Your Super Tuesday War on Women update finds the battlefield shifting to an area that doesn’t involve any actual women. Wading into the fray this time is a well known, sober, principled, even toned observer of the human condition… Don Imus. The aging shock jock decided to add his two cents to the current kerfuffle embroiling Rush Limbaugh, doing so in his usual, measured, analytical style.

During Monday’s news updates on Fox Business Network’s Imus In The Morning, host Don Imus went off on Rush Limbaugh‘s weekend apology to Sandra Fluke, calling Limbaugh a “fat, gutless, pill-popping loser.”

Imus expressed anger over Limbaugh’s apology, pointing out that it was done on his website and not in person.

“A lame apology on his website, in which he says he didn’t mean to personally attack her,” Imus said, “is gutless.” Imus took issue with Limbaugh’s “sustained, vile, personal attack” on Fluke over three days, and said that if he’s going to apologize, you have to “go sit down with her” and apologize.

As Andrew McCarthy reminds us, this is the same guy who saw a lot of conservatives go to bat for him after he lost his own advertisers – and his job – for referring to the Rutgers women’s basketball team as a group of “nappy headed hos.” Having clearly learned his lesson from that sorry episode, he seems to have decided to correct Rush’s use of insulting language by… (OK, now I have a headache.)

For his next trick, Don will probably jump on the bandwagon with Steny Hoyer and suggest that Rush be sued. And then Rush can sue Imus. And Imus can sue Fluke. Pretty soon all of the available courts will be so tied up with this nonsense that there won’t be any judges left over to determine who wins Ohio next November.

A final thought on the absurdity of all this from McCarthy:

So naturally, Imus — a recovering alcoholic and drug addict — ripped Rush Limbaugh this morning as a “fat, gutless, pill-popping loser.” Perfect. Of course, as Rush eloquently explained today in publicly apologizing, yet again, to Sandra Fluke, his error in judgment was to succumb to a temptation at odds with the personality fans have come to know, and the person friends have come to know, over the past 25 years: the temptation to resort to the base language of unfounded personal insult — the language that is the Left’s stock-in-trade and that Imus often seems unable to complete a sentence without. The post-Rutgers Imus, much like the pre-Rutgers Imus, is a well-trained house pet. He’s got down perfectly when you need to grovel, when you can afford to be sanctimonious, and which targets are safe for his bile-laced tirades.

It is, as Andrew points out with more than a little venom on his tongue, a true “profile in courage.” The only good news out of all this – at least for the time being – is found in the economy. Champagne companies should shortly be recording record profits on the back of all the parties that the Democrats are throwing this week.