Rush: If we’re gonna pay for birth control, we want something in return

posted at 6:35 pm on March 1, 2012 by Tina Korbe

When Rush Limbaugh called Georgetown law student and so-called contraception activist Sandra Fluke a “slut” and a “prostitute,” he immediately took heat for it. What’d the legendary radio host do in response? He didn’t back down, that’s for sure.

Today, Rush sought to clarify his comments, but stood by his fundamental premise: Women who take money for sex are prostitutes, so women who take money for contraception for sex aren’t far behind.

He even went one step further, suggesting that the hard-working Americans who will have to pay higher insurance premiums to finance law students’ sex lives should be able to verify that their dollars-for-contraception are put to good use:

“If we’re going to have to pay for this — then we want something in return, Ms. Fluke,” Limbaugh said. “And that would be the videos of all this sex posted online so we can see what we’re getting for our money.”

Limbaugh attempted to clarify his comments and explain the rationale for his derisive labeling of Fluke.

“Now what did I say?” Limbaugh asked. “I said if we’re paying for this, it makes these women sluts, prostitutes. What else could it be? We are buying it.”

Rush’s comments are intentionally provocative, but they also underscore the point that women and men who aren’t sexually active rarely have a need for contraception. Others have made the point he’s making — that if we’re gonna pay for birth control, we want something in return — in a less over-the-top way by pointing out that, if we’re going to pay for our neighbor’s birth control, then we should have a say in our neighbor’s sex life. How does that newly-coined saying go? “If you don’t want Uncle Sam in your bedroom, don’t ask Uncle Sam to pay for what goes down in your bedroom.”

Again, contraception is not a necessity and fertility is not a disease. As plenty of folks have pointed out, contraception is, in fact, impossible to “insure,” as it’s impossible to “insure” against an expense that a person knows for a fact he or she will incur. In that case, it’s just an expense — and the person who’s gonna incur it should budget for it.


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