Your tax tuition dollars at work

posted at 9:10 am on April 5, 2012 by Jazz Shaw

One thing is for sure this election year… we’re going to be investing more in education. (And by “for sure” I mean, “not at all” once the election is over.) But everyone is talking about it. And let’s admit that education is important if we’re going to train up a new generation of scientists, engineers, business leaders and the people who will make the economy go.

So… how’s that working out?

College and university administrators have been happy to scoop up all the money by rapidly raising tuitions and fees. Higher-ed expenses have been rising much more rapidly than inflation for three decades.

And what has the money been spent on? Some of it presumably goes to professors in the hard sciences and the great scholars who have made American universities the best in the world. Well and good.

But many university administrators have other priorities. The University of California system has been raising tuitions and cutting departments. But, reports John Leo in the invaluable Minding the Campus blog, its San Diego campus found the money to create a new post of “vice chancellor for equity, diversity and inclusion.”

That’s in addition to what the Manhattan Institute’s Heather Mac Donald calls its “already massive diversity apparatus.” It takes Mac Donald 103 words just to list the titles of UCSD’s diversitycrats.

The money for the new vice chancellorship could have supported two of the three cancer researchers that the campus lost to Rice University in Houston, a private school that apparently takes the strange view that hard science is more important than diversity facilitators.

So basically, we may not find a cure for cancer, but we’re going to be chock full of people who can make you feel better about it.

This is one of those crazy stories which seems to keep cropping up that ticks everyone off but probably doesn’t mean very much in the end. This isn’t a government problem and it’s not an education problem. It’s the administrative branch of the the industry of education which bends to the winds of populism rather than offering the best path toward success for their students. But in the end, nobody made the students go there. Everyone participates in the free market of education. The only votes which count here are the ones cast with the feet and wallets of parents and students.


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I have a degree in Computer engineering. All college debt were paid off in 4 years.
. . .
liberal4life on April 5, 2012 at 9:47 AM

It is patently obvious that you was not an English Major . . .

BigAlSouth on April 5, 2012 at 7:04 PM

The money for the new vice chancellorship could have supported two of the three cancer researchers that the campus lost to Rice University in Houston, a private school that apparently takes the strange view that hard science is more important than diversity facilitators.

Rice is in Texas, after all.

Rice is in Houston — not as bad as being in Austin, but don’t get the idea that Rice is a hotbed of conservatism: the Academic departments are just as Leftist as in any university on the Coasts.

However, regardless of political persuasion, they take their engineering seriously.

The original name of the school was The William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science, and Art; the university has the distinction of being the only university whose founding was nearly scuttled when the founder’s lawyer and butler conspired to murder him and change his will.

The student body was pretty evenly divided in the Seventies, but was trending Left even as I watched, propelled in large part by the Watergate hearings. Fortunately, two years as a political science graduate student at UT Austin turned me back to the Right.

AesopFan on April 5, 2012 at 7:04 PM

Ehh, in the end when it comes to education it doesn’t matter anyway. I mean it’s not like those cancer researchers at Rice are actually going to teach classes. That’s what grad students are for. (Ok, so I’m a little jaded.)

Dave_d on April 5, 2012 at 11:01 PM

This is all true but look on the bright side, at least they are not teaching anything fairly to all races.

Dollayo on April 6, 2012 at 3:28 AM

Let’s face it: If you want an education go to the library and the Internet. If you want to be indoctrinated toward leftist ideology at a place where diversity is only skin deep and no real diversity of thought exists then by all means go to an American university.

Dollayo on April 6, 2012 at 4:29 AM

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