Time for your weekend break from politics. Most of us are, by now, familiar with the idea of “seizure dogs” and “therapy dogs” who assist owners with special medical needs. But a seizure cat? Keep this in mind if you’re ever considering rescuing a feline from the local shelter. From Wisconsin.

Amy Jung and her son, Ethan Jung, originally went to the Door County Humane Society on Feb. 8 to play with the cats, not to bring one home. Then Jung, 36, saw Pudding lying on a counter. She made a quick decision to adopt Pudding and his pal Wimsy.

At around 9:30 p.m., she went to bed and about 1½ hours later, the prodigious kitty came to her rescue.

Jung, who was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 4, started to have a seizure. According to Jung, Pudding planted his weight on her chest and, when he could not wake her, began swatting her face and biting her nose.

“Anything he could to pull me out of it (the seizure),” she said.

Unfortunately, just waking up wasn’t enough. The woman couldn’t make it out of bed or awaken her son Ethan to help her by yelling. So the cat rushed into Ethan’s room, jumped on his head and woke him up. They called for medical help and the woman was saved. (One sad note for Ethan… the cat weighs 22 pounds, which would probably wake up anyone.)

This isn’t the first time this has happened, though. The video below relays the story of another cat who saved a different woman who was having a heart attack.

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You may now resume your regularly scheduled discussion of whether dogs or cats are better. Personally, I have both.