Government to mandate “black boxes” on passenger vehicles?

posted at 11:06 am on April 19, 2012 by Ed Morrissey

Bruce McQuain at QandO picks up on an effort in the Senate to make cars even more expensive than ever.  The MAP-21 bill is already notorious for giving the IRS the power to confiscate passports on suspicion of tax evasion without getting a judge involved or a suspect a chance to defend himself, and its presence as part of the transportation bill makes it a little easier to pass unnoticed through the House.  Another section of MAP-21 would impose a mandate, starting in 2015, to equip every passenger vehicle sold in the US with a “black box” event data recording system:

SEC. 31406. VEHICLE EVENT DATA RECORDERS.

(a) Mandatory Event Data Recorders-

(1) IN GENERAL- Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall revise part 563 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, to require, beginning with model year 2015, that new passenger motor vehicles sold in the United States be equipped with an event data recorder that meets the requirements under that part.

(2) PENALTY- The violation of any provision under part 563 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations–

(A) shall be deemed to be a violation of section 30112 of title 49, United States Code;

(B) shall be subject to civil penalties under section 30165(a) of that title; and

(C) shall not subject a manufacturer (as defined in section 30102(a)(5) of that title) to the requirements under section 30120 of that title.

Title 49, section 563 relates the requirements for ground-transportation EDRs if added to a vehicle by a manufacturer.  It doesn’t require vehicles to include one — or it doesn’t at the moment.  S.1813 would change that to make it a requirement.

In other words, this will be similar to the black-box requirements for airplanes, used to reconstruct events after a crash or other incidents.  There are a lot of auto accidents in the US, but unlike with commercial aircraft, they don’t usually fall 30,000 feet.  The federal government mandated black boxes on aircraft because so little evidence otherwise survives a catastrophic crash, an outcome that’s rare among traffic accidents involving cars.

Besides that, the federal government has jurisdiction over aviation; they don’t over normal traffic.  If states saw a need for this requirement, they could impose it themselves.  California, for instance, has specific and unique requirements for emission systems in vehicles sold in the state, and automakers adapted by selling California-specific versions of their models.

The next question is who gets access to the data, and that’s a little murky.  The proposal states that the owner of the vehicle owns the data as well, but with some exceptions:

(b) Limitations on Information Retrieval-

(1) OWNERSHIP OF DATA- Any data in an event data recorder required under part 563 of title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, regardless of when the passenger motor vehicle in which it is installed was manufactured, is the property of the owner, or in the case of a leased vehicle, the lessee of the passenger motor vehicle in which the data recorder is installed.

(2) PRIVACY- Data recorded or transmitted by such a data recorder may not be retrieved by a person other than the owner or lessee of the motor vehicle in which the recorder is installed unless–

(A) a court authorizes retrieval of the information in furtherance of a legal proceeding;

(B) the owner or lessee consents to the retrieval of the information for any purpose, including the purpose of diagnosing, servicing, or repairing the motor vehicle;

(C) the information is retrieved pursuant to an investigation or inspection authorized under section 1131(a) or 30166 of title 49, United States Code, and the personally identifiable information of the owner, lessee, or driver of the vehicle and the vehicle identification number is not disclosed in connection with the retrieved information; or

(D) the information is retrieved for the purpose of determining the need for, or facilitating, emergency medical response in response to a motor vehicle crash.

In other words, the vehicle owner retains the data, until (a) a court or (c) and (d) government decides he doesn’t.  Speaking of which, what exactly does (d) mean?  I suppose this is based on the OnStar system, which relays GPS coordinates to a call center when airbags deploy, but that is a private transaction between the owner and the service.  This is supposedly a mandate for event-data recorders, not for transmitters and ongoing two-way communications.  What would a black box have to do with emergency response if all they do is record?  How much surveillance would these EDRs allow, anyway?

I suspect that this is an effort by the Senate to plow the road for a mileage tax.  With gasoline tax revenues expected to drop with the advent of electric and hybrid vehicles (a large assumption, by the way), Democrats have been looking for ways to recoup the lost revenue.  They have repeatedly discussed and occasionally proposed instituting a mileage tax, which would either force drivers to keep extensive records of their travel or to add a device that calculates mileage and transmits it to the government.  Forcing manufacturers to include EDRs would give future Congresses the device necessary for this step; all it would take would be a future modification to Title 49, part 563 to require mileage collection.  There doesn’t appear to be any other pressing reason to add EDRs to the family car.

Addendum: Some cars already include EDRs or their rough equivalents (and have to comply with the existing Title 49 part 563 when they do).  No one is arguing that manufacturers should be barred from adding them, but this should be a choice for manufacturers and buyers, not a mandate.


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…but I refuse to play the game
Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 1:09 PM

Ok, so what does THAT look like exactly?

Cleombrotus on April 19, 2012 at 1:33 PM

Given that so many crimes occur in homes, shouldn’t the Congress mandate Telescreen monitoring of all rooms in houses? Of course the data would only be retrieved in the case of genuine government need, and the individual citizen would always have the right to object before his or her transport to reeducation camps, but the need for this kind of home safety device is obvious.

MTF on April 19, 2012 at 1:14 PM

Given that so many crimes are occurring in congress and in the Oval Office, maybe it’s time to have telescreens in all of their private offices and broadcast the pictures out onto the sidewalks, malls and into our homes. They need more monitoring than we do.

Hey.. why not just have chips implanted in our skulls. That we they would know where we are, what we’re doing and what we’re saying at all times. And if we refuse to jump when a cops yells “Jump” they can turn a switch or push a button that shuts our brains down. If you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear.
Can we use that line on politicians? “If they have nothing to hide from the public, they should have nothing to fear from our telescreens!”

Every technology offers with it both a new way to free man and/or a new way to enslave man. And this garbage.. “Well.. this is the 21st century and we’re facing new threats blah blah blah.” That argument has been around since the beginning of time. “It’s a new day and therefore we have to enslave you to protect you.” Back when they invented the wheel there was some cave man arguing the need to enslave all the other cave dwellers because “this wheel thing meant it was a new day. Freedom is out. We must embrace socialism now! Wheel changes everything!”

JellyToast on April 19, 2012 at 1:34 PM

@wildcat72

If I was a golden goose, I’d sh!t golden eggs.

(There is no golden goose. Likewise, you aren’t organizing 50 million Americans to do this. Technology will trump humanity, increasingly (and exponentially) as time goes on.

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 1:34 PM

I wanna know if there’s somebody that shouldn’t be coming back after 2012.

Getting ‘UN-elected’ for agreeing with this seems like a good way to ‘send a message’ to these clowns.

CPT. Charles on April 19, 2012 at 12:10 PM

Now Now Now … let’s be careful here – remember that some of those establishment Republicans, like Scott Brown, actually agree with you on about 75% of the issues!

LOL

/s

HondaV65 on April 19, 2012 at 1:34 PM

… a 1984 world …

Standard Republicans should rise up and show some Paulish outrage on this.

With embedded GPS they (who’s they? who knows) always know where you’ve been, when, and where you are. Plus they’ll probably mandate auto car-disablers so “they” can disable your car anytime, from anywhere… Imagine also cell phones are mandated as buggers and trackers too. No more mandates!
`

I forgot to add, yes, your speed “they” know? Can you say auto-ticket? No thanks bud.

Remember when the leftists mandated that speedometers couldn’t go above 85mph? (ca. 1983? [ironic, just in time for the real 1984!]) To go along with the leftists’ 55mph speed limit. That went over real well.

So, to summarize your 1984 future… cars which records your speed and every move, and may even give a panoramic photographic record (with low cost of future bandwidth & data storage). Cell phones that track your place and actions. Camera’s everywhere, and at every red light (you have double evidence against you now… your own car gives you a red light ticket, so does that red light [2 tickets?]). Internet and TV tracking. Flying drones everywhere. And more that I can’t think of.

End this seeming unimpeded march to a 1984 Brave New World that we don’t want!!

anotherJoe on April 19, 2012 at 1:35 PM

Ok, so what does THAT look like exactly?

Cleombrotus on April 19, 2012 at 1:33 PM

In my case, I will opt out of life. Others can make choices as they see fit.

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 1:36 PM

Ok, the government has officially gone too far!!!

easyt65 on April 19, 2012 at 1:40 PM

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 1:36 PM

That’s pretty sobering, Mitchell, and I appreciate the realism. But there has to be a better option.

Cleombrotus on April 19, 2012 at 1:41 PM

So, I’ve been thinking about this. That thing Progressive is offering (keep in mind Progressive is owned by a committed lefty—the name expresses his political views) does the same thing. But what can it tell you? If you brake hard, it might have been a dog or kid who ran in front of your car. And it might be recording you’re going 70 MPH, but you might be on Route 95 and that’s the speed limit. How does it tell if you’re going that fast in a 45 MPH stretch of road? Without a GPS.

Mechanical failure in cars seldom cause accidents, and we’ve sufficient means to determine driver error. Besides even if your black box indicates you exceeded the speed limit yesterday, what has that to do with the accident you’re in today? Are you going to get tickets based on what’s in the black box?

Is there going to be a drive recorder too? Just like the flight recorder?

This is beyond absurd. Cars are not airplanes. A car making a swerve to get out of the way of debris on the road isn’t like a pilot not compensating for icing or something. Which Republicans voted for this nonsense? Seriously. This is not only creepy, big brother-wise, it’s just plain stupid.

Portia46 on April 19, 2012 at 1:47 PM

That’s pretty sobering, Mitchell, and I appreciate the realism. But there has to be a better option.

Cleombrotus on April 19, 2012 at 1:41 PM

This is only part of It. Other factors are personal and still others (last and least probably) are philosophical.

But the inevitable and exponentially increasing emergent phenomena of technological evolution, and the resulting loss of privacy and freedom are factors. I’d say 2nd for me on my list of 3.

Also, there is no way to solve that problem. In principle the others are, however difficult. but the problem in question will be a problem for more an more people as time (not much time) goes on, until there are no people — probably as a result of the artificially intelligent technologies.

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 1:48 PM

Progressive car insurance already offers a discount on your insurance if you plug their device into your car so they can monitor what you do. They want you to volunteer for this!

I will definitely look for a way to disable this thing, if I buy a new car.

TerryW on April 19, 2012 at 1:51 PM

How long before we are all required to have a chip implanted?

bopbottle on April 19, 2012 at 11:24 AM

That’s not out of the realm of things, the way this government is headed. Wasn’t it one of Obama’s minions that suggested we “microchip” our kids just like we do our pets?

Susanboo on April 19, 2012 at 1:53 PM

Technology will eclipse what it has meant to be human in a way I don’t want. Philosophically, I personally don’t see accepting a situation I don’t want as mandatory for me.

Others believe you should accept whatever happens, no matter how much against their values, and make the best of it. I respect that. That’s one of their values. But not my value.

What do you think the surveillance technology will be like in 30 years? The communications technology, etc? How do you think you will personally “fit in” to this society — as a human being?

However you estimate the technology to be in 30 years, I think you underestimate it.

But now is beginning to be plenty bad as this post shows.

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 1:53 PM

It’s Government Motors which has been putting black boxes in cars. No surprise there–and another excellent reason to avoid buying their products.

Portia46 on April 19, 2012 at 1:55 PM

angryed on April 19, 2012 at 11:53 AM

As you appear to have zero value on this planet, yourself…yes.

MadisonConservative on April 19, 2012 at 1:56 PM

But what can it tell you? If you brake hard, it might have been a dog or kid who ran in front of your car. And it might be recording you’re going 70 MPH, but you might be on Route 95 and that’s the speed limit. How does it tell if you’re going that fast in a 45 MPH stretch of road? Without a GPS.

What point were you trying to make? It will have GPS. Obviously.

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 1:56 PM

The paranoia runs deep at RomneyAir. Seems like every single advancement in technology scares you people.

angryed on April 19, 2012 at 11:35 AM

Maybe ed died and one of his liberal relatives is posing as him. That would explain the sudden change in his political views.

Susanboo on April 19, 2012 at 2:02 PM

I have heard starvation works well on government mandates and trolls.

Bmore on April 19, 2012 at 2:05 PM

Is that a Chevy Volt in the cover pic?

Dominion on April 19, 2012 at 2:05 PM

I have heard starvation works well on government mandates and trolls.

Bmore on April 19, 2012 at 2:05 PM

You are dumb (including about the “troll” thing).

But aide from that, you think Bmore’s half-arsed little anonymous comments and a few thousand more like yours across the blogosphere are going to translate into a serious mass-movement where large numbers of people are collectively risking serious financial penalties and criminal records and punishments for themselves?

In your dreams, pal. In your dreams.

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 2:21 PM

*aside

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 2:22 PM

But what can it tell you? If you brake hard, it might have been a dog or kid who ran in front of your car. And it might be recording you’re going 70 MPH, but you might be on Route 95 and that’s the speed limit. How does it tell if you’re going that fast in a 45 MPH stretch of road? Without a GPS.

What point were you trying to make? It will have GPS. Obviously.

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 1:56 PM

Not necessarily…..

My question is: Is this for newer or all vehicles?

More importantly: where is all this computing power to run this boondoggle gonna come from?

BlaxPac on April 19, 2012 at 2:26 PM

Tyranny is the new normal in America.

Axion on April 19, 2012 at 2:28 PM

More importantly: where is all this computing power to run this boondoggle gonna come from?

A tiny installed chip that’s In the car already. I don’t know why you think this would take a lot of CPU power. Yes, they’d have to add a bit of memory.

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 2:32 PM

Susanboo on April 19, 2012 at 2:02 PM

….boo boo!…please leave it alone in the forest!

KOOLAID2 on April 19, 2012 at 2:33 PM

You are Random.

Bmore on April 19, 2012 at 2:34 PM

I walked you to the door once. Be happy to oblige a second time.

Bmore on April 19, 2012 at 2:35 PM

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 2:32 PM

I meant the processing of the information itself. Even if not real-time, you’re talking about a bit of number crunching

BlaxPac on April 19, 2012 at 2:36 PM

Maybe ed died and one of his liberal relatives is posing as him. That would explain the sudden change in his political views.

Susanboo on April 19, 2012 at 2:02 PM

Yes, because Ed has never been opposed to government overreach, or demonstrated libertarian tendencies. You totally nailed it. Maybe that liberal relative of his is the one who posted all those Reason.com videos. Total mystery.

MadisonConservative on April 19, 2012 at 2:37 PM

I walked you to the door once. Be happy to oblige a second time.

You are a whiny “run to mama” little b:tch, aren’t you?

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 2:39 PM

I can’t get too exercised about this, all modern cars have computer that monitor hundreds of variables and many of them already record them. It’s a very small increment, and could be used to find design failures and save lives. (Not to mention corporate reputations — recorded data has been used to prove many “runaway car” cases to be human-caused.)

Socratease on April 19, 2012 at 2:39 PM

You’re as thin skinned as always. ; ) Still funny though.

Bmore on April 19, 2012 at 2:41 PM

Its been fun. Bye.

Bmore on April 19, 2012 at 2:43 PM

Back OnTopic: Disconnect/disable the hardware ? No way.
The ‘features’ will be added right into the onboard computer that already controls the engine, transmission, brakes, radio, and dome-lights.
Remember those OnStar ads featuring a stolen vehicle? Ask your friends that get email reminders about oil-changes and tire pressure!

Traffic cops will suck your speed data out via bluetooth .. Resistance is futile.

/.

CaveatEmpty on April 19, 2012 at 12:20 PM

Yep, mess with it and the ‘Check Engine’ light will go on. With the Check Engine light on you can’t pass emissions testing in any county that it’s required, which is most metro counties.

slickwillie2001 on April 19, 2012 at 3:01 PM

Any guesses on how long it will take an insurance company to raise your rates if you don’t turn over the information? And any guesses on how long it will take an insurance company to raise your rates after you turn over the information and they see how fast you drive?

Of course, this is all Constitutional under the Broccoli sub-clause of Commerce Clause of the US Constitution. (I.E., Anything the Federal government wants to do, is OK.)

Fred 2 on April 19, 2012 at 3:02 PM

Why doesn’t the govt just implant a tracking device underneath the skin of every newborn and be done with it.

Kissmygrits on April 19, 2012 at 3:06 PM

The ATF can’t even track a few guns sold to drug cartels, why do they think they can track every car on the road.

Kissmygrits on April 19, 2012 at 3:08 PM

The MAP-21 bill is already notorious for giving the IRS the power to confiscate passports on suspicion of tax evasion without getting a judge involved or a suspect a chance to defend himself

Does the follwoing sound all too familiar?

In a country where the “separation of powers” has become a bad joke, the law courts are no less corrupt.

The threat of prosecution for tax fraud is the [Government’s] weapon of choice against anyone who dares to challenge its hegemony.

When [citizen], once the richest man in [country], used his oil wealth to promote human rights and democracy, [fascist leader] detected a threat to his throne.

The [citizen] was duly arrested and convicted of fraud. He now languishes in jail where he is in the third year of an eight-year prison sentence.

Almost every national radio and television station is now controlled directly or indirectly by the state, and the same applies to every newspaper of any influence.

That diminishing number who have the courage to investigate or speak out against the abuses perpetrated by the rich and powerful very soon find themselves out of a job – or, in an alarming number of cases, on the receiving end of a deadly bullet.

Some 20 journalists have been killed in suspicious circumstances since [fascist leader] came to office. No one has yet been convicted for any of these crimes.

[fascist leader] calls the system over which he presides “sovereign democracy”. I think a better term is “cryptofascism”.

Any guesses what country that is?

If we do not expect and demand justice and freedom, and instead only care about stability and security, then it won’t be long before the United States of America becomes like that country in all of the other ways shown above.

ITguy on April 19, 2012 at 3:17 PM

You are Random.

Bmore on April 19, 2012 at 2:34 PM

A self-loathing, nihilistic, gay liberal?
Naw!

tom daschle concerned on April 19, 2012 at 3:27 PM

But aide from that, you think Bmore’s half-arsed little anonymous comments and a few thousand more like yours across the blogosphere are going to translate into a serious mass-movement where large numbers of people are collectively risking serious financial penalties and criminal records and punishments for themselves?
In your dreams, pal. In your dreams.
Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 2:21 PM

Unfortunately, I fear you are correct.

And so we slowly slip into servitude. You’re also correct in your assessment of technology outstripping what it means to be human.

But, as for me, I’m not checking out of life. I’m fighting on a different level.

Cleombrotus on April 19, 2012 at 4:03 PM

Unfortunately, I fear you are correct.

And so we slowly slip into servitude. You’re also correct in your assessment of technology outstripping what it means to be human.

But, as for me, I’m not checking out of life. I’m fighting on a different level.

Cleombrotus on April 19, 2012 at 4:03 PM

Good luck to you. I hope you enjoy it as much as possible. 

And — as on almost everything else — tom daschle is wrong, of course. I don’t hate myself. I hate the world I live in: the lies, the overlooking of evil, the stupidity, the suffering. I also like some parts of the world. But for me, on balance, my best time is past. So I’m not long for this world even though I tarry a little for a certain discrete finite reason. 

I hate the tom daschles of this world. Vicious, and stupid, at the same time. 

He’s also wrong about the other two things he said: gay and a liberal (read leftist). I’m neither. But being stupid and wrong and vicious is the default state for this world’s tom daschles. 

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 4:26 PM

Well, if Dick Morris says it’s true – it must be.

LOL – Morris “Flip-Flops” more than Willard McDole!

The easiest way to do so is to name a woman. Two seem available. But Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, an attractive candidate for the future, is too inexperienced and Texas Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison is, perhaps, too experienced. Both would have difficulty navigating a presidential campaign. Hutchison might just seem like an old woman running with an old man, and Palin with McCain might seem like a father-daughter team, the younger partner just learning the ropes.

McCain has reached for the stars and grabbed one. On a recent cruise to Alaska, I had the pleasure of spending an afternoon with Sarah Palin. She is brilliant and articulate and, in Alaska politics, is a breath of fresh air as an alternative to their corruption epitomized by Alaska Republican Senator Ted Stevens. Now Obama, who has spent two years preventing a woman from being president, will spend two months preventing one from becoming vice president – and hopes to do so with women votes. The entire premise of the Democratic convention was the fungibility of Bush and McCain. Now McCain has vividly demonstrated the difference. Sarah Palin is no Dick Cheney!

HondaV65 on April 19, 2012 at 4:28 PM

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 4:26 PM

tl;dr

tom daschle concerned on April 19, 2012 at 4:29 PM

When they do that, that will be the last time I ever buy a new vehicle.

sage0925 on April 19, 2012 at 5:48 PM

When they do that, that will be the last time I ever buy a new vehicle.

sage0925 on April 19, 2012 at 5:48 PM

Might want to pick up a new model soon then.

Bmore on April 19, 2012 at 5:50 PM

Yeah, they’ve been trying to do this with us truckers for years. Most of us already have them(Qualcomm units). One a$$hole in Lahood’s dept wanted to have mandatory cameras inside the cab of all our rigs. Not just new trucks. Older trucks would need to be compliant as well.

CITIZEN! OBEY YOUR FEDERAL OVERLORDS!!!!

DStreete on April 19, 2012 at 5:53 PM

Exactly. The government WILL know where you’re at at all times. The next black box will be very small, installed at birth, probably in the left arm.

If this doesn’t scare the bejessus our of you, you’re unconscience.

Portia46 on April 19, 2012 at 11:32 AM

Right hand or forehead.

PalinLover on April 19, 2012 at 5:59 PM

Remote monitoring? Pshaw. Let’s consider the “remote shutdown” option, shall we? Sure, it’ll be billed as a way for cops to stop a stolen car, but there’s no practical restriction on it’s use.

BTW: did you pay your tax bill, citizen?

mojo on April 19, 2012 at 6:03 PM

Mitchell Heisman on April 19, 2012 at 4:26 PM

Well, believe it or not, I find such clear-sighted pessimism encouraging in a strange way. There’s a part of me that really wants to see hope where there really isn’t any and so deceive myself because it’s somehow comforting. I’d much rather go forward with my eyes in my head, hating what I see, rather than being blind and fooling myself.

I’d check that sense of despair I get in your writings though. There actually is a Hope. It’s just not on this side of eternity, is all.

Best to you as well, Mitchell [Luck's got nothing to do with it ;) ]

Cleombrotus on April 19, 2012 at 7:19 PM

Oops, sorry, that was “Brave New World” wasn’t it.
WryTrvllr on April 19, 2012 at 12:06 PM

or solvent green

unseen on April 19, 2012 at 8:23 PM

Well yea, Ed.

It was the Patriot Act 1, then PA 2, then NDAA, then the Natural Resource(s) Executive Orders…then mandated black boxes in cars….what’s not to like?

Yes, because Ed has never been opposed to government overreach, or demonstrated libertarian tendencies. You totally nailed it. Maybe that liberal relative of his is the one who posted all those Reason.com videos. Total mystery.

MadisonConservative on April 19, 2012 at 2:37 PM

Exactly.

What line will we not let them cross?

Mcguyver on April 19, 2012 at 9:31 PM

Nope. Ain’t gonna do it. As long as I can drive something older and faster and immune to computer-killer rayguns, I’m gonna outdrive ‘em or bust.

cane_loader on April 19, 2012 at 10:41 PM

This isn’t about a mileage tax. Cars already include the instrument needed for a mileage tax; it’s called an odometer. This is about government slowly gaining total control over citizens. It’s one more way to hijack the majesty and the power of the law to punish anyone who won’t comply with government micromanagement.

njcommuter on April 20, 2012 at 12:32 AM

DStreete on April 19, 2012 at 5:53 PM
if all motorists had to follow all the rules we do as CDL drivers there would be more outrage over this kind of thing. I parked my eagle and trailers this year because I can’t take it any more.
njcommuter on April 20, 2012 at 12:32 AM
This is my opinion as well, you nailed it.

aceinstall on April 20, 2012 at 9:41 AM

They have repeatedly discussed and occasionally proposed instituting a mileage tax, which would either force drivers to keep extensive records of their travel or to add a device that calculates mileage and transmits it to the government.

Really? Extensive records? Why not just record the odometer reading when the vehicle gets its annual inspection? Then you subtract it from last year’s.

GWB on April 20, 2012 at 9:46 AM

Really? Extensive records? Why not just record the odometer reading when the vehicle gets its annual inspection? Then you subtract it from last year’s.

GWB on April 20, 2012 at 9:46 AM

By not renewing you get away with last years mileage, also, each jurisdiction wants to collect tax much like we have to do now in the trucking industry. It’s called I.R.P., we have to register for every state we travel thru and record the mileage in said state, than calculate M.P.G. for the quarter and send fuel tax to each state traveled in. If I only buy fuel in Maine, N.H. feels cheated because that is how they fund road repair.

aceinstall on April 20, 2012 at 10:09 AM

I predict an I.R.P. type program coming soon to all drivers. complain all you want, but if you all were willing to impose massive rules and regulations on me ( commercial driver ) in the name of public safety, it will be easy for regulators to expand it to you.

aceinstall on April 20, 2012 at 10:20 AM

This passed the Senate already but still has to pass the House. Contact your Rep. to vote this monstrosity down. And a couple of more notable (at least to me) items:

co-sponsers:
Sen. Max Baucus (D-MT)
Sen. James “Jim” Inhofe [R-OK]
Sen. David Vitter [R-LA]

WHAT?????

And then:
under the Sec. 22701: National Rail Plan
Authorizes Unions to be included in adopting planing for the development of a long range National Rail Plan.
What business does a union have being included in developing a long range National Rail Plan?

boogieboy on April 20, 2012 at 4:37 PM

I’m shocked, shocked! at the picture of that electric car.

I thought they weren’t supposed to have any carbon footprint!

CatchAll on April 21, 2012 at 4:41 PM

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