Georgetown co-ed: Please pay for us to have sex … We’re going broke buying birth control

posted at 1:55 pm on February 28, 2012 by Tina Korbe

At a hearing of the House Democratic Steering and Policy Committee yesterday, a single witness — Georgetown law student and “reproductive rights activist” Sandra Fluke — told sympathetic policy-makers that the administration’s so-called contraception mandate should stand … because her peers are going broke buying birth control.

“Forty percent of the female students at Georgetown Law reported to us that they struggled financially as a result of this policy (Georgetown student insurance not covering contraception),” Fluke reported.

It costs a female student $3,000 to have protected sex over the course of her three-year stint in law school, according to her calculations.

“Without insurance coverage, contraception, as you know, can cost a woman over $3,000 during law school,” Fluke told the hearing.

Craig Bannister at CNSNews.com did the math — and discovered that these co-eds, assuming they’re using the cheapest possible contraception, must be having sex about three times a day every day to incur that kind of expense. What Fluke is arguing, then, is that her fellow law students have a right to consequence-free sex whenever, wherever. Why, exactly, especially if it costs other people something? When I can’t pay for something, I do without it. Fortunately, in the case of contraception, women can make lifestyle choices that render it unnecessary.

At one point, Fluke mentions a friend who felt “embarrassed and powerless” when she learned her insurance didn’t cover contraception. Can you imagine how proud and empowered that same friend would be if she learned she has the ability to resist her own sexual urges? We can only assume she doesn’t know that because Fluke and she both labor under the illusion that contraception is a medical necessity.

Some little part of Fluke must recognize that it’s not … because she sought to bolster her argument with an example of an illness in which contraception might be a medically necessary treatment. Another friend of hers, she said, has polycystic ovarian syndrome, for which contraception is a common treatment. Some insurance programs that don’t cover contraception normally would nevertheless cover it as a treatment for PCOS — but other insurance programs wouldn’t. Fluke makes it sound like contraception is the only treatment for PCOS. In fact, it isn’t — and contraception is prescribed as a treatment only when the woman also wants to contracept. Fluke says her friend is a lesbian — and so wouldn’t need contraception. Why didn’t she opt for any of the other treatments, then?

At the end of her testimony, Fluke spoke in strong language of her resentment of university administrators and others who suggest she should have chosen to attend a different university that would have offered student insurance that does cover contraception — even if that other university wasn’t quite as prestigious as Georgetown.

“We refuse to pick between a quality education and our health and we resent that, in the 21st Century, anyone thinks it’s acceptable to ask us to make that choice simply because we are women,” Fluke said.

Ms. Fluke, I resent that you think women are incapable of controlling themselves, of sacrificing temporary pleasure for the sake of long-term success. You make us sound like animals, slaves to our instincts and able to be used, but we’re better than that. We’re persons, equal to men in dignity and love.


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Q: If she wants US to redistribute OUR wealth so she can have free birth control, shouldn’t she and her better looking girlfriends uhhhh, ummmmm, ahhhhh, share the wealth?

dthorny on February 29, 2012 at 10:31 AM

This is what the psyche of the age group Fluke claims to represent concerning their entitlement of other people’s money. I could care less if Fluke has intercourse with a 1000 men, I DO NOT care. Just don’t ask me to pay for that privilege. The Rule Of Thumb is if you can’t afford it, YOU CAN”T AFFORD IT. I know that is difficult to comprehend for someone who attends Georgetown, but it is a fact of life that she evidently has missed. Freedom is doing what you want to do and not expecting others to pay for your freedom to do so. Is it really that complicated for these children?

volsense on February 29, 2012 at 10:34 AM

If it hasn’t been said already, I’ll say it: That chick is too ugly to get gettin’ any. She’s a liar.

jediwebdude on February 29, 2012 at 10:25 AM

Don’t believe it for a New York minute. Much uglier women than her have gotten some after their bedmate put on some beer goggles. And too many modern males will go after anything that…how shall I say this…has the required female equipment.

Nevermind the fact that they’ll be begging God to be stricken with Alzheimer’s before they turn 30, to forget the hideous hags they boinked.

MelonCollie on February 29, 2012 at 10:41 AM

Craig Bannister at CNSNews.com did the math — and discovered that these co-eds, assuming they’re using the cheapest possible contraception, must be having unprotected sex about three times a day every day to incur that kind of expense

Don’t get me wrong, I think this woman is totally off base but I believe she was testifying about the expense of birth control pills not being covered by Georgtown’s student insurance, not the cost of condoms. Women who use birth control pills take one pill a day in order not to get pregnant. It doesn’t matter how many sexual encounters they have each day, they don’t have to take a separate pill each time they have sex. Craig Bannister makes it sound like she’s talking about condoms. Obviously, a woman’s male partner would have to use a new condom each time they enagaged in intercourse.

I certainly don’t believe that bc pills cost women at Georgetown $3000 over four years or other people should be paying for Ms. Fluke’s and her friends’ contraception, but concluding that these women are having sex three times a day erroneously frames the issue. This IMO distracts from the position that no insurance company, employer,or (in the case of Georgetown Univeristy) college should be forced to cover the cost of contraception.

susandiane311 on February 29, 2012 at 11:18 AM

The only way this female comes up with $82 a day is to count condom use … which means she is a nympho – having sex between 3-3.9 times a day. So in order to keep up her sex addiction and not wanting to work 2.5 hrs a week at minimum wage to afford her habit, she wants the Constitution and the Catholic Church to yeild. — Viki McKenna, WINS, Madison, Wisconsin.

Friendly21 on February 29, 2012 at 12:00 PM

She seems to believe that the cost of birth control coverage won’t get passed back to her as higher tuition and/or insurance premiums.

agmartin on February 29, 2012 at 12:08 PM

which means she is a nympho – having sex between 3-3.9 times a day. So in order to keep up her sex addiction and not wanting to work 2.5 hrs a week at minimum wage to afford her habit

Wow, what a prudish conservative nutball.

Random on February 29, 2012 at 12:13 PM

Ummm… my logic, and rationality, is that as a tax payer, I should have access to those goods purchased with my tax dollars. So I should be able to participate freely with Georgetown ‘ladies/students’ when I feel the overpowering urge to have sex!

dahni on February 29, 2012 at 12:26 PM

STD prevention, numnbnuts.

Random on February 29, 2012 at 6:12 AM

Do you know what the best method for STD prevention is? Besides that, married or monogamous couples typically aren’t concerned with STD prevention. However, if STD prevention is a woman’s primary concern why would she sleep around? Isn’t that a rather unhealthy attitude?

If high cholesterol is your primary concern do you eat lots of fatty foods regardless? Fatty foods taste good and are satisfying, what right does anyone have to suggest you should probably avoid them if high cholesterol is a primary concern of yours?

NotCoach on February 29, 2012 at 12:45 PM

Crossed legs are free!

Gratis legal ruling for the young lady.

profitsbeard on February 29, 2012 at 1:32 PM

I grew up at the wrong time. Where were these nymphos who need it 3 times a day every day when I was in college? (of course since I went to a military academy – there weren’t very many women at all – let alone these types)

And hey – she’s not THAT bad – she’s obviously not terribly bright (so any line will work), and also very hot-to-trot (s any line will work), so to a horny drunk college kid, I’d say she’s very doable….

dentarthurdent on February 29, 2012 at 1:48 PM

This dim bulb is what Georgetown accepts as a student? OMG!
She is dummer than the hole in a donut.
I thought Georgetown was more selective.

If I worked in admissions I’d be embarrassed!

Delsa on February 29, 2012 at 1:57 PM

Actually, these women should really be charging for sex.
At least charge enough to cover the cost of the pills, condoms, etc.
Depending on how often they’re doing it, a guy could really get a cut rate.
And don’t forget a group discount rate.

Badger40 on February 29, 2012 at 2:23 PM

Late to this party.

I agree. Wow.

Birth control as part of health insurance coverage is just something I don’t get. Insurance needs to be there for unanticipated large expenses that there isn’t time to plan for. It’s that simple.

Birth control is at most a monthly expense if one is buying the typical set of pills. For condoms, it can be an event by event thing — just replace them after you use them.

Any cost that’s added to insurance coverage automatically increases the expense of the item because of all the processing. For something routine and repetitive such as birth control, you’re simply paying more to have someone else check the bills and write the checks and tell you what they did. Oh, plus the insurance company has to make a profit! That’s right, they’re in it to make money and they need to make money on every claim they deal with. If they lose money, they go out of business.

So, yeah, wow.

EconomicNeocon on February 29, 2012 at 3:57 PM

Does anyone think she squeals like a hog?

She shore got a purdy mouth !

BigSven on February 29, 2012 at 4:57 PM

I am confused. Fluke testified on February 23, but the article says it was yesterday (February 27). Did Fluke testify twice?

See http://cnsnews.com/news/article/dems-stage-single-witness-hearing-frame-their-reproductive-rights-argument

Colony14 on February 29, 2012 at 8:05 PM

Here’s an idea Sandra, have your boyfriend use a condom.

JustJP on February 29, 2012 at 8:07 PM

Since our government has decided to cover the costs of one’s personal choices I am in the process of making a bill to send to Congress so they can get it paid.

1. Fix car $5000.00
Reason: Hardship – need car to get to work
2. Fix carpal tunnel caused by excessive video gaming $5000.00
Reason: Hardship – need functioning hands to be able to work.
3. Yearly supply of Dr. Pepper $500.00
Reason: Hardship – unable to work due to sleep deprivation
caused by excessive video game playing.
4. Recovery cost from video game addiction $10,000
Reason: Hardship – due to addiction unable to go to work.
5. Yearly cost of medical supplies $1000.00
Reason: Hardship – need a supply of band-aids, neo-sporin,
hydrogen peroxide, etc. due to injuries sustained while
working on the hobby farm. If injuries from farm work not
tended, infection and maybe even death may occur and I will
be unable to work.
6. Cost of hi-def tv and cable $2500.00
Reason: Hardship – need tv to get the hard hitting channel 4
news and weather.

If anyone can think of anything to add to this bill to the government, let me know.

Ibanez Lotus on February 29, 2012 at 11:13 PM

Dear Ms. Fluke,
Contraception might be expensive, but aspirin isn’t. I highly recommend you buy a bottle, and place one aspirin between your knees. Hold it there. Now you don’t need contraception. Funny how that works.
As a sexually active male, I have been more than willing to assist female partners with the expense of their preferred contraception–but that is MY partner, MY chosen responsibility, and yes, I personally benefit from the arrangement. YOU are not my responsibility. Get your own man to help you out if you’re too broke to afford it. If a woman came up to me asking me to pay for her pill so she could have sex with another man, I’d laugh in her face, and that is EXACTLY what you are asking me and every other citizen of the US. You should be practising safe sex anyway–and if a man is too cheap to buy his own dang condoms, you should ditch his sorry butt.

quikstrike98 on February 29, 2012 at 11:42 PM

The only way this female comes up with $82 a day is to count condom use … which means she is a nympho – having sex between 3-3.9 times a day.

I attended The American University across town from Georgetown. When I was there in the early ’90s, condoms were available for free from the campus health center. Perhaps they aren’t available at Georgetown, but all Ms Fluke and her pals need to do is make friends with students at AU to get their free condom connection. There are other places to obtain free condoms if she can’t find a male partner with the cash to afford his own (pathetic). Either way, not my problem sweety. YOUR problem.

quikstrike98 on February 29, 2012 at 11:48 PM

She seems to believe that the cost of birth control coverage won’t get passed back to her as higher tuition and/or insurance premiums.

agmartin on February 29, 2012 at 12:08 PM
.

… with 3rd party administrative overhead included.

Let’ review a few facts:
Miss Fluke’s nearby local Target sells generic birth control pills at a cost of $9 per month.

that’s
$9 x 12 = $108
or $108 per year

$108 x 3 = $324
or $324 for three years

Miss Fluke testified that the costs of birth control for three years was $3,000

$3,000 vs. $324
a 926% overstatement?
and keep in mind Miss Sandra Fluke is in law school!
.

If Miss Sandra Fluke were to set out a tip jar on her bedroom nightstand she could recover substantially all of the cost of generic birth control pills purchased at her local Target at a rate of $2 a trick once a week. If she were more active, say twice a week or more then the gentlemen is her life would need to tip at a rate of $1 per intimate encounter and Miss Fluke could recover only substantially all of her cost of generic birth control pills.

Mike OMalley on March 1, 2012 at 6:30 AM

She seems to believe that the cost of birth control coverage won’t get passed back to her as higher tuition and/or insurance premiums.

agmartin on February 29, 2012 at 12:08 PM

.

… with 3rd party administrative overhead included.

Let’ review a few facts:
Miss Fluke’s nearby local Target discount store sells generic birth control pills at a cost of $9 per month.

that’s
$9 x 12 = $108
or $108 per year

$108 x 3 = $324
or $324 for three years

Miss Fluke testified that the costs of birth control for three years was $3,000

$3,000 vs. $324
a 926% overstatement?
and keep in mind Miss Sandra Fluke is in law school!
.

If Miss Sandra Fluke were to set out a tip jar on her bedroom nightstand she could recover substantially all of the cost of generic birth control pills purchased at her local Target at a rate of $2 a trick once a week. If she were more active, say twice a week or more then the gentlemen in her life would need to tip at a rate of $1 per intimate encounter and Miss Fluke could recover substantially all of her cost of generic birth control pills.

Mike OMalley on March 1, 2012 at 6:34 AM

http://www.livescience.com/18724-medical-students-prostitution.html

As mentioned above, she and her fellow students have an easy solution, which may help with tuition as well. Cheers!

talkingpoints on March 1, 2012 at 7:28 AM

Q: If she wants US to redistribute OUR wealth so she can have free birth control, shouldn’t she and her better looking girlfriends uhhhh, ummmmm, ahhhhh, share the wealth?
dthorny on February 29, 2012 at 10:31 AM

.
I can’t help asking:

If your username was ‘broken-down’, would it look like D. Thorny, or would it look like D.T. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

listens2glenn on March 1, 2012 at 11:02 AM

Why are we even thinking about paying for aids to enable “recreational sex” ?
I have the same problem with this that I have with Medicare paying for Viagra.

There are many medical requirements that people need just to stay alive and a government deficit that is astronomical, but for some reason we are supposed to pay to cover a recreational activity. What’s next ?? motorcycle helmets, child car seats, parachutes for workers in high-rises ? .. therapeutic ice skating, boating, race car driving ?

Shoot, why don’t they just send this BS to Planned Parenthood and let their donor base pay for it, if they feel so strong.

J_Crater on March 1, 2012 at 12:23 PM

Puhleeze. Get a job and pay for your own. BCPs are like $40/mo. 40 x 12 isss… $1000! Now I know where lawyers learn to over-bill.

exliberal on February 28, 2012 at 9:39 PM

Maybe she needs to learn how to charge in 7 1/2-minute increments…

Miss_Anthrope on March 1, 2012 at 1:31 PM

Ms. Fluke gives responsible women a bad name. Why in Heaven’s name are we supposed to pay to take the risk of a baby out of her recreation? If she’s having that much sex, I suggest any partner of hers be sure he’s got a condom. Who knows what little gifts she’s passing around? Not all cases of STDs are obvious, and birth control pills make many of them more transmittable than they would be without the pills.

Want herpes? AIDS? How about genital warts? Maybe chlamydia, or HPV, HSV, or chancroid? These are only some of the joyous possibilities. And not all of them have cures.

If I were a guy, I’d avoid this gal like poison.

hachiban on March 1, 2012 at 1:39 PM

Ms Fluke chooses a Religious (Jesuit) College and then complains that contraception coverage isn’t on her insurance? Q1: Did she purchase insurance through her college? If so, why not get back on Mommy & Daddy’s insurance plan – Obamacare demands that it can be done (certainly cheaper than her ‘over $3000/year’ – maybe). Q2: Is Georgetown Law the only good Law school in America?

Ms Fluke – at PP contraception is about $600 a year.

Ms Fluke could join the military, both her law degree and contraception would be paid for by the government (i.e. the taxpayers).

I also have to wonder if Ms Fluke has taken a single Constitutional Law class to know that what she is demanding – is Un-Constitutional.

and finally

Ms Fluke – at Wal Mart pharmacies contraception is $4./month ($48./year).

I can only say one thing about this entire bs ‘testimony’ – if this is what American law schools are producing – God Help America

jackal40 on March 1, 2012 at 2:31 PM

Rush is right – she’s quite the whoooore.

kscheuller on March 1, 2012 at 9:25 PM

Does this highly educated woman and her friends not know that Walmart and Target have $9/month pill prescriptions? Except for in MN, WI, and seven other states which do not allow them to sell them for less than market. She says they spend $3000 over 3 years? A grand a year? And these are our future lawmakers and judges.

wirebitersmith on March 4, 2012 at 1:43 AM

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