Sarkozy out in France

posted at 8:41 am on May 7, 2012 by Morgen Richmond

The “conservative” era is officially drawing to a close in France, following Sarkozy’s loss yesterday to the Socialist candidate Francois Hollande in a run-off election. Here’s a glimpse at what the people of France voted for, via the Daily Mail:

The uncharismatic Mr Hollande, who has never held any ministerial office and is the first socialist to win the French presidency since Francois Mitterrand in 1988, has been an outspoken advocate of rewriting the plans to save the [Euro].

He wants a new ‘preamble’ written into the new European fiscal pact signed by 25 EU nations to water down calls for austerity measures.

He is demanding a change to strict rules which dictate how much member states can spend, without which most observers believe a new European economic crisis is inevitable.

After his victory he said that one of his priorities was to ‘preserve our social model’ – a reference to France’s generous welfare state.

The new president has pledged to spend an extra 20 billion euros in the years ahead to kickstart the economy and wants to slap a 75 per cent tax rate on those earning more than one million euros a year, or around £850,000.

Hollande’s victory is being framed as a vote to end austerity in France, and clearly reducing the deficit will not be Hollande’s top priority. But based on exit polling, and with the other conservative candidates in the general election refusing to endorse Sarkozy, the election seems to have been more a referendum on Sarkozy’s leadership than anything else. GDP growth in France has languished between 1-2% since the last official recession ended at the end of 2009, and their unemployment rate is the highest among G8 nations by a fairly wide margin.

So although I doubt a presidential election in France has ever foreshadowed an election outcome here in the U.S., there are obviously some parallels between Sarkozy’s situation and the electoral climate President Obama faces this year. While faring slightly better than France, GDP and employment growth have languished in the U.S. as well and unless the economy turns around dramatically, Obama is likely to confront the same sort of broad-based, voter discontent which was clearly a factor in Sarkozy’s defeat.

But the contrasts are interesting too with a far-left candidate in France riding a wave of voter discontent, and promising “change” in the form of increased government spending and higher taxes, in order to displace the more conservative Sarkozy. This sounds more like our election in 2008 but here we are 4 years later and President Obama’s policies have failed to effect any lasting economic growth. (Hollande can only dream of spending even a fraction of what Obama oversaw with the stimulus act.) With President Obama seemingly moving forward in the 2012 campaign with the same progressive ideas he’s been touting since 2007, Mitt Romney seems well-positioned to capitalize as the candidate of real change in this race, with a conservative framework for ramping up economic growth and ratcheting down the federal deficit. But just like in France, it remains unclear what sort of impact class resentment may have on the race. If Romney can neutralize this line of attack from Democrats (a tall order), and convince more voters that he has the best economic plan (an easier task), and barring any surprises, he should win in November. Easier said than done.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2

“My real enemy is the world of finance.”

So sayeth France’s new socialist president. Couldn’t have happened to a nicer country. Oh, wait a minute…

Rixon on May 7, 2012 at 8:45 AM

France and Hollande deserve each other.

Happy Nomad on May 7, 2012 at 8:47 AM

Well good luck with that.

Dash on May 7, 2012 at 8:47 AM

…well…JugEars will be hugging the new guy!

KOOLAID2 on May 7, 2012 at 8:48 AM

France votes to go back to sipping wine and eating cheese at the roadside cafes…….

While someone else pays for it, and Islam rises to show them a new way to live.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6-3X5hIFXYU

Viva, over ze cliff.

PappyD61 on May 7, 2012 at 8:48 AM

The US tossing out Obama will serve as a model for France when they toss out this socialist.

You can probably visit Paris in a year or two and see Sarkozy “Miss me yet?” posters.

Marcus on May 7, 2012 at 8:49 AM

Espoir et changement!

C’est juste un saut vers la gauche…

Fallon on May 7, 2012 at 8:50 AM

I give them a year before they beg the Germans to invade them again.

HumpBot Salvation on May 7, 2012 at 8:50 AM

After his victory he spiking of the OBL football Obama said that one of his priorities was to ‘preserve our social model’ – a reference to France’s generous the US’s ever-ballooning welfare state.

Hollande and Obama are pretty much interchangable.

Bitter Clinger on May 7, 2012 at 8:51 AM

75% tax on the rich?

Progressive/Communist Democrat leadership over here falls on the floor and has a politigasm at the thought of this.

PappyD61 on May 7, 2012 at 8:51 AM

Change you can believe in./

swinia sutki on May 7, 2012 at 8:52 AM

Goodbye, EU! Time to cash in those last few Euros before they become novelty items.

blammm on May 7, 2012 at 8:53 AM

Gird your loins

forest on May 7, 2012 at 8:53 AM

Hollande probably won because the French get two votes each…

How do the French vote at the UN?
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
….with both hands raised…

/

Logus on May 7, 2012 at 8:54 AM

Well, at least France admits when it elects a socialist…

Shump on May 7, 2012 at 8:54 AM

D-Day part deux????

Electrongod on May 7, 2012 at 8:54 AM

I wish we would stop calling these European parties “conservative”. Even the Tories in GB are not conservative and haven’t been since Thatcher. They are simply not as far left as the other parties, but that hardly makes them conservative. I would call them “centrist” or come up with some other name for them.

Monkeytoe on May 7, 2012 at 8:54 AM

So France just elected a ‘White Obama’ (white Socialist)?! Welcome to Greece’s world and where we are heading!

easyt65 on May 7, 2012 at 8:55 AM

I give them a year before they beg the Germans to invade them again.

HumpBot Salvation on May 7, 2012 at 8:50 AM

Mr. Hollande’s Opus?

;)

Logus on May 7, 2012 at 8:55 AM

Oh good – the Occupiers will have a “country” to go to come January 20, 2013.

Steve Eggleston on May 7, 2012 at 8:55 AM

Just like that old joke about life in hell and how it doesn’t seem to be that bad just standing around in the flames, drinking coffee. Then Satan shows up and says ok, coffee break is over. Back on you heads.

Kissmygrits on May 7, 2012 at 8:56 AM

So France just elected a ‘White Obama’ (white Socialist)?! Welcome to Greece’s world and where we are heading!

easyt65 on May 7, 2012 at 8:55 AM

The French will get fried?

Logus on May 7, 2012 at 8:56 AM

Once Socialist Obama is out…
French companies can come here…
Remember…we speak Spanish…

Electrongod on May 7, 2012 at 8:56 AM

France and Hollande deserve each other.

Happy Nomad on May 7, 2012 at 8:47 AM

This.

Red Cloud on May 7, 2012 at 8:58 AM

Euros go on eBay in 5…..4…..3…..

…you know where you can get a pile of international money from the 1930′s for $6.00.

and lest we forget Francois Mitterand was an arrogant that wouldn’t let the U.S. fly over it’s airspace when they went to attack U.S. enemies (Libya I think it was) in the 1980′s.

PappyD61 on May 7, 2012 at 9:00 AM

Conservatism is failing all around the world.

inthemiddle on May 7, 2012 at 9:00 AM

These European countries decided to get rid of their austerity programs figuring other sucker countries will have to bail them out – like probably including the USA. Why pay when they can get you to pay?

Chessplayer on May 7, 2012 at 9:01 AM

I wish we would stop calling these European parties “conservative”. Even the Tories in GB are not conservative and haven’t been since Thatcher. They are simply not as far left as the other parties, but that hardly makes them conservative. I would call them “centrist” or come up with some other name for them.

Monkeytoe on May 7, 2012 at 8:54 AM

Very true.

PappyD61 on May 7, 2012 at 9:01 AM

Remember… we speak Spanish…

Electrongod on May 7, 2012 at 8:56 AM

Well, some of us speak French.

*swoon*

/////////////////////////////

Fallon on May 7, 2012 at 9:01 AM

Conservatism is failing all around the world.

inthemiddle on May 7, 2012 at 9:00 AM

Your observations fail everyday.

Bitter Clinger on May 7, 2012 at 9:02 AM

75% tax on the rich?

..no doubt this will attract multitudes of new businesses and encourage the average person to work harder and strive for more.
….Nothing screams incentive like having to give away 75% of what you earn.

..Julia can knock on the door…but very soon….nobody will be home.

Baxter Greene on May 7, 2012 at 9:04 AM

Conservatism is failing all around the world.

inthemiddle on May 7, 2012 at 9:00 AM

LOL

Clueless troll is….clueless.

HumpBot Salvation on May 7, 2012 at 9:04 AM

+1 Marcus

cmsinaz on May 7, 2012 at 9:04 AM

And yet the same Hot Air crowd that alternates between whining and joking about European socialism thinks that Le Pen and BNC are bad. “We don’t have a solution but we don’t like yours”, right?

Archivarix on May 7, 2012 at 9:04 AM

Wow, the French stopped striking long enough to vote!!!! Shocking!!!!

search4truth on May 7, 2012 at 9:05 AM

Morgen Richmond is BACK. Thank goodness. Was just going to post in another thread and ask what happened to Richmond and another new contributor whose posts are great. Richmond’s contributions are among the better ones here. This contributor ought to become permanent.

Why didn’t Richmond get introduced to readers in the same way the site last year heralded another new HotAir blogger (whose debut included accompanying photos and glowing introductions from Ed)?

Richmond provides solid analysis without constantly injecting his/her own persona into the articles (a la Allahpundit) and without all the defeatist, woe-is-me/we’re all doomed tone (a la Allahpundit). And I say this as someone who likes AP’s work. But more solid bloggers (like Richmond) with empowering analysis are needed counterbalance it.

The number one criterion for new HotAir bloggers should be strength of analysis/writing. Reminds of how every time I see that “Katie Pavlich” ad on the right of this screen I think it’s interesting that the photo of her face is larger than the photo of the book. Makes you wonder if the publisher is banking on her looks as a way to sell books more than anything. I hope HotAir continues introducing readers to great new contributors like Morgen Richmond, and doesn’t go down the path of selecting contributors for reasons other than experience level and writing/analytical ability.

bluegill on May 7, 2012 at 9:05 AM

but .. but .. JugEars & Sarkozy were supposed to be homies!!
Could this be another episode of OBarky’s Golden-Touch-Of-Death?

/.

CaveatEmpty on May 7, 2012 at 9:08 AM

The French are toast!

Husker_red on May 7, 2012 at 9:10 AM

Morgen Richmond is BACK. Thank goodness.

bluegill on May 7, 2012 at 9:05 AM

Much as I hated your Mitt shilling, I’ll agree with you on this. Tina was a piece of eye candy; Morgen is a feast for the mind.

Archivarix on May 7, 2012 at 9:10 AM

Kiss EU goodbye. Germans are sick of being the EU National Bank.

Philly on May 7, 2012 at 9:10 AM

I wish we would stop calling these European parties “conservative”. Even the Tories in GB are not conservative and haven’t been since Thatcher. They are simply not as far left as the other parties, but that hardly makes them conservative. I would call them “centrist” or come up with some other name for them.

Monkeytoe on May 7, 2012 at 8:54 AM

Center left is probably most apt.

stvnscott on May 7, 2012 at 9:10 AM

Conservatism is failing all around the world.

inthemiddle on May 7, 2012 at 9:00 AM

What a joke…
…….Conservatism in Europe is basically socialism with a restrictor plate.

Europe is being financially crushed due to it’s socialist policies.

Even full blown communist are getting it.

Heartache for the Che lovers:

The Castros, Cuba and America
On the road towards capitalism

Change is coming to Cuba at last. The United States could do far more to encourage it

http://www.economist.com/node/21551047

Yet a momentous change has begun in Cuba in the meantime. The country has started on the road towards capitalism; and that will have big implications for the United States and the rest of Latin America.

Baxter Greene on May 7, 2012 at 9:10 AM

I have absolutely no sympathy for these jackanapes. They were warned 160 years ago about the destructive nature of their statist foolishness:

III. TAXES

Have you ever chanced to hear it said “There is no better investment than taxes. Only see what a number of families it maintains, and consider how it reacts on industry; it is an inexhaustible stream, it is life itself.”

In order-to combat this doctrine, I must refer to my preceding refutation. Political economy knew well enough that its arguments were not so amusing that it could be said of them, repetitions please. It has, therefore, turned the proverb to its own use, well convinced that, in its mouth, repetitions teach.

The advantages which officials advocate are those which are seen. The benefit which accrues to the providers is still that which is seen. This blinds all eyes.

But the disadvantages which the tax-payers have to get rid of are those which are not seen. And the injury which results from it to the providers, is still that which is not seen, although this ought to be self-evident.

When an official spends for his own profit an extra hundred sous, it implies that a tax-payer spends for his profit a hundred sous less. But the expense of the official is seen, because the act is performed, while that of the tax-payer is not seen, because, alas! he is prevented from performing it.

You compare the nation, perhaps, to a parched tract of land, and the tax to a fertilizing rain. Be it so. But you ought also to ask yourself where are the sources of this rain and whether it is not the tax itself which draws away the moisture from the ground and dries it up?

Again, you ought to ask yourself whether it is possible that the soil can receive as much of this precious water by rain as it loses by evaporation?

There is one thing very certain, that when James B. counts out a hundred sous for the tax-gatherer, he receives nothing in return. Afterwards, when an official spends these hundred sous and returns them to James B., it is for an equal value of corn or labour. The final result is a loss to James B. of five francs.

It is very true that often, perhaps very often, the official performs for James B. an equivalent service. In this case there is no loss on either side; there is merely in exchange. Therefore, my arguments do not at all apply to useful functionaries. All I say is, – if you wish to create an office, prove its utility. Show that its value to James B., by the services which it performs for him, is equal to what it costs him. But, apart from this intrinsic utility, do not bring forward as an argument the benefit which it confers upon the official, his family, and his providers; do not assert that it encourages labour.

When James B. gives a hundred pence to a Government officer, for a really useful service, it is exactly the same as when he gives a hundred sous to a shoemaker for a pair of shoes.

But when James B. gives a hundred sous to a Government officer, and receives nothing for them unless it be annoyances, he might as well give them to a thief. It is nonsense to say that the Government officer will spend these hundred sous to the great profit of national labour; the thief would do the same; and so would James B., if he had not been stopped on the road by the extra-legal parasite, nor by the lawful sponger.

Let us accustom ourselves, then, to avoid judging of things by what is seen only, but to judge of them by that which is not seen.

Last year I was on the Committee of Finance, for under the constituency the members of the opposition were not systematically excluded from all the Commissions: in that the constituency acted wisely. We have heard M. Thiers say – “I have passed my life in opposing the legitimist party, and the priest party. Since the common danger has brought us together, now that I associate with them and know them, and now that we speak face to face, I have found out that they are not the monsters I used to imagine them.”

Yes, distrust is exaggerated, hatred is fostered among parties who never mix; and if the majority would allow the minority to be present at the Commissions, it would perhaps be discovered that the ideas of the different sides are not so far removed from each other, and, above all, that their intentions are not so perverse as is supposed. However, last year I was on the Committee of Finance. Every time that one of our colleagues spoke of fixing at a moderate figure the maintenance of the President of the Republic, that of the ministers, and of the ambassadors, it was answered-

“For the good of the service, it is necessary to surround certain offices with splendour and dignity, as a means of attracting men of merit to them. A vast number of unfortunate persons apply to the President of the Republic, and it would be placing him in a very painful position to oblige him to be constantly refusing them. A certain style in the ministerial saloons is a part of the machinery of constitutional Governments.”

Although such arguments may be controverted, they certainly deserve a serious examination. They are based upon the public interest, whether rightly estimated or not; and as far as I am concerned, I have much more respect for them than many of our Catos have, who are actuated by a narrow spirit of parsimony or of jealousy.

But what revolts the economical part of my conscience, and makes me blush for the intellectual resources of my country, is when this absurd relic of feudalism is brought forward, which it constantly is, and it is favourably received too:-

“Besides, the luxury of great Government officers encourages the arts, industry, and labour. The head of the State and his ministers cannot give banquets and soirees without causing life to circulate through all the veins of the social body. To reduce their means, would starve Parisian industry, and consequently that of the whole nation.”

I must beg you, gentlemen, to pay some little regard to arithmetic, at least; and not to say before the National Assembly in France, lest to its shame it should agree with you, that an addition gives a different sum, according to whether it is added up from the bottom to the top, or from the top to the bottom of the column.

For instance, I want to agree with a drainer to make a trench in my field for a hundred sous. Just as we have concluded our arrangement, the tax-gatherer comes, takes my hundred sous, and sends them to the Minister of the Interior; my bargain is at end, but the Minister will have another dish added to his table. Upon what ground will you dare to affirm that this official expense helps the national industry? Do you not see, that in this there is only a reversing of satisfaction and labour? A Minister has his table better covered, it is true, but it is just as true that an agriculturist has his field worse drained. A Parisian tavern-keeper has gained a hundred sous,I grant you; but then you must grant me that a drainer has been prevented from gaining five francs. It all comes to this, – that the official and the tavern-keeper being satisfied, is that which is seen; the field undrained, and the drainer deprived of his job, is that which is not seen. Dear me! how much trouble there is in proving that two and two make four; and if you succeed in proving it, it is said, “the thing is so plain it is quite tiresome,” and they vote as if you had proved nothing at all.

http://bastiat.org/en/twisatwins.html

ebrown2 on May 7, 2012 at 9:11 AM

Obama’s Hollande’s victory is being framed as a vote to end austerity in France America, and clearly reducing the deficit will not be Obama’s Hollande’s top priority. But based on exit polling, and with the other conservative candidates in the general election refusing to endorse Sarkozy Romney

Forward Forewarned

BacaDog on May 7, 2012 at 9:14 AM

The US tossing out Obama will serve as a model for France when they toss out this socialist.

You can probably visit Paris in a year or two and see Sarkozy “Miss me yet?” posters.

Marcus on May 7, 2012 at 8:49 AM

That’s what I thought…Obama part deux.

askwhatif on May 7, 2012 at 9:16 AM

He wants a new ‘preamble’ written into the new European fiscal pact signed by 25 EU nations to water down calls for austerity measures.

So the boy frog is no different than any other leftist piece of garbage thinking everybody can print all the money they want with no consequences. Perfect for a nation full of mental children.

MNHawk on May 7, 2012 at 9:16 AM

and lest we forget Francois Mitterand was an arrogant that wouldn’t let the U.S. fly over it’s airspace when they went to attack U.S. enemies (Libya I think it was) in the 1980′s.

PappyD61 on May 7, 2012 at 9:00 AM

Yes, it was Libya, and the Spaniards and Italians also refused overflight permission.

Steve Eggleston on May 7, 2012 at 9:19 AM

Yes, it was Libya, and the Spaniards and Italians also refused overflight permission.

Steve Eggleston on May 7, 2012 at 9:19 AM

I also remember our pilots being a little tired from the extra long flight…threw off their aim slightly…whoops, was that a French embassy?

MNHawk on May 7, 2012 at 9:21 AM

This won’t end well, Frenchies.

AZCoyote on May 7, 2012 at 9:21 AM

I’ll agree with you on this. Tina was a piece of eye candy; Morgen is a feast for the mind.

Archivarix on May 7, 2012 at 9:10 AM

Didn’t want to mention any names because I didn’t want to put down anyone. I think Tina did an admirable job, particularly when you consider how YOUNG she was (something I didn’t learn till recently). I don’t fault Tina at all, and I don’t know what all happened behind the scenes. Just seems to me that she might have been better served by allowing her to get more part-time blogging experience under her belt before making her full-time. I fault those who hired her over vastly more experienced options.

bluegill on May 7, 2012 at 9:21 AM

Hollande and Obama are pretty much interchangable.
Bitter Clinger on May 7, 2012 at 8:51 AM

In more ways than one.

The uncharismatic Mr Hollande, who has never held any ministerial office …

But he’s probably clean and speaks well.

Cleombrotus on May 7, 2012 at 9:22 AM

bluegill on May 7, 2012 at 9:21 AM

Chit chat?

Fallon on May 7, 2012 at 9:27 AM

Lets see we have Greece going down the tubes, Italy getting an EU appointed set of overseers that are unelected, Spain and Portugal heading over the cliff, Ireland desperately trying to hang on to some sanity and figure out how to get some solvency back, and now France elects a guy who sees the abyss and wants to put the petal to the metal.

It doesn’t matter if you are ‘Left’ or ‘Right’ in Europe: you want more and larger government without having to think about debt repayment all that much. If the International Socialists are bad and the National Socialists scary, do note that the spectrum is Socialist to Socialist as your base set of choices. It doesn’t matter what you call your brand of socialism, it winds up having the same effect.

Europe has got a problem in that the last bits of small government thinking got relegated to a few universities in the early and mid-20th century and never went beyond that into political use. The idea of trusting the individual to make good choices and the State getting out of the way of purely personal decisions is something not practiced in much of Europe. Try to set up a charity or private endowment and NOT get someone from the government to ‘help’ you make ‘good’ decisions in a place like France. If you can’t be trusted to do good on your own, then you can’t be trusted AT ALL. That is why the State is there to ‘help’ you… and in that doing you never ever learn what it means to be good, just to fear the power of the State.

All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state. -Benito Mussolini

ajacksonian on May 7, 2012 at 9:28 AM

Conservatism is failing all around the world.
inthemiddle on May 7, 2012 at 9:00 AM

Sounds like you believe that somehow you, along with all the others who are loath to actually work for their living, will personally benefit from that development.

Too bad all the rest of us are going to have to suffer while you’re busy learning the hard way.

Cleombrotus on May 7, 2012 at 9:30 AM

If I were Hollande I wouldn’t pose like that, in the cover picture. If he spends the way he campaigned the French people mIght make it a permanent position for him when he fails.

-Wasteland Man.

WastelandMan on May 7, 2012 at 9:36 AM

To recover from past socialism takes some pain (spending cuts) and the French, as they did in World war II, surrendered. And, as in World war II, they will suffer the consequences.

The return to socialism will turn France into Greece.

MaiDee on May 7, 2012 at 9:37 AM

But he’s probably clean and speaks well.

Cleombrotus on May 7, 2012 at 9:22 AM

You do realize French use less soap per capita than any other first world nation, don’t you?

Just sayin’

MNHawk on May 7, 2012 at 9:38 AM

. I fault those who hired her over vastly more experienced options.
bluegill on May 7, 2012 at 9:21 AM

You take this much too seriously.

Cleombrotus on May 7, 2012 at 9:39 AM

Hollande and Obama are pretty much interchangable.
Bitter Clinger on May 7, 2012 at 8:51 AM

Hollande and Sarkozy too.

joana on May 7, 2012 at 9:40 AM

So a communist defeats a socialist in a European election. Big deal. There hasn’t been a “conservative era” in France since Richleau kicked the bucket, and even that’s stretching it.

Nice analysis by Morgen Richmond, but let’s call a spade a spade. Sarkosy is Bush without the balls; a fake conservative who got tossed out on his ear for a duplicitous redistributionist because, given the choice between a leftist and a leftist, the electorate will choose the leftist every time (hear me, John McCain?).

Here’s my prediction: Hollande will fail just as Obama has failed, in the grand manner. And like Obama, Hollande will oversee the death of the left in his country, particularly the left’s European project, which is Europe itself. The euro, on life support now, will die on his watch. Proper nationalism will return with a vengeance. Merkel, the other great fake conservative of the post 9-11 era, will be the next to go as the Germans wake up and refuse to be the European welfare state’s lender of last resort. Germany may also lurch leftwards for a short period, but, like in France, that will just provide cover for the real work at hand.

Conservatism is not dying across the political landscape. Progressivism is. First the Soviet Union imploded. Then China moved from Maoism to a totalitarian market economy, whatever that is. The most socialized states in Europe unraveled next, with the U.S., the least socialized of the major world nations, finally hitting the wall a couple of years ago. The process will continue to play itself out, because it must. Socialism/Progressivism is unworkable; it will always eventually fail.

Whether it is replaced by tyranny, chaos, or a proper conservatism is up to us.

Mr. Arkadin on May 7, 2012 at 9:40 AM

You do realize French use less soap per capita than any other first world nation, don’t you?
Just sayin’
MNHawk on May 7, 2012 at 9:38 AM

Yes. That’s why Hollande’s election wasn’t the surprise. Sarkozy’s was.

Cleombrotus on May 7, 2012 at 9:41 AM

This is kinda scary to me. I had held out hope that perhaps Wurope was not lost. But they will continue to spend and when they run out of money they will come crying.

This could easily end NATO, because as long as we have a vested interest with Europe, we don’t want them to go under and will be forced to try to buy them out. Hopefully Mitt will not give any more than 20 bucks to France when they go over the cliff.

jeffn21 on May 7, 2012 at 9:42 AM

J’espere qu’ils ont pas de l’argent.

It does not matter who is president of France, there are very few choices, and the choices are: to do them or not.

Obama chose not to do them. I think this socialist also will choose not to do them. He cannot borrow the money or create it. The stranglehold of the pluralism during Sarkozy has been a lot like our gridlocked congress, he might have done things if they would have let him, but they were hanging on to the old for dear life, and they will find a socialist will just let them hold on a teeny bit longer. France is not in the shape that, say, a Spain or Italy is.

There is an alternative scenario, where like here in the U.S., with the unions letting Democrat governors mess with their health insurance collective bargaining, it is possible the left will allow one of their own to change something. Or he will triangulate somehow, like a Clinton.

Things will worsen in France, but if he decides to go thru with the 75% tax rate on the paying class, they will cease earning or move abroad. And if we are here with a President Romney making business freer and cheaper, why wouldn’t they want to come here?

Things will worsen in France, I wonder what kind of vacations they will take in August, or will it be rioting?

The only choice for the tax paying class in France, if the taxes go higher is to shut your business, they cannot move their business, the country regulates a lot of things to do with hiring and how many French it takes to count Euros, and relationships of companies to companies here. Figuratively, no one can be fired, realistically, you shut down and dissolve.

Big fear on Wall Street this morning, I think is a little silly, reactionary, we should save ravaging the markets until he actually does something.

Fleuries on May 7, 2012 at 9:42 AM

You do realize French use less soap per capita than any other first world nation, don’t you?

Just sayin’

MNHawk on May 7, 2012 at 9:38 AM

Go easy on the frog eaters. 20-25% of their population are so alien to the soap, it’s just not fair to count them in per capita average. I’ll risk the ban hammer by suggesting to introduce it to that population segment pronto – either as a detergent or, failing that, as a lubricant.

Archivarix on May 7, 2012 at 9:44 AM

France votes to go back to sipping wine and eating cheese at the roadside cafes…….

Ah no – that will be banned under sharia law.

Next year France will be under Islamic rule……

redguy on May 7, 2012 at 9:44 AM

I left out one important point, this new leader probably signals the end of the EU for all kinds of emotional and nationalistic reasons. Sarkozy was a mean conservative not wanting to bail out other socialistic EU countries, but the french will let a socialist do the same thing for their self preservation.

Am I wrong?

Fleuries on May 7, 2012 at 9:45 AM

I give them a year before they beg the Germans to invade them again.

No, Germany says “Been there, done that” – too many socialists to starve…..

redguy on May 7, 2012 at 9:45 AM

You do realize French use less soap per capita than any other first world nation, don’t you?

Just sayin’

MNHawk on May 7, 2012 at 9:38 AM

So one would assume that is why they use so much perfume?

oldroy on May 7, 2012 at 9:47 AM

Oh good – the Occupiers will have a “country” to go to come January 20, 2013.

New bumper sticker – New HQ of OWS – Paris, France

redguy on May 7, 2012 at 9:48 AM

Jeez….. look at that pose. I can see The One doing that one.

itsspideyman on May 7, 2012 at 9:50 AM

This may signal the beginning of the end of the US-British-French-German coalition opposing Iran’s nuke program.

The sanctions will probably begin to crumble, as did those imposed on Saddam’s Iraq.

This could make an Israeli strike on Iran in the foreseeable future more likely.

farsighted on May 7, 2012 at 9:57 AM

Chit chat?

Fallon on May 7, 2012 at 9:27 AM

My earlier posts (which seemed to have caught people’s attention) about the rude regulars in other threads referred to chat having nothing whatsoever to do with anything related to this site.

bluegill on May 7, 2012 at 9:57 AM

. I fault those who hired her over vastly more experienced options.
bluegill on May 7, 2012 at 9:21 AM

You take this much too seriously.

Cleombrotus on May 7, 2012 at 9:39 AM

He’s been policing the blog for some time and generally lashed out at Ed and Tina whenever they posted anything that wasn’t unabashedly pro-Romney (and he is still doing it with AP).

Doomberg on May 7, 2012 at 10:02 AM

Go easy on the frog eaters. 20-25% of their population are so alien to the soap, it’s just not fair to count them in per capita average. I’ll risk the ban hammer by suggesting to introduce it to that population segment pronto – either as a detergent or, failing that, as a lubricant.

Archivarix on May 7, 2012 at 9:44 AM

Remember when European nations were spreading ‘the gospel of soap’ to third-worlders who lived in utter filth? The irony is so thick you could slice it and put it on a sandwich.

MelonCollie on May 7, 2012 at 10:05 AM

Hopefully Mitt will not give any more than 20 bucks to France when they go over the cliff.

jeffn21 on May 7, 2012 at 9:42 AM

Perhaps instead of cash we should just send the French some of that Government cheese.

Happy Nomad on May 7, 2012 at 10:08 AM

Europe has got a problem in that the last bits of small government thinking got relegated to a few universities in the early and mid-20th century and never went beyond that into political use. The idea of trusting the individual to make good choices and the State getting out of the way of purely personal decisions is something not practiced in much of Europe. Try to set up a charity or private endowment and NOT get someone from the government to ‘help’ you make ‘good’ decisions in a place like France. If you can’t be trusted to do good on your own, then you can’t be trusted AT ALL. That is why the State is there to ‘help’ you… and in that doing you never ever learn what it means to be good, just to fear the power of the State.

All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state. -Benito Mussolini

ajacksonian on May 7, 2012 at 9:28 AM

Good analysis. The problem with countries like France and Italy is that they have never broken free of the monarchy mentality. France is the worst when it comes to social class divisions. The “government” has replaced the “monarchy” there and the “bureaucrats” have replaced the “royal court,” but they operate essentially the same with all the attendant favors and perks associated with being a part of the exclusive elite.

This election result does not necessarily portend well for Romney as the author of this post supposes. I fear that the majority of people world-wide are pushing for socialist policies because it is easier for them to have the government give it than to have to find a way to get it themselves. We are about at the tipping point here so we must be very careful in our approach to turning back the trend. If our policies scare and overwhelm the electorate, they will do the safest thing–which is to vote for the party that is keeping the status quo so that hard decisions to not have to be made.

By the way, it is being reported that Obama has already invited the new socialist president of France for a visit. I’m sure they’ll be best buds and will not waste any time “coordinating” policy objectives.

KickandSwimMom on May 7, 2012 at 10:09 AM

Big fear on Wall Street this morning, I think is a little silly, reactionary, we should save ravaging the markets until he actually does something.

Fleuries on May 7, 2012 at 9:42 AM

Not only Wall Street, but also among currency traders. If Socialists in France and Greece throw out “austerity” plans, currency traders will probably devalue Euros and make dollars and the American economy look strong by comparison.

This could actually help Obummer by promoting a capital influx to the United States, to prop up the economy just enough to ensure his re-election.

The rats flee a sinking ship to one sinking more slowly, until China will be the only boat that floats…

Steve Z on May 7, 2012 at 10:23 AM

January 2018- Welcome to The Islamic Republic of France!

jeffinsjvca on May 7, 2012 at 10:25 AM

So one would assume that is why they use so much perfume?

oldroy on May 7, 2012 at 9:47 AM

Yup. And tangentially why they made up so many sauces for their culinary dishes.

When a society and culture doesn’t bathe with any regularity, they invariably will stink. The upper-crust and those with wealth however realize that stink does stank and thus seek ways to cover it without bathing – what a horrid idea.

A lot of meat went rancid without proper/effective ways of preservation/storage. Enter various sauces to cover the rancid meat.

Logus on May 7, 2012 at 10:26 AM

Now the U.S.A. and France has more in common, we both have socialist presidents.

Axion on May 7, 2012 at 10:30 AM

By the way, it is being reported that Obama has already invited the new socialist president of France for a visit. I’m sure they’ll be best buds and will not waste any time “coordinating” policy objectives.

KickandSwimMom on May 7, 2012 at 10:09 AM

Not surprised at that, one bit.

Soon Obama will be touting France as showing the way out.

France went from Monarchy through bloody autocracy to Emperor to various forms of authoritarian governments and never, not once, have they tried to get away from government telling them what to do. Centuries of cluebats have not worked there and now the worst of Europe is returning, with modern guise and very old and bloody clothing.

Remember, anti-semitism has gotten bad enough that Jewish leaders are saying its time to leave France. That cry of ‘never again’ rings hollow, and now it rings not at all from the Left of the world as they seek to repeat the past they have forgotten.

ajacksonian on May 7, 2012 at 10:34 AM

I wish we would stop calling these European parties “conservative”. Even the Tories in GB are not conservative and haven’t been since Thatcher. They are simply not as far left as the other parties, but that hardly makes them conservative. I would call them “centrist” or come up with some other name for them.

Monkeytoe on May 7, 2012 at 8:54 AM

Very true.

PappyD61 on May 7, 2012 at 9:01 AM

Amen and hallelujah! The “Conservative” parties of Europe are about as “conservative” as the Clinton wing of the Democrat party here in the U.S. In fact, they are virtually indistinguishable from our very own beloved “moderate Democrats.” They are statists who are careful not to touch their metastasizing bureaucracies and social programs, and who limit their “conservatism” to shifting a few pounds or francs or ecus from one agency to another. All in the name of helping “the poor” and “the children.”

Scriptor on May 7, 2012 at 10:38 AM

Europe has got a problem in that the last bits of small government thinking got relegated to a few universities in the early and mid-20th century and never went beyond that into political use. The idea of trusting the individual to make good choices and the State getting out of the way of purely personal decisions is something not practiced in much of Europe. Try to set up a charity or private endowment and NOT get someone from the government to ‘help’ you make ‘good’ decisions in a place like France. If you can’t be trusted to do good on your own, then you can’t be trusted AT ALL. That is why the State is there to ‘help’ you… and in that doing you never ever learn what it means to be good, just to fear the power of the State.

All within the state, nothing outside the state, nothing against the state. -Benito Mussolini

ajacksonian on May 7, 2012 at 9:28 AM

“It is better to be wrong with Sartre (idiotic leftist) then right with Raymond Aron” (classical liberal-i.e. real libertarian)

http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/egghead/2003/09/exit_pursued_by_a_lobster.html

ebrown2 on May 7, 2012 at 10:48 AM

Kiss EU goodbye. Germans are sick of being the EU National Bank.

Philly on May 7, 2012 at 9:10 AM

Germany’s going Galt.

parteagirl on May 7, 2012 at 10:52 AM

Forward… and over the cliff. Au revoir

sdbatboy on May 7, 2012 at 10:59 AM

If Romney can neutralize this line of attack from Democrats (a tall order), and convince more voters that he has the best economic plan (an easier task), and barring any surprises, he should win in November. Easier said than done.

While there’s no doubt that class warfare is like catnip to the Left, I still don’t buy the notion that it will resonate with moderates and independents. I just don’t think that they will punish Romney merely because he is personally wealthy. He definitely must make his case for why his plans are better for the middle class than Dear Leader. So there’s work to be done, no doubt. But in the end I really think that ObaMao’s total embrace of class and racial conflict will backfire.

cicerone on May 7, 2012 at 11:04 AM

I always laugh at the declarations of “end of such and such era”.

Clinton said the ear of big govt was over in 1997. And 11 years later, the US elected a communist as president and the conservative movement was declared DOA. Then 2 years later the Tea Party was declared the new way of govt only to be declared dead a year once again.

Here’s a prediction: in the next decade another conservative will win the presidency in France, at which time the “era of socialism in France” will be declared over.

angryed on May 7, 2012 at 11:16 AM

bluegill on May 7, 2012 at 9:05 AM

Waaay off topic. IIRC, you’re really hard on other posters for that and frequently scold them.

a capella on May 7, 2012 at 11:18 AM

Plus ca change… plus c’est la meme chose.

J.E. Dyer on May 7, 2012 at 11:24 AM

To be fair to the French, you can’t compare their productivity to Americans. If you worked a French men 40 hours a week, he would die of exhaustion SNARK. Don’t the French take like 3 to 4 hours off in the middle of the day just to recover from working in the morning hours? I really don’t know how they manage to go back, and work a couple of more hours in the afternoon/

Americans with their sweat equity it’s so peasant like….LOL!

Dr Evil on May 7, 2012 at 11:24 AM

Here’s a prediction: in the next decade another conservative will win the presidency in France, at which time the “era of socialism in France” will be declared over.

angryed on May 7, 2012 at 11:16 AM

How was Sarkozy less socialist than Hollande?

What will really be different in France after this election?

Dr Evil on May 7, 2012 at 11:27 AM

He’s been policing the blog for some time and generally lashed out at Ed and Tina whenever they posted anything that wasn’t unabashedly pro-Romney (and he is still doing it with AP).
Doomberg on May 7, 2012 at 10:02 AM

I suspect that “vastly more experienced options” really means “thinks more like me”.

Cleombrotus on May 7, 2012 at 11:31 AM

How was Sarkozy less socialist than Hollande?

What will really be different in France after this election?

Dr Evil on May 7, 2012 at 11:27 AM

To be honest, I haven’t really kept up with the nuances of Hollande and Sarkozy. If Sarkozy is conservative like Romney is conservative, then you’re right there is no difference between them just like there’s no difference between Romney/Obama.

Pundits always love to declare the end of eras. But they’re not because voters don’t vote that way. They vote because they’re pissed off and want to kick the party in office out. It’s almost a coincidence who that party is.

angryed on May 7, 2012 at 11:35 AM

Sarkozy lost because of general discontent with the economy. They threw the bum out. This has happened all over Europe for the past two years. When things go bad you throw the bums out. It does not matter what the party is of the challenger. In 2006, America the bums out (Republican party). In 2008, America threw the bum out (the bum was the Republican party). In 2010, America threw the bum out (the Democratic party). The economy is better now than 2010. Troubles in Europe mean more Euros get converted into dollars. US dollars and US stock is a better place to put your money now than in Europe.

The current “Vegas” odds on the next election is Obama is favored by 4% in the popular vote. Romney is not a dynamic or inspirational figure. He does not inspire passion in his supporters. He is the competent, uninspiring bookkeeper who knows how to do your taxes. If the economy goes south, he has a chance. If the economy plugs along at a 2.0% growth rate, Obama wins.

ZippyZ on May 7, 2012 at 11:57 AM

Bye-bye Euro.

Philly on May 7, 2012 at 12:03 PM

As much as i hate to point out the large “Oh, Shyte” factor in all this….

Forget the financial repercussions of this on the Euro and the EU as a whole…I’m more concerned with France (lack of) insight and self preservation when it comes to dealing with countries that don’t have their, and Western Civilizations best interest at heart.

Wanna take the over/under on how long it’ll be before we start seeing more French technology in the hands of countries like Iran, Syria, etc?

Sure, a lot of it isn’t bleeding edge, but it’s not muskets and Napoleon cannon either…and just like the Russians & Chinese, and Atty Gen. Holder & the BATF, I don’t see them thinking that far in advance on what they’re selling and to whom…

BlaxPac on May 7, 2012 at 12:19 PM

There is a difference between the “conservative” and socialist parties in Europe, and it relates to how they deal with the U.S. in regards to foreign policy and in forming coalitions for military objectives.

Sarkozy led the western/nato effort to topple Qaddafi, while our president was sitting on the sidelines waiting for his spine to kick in (err, Hillary), but Hollande has promised to withdrawl all French soldiers from Afghanistan this year.

Our foreign policy will shift because of this election: France has gone from reliable ally to unreliable NATO partner. Shit.

timbok on May 7, 2012 at 12:34 PM

The French would have elected a rapist socialist over Sarkozy. With Hollande elected, it remains to be seen if he is just a Socialist.

Conservative4Ever on May 7, 2012 at 12:58 PM

History.

Bmore on May 7, 2012 at 1:03 PM

Comment pages: 1 2