morning Joe.” He’s only half-kidding: Prepare for a solid day’s worth of truly insufferable media navel-gazing about the “loss of moderation” and tea-party “radicalism,” yadda yadda yadda.

Update: Philip Klein sees the value in sending a message to Romney:

Any elected Republican that doesn’t pursue a small government agenda once in office risks suffering the same fate as Lugar. Had Lugar hung on, then a lot of people would have dismissed the Tea Party as a passing fad from 2010. But now it’s clear that the movement has been underestimated once again. Tea Partiers have a lot more staying power than skeptics expected.

With the Republican presidential nomination going to the ideologically malleable Mitt Romney, supporters of limited government have recognized that their best hope for advancing the conservative agenda rests on the ability to elect as many principled conservatives to Congress as possible. That is, lawmakers who will be willing to fight for smaller government even if it means standing up to a president of their own party. The more victories the Tea Party racks up, the greater the chance that Romney will be forced to govern as a limited government conservative if elected, even if his natural inclination is to migrate to the left.

Update: Very curious. Looks like the prepared statement that Lugar released earlier was much more critical of Mourdock than the remarks he ended up delivering. Compare and contrast. Maybe his speechwriters drafted something and he thought it was too bitter? Here’s the relevant passage from the prepared remarks:

He and I share many positions, but his embrace of an unrelenting partisan mindset is irreconcilable with my philosophy of governance and my experience of what brings results for Hoosiers in the Senate. In effect, what he has promised in this campaign is reflexive votes for a rejectionist orthodoxy and rigid opposition to the actions and proposals of the other party. His answer to the inevitable roadblocks he will encounter in Congress is merely to campaign for more Republicans who embrace the same partisan outlook. He has pledged his support to groups whose prime mission is to cleanse the Republican party of those who stray from orthodoxy as they see it…

I don’t remember a time when so many topics have become politically unmentionable in one party or the other. Republicans cannot admit to any nuance in policy on climate change. Republican members are now expected to take pledges against any tax increases. For two consecutive Presidential nomination cycles, GOP candidates competed with one another to express the most strident anti-immigration view, even at the risk of alienating a huge voting bloc. Similarly, most Democrats are constrained when talking about such issues as entitlement cuts, tort reform, and trade agreements. Our political system is losing its ability to even explore alternatives. If fealty to these pledges continues to expand, legislators may pledge their way into irrelevance. Voters will be electing a slate of inflexible positions rather than a leader.

I hope that as a nation we aspire to more than that.

Update: As expected, North Carolina’s initiative to ban all forms of same-sex unions wins in a romp. Probably won’t hear too much more about gay marriage from Joe Biden during this campaign.

Update: How’s this for a beautiful result? Count the vote totals — and remember that the Democratic primary was the one being hotly contested while its GOP counterpart was a walkover:

Walker’s banked considerably more votes than Barrett and Falk combined. Message sent.

Update: And at last, we arrive at the most surreal story of the night. I think we can go ahead and put West Virginia in the Romney column for November:

With 60-odd percent of the vote counted in West Virginia’s Democratic primary, a man named Keith Judd can make a unique claim. He has won a greater proportion of the vote — almost 40 percent — than any other primary candidate running against Barack Obama.

Who’s Keith Judd? He’s prisoner #11593-051, currently serving out a sentence for making threats at the University of New Mexico.

With 74 percent reporting in West Virginia, Obama leads Judd 60/40. Inmate #11593-051 may end up winning a delegate.

Update: Jon Gabriel tweets, “It’ll be ironic if Eric Holder ends up being Keith Judd’s cellmate.”

Update: You ready for this? Joe Manchin refuses to say whether he voted for Obama in the Democratic primary in West Virginia.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2 3 12

Lugar lugar lugar you just wouldn’t listen would ya

cmsinaz on May 8, 2012 at 5:25 PM

Here’s hoping Indiana voters spit Lugie out.

Doughboy on May 8, 2012 at 5:25 PM

RINO hunt! No tag limit!!!

pseudonominus on May 8, 2012 at 5:27 PM

I like those term limits Allah

cmsinaz on May 8, 2012 at 5:27 PM

Adios Mo Fo!

bhawknine on May 8, 2012 at 5:27 PM

“Lugargeddon”

Isn’t that one of those German liqueurs with flakes of radioactive platinum in it or something?

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on May 8, 2012 at 5:28 PM

“nice man”? You sound like Noonan.
Lugar is an arrogant, pompous, self-interested old man. He should have left the stage long ago.
We need to a new set of “senior party strategists” as well.

GaltBlvnAtty on May 8, 2012 at 5:29 PM

“Lugargeddon”

That sounds like the sound one would make clearing one’s throat.

TigerPaw on May 8, 2012 at 5:29 PM

Holding fire to the feet of our representatives, one at a time. Go Mourdock

nobar on May 8, 2012 at 5:30 PM

Contrast Lugar’s lackadaisical approach

I live in Indiana, allahpundit, and think you have a poor word choice here…

Lugar probably didn’t think he’d seriously get turned out of office, but he’s been on the attack for a while. IMO, his problem isn’t that he didn’t attack early & hard enough: it’s that he A. has a record that is now to the left of Indiana voters, and seems to have lost connection to the issues here, and B. his ads have been largely negative, mudslinging attacks rather than highlighting positive accomplishments he has made recently (if he did anything?)

In particular, the ad with the lady saying if Lugar loses, “heaven help us, ’cause Mourdock won’t” is especially annoying.

I enjoyed voting for Mourdock today, I must say!

Just my $0.02.

cs89 on May 8, 2012 at 5:30 PM

Beyond all of this, on a gut level, the careerism evinced by an 80-year-old pleading for one more term in the Senate after serving 36 years is simply grotesque.

Got something against ridiculous old buttknockers?

:P

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on May 8, 2012 at 5:31 PM

Remember: The Tea Party is supposed to be dead. /snark

Give ‘em two terms in the Senate and, let’s say, six in the House…

I’ve been arguring this to people I know and they seem to like it. Gives them time to do something, while limiting their time in office.

BigGator5 on May 8, 2012 at 5:31 PM

Sacred Cows only live in India. NOT Indiana.

portlandon on May 8, 2012 at 5:32 PM

The tea party is dead. Right? Or running out of steam, according to Salamander.

Let me know how bad Lugar gets beat. I hope he screams like a girl.

platypus on May 8, 2012 at 5:33 PM

Gird your loins for “tantrum throwing” and “right wing extremist takeover” memes from the Beltway-media axis.

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on May 8, 2012 at 5:33 PM

Term limits…

d1carter on May 8, 2012 at 5:34 PM

I got my chance to vote today in NC! Woo Hoo!

I voted for Romney (of course), McCrory for Gov (I think our state’s about to trade up) and against the moronic marriage amendment.

MJBrutus on May 8, 2012 at 5:35 PM

May the voters do their thing to tell the good ole boy r’s in dc, we need new blood to help our Republic!
L

letget on May 8, 2012 at 5:35 PM

Give ‘em two terms in the Senate and, let’s say, six in the House and you might finally see some movement on entitlements.

Sounds like a winner to me…

d1carter on May 8, 2012 at 5:36 PM

Obama fears coming out for marriage equality because it could alienate culturally conservative Dems and independents in swing states.

name one Greg, there is no culturally conservative dem Obama could possibly drive away at this point

DanMan on May 8, 2012 at 5:37 PM

I used to oppose term limits on grounds that the people should be fully free to choose their representatives but over time I’ve come to think the greater danger than slightly limiting their choices is letting a permanent political class calcify. If you want bold solutions to grave national problems, one surefire way to encourage them is to free politicians from reelection considerations. Give ‘em two terms in the Senate and, let’s say, six in the House and you might finally see some movement on entitlements. Might.

I am moving this direction on term limits also. Its time.

Bmore on May 8, 2012 at 5:38 PM

Lugar lugar lugar you just wouldn’t listen would ya

cmsinaz on May 8, 2012 at 5:25 PM

That was exactly the problem.

He doesn’t think he needs to define or explain his policy positions because he’s just too far above the hoi polloi to waste his time explaining himself.

jaime on May 8, 2012 at 5:38 PM

letting a permanent political class calcify.

AP’s fine tuned and observant misanthropy.

the_nile on May 8, 2012 at 5:38 PM

Remember seeing on HA about a year ago Lugar telling the Tea Party to bring it on. Careful what you wish for.

msupertas on May 8, 2012 at 5:39 PM

Got something against ridiculous old buttknockers?
:P
Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on May 8, 2012 at 5:31 PM

If I said you had a beautiful CulchaVulcha would you hold it against me?

(I admit it-that’s probably reaching back to Vaudeville)

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on May 8, 2012 at 5:39 PM

Man, I hope he loses.

His viewpoint is an ossified one from decades ago.

I would take a Democrat in his seat this election, just to get him out of there, so we can eject the Democrat next time.

Part of fixing Congress is going to be ejecting the dinosaurs who have allowed the Dems to bankrupt us.

Next target: Mitch McConnell.

McConnell must go, if we are to restore Congress.

He is a huge part of the problem and will never, ever, at his age, be part of the solution.

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 5:39 PM

Put a stake in him. The guy’s been dead for 20 years.
Randy

williars on May 8, 2012 at 5:40 PM

Bob Beckel does not like Mourdock…so there’s that.

d1carter on May 8, 2012 at 5:40 PM

the careerism evinced by an 80-year-old pleading for one more term in the Senate after serving 36 years is simply grotesque.

Once they grab hold of The Precious it makes Smeagols of them all.

Bruno Strozek on May 8, 2012 at 5:41 PM

Obama’s favourite Republican!

How long till the polls close?

Valkyriepundit on May 8, 2012 at 5:41 PM

In particular, the ad with the lady saying if Lugar loses, “heaven help us, ’cause Mourdock won’t” is especially annoying.

I enjoyed voting for Mourdock today, I must say!

Just my $0.02.

cs89 on May 8, 2012 at 5:30 PM

Rush played it on his show today, hurl inducing rot.
Does anyone have a link.
I’ll go look.

MontanaMmmm on May 8, 2012 at 5:41 PM

I find the various polls on on gay marriage seen to have results different than actual elections. Seems the results of polls may receive some sort of political correct responses. I might tend to view the various election results as more accurate.

DVPTexFla on May 8, 2012 at 5:42 PM

In to the NC vote on gay marriage, Ryan T. Anderson over at “The Corner” at NRO takes issue with the word ban and how the argument is mis-framed by the media and pundits.

How we talk about an issue affects how we think about it. Consider the language we use about marriage. A Fox News headline reads: “North Carolina voters take up amendment banning gay marriage.”

So what’s the problem? Framing. Today’s vote in North Carolina is not about banning anything. Nothing will be made illegal as a result. In all fifty states across the nation two people of the same sex can live together, have their religious community bless their union, and have their workplace offer them various joint benefits — if the religious communities and workplaces in question so desire. Many liberal houses of worship and progressive businesses have voluntarily decided to do so. There’s nothing illegal about this. There’s no ban on it.

What’s at issue is whether the government will recognize such unions as marriages — and then force every citizen and business to do so as well. This isn’t the legalization of something, this is the coercion and compulsion of others to recognize and affirm same-sex unions as marriages.

onlineanalyst on May 8, 2012 at 5:43 PM

I find the various polls on on gay marriage seen to have results different than actual elections. Seems the results of polls may receive some sort of political correct responses. I might tend to view the various election results as more accurate.

That’s called “The Bradley Effect”.

Much like I expect Obama to poll better than he’ll do come election day 2012, especially since his core constituencies aren’t known for high turnout.

teke184 on May 8, 2012 at 5:44 PM

He’ll be on the Sunday shows telling the marxist hosts how he was about to leave the Repubs anyway cause they’re way to extreme for him. Fricking loser. Don’t let the door hit ya where the good Lord split ya.

msupertas on May 8, 2012 at 5:44 PM

Not that it’s ever less than great, but when the election season dawns on the horizon AP’s writing takes on an awesome quality.

jaime on May 8, 2012 at 5:44 PM

Or should I say a quality of awesomeness? I don’t know.

jaime on May 8, 2012 at 5:45 PM

My specific problem with McConnell?

We have an unprecedented situation in which the U.S. Senate has refused to pass a budget for THREE YEARS!

McConnell, as MINORITY LEADER, has enough votes to do something about that unprecedented, UNCONSTITUTIONAL situation!

The fact that he has not been able to get Harry Reid off the dime means, to me, that he is the most disgraceful Republican in Congress, and that, adiitionally, he actually may be in cynical collusion.

McConnell must be shown the door, with a boot mark on his seat.

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 5:46 PM

Lugar, in Spanish, means place.

Your place, Sen. Lugar, is at home now. You have sucked at the taxpayers’ teet for way too long.

All incontinents to go home, and most all from the Congress too, in Nov. Otherwise the land will not survive in its recent former status.

65% told Rasmussen that their chidren will NOT be better off than they are.

I always question the rest of them. They must be doped, drunk, or occupiers.

Schadenfreude on May 8, 2012 at 5:46 PM

Lugars Social Security Scare AdYikes.

MontanaMmmm on May 8, 2012 at 5:46 PM

First.

Because I’ll be busy later.

Bishop on May 8, 2012 at 5:46 PM

“nice man”? You sound like Noonan.
Lugar is an arrogant, pompous, self-interested old man. He should have left the stage long ago.
We need to a new set of “senior party strategists” as well.

GaltBlvnAtty on May 8, 2012 at 5:29 PM

That remark is worth repeating. These Old Bulls like Lugar and Hatch have gotten too comfortable in their Kollegiality Klub and have forgotten that their primary responsibilities are to the Constitution, their states, and their constituents.

onlineanalyst on May 8, 2012 at 5:47 PM

He’s been a good senator in the past, but the guy has grown out of touch with his constituency, and some of the values we all share. Regardless if he loses, we should look back with fondness on his career.

It’s time for him to go, and bring in new blood.

rubberneck on May 8, 2012 at 5:48 PM

Lugar: The Incontinent Truth

DrStock on May 8, 2012 at 5:49 PM

Nah nah nah nah nah! Nah nah nah nah nah! Heeeeeyy-eeyyy-eyyyy, goo-ood-bye!

Stoic Patriot on May 8, 2012 at 5:49 PM

First.

Because I’ll be busy later.

Bishop on May 8, 2012 at 5:46 PM

You Chit Chatter, you should be banned outright, I say outright.:)

MontanaMmmm on May 8, 2012 at 5:49 PM

If I said you had a beautiful CulchaVulcha would you hold it against me?

(I admit it-that’s probably reaching back to Vaudeville)

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on May 8, 2012 at 5:39 PM

Sounds erotic.

msupertas on May 8, 2012 at 5:49 PM

President Gutsy Call

Teh Awesome

ladyingray on May 8, 2012 at 5:51 PM

Lugars Social Security Scare AdYikes.

MontanaMmmm on May 8, 2012 at 5:46 PM

1001 reasons to throw him out.

This alone w/b enough to do it.

Schadenfreude on May 8, 2012 at 5:51 PM

Peggy Noonan also stressed family ties when making the case for sending Lugar back to the Senate: “What Washington needs is sober and responsible adults.”

What Washington needs is term limits for Congress.

Those family ties Ms. Noonan advocates more often than not become incestuous in the perpetual incumbency culture within the Beltway.

MessesWithTexas on May 8, 2012 at 5:52 PM

Skim this, while you wait. It’s a great short read.

“Toto, I have a feeling we’re not in Kansas anymore,” Dorothy says in “The Wizard of Oz.” Barack Obama might have had the same sensation this weekend when, in his first official campaign event at the Schottenstein Center at Ohio State, Obama spoke to a crowd of 14,000 in a center that fits 20,000. “There were,” according to the Toledo Blade, “a lot of empty seats.” This happened despite the fact that Obama volunteers worked feverishly to gin up a crowd.

“Axelrod, I have a feeling we’re not in 2008 anymore,” Obama might have thought.

Schadenfreude on May 8, 2012 at 5:52 PM

(I admit it-that’s probably reaching back to Vaudeville)

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on May 8, 2012 at 5:39 PM

Careful, sir. I have seltzer bottles and deadly aim!

;)

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on May 8, 2012 at 5:52 PM

Mitch McConnell is a born and bred political animal. Even his major in college was Political Science, back when that was the equivalent of underwater basket weaving.

He has never known anything other than political power.

He served active duty for one month.

Frat president, yadda yadda.

Mitch McConnell is a spectacular failure, and represents the failed Congress.

He must go.

Link

Addison Mitchell “Mitch” McConnell, Jr. (born February 20, 1942), a Republican, is the senior United States Senator from Kentucky and the Minority Leader.[2] He is the longest serving U.S. Senator in Kentucky history.[3]
Contents

McConnell was born in Tuscumbia, Alabama to Julia (née Shockley) and Addison Mitchell McConnell.[4]

McConnell was raised in southern Louisville, Kentucky, where he attended the duPont Manual High School, and in 1964 he graduated with honors from the University of Louisville with a B.A. in political science. He was student body president and a member of the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity. McConnell has maintained strong ties to his alma mater, and “remains a rabid fan of its sports teams.”[5] He graduated in 1967 from the University of Kentucky College of Law, where he was elected president of the Student Bar Association.

McConnell became a member of the 100th Division (Training), U.S. Army Reserve, in Louisville, Kentucky, during his final semester of law school; and he reported for his six months of active service, primarily for training, in July 1967. After induction at Fort Knox, Kentucky, McConnell was released early from his active-duty military service in August 1967.[6] McConnell received a medical discharge for optic neuritis, which is a common manifestation of multiple sclerosis.[7]
Early political career

In 1967, to gain experience on Capitol Hill, during his final semester of law school, McConnell was an intern for Senator John Sherman Cooper (R-KY). Later, he was an assistant to Senator Marlow Cook (R-KY) and was a Deputy Assistant Attorney General under President Gerald R. Ford. From 1978 until his election to the Senate, he was the Jefferson County Judge/Executive, the former top political office in Jefferson County, Kentucky, which includes Louisville. However, Louisville and certain small cities were not under the County Judge’s jurisdiction during that time.
U.S. Senate

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 5:53 PM

As a Hoosier, I’m hoping that Mourdock knocks off Lugar and by a healthy margin at that. All of representatives need to be reminded that they are in fact vulnerable if they lose sight of what their representatives want. On a side note, I met Lugar at a 10k race last year (Dick Lugar 10k Race) and he didn’t look anything like I expected. He’s a very short man and his face didn’t match his physique at all. Had to have the whitest teeth I’ve ever seen. Nice guy though, he did pose for a pic with my son.

volnation on May 8, 2012 at 5:53 PM

jaime on May 8, 2012 at 5:38 PM

yepper

cmsinaz on May 8, 2012 at 5:53 PM

Just a thought: There is no need for a constitutional amendment to ban congressional pensions, while there would be for term limits. Banning pensions might accomplish the same goal, that of having citizen legislators instead of lifelong overlords, and be easier to enact.

Vashta.Nerada on May 8, 2012 at 5:54 PM

Beyond all of this, on a gut level, the careerism evinced by an 80-year-old pleading for one more term in the Senate after serving 36 years is simply grotesque. (Again, same goes for Hatch.) I used to oppose term limits on grounds that the people should be fully free to choose their representatives but over time I’ve come to think the greater danger than slightly limiting their choices is letting a permanent political class calcify.

- Allahpundit

Amen and Amen, brother.

Jaibones on May 8, 2012 at 5:54 PM

Schadenfreude on May 8, 2012 at 5:51 PM

I agree!!..It is time for Lugar to go..:)

Dire Straits on May 8, 2012 at 5:54 PM

Bishop on May 8, 2012 at 5:46 PM

you’re da man!

cmsinaz on May 8, 2012 at 5:54 PM

that his situation was unique, that his connection to voters in the Hoosier State went deeper

Pfft! There’s a whole generation of Hoosiers who just now woke up and started asking, “OK, we’ve been voting for you all our lives, sometimes because you were the only guy on the ballot, but who are you?” And when he answered by attacking the Tea Parties, they didn’t like his answer.

PerceptorII on May 8, 2012 at 5:55 PM

Assuming it plays out that way, the conventional wisdom among Republican incumbents will be set in cement. From now on, if you see a tea-party challenge coming, you follow the McCain/Hatch approach and confront it proactively and expeditiously. There’ll be no more Bennetts or Lugars who get caught napping in the primary; from now on, everyone’s awake.

Maybe, just maybe, these bastinos will work hard doing their jobs, instead of working hard at keeping their jobs.

The former provides the latter. But not vice versa.

BobMbx on May 8, 2012 at 5:55 PM

I used to oppose term limits on grounds that the people should be fully free to choose their representatives but over time I’ve come to think the greater danger than slightly limiting their choices is letting a permanent political class calcify. If you want bold solutions to grave national problems, one surefire way to encourage them is to free politicians from reelection considerations. Give ‘em two terms in the Senate and, let’s say, six in the House and you might finally see some movement on entitlements. Might.

I am moving this direction on term limits also. Its time.

Bmore on May 8, 2012 at 5:38 PM

My family and I moved to Hawai’i in 1963. 2 years after O’bama claims to have been born there.

The same guy who was a Senator then is still a Senator now.

All you need to know.

Del Dolemonte on May 8, 2012 at 5:56 PM

since its just 3pm, a little coca-cola to start with
*clink*

cmsinaz on May 8, 2012 at 5:56 PM

“… you’re probably not going to get much from a genial grandfatherly type whose tenure has seen more than $14 trillion added in federal debt.”

Maybe someone should ask Lugar how his Grandchildren are going to pay that back…?

Seven Percent Solution on May 8, 2012 at 5:56 PM

I hope Mourdock cleans Lugar’s clock, and if he does, I hope that other incumbent Republican fossils think long and hard about the prospect of the same thing happening to them.

AZCoyote on May 8, 2012 at 5:56 PM

Frat president, yadda yadda.

Frat Student-body president.

Typo.

All McConnell has ever wanted is power.

We see the results of his stewardship in the U.S. Senate.

He is the epitome of failed America.

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 5:57 PM

onlineanalyst on May 8, 2012 at 5:43 PM

He can call it what he wants, it makes the amendment no less moronic. In NC, the law is that marriage is limited one man and one woman. This amendment is promote that state to Constitutional level, thus barring future legislation to change the law. The law’s upholders want to use their present (perceived) majority tie the hands of future majorities. They want to prevent the will of the people if and when most people want to change the law.

MJBrutus on May 8, 2012 at 5:58 PM

Senator McConnell’s personal fortune was between $9,839,049 to $44,587,000 in 2010 and he was ranked as the 10th wealthiest member of the U.S. Senate.[38]

Nothing Mitch McConnell does will ever hurt his family’s ability to eat.

He has no personal stake in passing a budget.

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 5:59 PM

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 5:46 PM

I have no great love for McConnell, but the fact that you can’t spell “additionally” correctly just craps all over your point…not to mention that it means you don’t know how to use spell check or wikipedia…

Just sayin’…

ladyingray on May 8, 2012 at 5:59 PM

Got something against ridiculous old buttknockers?
:P

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on May 8, 2012 at 5:31 PM

If I said you had a beautiful CulchaVulcha would you hold it against me?

(I admit it-that’s probably reaching back to Vaudeville)

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on May 8, 2012 at 5:39 PM

Strangely enough, I live in Culcha Vulcha (or something like it)

{S rimshot

apostic on May 8, 2012 at 5:59 PM

or establishment-minded conservatives (George Allen), the party has not completely lost touch with the lessons of its victories in 2010.

The only thing I worry about hurting him is the Virginia primary lockout of all primary candidates, but Romney and Paul. That was a mistake. George Allen needs Virginia republicans and Reagan Democrats to be excited not pissed off. The good news George Allen has a good record in Virginia even with the Media attacking him with a sound bite last time around.

George Allen has done his share to help Virginia Indians get their tribal status back.

Dr Evil on May 8, 2012 at 6:00 PM

since its just 3pm, a little coca-cola to start with
*clink*

cmsinaz on May 8, 2012 at 5:56 PM

:)

Standard “Drinking Game” rules apply for this evenings event Ladies and Gentlemen…

… Extra shots for any mention of the TEA Party, and how radical and extreme they are.

*clink*

Seven Percent Solution on May 8, 2012 at 6:00 PM

but over time I’ve come to think the greater danger than slightly limiting their choices is letting a permanent political class calcify

Like a 3-day old dog tird in the yard.

UltimateBob on May 8, 2012 at 6:00 PM

My predictions for tonight:

Indiana

IN-Sen
Mourdock – 55%
Lugar – 45%

Republican congressional primaries:
IN-05
McIntosh over Brooks
IN-06
Messer, Frazier 2nd, Bates 3rd

Wisconsin

WI-Gov (D):
Barrett-43%
Falk-39%
Vinehout-16%
La Follette-7%

North Carolina

NC-Amendment One:
Yes – 56%
No – 43%

NC-Gov (D):
Dalton – 46%
Etheridge – 41%
Faison – 9%
Blackmon – 3%

Republican congressional primaries:
NC-02: Renee Ellmers
NC-03: Walter Jones over Palombo (close)
NC-06: Howard Coble
NC-08: Richard Hudson and Scott Keadle go to runoff.
NC-09: Rob Pittenger and Jim Pendergraph go to runoff.
NC-11: Mark Meadows and Ethan Wingfield go to runoff.
NC-13: George Holding over Paul Coble (very close)
NC-07: Pantano comfortably over Rouzer

joana on May 8, 2012 at 6:01 PM

Lunger, loogie, looger
There goes another booger
No more decency
Too much complacency
Adios Senator Lugar

Schadenfreude on May 8, 2012 at 6:02 PM

Polls in Indiana are closed. Let the fun begin.

Jaibones on May 8, 2012 at 6:02 PM

McConnell has supported several gun control measures put forth by Democrats, including the 1991 Crime Bill S.1241 (see U.S. Senate Roll Call Vote here) sponsored by then senator Joseph Biden, that instituted a national waiting period for handgun purchases as well as a federal ban on semi-automatic firearms.[14] In 1998, McConnell voted for Barbara Boxer’s Trigger Lock Amendment 3230 (see U.S. Senate Roll Call Vote here), which required the purchase of a trigger lock with the sale of each handgun.

In addition to regulation of fire arms, McConnell has also supported nuclear arms control initiatives such as the START I treaty, which he voted for in 1992, describing it as “an outstanding agreement”.[15][16]

McConnell is a gun-grabber, too.

So this is our top Republican in the Senate?

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 6:02 PM

*clink*

Seven Percent Solution on May 8, 2012 at 6:00 PM

:)

cmsinaz on May 8, 2012 at 6:02 PM

boy is cnn laying on thick about what a great guy lugar is, the last of the moderates….yada, yada, yada

cmsinaz on May 8, 2012 at 6:03 PM

I have no great love for McConnell, but the fact that you can’t spell “additionally” correctly just craps all over your point…not to mention that it means you don’t know how to use spell check or wikipedia…

Just sayin’…

ladyingray on May 8, 2012 at 5:59 PM

lol

so the “i” key stuck.

you forgot your sarc tag, but I got it

;-)

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 6:03 PM

cmsinaz on May 8, 2012 at 5:56 PM

:)

Standard “Drinking Game” rules apply for this evenings event Ladies and Gentlemen…

… Extra shots for any mention of the TEA Party, and how radical and extreme they are.

*clink*

Seven Percent Solution on May 8, 2012 at 6:00 PM

Thanks for setting the rules..*clink*..:)

PS..Good to see you 7% and cmsinaz!!..:)

Dire Straits on May 8, 2012 at 6:04 PM

john king already getting us going with tea party

cmsinaz on May 8, 2012 at 6:04 PM

Mourdock will be a great addition to the Senate. He’s smart as a whip and understands Tea Party issues well. I sent him money and I’m glad he’s been doing so well.

Those who support Lugar like Noonan should not worry about him so much. Once he’s out he can work for Obama in Defense where he belongs.

Burke on May 8, 2012 at 6:05 PM

Strangely enough, I live in Culcha Vulcha (or something like it)

{S rimshot

apostic on May 8, 2012 at 5:59 PM

What a co-inky-dink! Chula Vista’s my cousin!

;)

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on May 8, 2012 at 6:05 PM

It’ll be interesting to keep an eye on the West Virginia democrat primary for President.

Obama may lose some parts of the state to a resident of Texas who can’t even vote for himself: he is a federal prisoner.

joana on May 8, 2012 at 6:05 PM

Dire Straits on May 8, 2012 at 6:04 PM

hey hey hey :)

cmsinaz on May 8, 2012 at 6:06 PM

Dire Straits on May 8, 2012 at 6:04 PM

:)

*clink*

Seven Percent Solution on May 8, 2012 at 6:06 PM

I have no great love for McConnell, but the fact that you can’t spell “additionally” correctly just craps all over your point…not to mention that it means you don’t know how to use spell check or wikipedia…

Just sayin’…

ladyingray on May 8, 2012 at 5:59 PM

So you saw my response to the God-basher the other night, eh?

;-)

/I see what you did there

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 6:06 PM

I’m concentrating my fire on McConnell for 2014, because I think Lugar’s already dust, judging from the groundswell.

We have to break the gridlock in the GOP Senate, and I can’t think of a better way to do it than to throw a failed, entrenched, political creature like McConnell out on the street to enjoy his money.

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 6:09 PM

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 6:03 PM

No. You didn’t.

ladyingray on May 8, 2012 at 6:11 PM

Lugargeddon? Yeah. Poor guy. He’s been sucking at the public teat for 40 years. Now he’s being forced into retirement where he’ll…continue to suck at the public teat for the rest of his days on earth. He’s a victim, you know.

Rational Thought on May 8, 2012 at 6:11 PM

I used to oppose term limits on grounds that the people should be fully free to choose their representatives but over time I’ve come to think the greater danger than slightly limiting their choices is letting a permanent political class calcify.

+ several million – the founding father conclude the same. They didn’t have in mind a congress which is divorced from reality and from those they’re supposed to represent, while stuffing their own pockets, from the left to the right.

If they were different they’d be on SS and the Obamascare, not exempt to a single law they force onto the people.

To Hades with all of them.

Schadenfreude on May 8, 2012 at 6:12 PM

No. You didn’t.

ladyingray on May 8, 2012 at 6:11 PM

Then be a dear, and explain yourself.

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 6:13 PM

Rational Thought on May 8, 2012 at 6:11 PM

Indeed, while he be a prominent lobbyist, due to 40 years. To Hell with them all.

Schadenfreude on May 8, 2012 at 6:13 PM

I enjoyed voting for Mourdock today, I must say!

Just my $0.02.

cs89 on May 8, 2012 at 5:30 PM

Great report from IN. Thank you.

Schadenfreude on May 8, 2012 at 6:14 PM

I wonder who Willy McDole is backing in Indiana tonight?

No need to wonder – it’s Dick Lugar of course.

HondaV65 on May 8, 2012 at 6:15 PM

Senator Lugar has always been a Hot Pistol. The only problem was, He’s always shot blanks. Now he’s coming up against someone who is using live ammo and Lugar just can’t hit the target.

I also think that if the Tea Party bags Lugar and they do so in a big way, I think they are going after Hatch with everything they have. Even if it’s a near miss in Hatch’s favor, it will scare the pants out of the rest of the RINO’s.

evilned on May 8, 2012 at 6:15 PM

Then be a dear, and explain yourself.

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 6:13 PM

Nope, newbie….ya hafta be smart to make it around here.

ladyingray on May 8, 2012 at 6:18 PM

Even if it’s a near miss in Hatch’s favor, it will scare the pants out of the rest of the RINO’s.

evilned on May 8, 2012 at 6:15 PM

I’d target McConnell over Hatch.

The former is the ongoing GOP face of the failure to pass a budget.

There are plenty of things to do to force Reid to pass a budget, and McConnell’s compliance with the first 3 years in American history without one, make him target numero uno, IMO.

McConnell could have stopped the Senate cold with a filibuster at any time.

Instead, he has allowed the 0bama $1T stimulus to be rolled over, year after year, stealthily.

McConnell is complicit in the bankrupting of the nation.

cane_loader on May 8, 2012 at 6:19 PM

Comment pages: 1 2 3 12