Video: Andy Garcia and For Greater Glory

posted at 10:01 am on May 2, 2012 by Ed Morrissey

Yesterday on my show, I had the opportunity to interview actor Andy Garcia, whose new film For Greater Glory opens on June 1st nationwide.  It has already opened in Mexico to large crowds, and for good reason.  The film tells the story of the Cristiada, also known as the Cristero Wars, which erupted when the socialist Mexican government of President Plutarco Calles attempted to forcibly suppress the Catholic Church. In March, I wrote about the rough cut version that I watched, and noted the similarity to Braveheart and the interesting and unplanned resonance of the question of religious freedom to the politics of today, when the government decides it has the authority to decide what kind of religious expression qualifies for First Amendment protection and which doesn’t.

Since many may not have caught this interview, which took place an hour into the show, I have broken it out separately in this video.  Garcia discusses the fight for absolute freedom and the relation to his own Cuban-American background, how history has forgotten the Cristiada until now, and his hopes and aspirations for the film.

The trailer is on the film’s website, but I’ll embed it here once again:

I’ll be reaching out to the publicists for more interviews from both sides of the camera as the release date for the film approaches.  It is a tremendously moving and powerful film, and one I believe most Hot Air readers will appreciate.


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Impressive interview, but how did Andy Garcia get his horse to stay still for so long?

dirtseller on May 2, 2012 at 10:03 AM

dirtseller on May 2, 2012 at 10:03 AM

The man has many talents. ;-)

Ed Morrissey on May 2, 2012 at 10:06 AM

Good on you Ed, this is a great story and should be watched by everyone. Our neighbor’s to the south take a lot of abuse, some well earned, and a lot, pure propaganda. Not all Mexicans are bad, lazy or ignorant, most are good decent people. That fact has been lost to most American’s because of the illegal immigration and narcotics issues.

SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 10:07 AM

Our neighbors to the south have a rich and passionate history. Largely unknown north of the Rio Grande.

cozmo on May 2, 2012 at 10:15 AM

Mexicans are just like Americans in the respect that generally speaking, the majority are good people whose reputation is sullied by the worthless, lazy parasites. The only issue I have with the Mexican community around me is the refusal to assimilate. You want to live in America (legally)? Be American. You want to be Mexican? Return to Mexico.

search4truth on May 2, 2012 at 10:21 AM

I give Ed and the interview 4 green tomatoes

gerry-mittbot-movie critic

gerrym51 on May 2, 2012 at 10:23 AM

Our neighbors to the south have a rich and passionate history. Largely unknown north of the Rio Grande.

cozmo on May 2, 2012 at 10:15 AM

Indeed they do, unfortunately as this movie points out to some small degree, Mexico was infected with the Marxism virus way back in the late 1800′s early 1900′s. It has been the prevailing political ideology of the Mexican ruling elite for at least the last 100 years. And Mexico’s economy has suffered profoundly because of it. On the positive side, Mexico’s ruling elite have never been able to fully implement a Marxist political system on Mexico precisely because of the action of people like those represented in this movie.

SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 10:25 AM

When The Mission debuted Fordham University began showing it to all incoming freshmen to introduce them to the Jesuit history. I might suggest in these days of attacks upon the Church and her believers, that all churches arrange for their parishioners to see this film. A reminder of our martyrdom.

xkaydet65 on May 2, 2012 at 10:28 AM

SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 10:07 AM
search4truth on May 2, 2012 at 10:21 AM

These “most” statements always interest me. You may be correct that “most” mexicans are good, decent people–I certainly hope that to be so, and have no reason to believe otherwise. Nevertheless, we Americans–we Westerners–often make the assumption that others are just like us, and want the same basic things we do. But if you look at the civilizations people create, this does not appear to be so–non-Western societies are distinctly different in their values, beliefs, etc. So, we may conclude that they are good decent people while also recognizing that perhaps their worldview is incompatible with ours–hence, as search4truth observed, the refusal to assimilate.

DrMagnolias on May 2, 2012 at 10:29 AM

Mexico was infected with the Marxism virus way back in the late 1800′s early 1900′s…

SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 10:25 AM

As was just about all of central, and south, America.

It was the “new” thing for the new world.

cozmo on May 2, 2012 at 10:30 AM

SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 10:07 AM
search4truth on May 2, 2012 at 10:21 AM
DrMagnolias on May 2, 2012 at 10:29 AM

By the way, as I think about how I said that, I want you to know Idid not intend to sound rude–I wanted it to be dispassionate, which is how I generally try to discuss these subjects. Please do not take offense at my imperfect approach–it was not intended.

DrMagnolias on May 2, 2012 at 10:34 AM

DrMagnolias on May 2, 2012 at 10:29 AM

I live in Southern California, and have relatives who are of Mexican decent. The BS about Mexicans not wanting to assimilate is just that, BS. Those of Mexican heritage who legally immigrated here do not have an assimilation issue.

Most of those who come here illegally believe that the United States is illegally violating the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which for those who are unaware of the terms of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, promises Mexican Citizens free and unrestricted transit of the US Mexican Border.

Furthermore there is a pretty significant percentage of second and third generation Mexican-American’s who believe that The Mexican Cession of 1848 is a unlawful act since it was forced on Mexico as part of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which was the conclusion of the Mexican – American War.

SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 10:48 AM

By the way, as I think about how I said that, I want you to know Idid not intend to sound rude–I wanted it to be dispassionate, which is how I generally try to discuss these subjects. Please do not take offense at my imperfect approach–it was not intended.

DrMagnolias on May 2, 2012 at 10:34 AM

No worries Doc. Like I said above, I live in Southern California and have relatives of Mexican decent, so I know perhaps a bit more about the situation than those not as closely related to the situation.

SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 10:52 AM

SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 10:48 AM

Are you saying that it is only those who are here illegally (and I’m not terribly interested in their claims of what was “forced”–all wars end with terms that the losers do not like) are waving Mexican flags and refusing to assimilate? That those who are here legally are willing to give up all allegiances to Mexico and refer to themselves as non-hyphenated Americans?

DrMagnolias on May 2, 2012 at 10:54 AM

SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 10:52 AM

And I certainly believe your experience counts. I do wonder if it is representative? I hope so–what I know I see in the news, which also may not be representative (knowing the media as I do).

DrMagnolias on May 2, 2012 at 10:55 AM

That those who are here legally are willing to give up all allegiances to Mexico and refer to themselves as non-hyphenated Americans?

DrMagnolias on May 2, 2012 at 10:54 AM

Not exactly. But the situation isn’t what you are making it out to be either. Mexico is a lot closer to America than Ireland, Italy, or Russia is, and America still has plenty of Irish, Italian, and Russian-Americans who are proud of their heritage.

Most of those Mexican-American’s waving Mexican Flags consider themselves Americans, but they are fiercely proud of the Mexican Heritage. It isn’t that they refuse to assimilate, it’s that they refuse to be embarrassed or ashamed of being of Mexican heritage.

Like I tried to explain, it isn’t a simple one size fit’s all situation, it’s pretty damned complex and a lot of Mexican-American’s are pretty resentful of how they have been caricatured in the Media.

Mexico IS NOT a culture that is profoundly different than that of America or whose fundamental that worldview is incompatible with ours. It’s morals, ethics and worldview is fundamentally Western in nature.

As I said before Mexico just had the misfortune of being infected by the Marxism virus, which has rather profoundly crippled their economy. And quite frankly, many Mexicans and Mexican-American’s are damned sick and tired of being caricatured as stupid or lazy.

SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 11:13 AM

And I certainly believe your experience counts. I do wonder if it is representative? I hope so–what I know I see in the news, which also may not be representative (knowing the media as I do).

DrMagnolias on May 2, 2012 at 10:55 AM

I can not say how representative it is, however, living a mere 40 miles north of the border as I do, I know a lot of both legal and illegal Mexicans. What I do know however is that those put up by the Media are no more representative of Mexican-America’s as a whole than Al Sharpton or Jesse Jackson are of African-Americans.

SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 11:19 AM

It is a tremendously moving and powerful film, and one I believe most Hot Air readers will appreciate.

I would probably appreciate the movie more if my community hadn’t been destroyed by illegals from Mexico. Unfortunately, it has been and mine and my family’s way of life has forever been changed, so excuse me if I don’t care about this movie.

Yeah, call me bitter, call me a bigot, I think many would feel the same if they saw crime rates rise by over 75% and most are by the Mexican drug cartel. My home value has lost over $100,000 by the mass exodus of illegals leaving homes they bought and the foreclosures keep mounting. I could go on and on about how I live in an area that looks like a village in Mexico.

So, count me out on watching this movie.

moonsbreath on May 2, 2012 at 12:08 PM

I’m sorry. The waving of Mexican (or other nations’ flags, although it’s orders of magnitude rarer) flags is an affront and a provocation. I say this because it often seems to be flown in defiance.

Be proud of your heritage and wave Old Glory.

I don’t fly or wave my ancestors’ flag even though I’m proud of my heritage.

It’s your right to fly whatever flag you wish, but know that you’ll alienate me if it’s not some version of the US flag.

freedomfirst on May 2, 2012 at 12:18 PM

I can not say how representative it is, however, living a mere 40 miles north of the border as I do, I know a lot of both legal and illegal Mexicans. What I do know however is that those put up by the Media are no more representative of Mexican-America’s as a whole than Al Sharpton or Jesse Jackson are of African-Americans.

SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 11:19 AM

Having a cattle ranch in South Texas that’s even closer to the border, let me confirm to the letter what SWalker is saying here and in his/her previous remarks about assimilation. My foreman and head wrangler were both born and raised in Mexico and became US citizens out of desire. They both served their new country in the military and you will not find a more patriotic pair of individuals, and who are very vocal in their disapproval of the La Raza types.

TXUS on May 2, 2012 at 12:29 PM

This looks like a great movie, I love Andy Garcia, I think he’s an amazing actor, and it seems that this is a role big enough to take him even higher.

I shall definitely go.

Hope on May 2, 2012 at 2:11 PM

Most of those who come here illegally believe that the United States is illegally violating the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, which for those who are unaware of the terms of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, promises Mexican Citizens free and unrestricted transit of the US Mexican Border.
SWalker on May 2, 2012 at 10:48 AM

In reading the actual treaty, I see this:

ARTICLE VI
The vessels and citizens of the United States shall, in all time, have a free and uninterrupted passage by the Gulf of California, and by the river Colorado below its confluence with the Gila, to and from their possessions situated north of the boundary line defined in the preceding article; it being understood that this passage is to be by navigating the Gulf of California and the river Colorado, and not by land, without the express consent of the Mexican Government.

If, by the examinations which may be made, it should be ascertained to be practicable and advantageous to construct a road, canal, or railway, which should in whole or in part run upon the river Gila, or upon its right or its left bank, within the space of one marine league from either margin of the river, the Governments of both republics will form an agreement regarding its construction, in order that it may serve equally for the use and advantage of both countries.

Both countries may use any future road, canal or railway that is built, but the treaty specifically states that US citizens have free passage across the border, not Mexican citizens.

ARTICLE VIII
Mexicans now established in territories previously belonging to Mexico, and which remain for the future within the limits of the United States, as defined by the present treaty, shall be free to continue where they now reside, or to remove at any time to the Mexican Republic, retaining the property which they possess in the said territories, or disposing thereof, and removing the proceeds wherever they please, without their being subjected, on this account, to any contribution, tax, or charge whatever.

Those who shall prefer to remain in the said territories may either retain the title and rights of Mexican citizens, or acquire those of citizens of the United States. But they shall be under the obligation to make their election within one year from the date of the exchange of ratifications of this treaty; and those who shall remain in the said territories after the expiration of that year, without having declared their intention to retain the character of Mexicans, shall be considered to have elected to become citizens of the United States.

In the said territories, property of every kind, now belonging to Mexicans not established there, shall be inviolably respected. The present owners, the heirs of these, and all Mexicans who may hereafter acquire said property by contract, shall enjoy with respect to it guarantees equally ample as if the same belonged to citizens of the United States.

This article seems to spell out that Mexicans at the time of the treaty had one year to choose whether to become US or Mexican citizens. If, after a year, they did not express a preference, they automatically became US citizens. Within that year’s time, they were free to cross the border with their possessions, if they so chose.

So, to me it appears that your statement (or what you express are the statements and beliefs of those here illegally) is incorrect.

TrubadorMike on May 2, 2012 at 4:52 PM

TrubadorMike on May 2, 2012 at 4:52 PM

Thank you for straightening him out – saved me the trouble.

Whether the Mexicans that SWalker refers to believe that the U.S. is violating Guadalupe-Hidalgo, is not matter.

Ignorance of the law is no excuse.

Flouting of U.S. territorial sovereignty, latching on like leeches to every possible social benefit, and then sending large amounts of money back to Mexico – depriving the communities they have invaded and which they are burdening with their multiple demands on hospitals, schools and social services – even less so.

cane_loader on May 2, 2012 at 5:03 PM

depriving the communities they have invaded and which they are burdening with their multiple demands on hospitals, schools and social services of the multiplier effect of that money – even less so.

cane_loader on May 2, 2012 at 5:03 PM

Left that part out.

cane_loader on May 2, 2012 at 5:04 PM