Stolen Valor whistleblower fired

posted at 11:35 am on March 7, 2012 by Jazz Shaw

This is one infuriating story which goes back a fair ways. Some years back, Xavier Alvarez was going around wearing a Congressional Medal of Honor [See EDIT below] – and bragging about it to anyone who would lend an ear – without ever having served a single day in uniform. Thanks to the alert senses of one woman, a Marine herself who had finished her service, he was caught red handed and charged under the Stolen Valor act. His case is currently pending before the Supreme Court and he faces up to a year in jail along with other penalties.

But what happened to Melissa Campbell, the sharp eyed Marine who spotted his despicable behavior? That’s a story which may wind up angering you even more.

Less attention has been paid to the fate of the woman who helped expose Mr. Alvarez and who brought him to the attention of the FBI. Ms. Campbell, the event planner serving Mr. Alvarez snacks on June 27, 2007, was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who served her country for 10 years.

But after exposing Mr. Alvarez’s medal claim as a hoax — later reporting to the FBI what she viewed as a crime in progress — Ms. Campbell said she wasn’t thanked by her employer. Instead, she said, she was fired.

“I was told it was unprofessional to confront him,” she told The Washington Times in a recent interview. The company did not respond to inquiries about her departure, citing a policy of not commenting on personnel matters. Mr. Alvarez declined through an attorney to comment.

Ms. Campbell now works as a family readiness officer for the military. She has politely declined the offers from a parade of lawyers inquiring whether she would like to file a lawsuit against her former employer. She told them she was not interested. While she still wants her name cleared, she said, she doesn’t want to spend any more time thinking about Mr. Alvarez.

On the one hand, I can understand Ms. Campbell’s attitude and seems to fit in with what we know about her character and history. She has no interest in lining her pockets through a lawsuit, found herself another job and would rather not think any more about the disgusting medal thief. The fact that she’s not out doing book tours and appearances on The View speaks highly of her. But that doesn’t mean that the rest of us have to remain silent.

Ms. Campbell’s former employer owes, at a minimum, a public apology to her. And it wouldn’t hurt if some patriotic minded individual found a way to reach out and improve her job situation, at least to thank her for doing the right thing at significant personal cost. So who is the real hero in this story? Here’s a picture for you.

Campbell

EDIT: The original picture displayed turned out to be a photoshop of the Stolen Valor perp. It has been replaced with a much nicer (and may I say, far more attractive) picture of Ms. Campbell. Also, the first paragraph includes the word “wearing” regarding the unearned Congressional Medal of Honor. It is not verified that the thief in question was ever seen wearing the medal. We apologize for any confusion.


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Comment pages: 1 2

I think this would make a great case study for both enlisted and commissioned training schools. Teach this case in a Military Ethics course.

This Marine performed valiantly.

Ooh-rah!

freedomfirst on March 7, 2012 at 1:20 PM

One slight nit to pick. There is no such thing as the Congressional Medal of Honor. The military decoration is known simply as the Medal of Honor.

The confusion comes from the society that Congress created to honor recipients of the award called the Congressional Medal of Honor Society, who themselves acknowledge that it is simply the “Medal of Honor”. “Congressional” refers to the society, not the award.

Congress has no role in awarding the Medal. The final awarding authority rests with the President. The President presents the award “in the name of the Congress” to indicate full national recognition of the awardee, vs. say a Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Finally, in the intrests of shameless blog promotion, I invite you all to peruse my site called Their Finest Hour. I blog regularly about recipients of the Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross (Army), Navy Cross, Air Force Cross, Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor, and the exploits of other heroic figures on the anniversary dates of their courage and/or achievements. Since we’re coincidental with the 70th anniversary of the United States’ participation in World War II, I’m making sure that every WWII Medal gets blogged on its 70th.

allanbourdius on March 7, 2012 at 1:20 PM

Does SC Edison really want to take the official position that it tolerates law-breaking on its premises?

The Monster on March 7, 2012 at 1:21 PM

this wasnt a shoplifter where immediate action was needed.

chasdal on March 7, 2012 at 12:54 PM

FYI

Large retail firms in malls don’t ALLOW their employees to take any sort of “immediate action” in regard to shoplifting. The retailers have been inundated with frivilous “I was publicly humiliated” lawsuits. They may only ask someone they have seen sholifting, “Is there anything I can ring up for you?” If the person says no, they are required to walk away from them and notify the mall’s “Loss Prevention” after the person leaves the store. Loss Prevention catches fewer than 10% of those shoplifters. Any employee who violates this policy is fired. Sound familiar?

WE get to pay for the stolen merchandise whih is treated as an additional “cost of doing business”

PolAgnostic on March 7, 2012 at 1:22 PM

allanbourdius on March 7, 2012 at 1:20 PM

Duly noted. Thanks for the clarification.

30 pcs of silver on March 7, 2012 at 1:22 PM

Alvarez get a personal phone call from Obama yet? Complimenting him on his service to the nation?

coldwarrior on March 7, 2012 at 1:23 PM

Classic!

freedomfirst on March 7, 2012 at 1:23 PM

Alvarez get a personal phone call from Obama yet? Complimenting him on his service to the nation?

coldwarrior on March 7, 2012 at 1:23 PM

Melissa Campbell did her duty, as she saw it, at a significant personal cost. Since she is a United States Marine, this is not at all surprising. The fact that she wants to leave the matter behind her and does not want to dwell on her sacrifices speaks well of her training and temprement.

I do not fault her employer, and it seems she does not either. Even if she knew she was going to be fired, I would venture to say she would do the same thing, in the same way. There is a larger issue here than her job.

Haiku Guy on March 7, 2012 at 1:28 PM

That’s the thanks you get Melissa, for being a good American. I hope you change your mind and sue the Bastards at your old job. Thank you for your service to our country! Semper Fi, my Sister!!!

Jersey Dan on March 7, 2012 at 1:29 PM

I’d love to go on one of those Southern California Edison’s Tours just for jollies. I think I’d start out saying I was a Member of Broad of Directors for the company. Then, I’d claim I worked there for over 30 years and started working in their mail room. I chip in that back in the 80′s I’d been in charge of one of their nuclear plants and single-handedly prevented it from a meltdown and saved them from having to report it to authorities. And then in the nineties I uncovered major financial malfeasance there while CFO of the company and they paid me millions to keep my mouth shut.

(That last one is the massacring of children parallel.)

After all that harmless breast-beating they could introduce me all around and I can bask in the limelight of adulation. If someone tries to call me on it, I’ll ask the head honcho of SCE if that undignified employee will get fired for it.

Dusty on March 7, 2012 at 1:29 PM

Cute Marine. She reminds me of Mary Katharine Ham.

Dale Wyckoff on March 7, 2012 at 1:35 PM

allanbourdius on March 7, 2012 at 1:20 PM

~~~~~~~~

Your site looks very interesting, I’ve bookmarked it! Thanks for the clarification, too…I was very fortunate to meet a living MOH recipient in the 90s, Wesley Fox. He was a guest at a Navy Ball we attended. What an impressive man…all of my friends and I were swooning. Anyone who impersonates a MOH recipient IS stealing something which they are not entitled to. I applaud Melissa Campbell for doing the right thing.

ellifint on March 7, 2012 at 1:35 PM

I’d love to go on one of those Southern California Edison’s Tours just for jollies. I think I’d start out saying I was a Member of Broad of Directors for the company. Then, I’d claim I worked there for over 30 years and started working in their mail room. I chip in that back in the 80′s I’d been in charge of one of their nuclear plants and single-handedly prevented it from a meltdown and saved them from having to report it to authorities. And then in the nineties I uncovered major financial malfeasance there while CFO of the company and they paid me millions to keep my mouth shut.

(That last one is the massacring of children parallel.)

After all that harmless breast-beating they could introduce me all around and I can bask in the limelight of adulation. If someone tries to call me on it, I’ll ask the head honcho of SCE if that undignified employee will get fired for it.

Dusty on March 7, 2012 at 1:29 PM

Brilliant! LOL

Book on March 7, 2012 at 1:36 PM

All of her actions so far have been resume builders.

Prop Gun on March 7, 2012 at 1:48 PM

The comments here are a bit disappointing.

I’m sure many of the people here defending the marine have children. I’m sure many of those same people have told their children that there is a right way and a wrong way to go about something you feel strongly about. That’s doubly true when you’re an adult. A call to the FBI was sufficient.

I know from experience that the services stress the importance of professionalism. The veteran forgot her training and paid the consequences.

And, as someone else mentioned, she isn’t a whistleblower.

caldfyr on March 7, 2012 at 1:50 PM

allanbourdius on March 7, 2012 at 1:20 PM

+1

Allan, you explained it perfectly.

Melissa Campbell is a true American. Ms Campbell, thank you for your service.

CatchAll on March 7, 2012 at 1:52 PM

Alvarez get a personal phone call from Obama yet? Complimenting him on his service to the nation?
coldwarrior on March 7, 2012 at 1:23 PM

Classic!
freedomfirst on March 7, 2012 at 1:23 PM

It would really be classic if Obama also called a press conference and publically declared that Melissa Campbell “acted stupidly.”

logis on March 7, 2012 at 1:55 PM

The fact that she’s not out doing book tours and appearances on The View speaks highly of her.
She is certainly no Sandra Cheap Fluck.

Melissa Campbell is one heck of a lot better looking, too.

UltimateBob on March 7, 2012 at 11:42 AM

The big difference…between US…and THEM! Thank you MC!

KOOLAID2 on March 7, 2012 at 1:59 PM

she didnt learn much in the corps if this is the way she acts towards those in authority.

chasdal on March 7, 2012 at 12:58 PM

You obviously never went thru Marine Corps boot camp. Integrity is more important than tact. She was right to question him. She was right to report him. Her company may have had the right to fire her but they were dead wrong to do so. I wouldn’t want to be associated with a company that would knowingly allow such a person as Alvarez to freely spew his lies at any function the company was having. Truth matters more than customer service. If you can’t see or understand that then it is you that has the problem not Ms Campbell.

StompUDead on March 7, 2012 at 1:59 PM

Look at the picture of that girl up there- like a precocious pixie. This is a Marine.

What depths this country has fallen to!

sartana on March 7, 2012 at 1:59 PM

I was very fortunate to meet a living MOH recipient in the 90s, Wesley Fox.

ellifint on March 7, 2012 at 1:35 PM

I have met Colonel Fox too. I also was under his command as a USMC officer candidate in 1990. The 43rd anniversary of his Medal of Honor valor was on Feburary 22nd, and naturally I blogged it. ;-)

Thanks for the site props. I hope you enjoy what I write.

allanbourdius on March 7, 2012 at 2:00 PM

Admiral Borda killed himself over a decoration that Newsweek lied about and these guys wear a full uniform when they’ve never served. Flay them alive.

NoDonkey on March 7, 2012 at 2:01 PM

caldfyr on March 7, 2012 at 1:50 PM

You tell your children to call the FBI everytime they don’t immediately know what someone is talking about – without even bothering to ask?

I’m not absolutely positive that you can be arrested for that. But that doesn’t mean you have a “right” to do it.

logis on March 7, 2012 at 2:08 PM

Once again, America thinks it is worse to observe the crime than to commit the crime.

Crusty on March 7, 2012 at 2:08 PM

And that is the business owners choice. You may think it’s stupid, and you may be right. But that doesn’t mean that they don’t have the right to make those policies and to do the firing.

blink on March 7, 2012 at 1:41 PM

Never said they didn’t or couldn’t. I was responding to the idea that shoplifting was something that involved “immediate action”.

Wait a few years with regard to tolerance of “company policies” and see if you feel the same when the amount of misstatement of earnings and accounting fraud that is currently pandemic starts to come out on publicly traded companies.

When the 2008-2009 financial crisis problems look like a picnic by comparison, many will be asking, “Why did we tolerate the existence of these criminals?”

PolAgnostic on March 7, 2012 at 2:09 PM

Dusty on March 7, 2012 at 1:29 PM

Funny.

Bmore on March 7, 2012 at 2:09 PM

I know from experience that the services stress the importance of professionalism. The veteran forgot her training and paid the consequences.

caldfyr on March 7, 2012 at 1:50 PM

What training exactly do you think she got before she was allowed to pass out snacks?

I too am disappointed that you and a few others would take such rabid exception to Ms. Campbell’s actions. How dare she forget her place and actually challenge somebody who clearly was a fraud! Who does she think she is? It all comes off as more than a little pompous. As if being something more than subservient is a bigger affont to society than claiming to be a war hero and telling stories about how you got your medal.

Fact of the matter is that recounting those war stories was probably one of the tells that got Ms. Campbell suspicious. The MoH recipients I’ve met have been extremely reluctant to recount what they did to be awarded a Medal of Honor.

But, I’ll return to a question I posed earlier. Ms. Campbell asked a few questions and her supervisor got upset as a result. Fine, we’ll go with your premise that this was tantamount to a crime against humanity and her employer was more than justified in firing her. When it turned out that she was correct, why didn’t they offer to re-hire her? Granted they were under no obligation to do so but you would think exposing a fraud would more than make up for a little perceived rudeness. There are 82 living MoH recipients. You would think that protecting the integrity of what those men (no living women) did would more than make up for asking a few pointed questions to a fraud like Alvarez who she knew was not one of the 82.

And BTW, I agree that the term whistleblower is wrong and is easily misconstrued- especially when used in conjunction with an employer action. Informant is probably a more accurate term. That she doggedly pursued this fraud even to the point of contacting the FBI should be more important than scolding her for being rude and defending those who fired her.

Happy Nomad on March 7, 2012 at 2:14 PM

Wow…sad that this woman was fired, meanwhile Alvarez may get off without any actual punishment. So if her employer deemed this as an unprofessional act on her part, then I can understand a “verbal warning”…but terminating her employment? Over-reaction.

Kudos to Ms. Campbell for doing the right thing and ending the farce and fraud by con-artist Alvarez.

The retired military personnel I’m around never ever brag about killings, or their own heroics. They will talk about people they served with, but never themselves. This guy should have set off red flags to people over the years.

jediwebdude on March 7, 2012 at 2:33 PM

And BTW, I agree that the term whistleblower is wrong and is easily misconstrued- especially when used in conjunction with an employer action. Informant is probably a more accurate term. That she doggedly pursued this fraud even to the point of contacting the FBI should be more important than scolding her for being rude and defending those who fired her.

Happy Nomad on March 7, 2012 at 2:14 PM

I did not use the term idly. While not an expert, I have been through enough corporate training on how braodly the term ‘whistleblower’ applies with regard to federal statutes to know that it is remarkably easy for an employer to get their a$$ in a crack in a wide variety of ways.

Whistleblower quick search: Meaning the first that popped – not inclusive of ALL possibly applicable codes

Obstruction of Justice, Tampering with a witness, victim, or an informant
18 U.S.C. § 1512

(b) Whoever knowingly uses intimidation, threatens, or corruptly
persuades another person, or attempts to do so, or engages in
misleading conduct toward another person, with intent to –

(1) influence, delay, or prevent the testimony of any person in an official proceeding;
(2) cause or induce any person to –
(A) withhold testimony, or withhold a record, document, or other object, from an official proceeding;

IAC, I would not want to be a Southern California Edison executive if a Congressional hearing subpoened me with regard to the company’s actions.

PolAgnostic on March 7, 2012 at 2:34 PM

What training exactly do you think she got before she was allowed to pass out snacks?
Happy Nomad on March 7, 2012 at 2:14 PM

She was hired by Southern California Edison as a security guard, and it’s very unlikely that she was trained by them to never question whether someone might be committting a crime on the premises.

The only problem here was that she questioned the WRONG PERSON.

After this, Alvarez got convicted of a half-dozen other felonies relating to his position on the water board. That kind of wholesale corruption doesn’t happen without a LOT of head-turning.

They needed to fire Campbell to set an example. These people can’t afford another flashlight shining into their rats’ nest.

logis on March 7, 2012 at 2:36 PM

Look at the picture of that girl up there- like a precocious pixie. This is a Marine.

What depths this country has fallen to!

sartana on March 7, 2012 at 1:59 PM

Actually I’m looking at something else right now. And I think it’s your commenting account…

Jazz Shaw on March 7, 2012 at 2:40 PM

Personally, I suspect that after being fired they attempted to hire her back – and that she said no. As a retired Army NCO, I would NOT return to any employer who treated me that way.

More importantly, those who are defending the employer’s choice to fire her seem to be ignorant of one of the core belief’s instilled in military service – be true to yourself, you unit, and your country. Obviously Alvarez did know these because he had not served. Ms. Campbell not only knew them, but acted correctly when she observed a fraud in the act.

Having raise two children who entered military service (one Army, one Marine), I would be proud to know that my daughter served with people of such honor and such conviction to do what is right. Many of you seem to feel Ms. Campbell acted unprofessionally – well, I disagree. I read nothing in this article which discredits herself, her employer, or her military service.

I would be proud to work along side Ms. Campbell or to even have her as MY supervisor. I salute you, Marine! Semper Fidelis

jackal40 on March 7, 2012 at 2:42 PM

What the heck are you talking about? What accounting fraud are you referring to? I should tell you that I know all about scrutinizing public company filings so your explanation ought to be fun.

blink on March 7, 2012 at 2:31 PM

You can scrutinize public filings till the cows come home (I used to do it up until June of 2009) and you will never find it. Start by learning everything about derivatives, CDS, CDO, CDO squared, etc, Then start digging into the grey areas between GAAP and the new global accounting standards. If you know a CPA, after you do the research, ask them some “theoretical” scenarios that can be hidden/done/discounted with regard to the balance sheet.

I WILL NOT cite specific instances since:

a) I am not breaking the law
b) a significant number of cases have been reported to the SEC
c) some have been taken to the FBI
d) none of the reported cases have been acted upon by the authorities in three years

When and how, if ever, it gets established that this is the Most Corrupt Administration Ever is dependent upon having political officials willing to stand up like Ms. Campbell and District Attorneys. State Attorney Generals and an Attorney General of the U.S. who are not part of the “go along to get along” crowd.

The largest R.I.C.O. conspiracy in the history of the world was ‘settled’ in February when the Obama administration gave “Get Out of Jail Free” cards to five large banks for millions of crminal acts committed using M.E.R.S. and fraudulent M.B.S.’s. If they are brazen enough to ram that through, do you think they care about this “small stuff”?

PolAgnostic on March 7, 2012 at 2:56 PM

Anyone who is surprised that Campbell took the action she did doesn’t know Marines.

J.E. Dyer on March 7, 2012 at 3:02 PM

Your definition shouldn’t concern any Southern California Edison executive. Campbell doesn’t indicate that there was any attempt to get her to withhold her testimony.

blink on March 7, 2012 at 2:40 PM

Would those be the same people who haven’t replied to the request for comment?

You have obviously never been in a corporate manangement structure where the potential penalaties for any form of retaliation against any employee reporting any violation of federal statutes would be a possibility.

I suspect that Ms. Campbell has been exposed to some of the seamier lawyers who make a living in this field. And/or Southern California Edison has already negotiated a settlement with a strict NDA and no public comment clause.

PolAgnostic on March 7, 2012 at 3:09 PM

I was only in the US Army for four years and never served in combat but I can recognize a parade ground soldier and faker a mile off. Ms Campbell’s job at the time is irrelevant. She is a 10 year Marine vet and this clown obviously pissed her off enough that she had to say something about it. I know I sure as hell would.

RobertE on March 7, 2012 at 3:16 PM

Regardless of The Courts decision, one would think the military would have a Stolen Valor Black-Ops (r) department ready and willing to discourage this sort of thing.

FineasFinn on March 7, 2012 at 3:27 PM

Punished for reporting a crime. From an ethics standpoint I think the company messed up. Part of military training is to report malfeasance of your superiors so the attitude of reporting him is valid.

Given that, I would not want to work for a company with such questionalbe ethics and morals. The company I work for strongly supports ethics.

TerryW on March 7, 2012 at 3:33 PM

I generally avoid my FRG. If Campbell ever gets involved with mine, I’ll show up just to thank her.

tuffy on March 7, 2012 at 4:05 PM

The largest R.I.C.O. conspiracy in the history of the world was ‘settled’ in February when the Obama administration gave “Get Out of Jail Free” cards to five large banks for millions of crminal acts committed using M.E.R.S. and fraudulent M.B.S.’s. If they are brazen enough to ram that through, do you think they care about this “small stuff”?

Put up or shut up.

blink on March 7, 2012 at 3:36 PM

D’OH … it just dawned on me – you must be a member of the MSM!?!
(The “put up or shut up” statement indicates your overarching laziness – “if it isn’t handed to me on a silver platter by the DNC, it doesn’t exist”

Reading IS fundamental. The $ 25 billion “settlement” (of which $ 20 billion is funded by taxpayers through HAMP et al) is less than the land register fees evaded by the five banks over a 10+ year period using the Mortgage Electronic Registration System which was NEVER adopted or legalized by any state.

MERS was created by the banks to intentionally bypass the land registration fees and to allow faster bundling of Mortgage Backed Security trusts. The banks took advantage of the MERS capabilities to horizontally apply individual mortgages to multiply tranches of risk in the MBS – each individual tranche occurrence being a felony. They also took the same mortgage and included it in multiple M.B.S. trusts – every trust beyond the first being an additional felony.

(I know you must be getting tired of reading so many big words)

Conveniently, all of the felonies are documented via MERS and the extensive documentation required to set up an MBS trust. Holder et al pushed to forgive all of this for less than $ 5 billion. So the banks settled for a financial penalty that was less than one tenth of a cent on the dollar.

After all, it’s notlike the Obama administration to worry about $ 5 trillion dollars in non-tax dollars.

The hard work of documenting violations of the Sarbanes-Oxley law which might net a total of $ 1 trillion. Humph! Doing that might interfere with the campaign fund raising.

Take your little liberal self off and go have a nap. You’ve had to much reality for today.

While your ignoring all of the above – know this, even the New York Times had articles reporting what a smelly deal the Obama administration made.

PolAgnostic on March 7, 2012 at 4:06 PM

You have obviously never been in a corporate manangement structure where the potential penalaties for any form of retaliation against any employee reporting any violation of federal statutes would be a possibility.

PolAgnostic on March 7, 2012 at 3:09 PM

Even if you think that the company has a specific rule against it, that has nothing to do with executives being worried about a congressional hearing.

Wow, you really are a drama queen.

blink on March 7, 2012 at 3:38 PM

You write replies that completely ignore the statements being made … and I’m the drama queen.

Go finish you homework. Expecially your remedial reading comprehension exercises.

PolAgnostic on March 7, 2012 at 4:09 PM

Courage such as hers does not need monetary gain. The act in of itself was (is) rewarding enough. Well done, Marine, and “Ooh-rah” to you!

Cherokee on March 7, 2012 at 4:20 PM

Look at the picture of that girl up there- like a precocious pixie. This is a Marine.

What depths this country has fallen to!

sartana on March 7, 2012 at 1:59 PM

Actually I’m looking at something else right now. And I think it’s your commenting account…

Jazz Shaw on March 7, 2012 at 2:40 PM

Two thumbs up Jazz. Three, if I had an extra.

NapaConservative on March 7, 2012 at 4:28 PM

She’s a hero.

JellyToast on March 7, 2012 at 4:55 PM

Ms. Campbell now works as a family readiness officer for the military. She has politely declined the offers from a parade of lawyers inquiring whether she would like to file a lawsuit against her former employer. She told them she was not interested. While she still wants her name cleared, she said, she doesn’t want to spend any more time thinking about Mr. Alvarez.

I like this young lady. A great American for serving with The Marines. A great American for dropping a world of turds on the poser. And a great American for just moving on. Her satisfaction seems to have come from just doing what’s right.

hawkdriver on March 7, 2012 at 7:01 PM

Her former employer was fully within its rights to fire her for making a scene at one of its events.

If she had quietly noted and reported him, that would have been one thing, but initiating a conflict when she was supposed to be working was a perfectly legitimate basis to fire her.

Many people don’t think “stolen valor” should be a crime, especially not one resulting in an expensive waste of taxpayer money for prosecution and incarceration. The US Military is not a priesthood, and they aren’t entitled to special rights like japanese samurai of old. They are just people doing a job who are compensated for that job at high enough rates to ensure recruitment goals are met.

People who lie about their past to gain sympathy are scummy people, but as long as they aren’t actually hurting anyone physically or financially, the appropriate reaction is to call them out (not when you are supposed to be working, though), not to force the rest of us to pay to use force against them… and to what end?

So Jazz Shaw, you are wrong. Trying to attack an employer because you sympathize with the reason the employee didn’t do her job and embarrassed them at an event is just wrong.

kaltes on March 7, 2012 at 8:14 PM

They are just people doing a job who are compensated for that job at high enough rates to ensure recruitment goals are met.

kaltes on March 7, 2012 at 8:14 PM

It kind of shows through here. Your downfall in commenting is your inability to mast the things you distain.

hawkdriver on March 7, 2012 at 8:58 PM

Her former employer was fully within its rights to fire her for making a scene at one of its events.
kaltes on March 7, 2012 at 8:14 PM

Who are all these people who are denying your rights?

You dodge the concept of “right” and “wrong” and turn everything into an idiotic ass-backward faux-Constitutional argument. I know this is a truly horrible thing to have to tell any full-grown person: but you are acting like a bunch of liberals.

logis on March 7, 2012 at 9:08 PM

blink on March 7, 2012 at 5:27 PM

While your ignoring all of the above

PolAgnostic on March 7, 2012 at 4:06 PM

Good night, Infinite Do Loop

PolAgnostic on March 7, 2012 at 10:09 PM

I’ve done some contract work for SCE. This doesn’t surprise me. I’ve never seen such political correctness and drama in a workplace.

renaistre on March 12, 2012 at 9:16 AM

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