Today, while we wait for the Super Tuesday results to start rolling in, President Obama will provide a bit of a side-show with his first open press conference of the year at 1 p.m. (I leave it to the assembled masses to determine whether or not it was a calculated maneuver to do this on the same day as such a huge primary battle when the press is scattered across the nation.) As The Hill notes, the generally Obama-friendly media has been feeling a bit shut out of late.

Obama has recently received criticism from the press for only making himself available through less traditional formats.

In January, Obama took questions through YouTube in his “first completely virtual interview,” while participating in a Google+ “hangout.” The event was part of a broader strategy by the White House to connect with voters while circumventing traditional news media.

In recent months, Obama has hand-picked social media networks like Facebook and Twitter to relay his message on a variety of issues, holding town-hall meetings on both and participating in a third with LinkedIn…

Some members of the media have been critical of the new approach.

“I worry sometimes that the administration subverts the Wild West appeal of new media by rather scrupulously scrubbing and screening questions — like they have done in various new-media town-hall settings,” said Julie Mason, a talk show host on Sirius-XM and veteran White House correspondent who also serves on the board of the White House Correspondents’ Association.

So what topics with the Campaigner in Chief be hitting? Well, the big AIPAC speech, of course. But that will tie into other foreign policy questions such as what, if anything, he plans to do about Iran. But he’ll hit some domestic issues as well. He’ll be rolling out his new housing plan.

President Barack Obama is aiming mortgage relief at members of the military as well as homeowners with government-insured loans, the administration’s latest efforts to address a persistent housing crisis.

In his first full news conference of the year Tuesday, Obama was to announce plans to let borrowers with mortgages insured by the Federal Housing Administration refinance at lower rates, saving the average homeowner more than $1,000 a year. Obama also was detailing an agreement with major lenders to compensate service members and veterans who were wrongfully foreclosed upon or denied lower interest rates.

What could possibly go wrong? You are cordially invited to tune in for the presser and submit your own observations. I’ll bring the popcorn, which will be considerably cheaper than the stuff at the movie theater.