NFL suspends Saints coaches, fines team $500K for “bounties”

posted at 2:30 pm on March 21, 2012 by Ed Morrissey

Two big NFL stories hit at almost the same time today, and while one will undoubtedly be more popular, the other will have more real-world impact.  After the exposure of a “bounty” system in New Orleans in which players got rewarded for big hits that put opponents on the sidelines, everyone expected that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell would have to take some action.  Today, he lowered the boom on the Saints, suspending head coach Sean Payton for the entire 2012 season and putting another coach on “indefinite suspension,” and tagged on a half-million-dollar fine as well (via Warren Sapp on Twitter):

Saints coach Sean Payton has been suspended for one year, former defensive coordinator Gregg Williams was suspended indefinitely, general manager Mickey Loomis was suspended for eight regular-season games, the team was fined $500,000 and lost two second-round draft picks (one in 2012 and ’13) as a result of a bounty program conducted by the team during the 2009-11 seasons. …

Williams, now defensive coordinator of the Rams, has admitted to and apologized for running the program.

Payton and Loomis apologized and took the blame for violations that “happened under our watch,” but not until almost a week after the NFL pointed to them for failing to stop the program.

Rumors of bounty payments have floated for many years in the league, but this is the first time that the NFL has done anything significant about it.  Given the harsh penalties meted out to players for these hits, Goodell had little choice but to get tough with the Saints.  The league already faces legal action over the long-term effects of the game on players, and having its management participate in these bounties would have complicated their legal defense in the future unless the league imposed significant punishment.

The game is naturally tough enough on the health and longevity of players.  The 24-hour sports channels reward spectacular hits with plenty of airplay as it is.  The NFL did the right thing in cracking down on New Orleans, and it should follow suit on other teams who used the same kind of incentive systems aimed at knocking players out of games.

The other blockbuster story comes from New York, where Tim Tebow will land this season on the Jets’ runway:

Unusually quiet in recent weeks, the New York Jets shattered the calm Wednesday by completing a trade for polarizing quarterback Tim Tebow, the team confirmed.

The Jets will send a fourth-round pick to the Denver Broncos, a source said. …

Several teams expressed interest, including Tebow’s hometown Jacksonville Jaguars, but the Jets — perceived as a sleeper at the outset — pulled off the splashiest trade of the offseason.

This is a pretty strange trade.  Tebow might not have had all the skills in place, but he took the Broncos from 1-4 to the second round of the playoffs, and played very well against a tough but injured Pittsburgh Steelers defense.  If all Denver could get for him was a 4th-round pick, why bother at all?  Tebow could have played behind Peyton Manning and learned at the feet of the master for a couple more years, until Peyton was ready to hang up the cleats.  Denver would have had a seasoned vet on the bench who has already succeeded with the team in case Peyton goes down, and a stronger QB for the future.  Now they have to start all over again.  Meanwhile, Tebow will sit in New York behind Mark Sanchez, and probably end up creating a QB controversy there.

On the other hand, Denver VP John Elway paid Tebow a pretty nice compliment … on the way out the door, of course:

Tim Tebow’s a great kid. If I want someone to marry my daughter, it’s him,” Elway said. “Tim is a great football player, but with the opportunity that presented itself here, we had to take advantage of that.”

That really is a very nice thing for a father to say about a young man.  However, it’s somewhat diluted by Elway’s description of him as a “great football player,” considering he had just traded Tebow for a 4th-round pick.


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I have no problem with the fines or the suspension of Williams. The season long suspension of Payton and the loss of draft picks is outrageous.

If the NFL wants to get rid of bounties, good. Treating Payton and the Saints as if they invented them is wrong.

WannabeAnglican on March 21, 2012 at 3:23 PM

elway was tired of being overshadowed. if manning returns to form and wins elway will try to claim credit for signing. but signing peyton manning is a no-brainer. there are about 5 teams that are in a position to say no to manning, for all the others he’s a serious upgrade.

chasdal on March 21, 2012 at 2:52 PM

Manning has to do more than win. He has to win a Super Bowl. Quickly! he and Elway rolled the dice big time with that press conference. Anything else is failure…by his own standards.

http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/Peyton-Manning-must-win-Super-Bowl-with-Denver-Broncos-032012

a capella on March 21, 2012 at 3:24 PM

Since a lot of people are bringing up illegal hits on Favre I would be interested in just how often the saints got called for peronal fouls/roughing the passer during the NFC championship game. How about how much were Saints players fined for those supposed illegal hits? The answers of course are 2 personal fouls and $0 in fines.

Favre said it best “Had it been us doing that to [Saints quarterback Drew Brees], we probably wouldn’t feel that way,” Favre said. “They would be getting those questions. It’s football. If you’re able get the opposing quarterback out. … Are there cheap hits that happen occasionally? In every game. The ones on the quarterback are more obvious. People see them.”

I guess the NFL should just make it illegal to hit quarterbacks at all since we can’t hit them hard anymore.

MFn G I M P on March 21, 2012 at 3:24 PM

Ted, according to the Dr’s, Manning’s surgeries don’t put him at any higher risk of a spinal injury than someone who didn’t have the surgeries..so fragility isn’t an issue, apparently.

kit9 on March 21, 2012 at 3:26 PM

As for Tebow, I guess Elway ain’t no Lincoln.

jnelchef on March 21, 2012 at 3:23 PM

Exactly—Tebow has that never say die attitude.

INC on March 21, 2012 at 3:26 PM

This was one of the hits in question, right?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23l5oR9UO8k

visions on March 21, 2012 at 3:00 PM

These probably didn’t help either. BNo flags on either play.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPZCVCZNc50&feature=player_detailpage#t=15s

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPZCVCZNc50&feature=player_detailpage#t=103s

VikingGoneWild on March 21, 2012 at 3:27 PM

Does anyone really think that the “bounty game” was only played
by the Saints?

Does anyone really think that the NFL did not know this was
going on? Only when it became public did they decide to do
something about it. The fines and suspensions are stiff because
they want to appear that they “care”. They don’t.

Amjean on March 21, 2012 at 3:27 PM

Why couldn’t Tebow be used as a running back and as a threat to throw when given th ball? He looked like a fearless runner.

Vince on March 21, 2012 at 3:28 PM

ted c on March 21, 2012 at 3:21 PM

And the Denver line was pretty horrible last year as far as protecting the quarterback. They allowed 42 sacks last year. You have to question whether Manning will be able to stand up to that, especially since he really doesn’t have the mobility of a younger QB…

PetecminMd on March 21, 2012 at 3:28 PM

I will find it extremely funny if the NFL goes back to when Williams was with Washington and hits them for his actions there-and in the process destroys their trade for the #2 pick this year.

PetecminMd on March 21, 2012 at 3:18 PM

That would exact total chaos in the draft.

Could the NFL order both the #2 and #6 picks to be forfeited, because BOTH the Redskins and Rams hold culpability for employing Williams? A revoking of said trade between both teams for draft picks benefits the Rams, a team that ought to be punished – but it also lets the Redskins off the hook…

Myron Falwell on March 21, 2012 at 3:30 PM

If the NFL wants to get rid of bounties, good. Treating Payton and the Saints as if they invented them is wrong.

WannabeAnglican on March 21, 2012 at 3:23 PM

As a Saints fan, I so want to agree with you. But when you remember that two years ago the NFL told Benson to cut it out and he admits going to the coachs and telling them to stop, I just can’t blame the NFL for lowering the boom on us.

We were warned. We ignored the warning. Now we’re going to pay the price.

It’s fair and we’re a bunch of dumbsh*ts for not stopping it sooner.

DrW on March 21, 2012 at 3:30 PM

This was a deeply stupid maneuver, and I couldn’t be happier because I hate the Donkeys.

John the Libertarian on March 21, 2012 at 3:30 PM

They can buy them from the Vikes’ fans, given how bad the team’s been since Favre threw away the NFCCG after the 2009 season.

teke184 on March 21, 2012 at 3:11 PM

Nope, because as a Viking Fan you are always prepared for the other shoe to drop.

VikingGoneWild on March 21, 2012 at 3:30 PM

What QB will lineup when it’s a goal line stand?

faraway on March 21, 2012 at 3:30 PM

The fines and suspensions are stiff because
they want to appear that they “care”. They don’t.

Amjean on March 21, 2012 at 3:27 PM

you wrong..they care.

they care about their legal liability. allowing a team to plan and administer system for rewarding dangerous hits would be the predicate to nearly unlimited liabilty to players injured as a result of such a scheme.

DrW on March 21, 2012 at 3:34 PM

Did I read the offer was $10K to take out Favre? Can’t remember .. have to find it again.

maables on March 21, 2012 at 3:13 PM

SI claimed in 2010 that Saints MLB Jonathan Vilma offered $10K to anyone who took out Favre, but that claim was later retracted by the source who made it.

teke184 on March 21, 2012 at 3:15 PM

Per ESPN….
“According to the league, Saints defensive captain Jonathan Vilma offered $10,000 to any player who knocked then-Vikings QB Favre out of the 2010 NFC Championship Game.”
http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/7638603/new-orleans-saints-defense-had-bounty-program-nfl-says

VikingGoneWild on March 21, 2012 at 3:35 PM

I’m conservative, played HS football, flew S-3A carrier jets in the Navy, played contact ice hockey till I was 45, but a lot of posters sound like they’d be right at home at the Roman Colosseum.

Bevan on March 21, 2012 at 3:36 PM

New report is that the trade has hit a snag. Tebow has $5 million worth of “recapture” language in his contract, which means the Jets would have to pay it back to the Broncos. The deal may fall apart.

And it’s worth reiterating: The commissioner’s office has stated the penalties were extremely harsh because the Saints “continued to mislead and misrepresent what was going on in the organization.”

JDF123 on March 21, 2012 at 3:38 PM

Could the NFL order both the #2 and #6 picks to be forfeited, because BOTH the Redskins and Rams hold culpability for employing Williams? A revoking of said trade between both teams for draft picks benefits the Rams, a team that ought to be punished – but it also lets the Redskins off the hook…

Myron Falwell on March 21, 2012 at 3:30 PM

I haven’t heard any accusations about Williams at the Rams (didn’t he just get hired there?), but there is talk that he did have a bounty program when he was with Washington as well. If anything happens, it wouldn’t be for employing Williams, but for allowing a bounty program to occur.

There’s a lot of talk here about the fact that the Skins could be penalized, and in some way end up voiding the Rams trade. Some of the people I work with are in a complete panic about it especially after the salary cap fines. Not being a Washington fan myself, I’m enjoying it immensely.

PetecminMd on March 21, 2012 at 3:39 PM

“Putting a bounty on a gimpy-kneed Old Man (Farve)was low even by New Orleans standards.

This kinda crap makes me glad that every time I flush it eventuality ends up in The Big Easy.”
**********************************

Sorry, Bruno, but your fetid excrement remains right there, seeping into the permafrost wasteland you inhabit. Judging by the way you’ve used the term “eventuality,” I suspect that you spent most of your school years hiding out in the bathroom, perhaps exchanging photos of your undersized genitals with your hero, Brett Perv.

Peyton is admittedly a cocky, slick character who exhibits no deference whatsoever to northeastern lawyers or the NFL jockocracy. After Saints’ fans fought back against the NFL over merchandizing rights to the slogan “Who Dat”, costing the league millions in revenue, the writing was on the wall. Vikings fans should not feel validated. Your team still sucks and you live in an icy hell …

BatonRogue on March 21, 2012 at 3:39 PM

Looks like our genius BB has pulled another fast one on the New Jersey Jets.

It made no sense when the Patriots were floated as a possible destination for Tebow. But it was probably a trap because we know that any player BB wants, the Jersey Boys will try to get just to piss BB off. Well we never needed Tebow. Will the Jets convert him to a running back next? LOL

shanimal on March 21, 2012 at 3:42 PM

And the Denver line was pretty horrible last year as far as protecting the quarterback. They allowed 42 sacks last year. You have to question whether Manning will be able to stand up to that, especially since he really doesn’t have the mobility of a younger QB…

PetecminMd on March 21, 2012 at 3:28 PM

Exactly. One would think that Manning’s family would sit his a$$ down on the couch, read him the riot act and remind him that he–as a father, as a husband, as a son–is far more valuable than anything else the NFL could give him. Honestly, if I were his friend, I’d have a real heart to heart with him. I’ve treated a lot of spinal injuries, never have I had a patient with 4 neck procedures, but I’ve had them with 2, maybe 3 done. None of them were ever any bit better, despite subsequent surgeries. None of them would have been counseled to engage in vigorous activities—particularly pro football. But, that’s my 2c.

ted c on March 21, 2012 at 3:43 PM

What QB will lineup when it’s a goal line stand?

faraway on March 21, 2012 at 3:30 PM

the one that’s in great shape with a good neck —oh wait, he’s getting traded.

ted c on March 21, 2012 at 3:45 PM

Tebow sucked as a QB. The NFL has moved to a strong passing league, and Tebow connects on 1 out of 100 passes. Let the Jets deal with his fan base (though it’s been reported that the trade may not pass muster).

Tough hit on the Saints…got everyone’s attention though.

Karmi on March 21, 2012 at 3:52 PM

have you seen the bounty hit on Kurt Warner ? the guy laid him out then did a quick “Heisman” type pose as Warner’s head snapped.

Cheap hit ? Absolutely. If Warner had been the opposing player’s blood brother, he would have just blocked Warner to prevent him from getting to the runner. He might have decked his brother for a good laugh. but not like what happened.

And if Warner wasn’t . . . yeah, I thought it.

williampeck1958 on March 21, 2012 at 3:53 PM

Tebow’s stuck with the clueless & classless Antonio Cromartie as a teammate, who just insulted Tebow on Twitter.

Way to welcome the new kid, loser.

itsnotaboutme on March 21, 2012 at 3:58 PM

As for Tebow, Elway simply wanted him out of Denver because the fan base like Tebow more than Elway now. Can’t have that, now can we? Manning was one of only about 5 QB’s who he could bring in and not have an uprising. Tebow will start for the Jets by week 8. Sanchez will either crumble under the pressure or get hurt.

As for the Saints, ugh. Every NFL team tries to knock the other guys out of games. IT’S WHAT THEY DO.
Most, however, aren’t as weapons grade idiotic enough to promote “injuring” players and obnoxious enough to wave envelopes with money around at player meetings. Just. Freaking. Idiocy.

Sugar Land on March 21, 2012 at 3:59 PM

ted c on March 21, 2012 at 3:43 PM

Denver is probably a lot worse than they look on paper. We don’t get many Broncos games here (with the Skins and the Ravens) but I did see Denver-NE and there were at least 8 plays that Tebow scrambled on that would have resulted in a Manning sack. Admittedly, Tebow did manage to skitter his way to a 30 yard sack at one point, but still I don’t see how the Denver line is going to be a able to protect and older, injured pocket quarterback.

It makes no sense to me.

PetecminMd on March 21, 2012 at 4:01 PM

T-T-T-Timmy and the Jets.

Linsanity & Timsanity in the same city.

“If he can
Make it there
He’ll make it
Anywhere
New York, New York!”

itsnotaboutme on March 21, 2012 at 4:04 PM

ted c on March 21, 2012 at 3:43 PM

That’s about word for word what I told my husband I would do if we were in that situation.

INC on March 21, 2012 at 4:06 PM

The Tebola virus spreads to New York…

Galtian on March 21, 2012 at 4:08 PM

That’s about word for word what I told my husband I would do if we were in that situation.

INC on March 21, 2012 at 4:06 PM

Apparently, John Elway, Peyton Manning & Company know a helluva lot more than we do…./

ted c on March 21, 2012 at 4:09 PM

“Tim Tebow’s a great kid. If I want someone to marry my daughter, it’s him,” Elway said. “Tim is a great football player, but with the opportunity that presented itself here, we had to take advantage of that.”

That really is a very nice thing for a father to say about a young man. However, it’s somewhat diluted by Elway’s description of him as a “great football player,” considering he had just traded Tebow for a 4th-round pick.

“Somewhat diluted” is putting it mildly. Elway clearly doesn’t believe that Tim Tebow is a great football player, all protests aside. I wonder if Elway has ever thought about running for office. Sounds like he’d make a good politician.

gryphon202 on March 21, 2012 at 4:09 PM

Does anyone wonder if the insurance premiums on the neurosurgeon’s that hacked off on Peyton’s ‘medical waiver’ are going to go through the roof come November?

ted c on March 21, 2012 at 4:12 PM

Does anyone wonder if the insurance premiums on the neurosurgeon’s that hacked off on Peyton’s ‘medical waiver’ are going to go through the roof come November?

ted c on March 21, 2012 at 4:12 PM

They won’t. But I think the real question is, should they?

gryphon202 on March 21, 2012 at 4:13 PM

Payton and Loomis apologized and took the blame for violations that “happened under our watch,” but not until almost a week after the NFL pointed to them for failing to stop the program.

I haven’t kept up on this, because I don’t give a damn about pro sports. But, did the NFL bother to take the time to find out whether or not Payton KNEW about the bounty program?

Far too often – you’re presumed guilty, until you prove otherwise.

Since the NFL has chosen to act, the burden should be on the NFL to support its actions – with facts justifying same.

I know, I know – this isn’t a criminal matter and, therefore, the alleged presumption of innocence doesn’t apply.

But, I see this [you're presumed guilty - you have to prove your innocence] kind of mindset trickling into the courtrooms – all of the time.

And I’m getting tired of people being whitewashed with the stain of guilt, with an all too presumptively broad brush.

OhEssYouCowboys on March 21, 2012 at 2:39 PM
~~~~~

There I absolutely no way Peyton didn’t know, IMHO. Everyone knew in that locker room. My husband and i always respected Drew Brees, but today, he came out with a statement saying he demands to know what happened…he should have said nothing, because it stretches credulity to the breaking point to think he had no idea about this. Football is a rough sport, the reality is that you play that game knowing you are going to have extra aches and pains when you grow old, at a minimum. Most players accept that because they want to play. And there’s no getting around the fact that players will go for other players’ weak spots (to be fair, even one of my NY Giants players admitted that, though i can’t remember who he was referencing)…it seems the NFL is trying to do an impossible thing, make the NFL safe…but there’s nothing wrong with punishing outright bounties. There’s got to be accountablilty for so arrogantly offering money to your players for attempting to disable another player. Bounties might not be an incentive to the multi-millionaire palyers, but some guy who just got put on the team from the practice squad? Sure, that could be a big incentive for him.

ellifint on March 21, 2012 at 4:13 PM

As for Tebow, Elway simply wanted him out of Denver because the fan base like Tebow more than Elway now. Can’t have that, now can we?

Sugar Land on March 21, 2012 at 3:59 PM

great point, didn’t think about that. Can’t have any QB overshadowing the greatness of John Elway. That had to eat at his pride….. So he has to go out and grab one that is on his last leg in Peyton Manning.

it all makes more sense now…..

thx.

ted c on March 21, 2012 at 4:15 PM

Has anyone heard about a possible nullification in the Tebow trade? I just saw that in a crawl on ESPN…as much as I would love seeing the train wreck as the Jets attempt to juggle all of this, I hate to think of Tebow in that circus…

ellifint on March 21, 2012 at 4:16 PM

Not so fast, Ed:

http://espn.go.com/new-york/nfl/story/_/id/7718133/tim-tebow-trade-hits-snag-contract-language-source-says

And trading Tebow for one fourth round and one sixth round draft picks.

The teams agreed to the terms of the trade — the Jets dealt fourth-round and sixth-round selections in 2012 in exchange for Tebow and a 2012 seventh-rounder from Denver — before the Broncos asked New York to pay back a portion of bonuses and salary already paid to Tebow, sources told Schefter.

dthorny on March 21, 2012 at 4:17 PM

They won’t. But I think the real question is, should they?

gryphon202 on March 21, 2012 at 4:13 PM

I think the real question is, knowing what those guys know about peyton’s neck, if it were their own………would they go out and play? If the answer is no, and they signed the waiver, then their premiums should go up, because that means they are willing for others to accept risk that they themselves would not be confident in accepting.

ted c on March 21, 2012 at 4:19 PM

have you seen the bounty hit on Kurt Warner ? the guy laid him out then did a quick “Heisman” type pose as Warner’s head snapped.

Cheap hit ? Absolutely. If Warner had been the opposing player’s blood brother, he would have just blocked Warner to prevent him from getting to the runner. He might have decked his brother for a good laugh. but not like what happened.

And if Warner wasn’t . . . yeah, I thought it.

williampeck1958 on March 21, 2012 at 3:53 PM

And that hit was what forced Kurt Warner to retire.

dthorny on March 21, 2012 at 4:20 PM

I hope the Tebow trade to the Jets gets nullified. As a NY Giants fan, I’d rather root for Tebow playing for another team than join that circus of an organization that is the NY Jets.

RedRobin145 on March 21, 2012 at 4:21 PM

But, did the NFL bother to take the time to find out whether or not Payton KNEW about the bounty program?

The way I heard it was:

The NFL called Tom Benson, the owner, and said they had a bounty program and they needed to stop. Tom Benson called his GM and explained the problem and told him to knock it off. The GM proceeded to ignore that directive, and allow the program to continue.

That’s why the NFL is dropping the hammer on them.

And if Sean Payton didn’t know he had a bounty program going on, he needs to be fired. An NFL squad isn’t exactly a huge operation in terms of numbers of people.

Now, if I’m Tom Benson and didn’t give the GM the *wink*wink*nudge*nudge* when I told him to knock it off, I’d ask him to come to my office and give him 5 minutes to answer this question: why should you have a job after your 5 minutes are up?

I R A Darth Aggie on March 21, 2012 at 4:23 PM

Alright!

This year was the first year in a long, long time I actually cared about football. I rooted for my hometown Giants because people refused to accept Eli Manning as an elite quarterback, and he proved them wrong.

I also rooted for Tim Tebow because of all the Liberal hate he receives. I wanted a Manning vs Tebow Super Bowl. Now I have an excuse to root for the Jets again as well.

A Giants/Jets Superbowl would be terrific, just like the Yankees/Mets World Series, only now it’s even better because it would be Manning vs. Tebow.

Since Manning won twice I’m slightly favoring Tebow this time and have the Jets win. I’d be ok if wasn’t a Giants/Jets Superbowl, but I will be happy if Manning repeats.

hadsil on March 21, 2012 at 4:25 PM

I hope the Tebow trade to the Jets gets nullified. As a NY Giants fan, I’d rather root for Tebow playing for another team than join that circus of an organization that is the NY Jets.

RedRobin145 on March 21, 2012 at 4:21 PM

~~~~~~~~

As a fellow Giants fan, ITA…

ellifint on March 21, 2012 at 4:25 PM

Why couldn’t Tebow be used as a running back and as a threat to throw when given th ball? He looked like a fearless runner.

Vince on March 21, 2012 at 3:28 PM

If you mean in Denver, that’d be because Manning wouldn’t share the ball, or the spotlight. He left The Colts because he refused to play nicenice with his replacement. There’s no way he’d share a team with Tebow.

There’s a lot of self-love in that big, wrinkly forehead of his.

WhaleBellied on March 21, 2012 at 4:37 PM

Great guest commentary in the March 14th Colorado Springs Gazette by Dan Caplis. Basically, when you look at stats (among other things) when comparing Tebow to Manning, this was a very foolish move by the Broncos. Dan Snyder tried this stunt several times with the Redskins when he first took over, bringing in high-priced talent in order to try and strike it rich NOW, only to take what was once a respectable franchise down to cellar-dweller level.

RMCS_USN on March 21, 2012 at 4:44 PM

“Dear Lord, When I prayed to you to make us a better team, Peyton Manning isn’t what I had in mind…”

M240H on March 21, 2012 at 4:47 PM

RMCS_USN on March 21, 2012 at 4:44 PM

Dan Snyder still hasn’t learned, since it looks like they’re still buying flashy, high-priced talent without shoring up their basic positions (i.e. the O-line) As I tell all my Redskin-fan friends: You can’t buy a championship…

…unless you’re the Yankees.

PetecminMd on March 21, 2012 at 4:52 PM

Already for sale @ the Louisiana Mall Online, T-Shirts with this Caption:

Free Sean Payton

Del Dolemonte on March 21, 2012 at 4:54 PM

Live in Denver (Chiefs fan though). The people around here (sinners who frequent bars and such) are stamped as hell (stoked/amped) that Tebow is leaving and Manning is in. Tebow may have brought in the publicity and a playoff birth in a sh*tty division, but throwing 2-16 nearly EVERY first half was a fricking joke this past season. The Donkey’s defense is the ONLY thing that kept that non-spiral throwing guy in the game. The Donks should have kept him for short yardage situations, but in the end, Elway is Mr. Denver and will get his way.

ahlaphus on March 21, 2012 at 5:15 PM

Manning has to do more than win. He has to win a Super Bowl. Quickly! he and Elway rolled the dice big time with that press conference. Anything else is failure…by his own standards.

http://msn.foxsports.com/nfl/story/Peyton-Manning-must-win-Super-Bowl-with-Denver-Broncos-032012

a capella on March 21, 2012 at 3:24 PM

^^THIS

Ugly on March 21, 2012 at 5:46 PM

Free Sean Payton

Del Dolemonte on March 21, 2012 at 4:54 PM

http://www.nola.com/saints/index.ssf/2012/03/post_214.html

Ugly on March 21, 2012 at 5:48 PM

I have no problem with the fines or the suspension of Williams. The season long suspension of Payton and the loss of draft picks is outrageous.

If the NFL wants to get rid of bounties, good. Treating Payton and the Saints as if they invented them is wrong.

I couldn’t disagree more. The only thing that separates the NFL from organized gang violence is the thin veneer that says “no matter how hard I am hitting this other guy, my purpose is to tackle him within the bounds of the rules, not to hurt him.” The bounty program removed even that veneer.

This punishment was all about preventing crap like this from happening again. You can bet that coaches will be looking out for it verrrry carefully if a year’s salary is on the line.

The NFL, the Saints, and the coaches involved better hope that no major injuries are traced to bounty hits. Civil liability would be almost certain, and a prosecutor could make a great case for criminal liability if he wanted to.

FuzzyLogic on March 21, 2012 at 5:52 PM

I doubt the mindstate that the Saints players have/had are any different then most other players in sports, even at the highschool level. We all love to see big hits in football. In basketball, my coach didnt hesitate to tell us to give a guy a hard foul if he was carving us up inside. Now in both cases you dont want to kill the guy, you just want him to know, “Hey, were not punks” but I think the Saints went wrong attaching money too it and not keeping it in house.

As far as the sacks that Denver allowed you have to remember that a large amount of those was because the line had to block for a guy who scrambled ALOT. I think having Manning back there will make their job a little easier, Hes not going to move around a lot and he gets the ball out his hands way quicker.

Tebow in New York? That’s a train wreck waiting to happen. The fans will call for him soon as Sanchez looses a couple of games and Sanchez psyche cant handle that, then you add in the loud mouth coach and I just dont see this ending well for the jets.

Politricks on March 21, 2012 at 5:55 PM

Alright!

This year was the first year in a long, long time I actually cared about football. I rooted for my hometown Giants because people refused to accept Eli Manning as an elite quarterback, and he proved them wrong.

I also rooted for Tim Tebow because of all the Liberal hate he receives. I wanted a Manning vs Tebow Super Bowl. Now I have an excuse to root for the Jets again as well.

A Giants/Jets Superbowl would be terrific, just like the Yankees/Mets World Series, only now it’s even better because it would be Manning vs. Tebow.

Since Manning won twice I’m slightly favoring Tebow this time and have the Jets win. I’d be ok if wasn’t a Giants/Jets Superbowl, but I will be happy if Manning repeats.

hadsil on March 21, 2012 at 4:25 PM

—-

The superbowl is the AFC vs the NFC. It would be impossible to see a Jets vs Giants superbowl.

Politricks on March 21, 2012 at 6:00 PM

Dan Snyder still hasn’t learned, since it looks like they’re still buying flashy, high-priced talent without shoring up their basic positions (i.e. the O-line) As I tell all my Redskin-fan friends: You can’t buy a championship…

I agree. However, the Redskins need to draft a QB they think can help them win. The “we have other needs” argument has been going on for TWENTY YEARS now, and the game has changed. You need a serviceable QB in the NFL, and Rex Grossman is not that guy. The OL is however, the 2nd biggest need we have. I wanted Carl Nicks over Garcon for a big money signing personally. We also need another LB

Freeloader on March 21, 2012 at 6:06 PM

The superbowl is the AFC vs the NFC. It would be impossible to see a Jets vs Giants superbowl.

Politricks on March 21, 2012 at 6:00 PM

The Giants are in the NFC East and the Jets are in the AFC East so it possible.

VikingGoneWild on March 21, 2012 at 6:14 PM

The fines and suspensions are stiff because
they want to appear that they “care”. They don’t.

Amjean on March 21, 2012 at 3:27 PM

you wrong..they care.

they care about their legal liability. allowing a team to plan and administer system for rewarding dangerous hits would be the predicate to nearly unlimited liabilty to players injured as a result of such a scheme.

DrW on March 21, 2012 at 3:34 PM

Actually I am right. The league ignored it for years; that
proves they do not care about the players. I would make a huge
bet that this bounty game has been going on with other teams
as well. And the NFL knew about it. It was the little dirty secret. IF they cared, this would have been a huge story three
years ago when they supposedly warned the Saints.

NOW, they make a pretense of caring about the players health.
However, they only make the gesture because 1) they were caught
and 2) yes there may be financial culpability.

Amjean on March 21, 2012 at 7:02 PM

Whats the difference between this bounty for injury and a contract to break someones legs? The team owner should lose his team. He doesn’t have the character to be a NFL team owner.

meci on March 21, 2012 at 7:47 PM

Against bounties, even for clean, hard hits. I will laugh so damned hard if the Saints win the next Super Bowl.

FREE SEAN PAYTON!

Christien on March 21, 2012 at 8:02 PM

Peyton Manning made a huge mistake in not going to the San Francisco 49ers. They had the top defense in the NFL last year, a great offensive line to protect Manning and a very good rushing attack to take the heat off the QB. The Niners went to the NFL semifinals with an average QB last year. I don’t get it.

dthorny on March 21, 2012 at 8:05 PM

Peanuts !! This fine is peanuts when you consider what teams pay their top players. How a about fining them the annual salary of each of the players that received money from the “hitting bonus pool” over the last 3 seasons. $50 mill maybe? and $20x the draw any player won (ie if a player won $1000, he has a $20000 fine)from the pool. This still doesn’t begin to cover the medical costs from players injured for life from this sort of play.

$500K sounds like a lot, but it is probably less than the annual salary of the lowest first string player on the team.

KenInIL on March 21, 2012 at 3:07 PM

All you can talk about is the fine? Sean Payton’s banishment for an entire season just cost him 7 MILLION DOLLARS. Like one of the previous posters said, Williams is the perp here, not anybody else. Not Payton, not anybody else. Hell, Payton, the GM and the asst coach were all trying to keep an eye on Williams just to prevent this kind of crap in the first place. Goodell should change his name to BADell.

Oh yeah, one more thing. All you folks saying we Saints fans need to renew our supply of “paper bags”? I’ll thank you kindly to refer to them as paper sacks. We can always tell who the carpetbaggers are – they’re the ones who describe a buggy or a basket as a “shopping cart”.

GEAUX SAINTS!!

CatchAll on March 21, 2012 at 8:26 PM

Ed -

You’re from a state with the last-place Twins, last-place Vi-Queens and the Wild and Timberwolves, both of whom are unlikely to qualify for the palyoffs again in the 21st century. The state’s only Division 1 school (Golden Goofers) cannot qualify for bowl games or the NCAA basketball playoffs.

To paraphrase the old Virginia slogan: Minnesota Is for Lovers Losers.

bw222 on March 21, 2012 at 8:47 PM

Watch Roger Goodell destroy an anvil.*

*anvil is a metaphor for the NFL and its brand durability.

Sammy316 on March 21, 2012 at 8:51 PM

CatchAll on March 21, 2012 at 8:26 PM

Besides, during Lombardi Gras, Saints fans held a ceremony and buried all those sacks. The Ain’ts era is over.

WHO DAT?!

Christien on March 21, 2012 at 8:58 PM

Contradictory thoughts:

1. Many NFL defenses cultivate a culture of aggressive violence and intimidation against offensive players. This is nothing new, either. I have still never seen a player any meaner or more dangerous than the films of Dick Butkus.

2. A coaching staff and organization that openly rewarded efforts by their defense to injure opponents, rather than out-perform them, represents a violation of every ethic in sports, and needed to be given the death penalty by the NFL, even if it was only for legal defense against the players’ own scummy legal attacks.

Not at all sad to see Payton kicked in the nuts. Now, what does the NFL do about the Detroit Lions defensive line, which was consistently the dirtiest unit I saw all year, including the Saints.

Jaibones on March 21, 2012 at 10:49 PM

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