Rubio: Arizona immigration law is not a model for the nation

posted at 2:51 pm on April 19, 2012 by Tina Korbe

When the Arizona legislature first passed a law to require immigrants to carry alien registration at all times and to enable law enforcement agents to question people if they have reason to suspect they’re in the country illegally, Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio wasn’t quite sure what he thought of it. Eventually, he said he would have voted for it had he been in the Arizona legislature.

Today, though, Rubio said he does not consider the Arizona law a “model” for the nation:

Rubio said he understood why frustration with illegal immigration led Arizona to pass a law allowing local police to demand proof of citizenship. He also disagreed with the Obama administration’s contention that the law is unconstitutional. But he added, “I do not believe (laws like the one in Arizona) should be a model for the country.’’

Rubio’s reservations about the law come at a time when polls show the Republican Party facing a yawning deficit of support among Hispanic voters. Both national parties have launched national campaigns to reach out to the Hispanic community, the fastest growing part of the electorate and the key to victory in a number of swing states.Democrats have been zealously attacking Republican opposition to the DREAM Act, potentially popular legislation that would grant citizenship to the children of illegal immigrants who go to college or enroll in the military. In recent weeks, Rubio has started countering the criticism by proposing an alternative that would allow these children to obtain legal status but not citizenship.

If Rubio is successful in building support for his proposal, he would be helping the GOP kick a potentially losing issue off the election-year table. Critics have said the proposal would create a permanent underclass.

Properly speaking, Rubio is right. The Arizona law is not a model for the nation. It’s a model for other states to adopt as they see fit. It’s still up to Congress and the sitting president to craft a sensible immigration policy that takes into consideration national security, the rule of law, the probable economic contributions of potential immigrants and other factors. Immigration policy is one that has to be set at the national level for obvious reasons. The federal government’s failure to facilitate an immigration system that works justifies state-level attempts to tighten law enforcement. If federal legislators don’t like such state laws, they ought to provide states with a better framework for welcoming legal immigrants and deterring illegal immigration in the first place.

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We already have laws on the books for this. Why not enforce them?

Mirimichi on April 19, 2012 at 4:23 PM

You seemed to imply that securing the border would put a stop to MS-13 and the illegal drug problem, which it won’t obviously.

Buckshot Bill on April 19, 2012 at 4:18 PM

No, it won’t. But neither will an Arizona-style law do a damn thing to stem gang violence in places where MS-13 is prevalent, unless you’re planning to lock up the hoods’ parents, who are in most cases the only illegal aliens in the equation.

That’s all I was saying. The places where the problem is biggest should get the strongest remedy. There’s no call for overkill.

KingGold on April 19, 2012 at 4:23 PM

Move along KingGold, nothing to see here….

http://www.youthtoday.org/view_article.cfm?article_id=5245

Immigrants are moving to the suburbs as their first step when arriving here in the United States,” Petersen said, “where before they would typically go to the cities, and then the suburbs.”

In Cobb County, Ga., the focus of Petersen’s recent research, Hispanics account for about 74 percent of the known gang population – a demographic trend that is mirrored in national data.

“All you have to do is drive up and down the highway in Atlanta to see the evidence of gang migration,” Knox said.” There’s MS 13 (a notorious Hispanic street gang) markings prominently displayed everywhere.”

Unlike in the past, many of these gangs don’t claim “turf,” or a given geographic area with strict boundaries, as their own, Petersen said. Instead, members can be scattered across a wide area and often travel outside their own neighborhood to commit criminal activity.

Gang recruitment, especially among Hispanics, largely takes place in middle school where kids are still impressionable and have a stronger desire to fit in than older teens, Petersen said. For law enforcement, it’s also a time to drive home the dangers and consequences associated with gang life.

angryed on April 19, 2012 at 4:24 PM

It occurs to me that if we could get the national media to consistently refer to MS-13 not as a national drug gang, but as the Metro-Sexual 13, the gang would likely lose members more rapidly than we could ever arrest or deport them. :)

Buckshot Bill on April 19, 2012 at 4:28 PM

The last thing we need is yet another RINO.

voiceofreason on April 19, 2012 at 4:31 PM

It occurs to me that if we could get the national media to consistently refer to MS-13 not as a national drug gang, but as the Metro-Sexual 13, the gang would likely lose members more rapidly than we could ever arrest or deport them. :)

Buckshot Bill on April 19, 2012 at 4:28 PM

Ha ha. I like it.

angryed on April 19, 2012 at 4:34 PM

You want to give illegals seasonal hunting licenses?!

Or do you want to hunt illegals?

Buckshot Bill on April 19, 2012 at 4:19 PM

D’oh. Not the best turn of phrase on my side. Hunting them could have been fun if, of course, it were legal. That’s how it used to be in the Medieval time: once you are “outside the law”, you’re a free target for everyone who fancies your boots. Oh, and before you start throwing punches over the idea, please mind that I… a) am not Christian, b) have very few moral scruples, c) served in the Israeli Army, and d) was in actual door-to-door combat, and I don’t mean paintball.

Archivarix on April 19, 2012 at 4:37 PM

Archivarix on April 19, 2012 at 4:37 PM

I don’t know, hunting them seems to lack any real challenge. You just yell “I’ve got roof that needs shingling, and $200!” and wait.

It’s like those bear hunts they have up in Canada where they put you up a tree over a giant pile of rotting donuts and you wait to shoot the bears as come in to feed. They might as well be domesticated.

Buckshot Bill on April 19, 2012 at 4:41 PM

I don’t know, hunting them seems to lack any real challenge. You just yell “I’ve got roof that needs shingling, and $200!” and wait.

Buckshot Bill on April 19, 2012 at 4:41 PM

Yep, same as bear hunting, in a fashion. The point is not to kill as many as possible. It is to get a trophy and convince the rest to quit feeding in your backyard.

Archivarix on April 19, 2012 at 4:46 PM

Rubio talks like a Republican but thinks like a progressive. He’s a plant and not to be trusted.

LizardLips on April 19, 2012 at 4:48 PM

Rubio is not to be trusted on immigration.

David Blue on April 19, 2012 at 4:57 PM

Why go with Obama-lite (Romney) . . ..just go all the way with the Original? In the alternative . . . Perry/West 2012 to save America now!

Pragmatic on April 19, 2012 at 5:10 PM

Rubio is not to be trusted.

Pragmatic on April 19, 2012 at 5:11 PM

Rubio talks like a Republican but thinks like a progressive. He’s a plant and not to be trusted.

LizardLips on April 19, 2012 at 4:48 PM

[Just like his buddy Mittens!]

Pragmatic on April 19, 2012 at 5:12 PM

Rubio-just another dissapointment to conservatives…
Stay home in November! The GOP must be destroyed if we are ever to stop the Progressive/Socialists!

redware on April 19, 2012 at 4:23 PM

redware, put down the pipe and step back.

Agree with your desires but your plan is flukin’ flawed.

-Ross Perot remains a bitter pill
-staying home so Captain Queeg can elect the next Supremes
-and, no have constraints with Dmitry Medvedev
-then there’s the debt.

Don’t think so.

The purity of the Republican Party will be the least of our worries.

Typicalwhitewoman on April 19, 2012 at 5:29 PM

The purity competence and honesty of the Republican Party will be the least of our worries.

LegendHasIt on April 19, 2012 at 5:33 PM

We have tons of illegals, but we don’t consider it much of a problem.

ernesto on April 19, 2012 at 3:47 PM

VorDaj on April 19, 2012 at 3:52 PM

People aren’t illegal – actions are. Their undocumented status means that they’re breaking a particular law, but they are people regardless.

ernesto on April 19, 2012 at 3:55 PM

LOL.

farsighted on April 19, 2012 at 6:49 PM

I think the Arizona law is racist. I live in Seattle, WA which is less than two hours away from Vancouver. I personally know plenty of kids from there who live here and speak perfect english who are NOT citizens of the U.S. who would never get questioned but I bet my buddy who IS a citizen and has a strong accent would get asked for his papers if he was pulled over for speeding for example.

Smh,

Things like this is why Republicans will lose the general election.

Politricks on April 19, 2012 at 6:58 PM

I think the Arizona law is racist…..
Politricks on April 19, 2012 at 6:58 PM

Then you think the current laws of the United States are racist.

The Arizona laws are actually a subset of the national immigration laws.. They didn’t add anything, just gave the authority to local law enforcement to do what the feds are SUPPOSED to do.

LegendHasIt on April 19, 2012 at 7:12 PM

…The Arizona laws are actually a subset of the national immigration laws.. They didn’t add anything, just gave the authority to local law enforcement to do what the feds are SUPPOSED to do.

LegendHasIt on April 19, 2012 at 7:12 PM

Whhhaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat?

That’s not what they tell me on msnbc, nbc, abc, cbs, huffington post, moveon.org and all the other “news” sites…

Gohawgs on April 19, 2012 at 8:02 PM

I’ve lost a lot of respect for Rubio lately..mainly for his strong for support of the rebels al qaeda in Libya and his nightmare act…he’s no longer a conservative in my eyes

sadsushi on April 19, 2012 at 9:18 PM

Wait what? Aren’t the words from the Arizona law verbatim from the federal statute?

321mdl on April 19, 2012 at 9:41 PM

I did some research and the problems with Rubio’s DREAM Act are many.

First and foremost is the fact that if we carve out an exception to the law for one group, it will inevitably be used as a wedge to carve out exceptions for others.

We are a nation of laws and those laws must be enforced equitably without preference or prejudice.

The issue that weighs most heavily with me beyond the aforementioned is that in order to grant legal status to these ‘children’ we almost have to grant at least a temporary amnesty to their parents. These parents who brought these children here, many of whom are now adults in their own right, willfully shattering federal immigration law, thus demonstrating a complete and calculated disregard for the rule of law and a clear disdain for the rights of the citizens and legal immigrants of this nation. I don’t believe that these parents deserve to be rewarded by being allowed to bypass our legal immigration system, as was clearly their intent when they decided to ignore our existing federal immigration laws.

Further, if one of these aforementioned illegal aliens brought their child to this nation when that child was a year old or younger, and has been here for five years as mentioned in Rubio’s plan, that child would only be about 5-6 years old, thus we would either be faced with putting that child in foster care for the next 12 years until he/she graduated from high school and reached 18 years of age, OR allow the parent(s) to remain in this nation WITH some sort of legal status AT LEAST until that child reached the age of majority, 18 years of age.

We all know that there are millions of people who would qualify for this AMNESTY, since the estimates being bandied about are that there are between 2-3 million ‘students’ who would qualify for the DREAM Act. 2-3 million students, and then a couple of parents each, another 4-6 million adults who had willfully shattered the law, and we’re at 6-9 million of the estimated 11 million illegal aliens in the nation. That’s AMNESTY.

The fact is that if we get into a contest with Obama to see who can grant the biggest AMNESTY, he wins hands down. WHY would Hispanics vote for a GOP candidate offering a STRICTER version of the DREAM Act than the Democrats version if that’s really the deciding factor to them? They wouldn’t.

IF we can’t persuade the Latino community to vote for Romney because they have an unemployment rate that is 3.5% higher than the average under Obama, and that they are better off as one of a much larger group of AMERICANS than they are as a special interest splinter group being held perpetually hostage by the Democrats over immigration, then they are beyond reason…and they would vote for the Democrats in ANY case.

I believe that the Latino community IS reasonable, and that they will vote for a better economy for ALL AMERICANS and to free themselves from being relegated to only the singular and unending issue of immigration.

For all of these reasons, I can’t support any DREAM Act or any other legislation that is going to seek to carve out preferential treatment for any block of illegal aliens. We all deserve equality under the law.

We can legislate until the sun grows cold, if we don’t ENFORCE THE LAWS WE HAVE, it makes no difference at all.

thatsafactjack on April 19, 2012 at 9:43 PM

Gohawgs on April 19, 2012 at 8:02 PM

I know. Weird, huh?

Apparently either they are lying or I am. I guess comparing the actual legislation(s) would give evidence of who is correct.

But actual research is also racist.

Or something.

LegendHasIt on April 19, 2012 at 9:51 PM

People aren’t illegal – actions are. Their undocumented status means that they’re breaking a particular law, but they are people regardless. We tend to choose to treat them as such, and it works out well.

ernesto on April 19, 2012 at 3:55 PM

And “Illegal Alien” defines their status perfectly. They are not simply “undocumented”, they entered the country illegally, knowing what their status would be, knowing they were breaking our laws, knowing that they would have to “live in the shadows”. Thus, we owe them nothing. They chose this.

What do liberals have against people taking responsibility for their own actions? Why is that such a terrible concept to liberals?

Monkeytoe on April 20, 2012 at 8:13 AM

this is why Rubio will “not” make a good VP candidate. Sit back and watch his favorable numbers go down significantly. Just as they did with Rick Perry and Newt when they went soft on illegal immigration. Will these people ever learn? Demint would make a good VP for Mitt. DD

Darvin Dowdy on April 20, 2012 at 8:27 AM

Up for re-election, huh Rubio. So criticize Arizona instead of fixing your own State. Illegals are illegals, you twit! Um..I hope he realizes that ‘twit’ is not a racist word.

dahni on April 20, 2012 at 12:57 PM

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