Film review: Wanderlust

posted at 8:00 am on March 3, 2012 by Ed Morrissey

Each year, I make a New Year’s resolution to spend more time writing movie reviews, and each year I end up letting it slide.  This week I decided that I would start seeing a new movie each week as a way to engage more on the entertainment industry, after having a conversation over a week ago with Steven Crowder in which he challenged me to follow through.  Normally, I only go to see movies I’m sure I’ll enjoy; if I start going each week, I’m forced to see movies I might otherwise miss and have an opportunity to discover some gems in the rough.

That, unfortunately, does not describe Wanderlust, which was released last Friday.  I chose this Judd Apatow-produced film only because the theater nearby had just two choices for films released this weekend, The Lorax and Project X, neither of which I wanted to see.  The Lorax is an adaptation of a Dr. Seuss book on conservation that’s preachy enough in its short form, and the thought of sitting through a 90-minute padded-out lecture didn’t appeal to me at all; Project X looks like Can’t Hardly Wait meets The Hangover and was even less appealingThe problem with starting this new plan in March is that this season is a graveyard for film releases, and the pickings will be mighty, mighty thin.

I had some hope for Wanderlust, since Apatow’s films are usually offbeat, quirky, original, and make emotional connections unexpectedly.  That was especially true of The Forty Year Old Virgin and Knocked Up, and to a lesser extent with Forgetting Sarah Marshall and Get Him To The Greek.  In this film, Paul Rudd and Jennifer Aniston play George and Linda, a couple who hit a streak of bad luck in New York and end up trekking to Georgia to stay with George’s brother Rick.  On the way, they stay overnight at a commune, and when Rick turns into a tyrant given to inappropriate commentary of all kinds, George and Linda try living at the commune to escape the shipwreck of their lives.

There may be plenty of comedic possibilities to explore, but Wanderlust mostly goes for the cheap laughs and the obvious plot twists.  Some of the best laughs come in the beginning, especially in a sequence where Linda unsuccessfully pitches a depressing nature documentary to HBO.  At a certain point, though, what should have been funny became more creepy than humorous, and it generates more eye rolls than laughs.  What works in other Apatow films is that the characters may do oddball things, but their basic humanity is evident.  In this case, most of the characters feel like archetypes for the sole purpose of being foils in  mean-spirited ways rather than showing any affection for them.  It’s hard to connect to any of the characters, even George and Linda, thanks to the cardboard cutout setups of the film.

The cast is solid and does as well as they can with the material, and there is plenty of hippie bashing, some of it humorous.  Rudd and Aniston make their best efforts and do have some good moments together on screen.  Alan Alda plays the co-founder of the commune, er, “intentional community,” and lends a bit more humanity to the proceedings. Justin Theroux nails the role of the charismatic and cheesy commune leader Seth.  The always-luminous Malin Akerman (Watchmen, 27 Dresses) feels more like a token free-love babe, but Lauren Ambrose manages to get above the material to project a vulnerable and slightly loopy Earth Mother (almost literally) in a smaller role.

There is some fun to be had with Wanderlust, and it wasn’t a bad movie at all — just a little disappointing, given Apatow’s track record.  Wanderlust might work best as a Netflix instant queue choice or a premium-channel opportunity.  Stick with Act of Valor and hope that next weekend will bring something a little more entertaining.  Due to subject matter, it’s definitely not appropriate for children or teens;  it gets an R rating for graphic nudity (full frontals of both men and women), drug references, and language.

Note: I plan to get feedback from Twitter followers each weekend in choosing the films to review, so be sure to follow me.

Update: My comments made it sound as though Apatow directed the film; he was one of the producers.  I’ve edited that first mention to clarify, and thanks to Joana in the comments for pointing out my ambiguity.


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I chose this Judd Apatow film only because the theater nearby had just two choices for films released this weekend, The Lorax and Project X, neither of which I wanted to see.

Indeed.

We kept hearing in November & December that the movie industry was really hurting, that relatively few people were going to the theaters. But there were several good movies out then.

However, I heard on the radio today that business is booming in theaters so far this year. But there are very, very few good movies out now.
How do I define ‘good’? Partly by this: the fewer the instances of profanity/left-wing propaganda/near-nudity/blasphemy/sexual situations/rebellious themes, the better.
Apparently my country & I disagree on what is good.

How can you tell how movies stack up morally?
Go here before you go there:
http://www.pluggedin.com/movies.aspx

itsnotaboutme on March 3, 2012 at 8:31 AM

Twenty nine minutes.
Is this some kind of record at HotGas for NOBODY commenting yet?

CurtissP-40b on March 3, 2012 at 8:31 AM

Very good review.

I used to always listen to Michael Medved’s show, and I always enjoyed it when he also reviewed movies.

Please continue these reviews.

bluegill on March 3, 2012 at 8:32 AM

itsnotaboutme on March 3, 2012 at 8:31 AM

My husband and I don’t go to movies for this very reason–pop culture is filth. This is one reason I love our Netflix subscription–we can watch old film noir, B-movies, and Hollywood’s golden age to our hearts’ content.

DrMagnolias on March 3, 2012 at 8:36 AM

Please continue these reviews.

bluegill on March 3, 2012 at 8:32 AM

I concur-please continue Ed- I might even start going to see flicks again (last one was “The DaVinci Code”).

And to bluegill and itsnotaboutme, thanks for your comments.
After ~ half hour of a HotAir post with no comments, I thought I woke up in a post-apocolyptic world and I was last man standing!

CurtissP-40b on March 3, 2012 at 8:36 AM

How do I define ‘good’? Partly by this: the fewer the instances of profanity/left-wing propaganda/near-nudity/blasphemy/sexual situations/rebellious themes, the better.

itsnotaboutme on March 3, 2012 at 8:31 AM

The nudity, sex and realistic language are often necessary.

More or less nudity, sex or profanity has nothing to do with whether a film is good or not.

bluegill on March 3, 2012 at 8:38 AM

Or at least, I should say, the mere presence of those things shouldn’t necessarily lower a film’s perceived worth.

I mean, humans say bad words, have sex and don’t always wear clothes. So why not represent that in films?

bluegill on March 3, 2012 at 8:49 AM

I live 30 miles from Hollywood (nothing I’m proud of) and haven’t been to a movie in 10 years. My son and I plan to see Act of Valor, but couldn’t believe it when I saw the price…$16.50 per seat. WTH?

jbh45 on March 3, 2012 at 8:56 AM

Good review, thanks.

Saw the Lorax last night with the family. It was OK; place was packed, and yes, the movie was a bit over-run with lefty talking points about the environment, evil corporations, and yes, if I’m not mistaken, what may have been a lesbian couple dancing in the final dance scene, right up front – all wrapped up with a Tinkerbell-esque plea at the end, straight from the good Dr. himself.

Meh.

Midas on March 3, 2012 at 9:01 AM

A friend of mine actually told me she lived in a commune years ago. She said it was great at first but eventually turned into something horrible. She didn’t say too much in detail about it, but something like there was a lot of abuse going on.. abuse of rules, abuse of property .. people were always taking and getting into her stuff, like they had a right to it, but yet there were some people who you were never allowed to touch their stuff. There were like.. no rules but there were all these rules kinda thing. She also said there was a lot of sexual demands. She never got into details but said it was horrible in the end.

As I write this it reminds me of OWS.

JellyToast on March 3, 2012 at 9:05 AM

Think of it as some form of Lenten penance ritual, if that will help you.

Mutnodjmet on March 3, 2012 at 9:08 AM

The nudity, sex and realistic language are often necessary.

bluegill on March 3, 2012 at 8:38 AM

But usually not. Usually it is simply gratuitous.

CW on March 3, 2012 at 9:10 AM

Act of Valor, but couldn’t believe it when I saw the price…$16.50 per seat. WTH? jbh45 on March 3, 2012 at 8:56 AM

Act of Valor is worth the money – GO see it.

indyvet on March 3, 2012 at 9:13 AM

This week I decided that I would start seeing a new movie each week

Ed, why would you want to put that much cash into Hollywood pockets? I know, I know, take back the culture…still, for most of the movies Hollywood puts out, all you need do is wait a week, then pick up the DVD from the bargain bin at WalMart.

Thomas More on March 3, 2012 at 9:13 AM

The film industry produced a vast number of excellent movies during its first 50 years or so without any nudity or overly sexual situations. Possibly at times it is necessary, but those instances are far more rare in my opinion than filmmakers seem to believe. Mostly it is gratuitous and adds nothing to the film other than instances and situations where it can be uncomfortable to watch… Some of the stuff I’ve read that is in Wanderlust is just far too much that it turns me off of any desire to see it.

Gingotts on March 3, 2012 at 9:22 AM

CurtissP-40b- If you don’t mind me asking what is the story behind your name?

Meat Fighter on March 3, 2012 at 9:33 AM

CurtissP-40b- I know the aircraft, just curious if you had any special connection with it?

Meat Fighter on March 3, 2012 at 9:34 AM

Twenty nine minutes.
Is this some kind of record at HotGas for NOBODY commenting yet?

CurtissP-40b on March 3, 2012 at 8:31 AM

Thank goodness I wasn’t here! There would have been 99 comments in a row and a Bishop bat, decending upon my fingers!

KOOLAID2 on March 3, 2012 at 9:40 AM

Although I tend to agree with the review, after reading it one may be lead to believe that Judd Apatow directed this movie.

It isn’t so: Apatow was merely one of the producers; the director was David Wain, of Wet Hot American Summer and Role Models fame. Wanderlust is a film much more in line with Wain’s work – often funny, sometimes boring, always frustrating – than with Apatow’s.

I wouldn’t pick solid as an adjective that aptly describes the cast. The screenwriters and the director failed to take full advantage of the massive talent that cast offered them.

joana on March 3, 2012 at 9:42 AM

Coming of age movies used to be reserved for that time between adolescence and adulthood. Now it’s 40-somethings still finding themselves. I’m tired of seeing Paul Rudd as the quirky neurotic guy and Jennifer Aniston as the quirky neurotic girl. Grow up already.

CarolynM on March 3, 2012 at 9:49 AM

“Starring Jennifer Aniston” is enough to get my stomach acids churning. Won’t be reading the review.

Marcus on March 3, 2012 at 9:50 AM

since Apatow’s films are usually offbeat, quirky, original, and make emotional connections unexpectedly

Really, I’ve found Apatow’s films to be idiotic one note vulgar and offensive overhyped pieces of garbage. If he’s a visionary, than Hollywood needs glasses. It’s really sad to see how low standards have fallen. Have never found puking to be all that entertaining or even a good plot device. Yet somehow he seems to weave a pretty girl doing just that into most of his movies. A true visionary genius. Thanks for the memories.

Tommy_G on March 3, 2012 at 9:51 AM

Jennifer Aniston: who when married to Brad Pitt before being dumped for Jolie, actually tracked down one of the Bush twins at a large party and harassed her for the party guests. She then ran to every media outlet boasting about it. Oh, yeah, I’d love to watch her act now.

Marcus on March 3, 2012 at 9:54 AM

Lawrence of Arabia was on cable last week – it’s amazing how a movie like that makes CGI look awful.

batterup on March 3, 2012 at 9:54 AM

I live 30 miles from Hollywood (nothing I’m proud of) and haven’t been to a movie in 10 years. My son and I plan to see Act of Valor, but couldn’t believe it when I saw the price…$16.50 per seat. WTH?

jbh45 on March 3, 2012 at 8:56 AM

We have a little independent 10 screen theater in Woodbury, MN that charges $4 before 6 PM and for children, and seniors, $6 is their max price.. they have all the latest movies too.

Dasher on March 3, 2012 at 9:57 AM

It normally is a graveyard, except that Hunger Games is coming out this month.

And no, it’s not YA fiction, despite its classification.

mrsknightley on March 3, 2012 at 10:08 AM

Is Jen naked in the movie? If not, not worth bothering with/

fossten on March 3, 2012 at 10:11 AM

Jennifer Aniston: who when married to Brad Pitt before being dumped for Jolie, actually tracked down one of the Bush twins at a large party and harassed her for the party guests. She then ran to every media outlet boasting about it. Oh, yeah, I’d love to watch her act now.

Marcus on March 3, 2012 at 9:54 AM

Really? Why is this not widely known? (The answer to that is obvious)

Imagine if Patricia Heaton had harassed Chelsea Clinton at a party. It would be headline fodder.

itsnotaboutme on March 3, 2012 at 10:16 AM

Due to subject matter, it’s definitely not appropriate for children or teens; it gets an R rating for graphic nudity (full frontals of both men and women), drug references, and language.

THIS is why we don’t even consider “R” rated movies. The description above would have been rated “X” just 20 years ago.

Is there ANYTHING you can’t do in a “X”?

And what is left to see of Jennifer Aniston at this point?

Does she have any idea she’s going to be thrown away like a Whitney Houston/Marilyn Monroe rag doll at some point?

PappyD61 on March 3, 2012 at 10:17 AM

I like mindless stuff but the cost and the hassle of going out aren’t worth it. Yay, Redbox & Blockbuster. Although I haven’t don’t that much lately either.

Cindy Munford on March 3, 2012 at 10:35 AM

Took the grandkids to see Star Wars Episode 1 in 3D. I know it’s pretty pathetic compared to 4, 5, and 6 but it was something they could all see as they’re 10, 7, and 5. They enjoyed it because they could relate to the kids and for the 3D. The two older ones have seen the original three and the girl loves 6 because of the romance and the Ewoks. The older boy likes them all, and wants to be Hans Solo. LOL That said it means I will be seeing Ice Age 4, Frankenweenie, Rise of the Guardians, The Pirates, Btave, Life of Pi, and of course The Hobbit and Madagascar 3. Come on, what is not to love about the penquins and King Julius.
Movie I’ll personally skip this time around: The Black Knight Rises, that franchise has been beaten to death and Anne Hathaway as Catwoman is not appealing.
But I’d like to see The Avengers, MIB 3, and War of the Ages. I go to movies to escape….at my age I’ve seen enough real life. LOL

Deanna on March 3, 2012 at 10:37 AM

We have a little independent 10 screen theater in Woodbury, MN that charges $4 before 6 PM and for children, and seniors, $6 is their max price.. they have all the latest movies too.

Dasher on March 3, 2012 at 9:57 AM

I know, I used to live on Duckwood Trail. My son attended New Life Academy. Used to walk around Colby Lake. Loved Woodbury.

jbh45 on March 3, 2012 at 11:21 AM

CarolynM on March 3, 2012 at 9:49 AM

Right, well said. Here’s an idea: how about movies where people are presented with unbelievable challenges and disappointments that they courageously overcome without all the hoopla about how Big Insurance wants to deny them care or Big Corporation wants to shut them out. How about just a woman/man against nature or good versus evil kinda thing? Not the Grey (horribly boring, bad CGI wolves) … but somethign like Master And Commander. Or is that too immature?

dboley on March 3, 2012 at 11:29 AM

I don’t want movie reviews on Hot Air. No one here will use them as a “should I or shouldn’t I” and in most cases every single post involving a movie makes 75% of the commenters sound like crotchety old men who can’t enjoy anything.

Sammo21 on March 3, 2012 at 11:35 AM

Sammo21 on March 3, 2012 at 11:35 AM

Oh, I dunno, I enjoyed this thread and HotAir gets kinda sleepy and depopulated of a Sunday AM.
The hosts could do an “Open Book Thread” instead but the “Morons” from Ace’s place would be pi**ed.

Meat Fighter on March 3, 2012 at 9:34 AM

My father flew one during the Late Great Hate.
I’ve wanted to get one since before kindergarden, but I can’t swing the $300K-400K it would cost to buy a restored Warbird.

CurtissP-40b on March 3, 2012 at 12:23 PM

um…..doesn’t even look good enough to pick out of the $2 DVD bargain bin at Big Lots.

Didn’t you see the trailer?

Tim_CA on March 3, 2012 at 12:45 PM

in most cases every single post involving a movie makes 75% of the commenters sound like crotchety old men who can’t enjoy anything.

Sammo21 on March 3, 2012 at 11:35 AM

I AM a crotchety old man who can’t enjoy anything.

Now get offa my lawn, punk.

Tim_CA on March 3, 2012 at 12:47 PM

My father flew one during the Late Great Hate.

CurtissP-40b on March 3, 2012 at 12:23 PM

Hey, CurtissP,

just did a search on late great hate and it appears people use that term for a number of conflicts, including Afghanistan. Is it a generic term, or does it apply to WWII?

John the Libertarian on March 3, 2012 at 12:50 PM

What works in other Apatow films is that the characters may do oddball things, but their basic humanity is evident. In this case, most of the characters feel like archetypes for the sole purpose of being foils in mean-spirited ways rather than showing any affection for them.

It’s okay Ed – I don’t come here for your movie reviews.

DHChron on March 3, 2012 at 12:50 PM

There’s a new Studio Ghibli movie out for general audiences (The Secret World of Arrietty), and to very little fanfare as usual.

Why not give that one a try?

tbrosz on March 3, 2012 at 12:50 PM

The President could’ve used some foreign policy advice from this guy:

“I have heard there are troubles of more than one kind.
Some come from ahead and some come from behind.
But I’ve bought a big bat. I’m all ready you see.
Now my troubles are going to have troubles with me!”

― Dr. Seuss

Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss!

Too bad that Lorax flick is so stinkin’ green.

itsnotaboutme on March 3, 2012 at 1:15 PM

A friend of mine actually told me she lived in a commune years ago. She said it was great at first but eventually turned into something horrible. She didn’t say too much in detail about it, but something like there was a lot of abuse going on.. abuse of rules, abuse of property .. people were always taking and getting into her stuff, like they had a right to it, but yet there were some people who you were never allowed to touch their stuff. There were like.. no rules but there were all these rules kinda thing. She also said there was a lot of sexual demands. She never got into details but said it was horrible in the end.

As I write this it reminds me of OWS.

JellyToast on March 3, 2012 at 9:05 AM

Some animals are more equal than others.

Theophile on March 3, 2012 at 1:25 PM

The nudity, sex and realistic language are often necessary.

More or less nudity, sex or profanity has nothing to do with whether a film is good or not.

bluegill on March 3, 2012 at 8:38 AM

A movie is not good if one does not enjoy it, regardless of what others may say about its merits. For many of us profanity is anything but realistic language, which detracts from rather than adds to a story. Being “edgy” has nothing to do with whether a film is good or not.

I watched The Guard last night and I can say it would have been a better movie without the foul language. As for this review, Knocked Up was the last straw for me and I refuse to see anything else with Apatow’s name on it.

slprice on March 3, 2012 at 1:40 PM

A friend of mine actually told me she lived in a commune years ago. She said it was great at first but eventually turned into something horrible. She didn’t say too much in detail about it, but something like there was a lot of abuse going on.. abuse of rules, abuse of property .. people were always taking and getting into her stuff, like they had a right to it, but yet there were some people who you were never allowed to touch their stuff. There were like.. no rules but there were all these rules kinda thing. She also said there was a lot of sexual demands. She never got into details but said it was horrible in the end.

As I write this it reminds me of OWS.

JellyToast on March 3, 2012 at 9:05 AM

(emphasis added)

One reason I am drawn to Aesop’s fables and all the old fairy tales and proverbs is because they show different cultures working out the rules that a community has to support and enforce in order for it to rise above oligarchic despotism.
Moving the hidden rules out into public law, where they can be overturned when necessary, is one of the major triumphs of civilization.

Too bad the current administration is moving us backwards.

AesopFan on March 3, 2012 at 1:54 PM

Is it a generic term, or does it apply to WWII?

John the Libertarian on March 3, 2012 at 12:50 PM

I read the term in a book by a Spitfire pilot, specifically referring to WW11.

But, it does seem there have been a lot of conflicts we’ve been engaged in since then that the term would apply to. Sigh…

CurtissP-40b on March 3, 2012 at 2:00 PM

I mean, humans say bad words, have sex and don’t always wear clothes. So why not represent that in films?

bluegill on March 3, 2012 at 8:49 AM

humans go to the bathroom too.

samharker on March 3, 2012 at 3:21 PM

A shameless attempt to cash in on, and make the Occupy bowel movement look harmlessly cool.
-

RalphyBoy on March 3, 2012 at 3:39 PM

Apparently my country & I disagree on what is good.

How can you tell how movies stack up morally?
Go here before you go there:
http://www.pluggedin.com/movies.aspx

itsnotaboutme on March 3, 2012 at 8:31 AM

.
I think this correction makes more sense.

“Apparently my country professional movie critics & I disagree on what is good.”

I believe most of our fellow Americans agree with you and I, as to what a good movie is. Not a bad link, BTW.

listens2glenn on March 3, 2012 at 3:42 PM

A friend of mine actually told me she lived in a commune years ago. She said it was great at first but eventually turned into something horrible. She didn’t say too much in detail about it, but something like there was a lot of abuse going on.. abuse of rules, abuse of property .. people were always taking and getting into her stuff, like they had a right to it, but yet there were some people who you were never allowed to touch their stuff. There were like.. no rules but there were all these rules kinda thing. She also said there was a lot of sexual demands. She never got into details but said it was horrible in the end.

As I write this it reminds me of OWS.

JellyToast on March 3, 2012 at 9:05 AM

-
There’s a Cheech and Chong gag about commune life. ‘Everything from the red brick to the pile of book against the wall is my room man’…
-
I hung out with a few people that lived in one of those many years ago… The gag is truer than life actually. They had bed sheets hanging from the ceiling in the basement to split the space up into about 6 bedrooms… lol
-
And there was a very strict caste system in place there too… Sheet walls meant not too much, but the doors on other’s brs were locked. Go figure.
-
I know for a fact that they recruited the girls right outta the 12 grade. That was their main source of sex, cleaning and cooking. I thought they were cool until I saw the top few treating the rest as peons… I never went back after a certian incident where I saw someone being told that the dog was there first so it had more rights… wow… man.
-

RalphyBoy on March 3, 2012 at 4:28 PM

I mean, humans say bad words, have sex and don’t always wear clothes. So why not represent that in films?

bluegill on March 3, 2012 at 8:49 AM

humans go to the bathroom too.

samharker on March 3, 2012 at 3:21 PM

Sitting here in Afghanistan at 3AM and tired as heck that was one of the funniest posts I have read on HA in a long time!!!

Thanks, Sam!

Now I am going to sleep.

g2825m on March 3, 2012 at 5:31 PM

don’t want movie reviews on Hot Air. No one here will use them as a “should I or shouldn’t I” and in most cases every single post involving a movie makes 75% of the commenters sound like crotchety old men who can’t enjoy anything.

Sammo21 on March 3, 2012 at 11:35 AM

One of the things Breitbart was fighting hardest for, was to have Republicans getting more involved in pop culture, not shying away from it further. He understood that it’s the message we send to the world about who we are, it’s how young people relate. Unfortunately, too many people in the party still have this old fashioned view, a pride that they haven’t seen a movie/heard a current song/watched pop culture tv, in 30 yrs. Very depressing to see how far we need to go from here.

di butler on March 3, 2012 at 5:52 PM

Ah…NO…!

Irenaeus on March 3, 2012 at 6:26 PM

Ed is as good at reviewing crappy movies as he is at picking presidential candidates.

Rusty Allen on March 3, 2012 at 11:12 PM

We rarely go to the movies because most of it is crap. I can usually tell it’s crap just from the trailer and the subject matter, this movie included.

We saw Act of Valor last weekend, excellent movie.

The next one will probably be The Avengers or the new Star Trek movie, something of that sort.

I’m not a big movie/TV person, I prefer reading, but my family members are. Netflix and Amazon get a good workout. I just re-watched The Bodyguard on my Kindle Fire, Whitney Houston wasn’t all that bad, considering she wasn’t really an actress. She certainly seemed more natural in her role than Kevin Costner did in his, he does much better in westerns. Although they use the F-word several times (for the shock value I suspect, it seemed out of place), there was no nudity and no other profanity. It’s shocking when you realize how “normal” is it to hear bad language in almost any movie these days.

My daughter watched Overboard with Goldie Hawn a few weeks ago. She really enjoyed it and it was actually pretty good, especially compared with today’s movies. It was goofy and sweet, no nudity or profanity, and had a good message.

Common Sense on March 4, 2012 at 12:58 AM

Go see Act of Valor.

Akzed on March 4, 2012 at 12:02 PM

I put Ed’s reviews in the same category as the host of “professional” reviewers cited on Rotten Tomatoes. Taken with a grain of salt. Of course, I had zero intention of seeing this movie anyway (still gotta see Act of Valor). Even a naked Jennifer Aniston isn’t worth my eight bucks.
Still, don’t blame Ed for lame movie reviews or football picks. He puts himself out there to be picked apart by dweebs like me. Kudos for that.

swinia sutki on March 5, 2012 at 5:59 AM