Pat Robertson: Pot should totally be legal

posted at 6:55 pm on March 8, 2012 by Tina Korbe

Quick: What do Pat Robertson and Ron Paul have in common? Yep, that’s right — they both think marijuana should be as legal as alcohol. Robertson made waves on the issue in the past when he said he thought marijuana-possession convictions shouldn’t end in mandatory prison sentences. He’s making waves again with the outright call to legalize the controlled substance.

Mr. Robertson’s support for legalizing pot appeared in a New York Times article published Thursday. His spokesman confirmed to the Associated Press that Mr. Robertson supports legalization with regulation. Mr. Robertson was not made available for an interview.

“I really believe we should treat marijuana the way we treat beverage alcohol,” Mr. Robertson was quoted by the newspaper as saying. “If people can go into a liquor store and buy a bottle of alcohol and drink it at home legally, then why do we say that the use of this other substance is somehow criminal?”

Mr. Robertson said he “absolutely” supports ballot measures in Colorado and Washington state that would allow people older than 21 to possess a small amount of marijuana and allow for commercial pot sales. Both measures, if passed by voters, would place the states at odds with federal law, which bans marijuana use of all kinds.

This debate seems to have no direction to go but in the direction of legalization; as Robertson said elsewhere in the article, “This war on drugs just hasn’t succeeded.”

As I wrote this morning about tobacco use, it’s not necessarily the government’s role to keep us from harming ourselves, even if it is the government’s role to keep us from physically harming others. A law that prevents driving under the influence of marijuana and other drug-related behaviors that could lead to the deprivation of another’s life or property but that allows private use of the drug doesn’t seem to be incompatible with conservatism to me. At the same time, I must not be quite as hip as the 81-year-old Robertson because some part of me still shies away from endorsing the idea of legalization entirely. This is just one of those hills I don’t want to die on — whether pot is legal or illegal doesn’t seem to matter much in the grand scheme of things to me.


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At the same time, I must not be quite as hip as the 81-year-old Robertson because some part of me still shies away from endorsing the idea of legalization entirely.

Perhaps one day you’ll begin to question whether your beliefs are just the result of being taught (and therefore someone else’s beliefs), or whether they really are yours.

Dante on March 8, 2012 at 8:04 PM

End welfare. Then legalize whatever you want.

J.E. Dyer on March 8, 2012 at 8:05 PM

He is right.

Hurricanes on March 8, 2012 at 8:07 PM

Ya only gives you the munchies…

http://missoulian.com/special-section/news/medical_cannabis/driving-under-influence-of-marijuana-a-growing-problem/article_1d9f6f8a-2137-11e0-a0be-001cc4c002e0.html?mode=story

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 8:06 PM

BIGGER PROBLEM: driving while high -OR- driving while texting

Perspective.

Jeddite on March 8, 2012 at 8:09 PM

Legalize it and I guarantee that drug companies would take a HUGE hit.

It’s extremely helpful with menstrual troubles, and also with depression.
Look at all of those pills they won’t be able to sell. The horror!!!

bridgetown on March 8, 2012 at 8:10 PM

I’ve been leaning towards legalization of a lot of drugs the past few weeks.
First, there is not a war on drugs, there is a war on our liberty using drugs as the excuse. Drug lords are forcing many innocent people to live in complete absolute terror in the south, building empires for themselves through corruption, kidnappings, torture and barbaric murders of anyone they can get to who oppose them.
Here in the US, the so called drug war is being used to militarize our police forces, expand police powers and expand and enrich law enforcement and government. How many of our freedoms have we lost due to the war on drugs? It is being used as an excuse to do almost anything and in the middle of it all are the American people.

The Pure Food and Drug act was passed in 1906, and was considered the beginning of the FDA. I guess the act of itself wasn’t so bad, possibly even good, but that was the beginning of the road to criminalize drugs.

America doesn’t have to follow Europe’s examples when legalizing drugs. We don’t have to have drug parks or government handouts of drugs. Just apply all the same laws to drugs as there are to alcohol. Employers can still fire people of they show up high on work just like if they were drunk. It doesn’t mean we have to tolerate people shooting up on the sidewalk.

JellyToast on March 8, 2012 at 8:11 PM

End welfare. Then legalize whatever you want.

J.E. Dyer on March 8, 2012 at 8:05 PM

Exactly! And if we lived in a Democrat-free Utopia everything would be great, but since we have Democrats who have power- they will find someway to victimize these people and pay for their habits.

melle1228 on March 8, 2012 at 8:12 PM

End welfare. Then legalize whatever you want.

J.E. Dyer on March 8, 2012 at 8:05 PM

Ending welfare cures a lot of societal ills.

Nathan_OH on March 8, 2012 at 8:13 PM

The Federal government has rules in place to limit the number of people who qualify for food stamps or SSI, because otherwise the demand would quickly exhaust the money available.

Similarly, there must be laws prohibiting the use of marijuana, because if it’s legalized, there will be a sudden explosion of slackers and total sh!ts who can’t take care of themselves, or hold down a job–and who will become dependent on government largesse.

In other words–legalize dope, and you break the Federal budget.
Legalize dope, and it’s Cloward-Piven.

Emperor Norton on March 8, 2012 at 8:16 PM

Dang. I missed the entire sex ‘n’ drugs 70s thanks to Sister Mary Agnese & SSgt. Oman. Every time I started to do something that remotely smelled like fun, my Grade School Teacher or Basic Drill Sergeant stormed into my brain and yelled me out of it…Welp, thank goodness for Rock ‘n’ Roll.
:)

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on March 8, 2012 at 8:17 PM

Legalize it and I guarantee that drug companies would take a HUGE hit.

It’s extremely helpful with menstrual troubles, and also with depression.
Look at all of those pills they won’t be able to sell. The horror!!!

bridgetown on March 8, 2012 at 8:10 PM

Who do you think will be selling the stuff?

sharrukin on March 8, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Legalize it and I guarantee that drug companies would take a HUGE hit.

It’s extremely helpful with menstrual troubles, and also with depression.
Look at all of those pills they won’t be able to sell. The horror!!!

bridgetown on March 8, 2012 at 8:10 PM
Who do you think will be selling the stuff?

sharrukin on March 8, 2012 at 8:18 PM

LOL-My first thought too. Pharmaceuticals already have R & D and federal reach. After the feds get done taxing and regulating it; it certainly won’t be supplied by the “little” dealer anymore.

melle1228 on March 8, 2012 at 8:19 PM

Who do you think will be selling the stuff?

sharrukin on March 8, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Whoever can grow a WEED.
Or, that’s how it should be. I grow tomatoes and I can sell them (I think)….now, I am going to be afraid of being arrested for not having a license to sell my veges. Great…

bridgetown on March 8, 2012 at 8:20 PM

Who do you think will be selling the stuff?

sharrukin on March 8, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Lots of businesses competing with each other? Ever been to an MMJ state? Do you really think Pfizer or Merck or any other pharma company would have any grounds for a patent?

Daikokuco on March 8, 2012 at 8:20 PM

Addiction should be treated as a medical problem and not a criminal one. That would cut down on crimes. If the illegal profits are taken out, we would not have the kind of atrocities we witness almost daily in Columbia and Mexico. Down the road it will choke off the drug revenue to the Taliban, when Afghanistan is essentially a narco state.

galtani on March 8, 2012 at 8:21 PM

Breaking! Pat Robertson is right for once

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 8:22 PM

Whoever can grow a WEED.
Or, that’s how it should be. I grow tomatoes and I can sell them (I think)….now, I am going to be afraid of being arrested for not having a license to sell my veges. Great…

bridgetown on March 8, 2012 at 8:20 PM

People can grow all sorts of things in their garden but most people just buy it at the store.

sharrukin on March 8, 2012 at 8:23 PM

Perspective.

Jeddite on March 8, 2012 at 8:09 PM

I was ok with Medical MJ they put thru in our state, but they pushed and pushed, shops everywhere like coffee shops next to schools…, Oh we gained persepective alright.

I don’t think it’s worse than booze but I don’t think it’s innocent either. It’s not the drugs or booze that kills it’s the people using.

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 8:26 PM

Addiction should be treated as a medical problem and not a criminal one. That would cut down on crimes. If the illegal profits are taken out, we would not have the kind of atrocities we witness almost daily in Columbia and Mexico. Down the road it will choke off the drug revenue to the Taliban, when Afghanistan is essentially a narco state.

galtani on March 8, 2012 at 8:21 PM

I don’t think that marijuana ought to be lumped in with addictive drugs, because it isn’t addictive

steel guy on March 8, 2012 at 8:26 PM

Down the road it will choke off the drug revenue to the Taliban, when Afghanistan is essentially a narco state.

galtani on March 8, 2012 at 8:21 PM

Afghanistan is the opium capitol of the world. I don’t think we should legalize heroin.

Marijuana legalization? Mexican cartels hardest hit. It comprises 60% of their profits (that’s a low ball estimate)

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 8:26 PM

Irrelevant. I’m adamantly in favor of legalizing pot–and heroin and cocaine, for that matter–and I’ve never touched anything stronger than 20-year-old single-malt scotch. Don’t play the prohibitionists’ ad hominem games.

Fabozz on March 8, 2012 at 7:49 PM

It is true, though, that the first couple of experiences with pot can be unpleasant for a number of reasons. First, it may be because the pot is simply poor quality ditchweed or brick crap from Mexico. You smoke that stuff, it ain’t going to be much fun. Secondly, a lot of people aren’t prepared for the sensations marijuana causes their first couple of times. They may get paranoid, extremely frightened, or even dizzy enough to throw up. However, if you use it after those experiences, you will handle it much better, and enjoy yourself far more. Third, it can also be due to weed that has been laced or tainted with other drugs or substances.

I’m not trying to argue here that anyone should ever do marijuana if they don’t want to do so, but I am saying that many people who try it only once or twice will often have a bad opinion about due to the initial effects of a first-time user…which doesn’t truly reflect an informed view on the drug, whether you’re for it or against it. Nor am I saying that one should have to try something before they oppose it, but I do wish the debate were more fact-based and less fear-based.

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 8:26 PM

I don’t think that marijuana ought to be lumped in with addictive drugs, because it isn’t addictive

steel guy on March 8, 2012 at 8:26 PM

sure isn’t :) That’s personal experience talking. Cigarettes and Alcohol on the other hand – addictive as all heck. That’s personal experience talking.

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 8:28 PM

Who do you think will be selling the stuff?

sharrukin on March 8, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Big Tobacco.

Syzygy on March 8, 2012 at 8:31 PM

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 8:06 PM

Driving under the influence is already illegal. If pot were legalized, it would still be illegal. People do pot all the time, and if they are caught driving under the influence, they’re treated like a drunk. Why do you think legalization would somehow make DUIs spike?

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 8:31 PM

sure isn’t :) That’s personal experience talking. Cigarettes and Alcohol on the other hand – addictive as all heck. That’s personal experience talking.

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 8:28 PM

I hear ya. It was the hardest thing for me to give up cigarettes and whisky. But with weed I like to indulge but if I go awhile without, no big deal.

steel guy on March 8, 2012 at 8:32 PM

Big TobaccoMarijuana.

Syzygy on March 8, 2012 at 8:31 PM

And if you know anything about marijuana, the sheer number of strains and hybrids that have been created as a result of people’s own enthusiasm for the drug is staggering. If those people were mobilized by a corporation to create even more strains for legal purposes, the industry would, quite possibly, give tobacco a run for its money.

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 8:33 PM

I was ok with Medical MJ they put thru in our state, but they pushed and pushed, shops everywhere like coffee shops next to schools…, Oh we gained persepective alright.

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 8:26 PM

And after the schoolchildren walked into the marijuana dispensary, how much pot did they walk out with?

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 8:35 PM

Daikokuco on March 8, 2012 at 8:00 PM

.
Awesome….. more social issues – thats what we need !
.
btw…. Don’t worry CNN Anderson says Ugandan Joseph KONY 2012 will be the next distraction for Romney…….. stem cell debate will just have to wait until later

FlaMurph on March 8, 2012 at 8:37 PM

[The Federal government trampling over the Constitution] is just one of those hills I don’t want to die on — whether pot is legal or illegal doesn’t seem to matter much in the grand scheme of things to me.

Hope this helps.

EddieC on March 8, 2012 at 8:44 PM

And if you know anything about marijuana, the sheer number of strains and hybrids that have been created as a result of people’s own enthusiasm for the drug is staggering.

You know, it is really almost like a seperate underground culture for many users. The different strains have different effects, aromas, looks & taste. I liken it to drinking fine wine.

steel guy on March 8, 2012 at 8:48 PM

End welfare. Then legalize whatever you want.

J.E. Dyer on March 8, 2012 at 8:05 PM

I am that.

Disturb the Universe on March 8, 2012 at 8:49 PM

I meant, I’m with that.

Disturb the Universe on March 8, 2012 at 8:50 PM

Wasn’t there an equally stupid fear of gin in the 1700s?

EddieC on March 8, 2012 at 8:51 PM

And after the schoolchildren walked into the marijuana dispensary, how much pot did they walk out with?

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 8:35 PM

You mean the kids, that got it from their friend at school or the ones that ate it in the cookies that were laced with it that came from dear old mommy.
kiss off.

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 8:52 PM

Blind squirrel, meet nut.

RedNewEnglander on March 8, 2012 at 8:54 PM

the industry would, quite possibly, give tobacco a run for its money.

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 8:33 PM

Perhaps. Years ago, the tobacco companies would’ve been best situated to capitalize on legalization since they have the infrastructure in place to grow, package, etc. But now with the grow farms in California (and elsewhere?), they’d have competition if pot were legalized nationally.

Syzygy on March 8, 2012 at 8:55 PM

You mean the kids, that got it from their friend at school or the ones that ate it in the cookies that were laced with it that came from dear old mommy.
MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 8:52 PM

As opposed to sneaking into dads liquor cabinet like I did when I was a kid.

steel guy on March 8, 2012 at 8:56 PM

You mean the kids, that got it from their friend at school or the ones that ate it in the cookies that were laced with it that came from dear old mommy.
kiss off.

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 8:52 PM

Oh, okay. So the kids got it illegally. Like they did before it was legalized. Like they do with booze. Huh.

And I love that you’re getting pissy just because I’m challenging your flawed arguments.

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 8:57 PM

You mean the kids, that got it from their friend at school or the ones that ate it in the cookies that were laced with it that came from dear old mommy.

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 8:52 PM

I hear they’re putting porn in cookies now.

EddieC on March 8, 2012 at 8:57 PM

You mean the kids, that got it from their friend at school or the ones that ate it in the cookies that were laced with it that came from dear old mommy.
kiss off.

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 8:52 PM

you mean it’s easier to get weed than alcohol for kids! No sh!t Sherlock :) The war on drugs is a failure. Those who ignore history (prohibition) are doomed to repeat it.

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 8:58 PM

steel guy on March 8, 2012 at 8:26 PM

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 8:26 PM

http://www.forbes.com/sites/erikkain/2011/07/05/ten-years-after-decriminalization-drug-abuse-down-by-half-in-portugal/

bridgetown on March 8, 2012 at 8:24 PM

Personally I do not smoke, drink or do any drug . Drug use should be discouraged and not glamorized, but I think we should decriminalize drugs. The wars on drugs since the Nixon?’s days had been an abysmal failure. Addiction should be treated as a medical and public health matter. I think the experience of Portugal and the Netherlands ,ay point to a more rational and responsible approach.

galtani on March 8, 2012 at 8:58 PM

Dante on March 8, 2012 at 8:04 PM

A bit smug from someone who really doesn’t know anything that Tina’s been through in her life, however young it is.

bntafraid on March 8, 2012 at 8:58 PM

Second look at Pat Robertson. And tornadoes.

keep the change on March 8, 2012 at 9:01 PM

Can we stop pretending a plant created by God is a drug? It’s a medicinal herb – only our corrupt Government classifies it a drug (Schedule 1 even!)

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 9:03 PM

I don’t think it’s worse than booze but I don’t think it’s innocent either. It’s not the drugs or booze that kills it’s the people using.
MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 8:26 PM

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 8:57 PM

Apparently you didn’t read all of my post.

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 9:04 PM

Apparently you didn’t read all of my post.

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 9:04 PM

I read that. Doesn’t make your citation of children getting drugs through illegal means any more due to legalization. It’s happening in every state where it hasn’t been legalized. I simply wanted to point out that, clearly, the legal status does nothing to prevent children from getting them through illegal means, any more than stricter gun control laws keep guns out of the hands of criminals.

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 9:08 PM

Personally I do not smoke, drink or do any drug . Drug use should be discouraged and not glamorized, but I think we should decriminalize drugs.

For me it’s just a matter of personal liberty. Except for a few close friends and my wife nobody would ever guess that I indulge. I work in a professional enviroment for 30 years and have held the same job for 20 years. I have a great family and am quite happy. I have been smoking for 35 years or so and it has not had any negative impact on my life at all. I don’t encourage or discourage it I just think it is an individual choic and nobodies business but my own.

steel guy on March 8, 2012 at 9:09 PM

This guy is a crackpot (no pun intended). Always coming up with bizarre ideas, he’s anything but a Christian. Shame!

elihu on March 8, 2012 at 9:15 PM

This guy is a crackpot (no pun intended). Always coming up with bizarre ideas, he’s anything but a Christian. Shame!

elihu on March 8, 2012 at 9:15 PM

I know plenty of Christians who smoke weed (not just me :-)

these are actual Christians by the by…not Sunday and Holiday warriors.

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 9:17 PM

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 9:08 PM

I get what your saying and it’s true, but everyones experience is different. What made me pissy was people saying that it has no ill effects. Booze has ill effects, texting – well everything… should be in moderation.
I’m coming at it from a perspective that it became a nightmare for our state and my sis in Colorado says the same for them.
Maybe being legal would help, don’t know.
I’m sorry I got mad.
It was really over the top here, truly on every corner.

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 9:19 PM

There is a very simple way to end the drug war without the drawbacks of full legalization of everything. Simply allow people to grow and consume anything they want on their own property. Marijuana itself is easy to grow. So are coca, poppies, mushrooms, and various other plants that are processed into harder drugs. This allows those who want to get high some chance to do it, without legalizing the hard stuff, and without the specter of retail recreational pharmaceuticals that scares so many people. It will likely reduce demand for the truly hard drugs enough to kill most of the black market for such things, and greatly reduce the cost to society for drug abuse, as plant forms of most drugs are far less harmful. Yes, there will still be a black market for hard drugs, and some people will likely try to process their cocaine into coca and so on, but the overall problem of drug abuse and the drug trade will be greatly reduced.

EricW on March 8, 2012 at 9:20 PM

I’m coming at it from a perspective that it became a nightmare for our state and my sis in Colorado says the same for them.
Maybe being legal would help, don’t know.
I’m sorry I got mad.
It was really over the top here, truly on every corner.

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 9:19 PM

How was it over the top? I live in Wisconsin, so I’m genuinely curious. I’m in favor of legalization, but I freely admit that because we’ve never really done it, we don’t know the negative ramifications.

Apology accepted. I prefer this level of discussion…most of the time.

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 9:23 PM

It was really over the top here, truly on every corner.

MontanaMmmm

A legal substance available on every corner isn’t “over the top”. I can buy Budweiser and a news paper on every corner too…does that mean it is over the top?

xblade on March 8, 2012 at 9:27 PM

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 8:26 PM

The paranoia would disappear right after the stigma and criminalization would.

Dante on March 8, 2012 at 9:28 PM

One change though that we damn well need if we go down the decriminalization path is regular drug testing for anyone on government assistance.

The argument that a man should be able to do what he wants in the privacy of his own home with his own resources is rightfully a powerful one.

As soon as you take a check from Uncle Sugar though this no longer holds true.

18-1 on March 8, 2012 at 9:29 PM

What does smoking marijuana have to with being a christian or not?

steel guy on March 8, 2012 at 9:31 PM

What does smoking marijuana have to with being a christian or not?

steel guy on March 8, 2012 at 9:31 PM

Some nitwits are trying to claim that the anointing oil used in the Bible was pot because some Polish lady made that claim.

sharrukin on March 8, 2012 at 9:35 PM

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 9:23 PM

We didn’t have it legal except for medical necessity, which the voters agreed to, but the distributers took advantage and pushed too far.

Soon everyone became “ill”. They set up drive thru Dr’s and online “permission slips”.

“Medical” shops popped up everywhere, the stories about the kids are not fictional, look up mj and butter/MT.
I don’t have time to link anymore gotta run.

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 9:36 PM

Some nitwits are trying to claim that the anointing oil used in the Bible was pot because some Polish lady made that claim.

sharrukin on March 8, 2012 at 9:35 PM

hahahahahahaha :) I like you sharrukin – even after I offered ample proof of that, you stick to your story.

Here’s an argument you might have less trouble with: Jesus drank alcohol, a far more addictive drug that contributes to more deaths/year than all illicit drugs combined.

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 9:43 PM

Do you have a still, too?

ExpressoBold on March 8, 2012 at 7:59 PM

Nope. But if I did, that wouldn’t be anyone’s godda*n business either.

Rational Thought on March 8, 2012 at 9:45 PM

Lots of businesses competing with each other? Ever been to an MMJ state? Do you really think Pfizer or Merck or any other pharma company would have any grounds for a patent?

Daikokuco on March 8, 2012 at 8:20 PM

They’d have to get pretty inventive to sell their dope.

Shooting Stars Marijuana! Now comes mixed with Viagra!

Dack Thrombosis on March 8, 2012 at 9:47 PM

Here’s an argument you might have less trouble with: Jesus drank alcohol, a far more addictive drug that contributes to more deaths/year than all illicit drugs combined.

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 9:43 PM

He did drink alcohol, as did most priests I’ve known. And I’m not saying that to knock them, the priests I’ve known were good guys.

steel guy on March 8, 2012 at 9:51 PM

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 9:36 PM

But again…you telling me that kids got ahold of pot through straw purchases only proves that, one way or another, kids will get things they’re not legally allowed to purchase. Whether it’s paying someone to buy them beer, or a gun…if they have the money and want it, they will get it. Therefore, I don’t see the point of refusing to allow adults to access marijuana if they choose to do so.

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 9:51 PM

MontanaMmmm on March 8, 2012 at 9:36 PM

So what?

Dante on March 8, 2012 at 9:52 PM

Pat looks a little bleary in the picture accompanying this article. Maybe he’s already been doing a little “medicating” on the side.

captn2fat on March 8, 2012 at 10:02 PM

Man, where can I get some of these double double-chocolate porn-cookies for my, uh… friend?

Jeddite on March 8, 2012 at 10:19 PM

He did drink alcohol, as did most priests I’ve known. And I’m not saying that to knock them, the priests I’ve known were good guys.

steel guy on March 8, 2012 at 9:51 PM

as well the Christians I know that smoke weed are wonderful people. I just don’t understand you adamant opposition to marijuana.

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 10:33 PM

This…explains…a lot.

rogaineguy on March 8, 2012 at 10:44 PM

How was it over the top? I live in Wisconsin, so I’m genuinely curious. I’m in favor of legalization, but I freely admit that because we’ve never really done it, we don’t know the negative ramifications.

MadisonConservative on March 8, 2012 at 9:23 PM

A few previously vacant buildings become occupied. Green crosses adorn the outside. A neon sign advertizing alternative medicine goes up in the window. You know, really community destroying stuff.

Daikokuco on March 8, 2012 at 10:55 PM

I must not be quite as hip as the 81-year-old Robertson because some part of me still shies away from endorsing the idea of legalization entirely. This is just one of those hills I don’t want to die on — whether pot is legal or illegal doesn’t seem to matter much in the grand scheme of things to me.

Ms. Korbe, with all due respect, your statement(s) reflect that you don’t understand a profoundly important basic point -and one that you really should.

The issue, Ms. Korbe, is whether liberty is consistently or selective/arbitrarily enforced. You can advocate the former (as I do) or the latter (as your statements imply) -but not both.

Selective reasoning… and its corollary, the selective application of liberty (and in the case of Americans, the Constitution) -is THE problem… the one universal problem… everything else is secondary.

If/when individuals disapprove of and/or are offended by other individuals practicing “Activity X,” this cannot, as a matter of principle, be a rational/moral/legal/Constitutional basis for some to restrict the activities of others and/or impose their view, under threat of law/gun -upon others.

The purpose/function of government/law -according to the American theory/system/history of government- is to protect us from this -not subject us to it.

If/when an individual’s actions can be objectively/rationally shown to violate the rights of others -to preserve & enjoy their lives without interference from others- THEN there is a legitimate basis for government/law(s) to deal with them.

Government has no valid basis for restricting marijuana use in the first place -and the arguments that it does are all fundamentally flawed and dually-refuted by both reason/theory, and reality/history.

To be opposed to government not having the authority to restrict something it has no legitimate basis to restrict is NOT an endorsement of whatever that thing or things might be.

THIS IS AN IMPORTANT POINT TO GRASP AND APPLY CONSISTENTLY. Conversely the fact that it isn’t grasped and applied consistently has lead to “us” being divided and squabbling amoung ourselves (implicitly) about the “proper” way to INCONSISTENLY IMPLEMENT LIBERTY.

There is no “right way” to selectively protect liberty. The very notion of enforcing liberty/freedom/law any way other than consistenly IS “the problem.”

The fact that you don’t view it as a concern reflects that you don’t understand this. What about those who do recognize the importance of this but aren’t concerned with those areas of importance to you where the laws aren’t consistenly applied?

Government(s)/law(s) can aim to implement some imposing their will(s) on others, or it can aim to protect people from it -but it cannot do both -and when it attempts to…

well, just look around you.

More of the same won’t fix it.

We ALL need to CONSISTENTLY impose any and all examples of “government” and law(s) doing the former -instead of the latter.

Thank you. (Thanks for the work you do.)

GuitarMark on March 8, 2012 at 11:00 PM

I haven’t seen any hash in the U.S. since I moved here in 1997.

JPeterman on March 8, 2012 at 7:21 PM

They said “California is the place you ought to be…”

JohnGalt23 on March 8, 2012 at 11:28 PM

I know this will sound “totally Spakoli”. Weed doesn’t mean pizzas in class that annoy Ben Stein. That’s p.r.o.p.a.g.a.n.d.a.

Marijuana has inspired some of the most creative and inspirational art and music of all time. It’s not addictive. Major League pitchers have engineered no hitters on LSD.

Alcohol [the legal drug] has inspired dead people and random urination in randomly hilarious places. Alcohol has inspired live disease and pancreas malfunction and family neglect and venereal diseases.

SoCons! which is effin better? Mellow harmless non addictive pot smokers…or wife beating angry drunk @ssholes?

I really hate calling Christians hypocrites, but the are. I don’t go to church, because MAN is the perversion of God’s word. I know God, God knows me. Homos ain’t going to hell…all you bitter judgement f*vks are. Now I’m gonna witness – FORGIVENESS is devine.

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 11:44 PM

I know plenty of Christians who smoke weed (not just me :-)
these are actual Christians by the by…not Sunday and Holiday warriors.
DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 9:17 PM

I know Christians that drink, enjoy cigars or pipes, even opium back when it wasn’t “criminal. I even know of Christian polygamists and none of the aforementioned is a barrier to getting into heaven. It is culture that determines whether those “vices” are acceptable, not the Holy Scriptures.

Once upon a time I was fully behind the war on drugs and three strikes. But the passing of time only shows it to be a monumental waste of resources and lives (more wasted than would ever have happened to negligent homicide or injury) . And an innocently seeming assault on our inalienable rights.

AH_C on March 9, 2012 at 12:10 AM

GuitarMark on March 8, 2012 at 11:00 PM

Yep.

Dante on March 9, 2012 at 12:21 AM

At the same time, I must not be quite as hip as the 81-year-old Robertson because some part of me still shies away from endorsing the idea of legalization entirely. This is just one of those hills I don’t want to die on — whether pot is legal or illegal doesn’t seem to matter much in the grand scheme of things to me.

This is classic shallow thinking. Everything matters in the grand scheme of things. First they came for the moonshiners, then they came for the potheads, and because I didn’t want to die on those constitutional hills, they came for my right to exercise my religion freely and those that could have spoken up for me were convicts.

GuitarMark on March 8, 2012 at 11:00 PM

What he said!

AH_C on March 9, 2012 at 12:31 AM

Get a clue folks. Legalizing pot doesn’t mean folks can show up to work, or school, or sports or whatever stoned.

In fact, if pot is legal, it will make it easier to have rules favoring ‘clean’ lifestyles. Currently, with pot being illegal, there’s all sorts of self incrimination issues involved with getting folks tested. This pretty much falls away if pot is legal… Same for other drugs…

In countries where pot has been decriminalized (not necessarily legalized), this is pretty much how things work. One feature is those who are found to be pot heads may agree to go into treatment programs, or not… According to their choice, they may or may not lose access to various other taxpayer benefit programs… Which is sort of how conservative libertarian principles are supposed to work, last I checked.

droofus on March 9, 2012 at 1:15 AM

Far out man. Who would have ever thought that Pat and Tommy Chong now have something in common?

RMCS_USN on March 9, 2012 at 2:11 AM

The Federal government has rules in place to limit the number of people who qualify for food stamps or SSI, because otherwise the demand would quickly exhaust the money available.

Similarly, there must be laws prohibiting the use of marijuana, because if it’s legalized, there will be a sudden explosion of slackers and total sh!ts who can’t take care of themselves, or hold down a job–and who will become dependent on government largesse.

In other words–legalize dope, and you break the Federal budget.
Legalize dope, and it’s Cloward-Piven.

Emperor Norton on March 8, 2012 at 8:16 PM

The drug laws haven’t been demonstrated to reduce the number of users there for it is unlikely that legalizing drugs will cause a noticeable increase in the number of users.

I have worked with people who smoked pot, the ones who were “slackers and total sh!ts” would have been without the pot as well.

Slowburn on March 9, 2012 at 2:29 AM

One thing legalizing the relatively harmless marijuana would do is maker the rest of the drug war easier by narrowing the fight to the more dangerous, highly addictive substances.

Full disclosure: I tried the stuff way back when I was a teenager. I decided that the effect was not worth the risk of arrest. I may have been a stupid kid, but I was not so stupid as to keep risking jail just for a temporary good feeling.

Random Numbers (Brian Epps) on March 9, 2012 at 2:32 AM

I have worked with people who smoked pot, the ones who were “slackers and total sh!ts” would have been without the pot as well.

Slowburn on March 9, 2012 at 2:29 AM

I know someone who uses regularly, through a CO prescription. The guy owns his own carpet-laying business and works his a$$ off. He would also be just as hard a worker, if a bit grumpier. without the pot.

Random Numbers (Brian Epps) on March 9, 2012 at 2:37 AM

If pot is made legal the people who smoke it will still get it through whatever source they already have. Who would want to buy government controlled weed? It would either be chock full of chemicals or downright ragweed.

tbear44 on March 9, 2012 at 2:45 AM

I don’t want to die on that hill. I want to live there, play there, and retire there, knowing I need never touch another drop of alcohol if I so wish.

JimRich on March 9, 2012 at 3:52 AM

Marijuana has inspired some of the most creative and inspirational art and music of all time.

At least, they thought so.

It’s not addictive.

Not true.

Alcohol [the legal drug] has inspired dead people and random urination in randomly hilarious places. Alcohol has inspired live disease and pancreas malfunction and family neglect and venereal diseases.

Which is irrelevant to whether marijuana should be legal.

SoCons! which is effin better? Mellow harmless non addictive pot smokers…or wife beating angry drunk @ssholes?

Are those my only choices?

I really hate calling Christians hypocrites, but the are. I don’t go to church, because MAN is the perversion of God’s word. I know God, God knows me. Homos ain’t going to hell…all you bitter judgement f*vks are. Now I’m gonna witness – FORGIVENESS is devine.

DHChron on March 8, 2012 at 11:44 PM

What does this have to do with anything?

Incidentally, I don’t believe marijuana should be illegal (at the federal level–at the state level, it would depend upon the state’s constitution), but that is because I do not believe the federal government has the Constitutional authority to criminalize its growth or use. It is not based on misinformation, straw man arguments, or smug name-calling.

DrMagnolias on March 9, 2012 at 6:15 AM

It’s not addictive.

Not true.

DrMagnolias on March 9, 2012 at 6:15 AM

It is true. Marijuana (or THC if you want to split hairs) is not addictive.

Dante on March 9, 2012 at 7:42 AM

“A law that prevents driving under the influence of marijuana and other drug-related behaviors that could lead to the deprivation of another’s life or property but that allows private use of the drug doesn’t seem to be incompatible with conservatism to me.” – Tina

That’s because it’s not “incompatible” with conservative principles.
Legalizing pot will staunch the flow of that cheap crap that flows in from Mess’ko.
Certified AMERICAN growers who supply high-grade herb (Skunk, BC Bud, Kush, etc.) would soon take over the business, be taxed, and sell only to adults.
And NO, marijuana is not a “Gateway Drug” – even the “drug czar” had to finally admit it.

~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on March 9, 2012 at 8:49 AM

End welfare. Then legalize whatever you want.

J.E. Dyer on March 8, 2012 at 8:05 PM

This. If you want to waste your life getting stoned in your parents’ basement, that’s your business. However, I will not fund such an endeavor with my hard-earned tax dollars.

Odysseus on March 9, 2012 at 8:57 AM

Now I understand why he says all those craxy things – he’s a stoner!

Ward Cleaver on March 9, 2012 at 9:23 AM

I’m just wondering: if thinking marijuana should be legal makes me a dope-smoking hippy, does believing alcohol should be legal make me a drunk and a wifebeater? Just curious.

FWIW, the presidential candidate I agree with the most is Gary Johnson, including his support for legalizing pot. That said, I don’t believe it should be a focal point for a campaign. Cutting government and restoring it to its Constitutional moorings is what I care about. The idea that the Drug War is a huge counterproductive waste of money is simply a self-evident fact that is part of the big picture – which means, of course, that marijuana (and most other drugs) should be legalized. Why we want big government supporting drug cartels by keeping it illegal is beyond me.

DRayRaven on March 9, 2012 at 9:25 AM

Welcome to the 700 Dimebag Club. We’ll be back with the program right after we make a quick road trip for lots of cheap, square hamburgers….

viking01 on March 9, 2012 at 9:34 AM

I like how people are afraid of pot with 0% knowledge on what it does (and does not) do:

http://www.ccguide.org/young88.php
http://examine.com/supplements/Marijuana/ (100+ citations)

A Axe on March 9, 2012 at 9:36 AM

This. If you want to waste your life getting stoned in your parents’ basement, that’s your business. However, I will not fund such an endeavor with my hard-earned tax dollars.

Odysseus on March 9, 2012 at 8:57 AM

Is that like cleaning up after your parent’s party the night before in the basement rec room and draining the leftover adult beverages? I suppose then, the chilluns would have to leave the basement until the ‘rents’ booze party concludes?
Just Curious

I’m just wondering: if thinking marijuana should be legal makes me a dope-smoking hippy, does believing alcohol should be legal make me a drunk and a wifebeater? Just curious.

DRayRaven on March 9, 2012 at 9:25 AM

Funny, er odd and pertinent you should mention the “wifebeater” [sic].
In all my years, dating back to the 60s, I have never encountered a violent individual who acted out while under the influence of marijuana. Years ago in fact, we proved that the incidents of “domestic violence” does not spike on Super Bowl Sunday. As usual, the aggrieved and alleged “feminazi” intelligentsia just shrug their bony shoulders and continue their tilting at windmills.
I can relate anecdote after anecdote re: cops setting up desperate people, young and old, to illegally purchase that harmless herb.
I like Gary Johnson. Further, I refuse to vote for the GOP elítist pick du jour. The “Romney Immaculate Deception” just aint floatin’ my boat.
(and I agreed with Rev. Robertson once before – his comment re: Chugo)
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on March 9, 2012 at 9:42 AM

Dante on March 9, 2012 at 7:42 AM

You might wish to go to the link I posted–it’s to an article by an addictions researcher at UCLA.

DrMagnolias on March 9, 2012 at 9:47 AM

crazy man position.

Stoic Patriot on March 8, 2012 at 6:58 PM

What, pray tell, is “crazy” about believing marijuana should be treated like alcohol? The only thing “crazy” here is our country’s current policy with regard to pot. It’s absolutely indefensible.

lawya on March 9, 2012 at 9:58 AM

DrMagnolias on March 9, 2012 at 6:15 AM

No, marijuana is not addictive. From the same website you just linked:

So, to wrap up, is marijuana addictive? For most people, no. About 10% of recreational users will develop problems serve enough to impair their work and relationships. Many more will come to depend on pot for relaxation and social purposes. This will be problematic if they don’t learn more effective coping mechanisms and come to rely on marijuana instead of solving their problems. When ready, most people will be able to quit with only mild withdrawal symptoms. And, compared to other recreational drugs, marijuana is relatively harmless. But, it is not completely harmless. And…what is more serious than its addictive consequences are the legal ones. This relatively harmless herbal plant is unregulated and illegal in the U.S.

Habit-forming does not mean addictive. Educate yourself.

MadisonConservative on March 9, 2012 at 10:01 AM

Coming in 2025 at the public hearings on mandatory marijuana coverage in Obamacare:

“Without insurance coverage, pot, as you know, can cost a woman over $3,000 during law school. For a lot of students who, like me, are on public interest scholarships, that’s practically an entire summer’s salary”

mabryb1 on March 9, 2012 at 10:04 AM

MadisonConservative on March 9, 2012 at 10:01 AM

The second sentence you quoted is clear: For most people, no. That simply does not support the claim that the substance is not addictive–addictions are not all or nothing, either everyone is hooked or the substance isn’t addictive.

When an addictions researcher says that yes, people can become addicted to marijuana, and backs his claims with an explanation of what goes on within the body so individuals become dependent, I tend to believe him more than commenters on a blog who simply repeat that it isn’t addictive. About 10% of alcohol drinkers will also become addicted, yet people on this board are tossing around comparisons claiming alcohol is a greater problem than marijuana, and misstating simple facts about marijuana to bolster their claims.

The fact that something is potentially addictive to certain individuals, does not grant the federal government the authority to regulate it.

DrMagnolias on March 9, 2012 at 10:15 AM

Addiction is not about the substance. Addiction is about the individual. An addict can turn marijuana into an addiction, but an addict can turn sex, porn and food into addictions as well. Those things are not illegal. The disease of addiction deserves medical, not punitive treatment. No evidence exists that incarceration cures the disease of addiction. 12 step programs, if followed, are an excellent treatment for addiction. Criminalization has done NOTHING to stop an addict from being an addict. Legalize it!

libfreeordie on March 9, 2012 at 10:19 AM

Tina, as an aid to understanding what is involved here remember that “freedom” is a major meme in the last few elections. (Why has Ron Paul polled so high for so long?)

It is not the government’s place to protect us from ourselves. It is the government’s job to protect us from others. If I want to be a dumbs**t broad and continuously puff on weed, M or T, or consume alcohol til I can’t stand so be it. It’s my responsibility to take the consequences. If smoking or boozing demonstrably impairs ability to run heavy machinery, such as automobiles, then the government is protecting others from your recklessness if you elect to drive impaired.

Of course, the religious right wants none of this because the next logical extension involves abortion. Methinks Pontius Pilot washing his hands of the issue facing him is a good model on abortion. On your hands, head, and soul be it if you go off and kill a baby. I can’t stop you. I can require you to deal with the consequences as they affect you.

Thus we have the tension between the libertarians and the er churchitarians. The latter want to run ever larger pieces of your life. The former want to be free to kill babies. Both are wrong. As usual the optimum is near the center and a HUGE dose of taking responsibility for your actions and their results.

Now, what sayeth thou about weed? What sayeth thou about the rest of the horrible war on the US population improperly called the War on Drugs that puts the US population in the middle of an ever escalating shooting war between drug agents and drug pushers? I spent my childhood being a target told to uselessly duck and cover under my puny desk in school. I’ve concluded, after nearly 7 decades of being a target, that it’s not the way civilized human beings should live. I’ve also concluded that some people will do stupid things even with nanny government’s hand on all our shoulders. And if there is money to be made fostering such stupid behavior, you can’t set the price so high everybody will stop a given stupid behavior. The market has the government out numbered, out gunned, and out maneuvered.

{^_^}

herself on March 9, 2012 at 10:19 AM

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