Fired ESPN editor: Do my actions count for nothing in judging whether my motive was racist?

posted at 6:40 pm on February 22, 2012 by Allahpundit

A bit more evidence to support the theory that the “chink in the armor” headline was indeed an honest mistake. Could a guy who spends sizable parts of his leisure time doing good works for the poor and sick also have a racist compulsion so intense that he’d risk his job on a sub-moronic “chink” joke?

It’s possible. Likely?

Actions speak louder than words. My words may have hurt people in that moment but my actions have always helped people. If those who vilify me would take a deeper look at my life they would see that I am the exact opposite of how some are portraying me.

They would see that on the day of the incident I got a call from a friend – who happens to be homeless – and rushed to his aid. He was collapsed on the side of the road due to exposure and hunger. They would see how I picked him up and got him a hotel room and fed him. They would see I used my vacation time last year to volunteer in the orphanages of Haiti. They would see how I ‘adopted’ an elderly Alzheimer’s patient and visited him every week for a year. They would see that every winter I organize a coat drive for those less fortunate in New Haven. They would see how I raised $10,000 for a friend in need when his kids were born four months premature. They would see how I have worked in soup kitchens and convalescent homes since I was a kid. They would see my actions speak louder than my words. They would see that these acts were not done for my glory, but for God’s. They would see that each day I live and will continue to live a life of joy and service…

I wrote thousands and thousands and thousands of headlines in my five years at ESPN. There never was a problem with any of them and I was consistently praised as an employee – both personally and professionally. Two weeks prior to the incident I had my first column published on espnW.com. My career was taking off. Why would I throw that all away with a racist pun? This was an honest mistake.

He worked there long enough that, assuming this is all true, some of his co-workers must have known about it. Did ESPN talk to anyone around him to try to determine whether the headline was an innocent mistake or did they just pull the trapdoor to send a message to the rest of the staff not to make this same error, accidentally or not? A “zero tolerance” policy would be harsh given that this is potentially a career-ruining offense and bad faith is by no means assured. Problem is, ESPN doesn’t have a “zero tolerance” policy: Two broadcasters who used the same phrase vis-a-vis Lin survived with their jobs, one with a suspension and one with no apparent punishment at all. The distinction, presumably, is that broadcasters work extemporaneously whereas Federico had time to deliberate on his choice of words, but that doesn’t prove much about motive. It’s possible to believe that Federico simply missed the double meaning when he was writing the headline and/or that the broadcasters thought they could get away with a dumb gag by slipping that phrase into their commentary on Lin. The real distinction at play seems to be that broadcasters are less easily replaced than some random copy editor, so they got the benefit of the doubt whereas Federico was axed on the spot. Or at least that’s how it looks: Can’t wait to see whether ESPN responds to him or whether they give him The Full Brock.


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Comment pages: 1 2

I am so confused, what does it all mean……

http://www.chron.com/business/energy/article/Fallen-oil-prices-reveal-chink-in-Sarah-Palin-s-1622285.php

Doester on February 22, 2012 at 9:08 PM

So ESPN is an Indian giver?

Regardless, the guy knew what he was doing.

SouthernGent on February 22, 2012 at 9:17 PM

Regardless, the guy knew what he was doing.

SouthernGent on February 22, 2012 at 9:17 PM

You know that how?

CW on February 22, 2012 at 9:20 PM

SouthernGent on February 22, 2012 at 9:17 PM

Show mean anything in his history to suggest you are right.

CW on February 22, 2012 at 9:23 PM

And somehow Chelsey Handler gets away with the most anti-Asian/Black shtick nightly.

Ben Hur on February 22, 2012 at 9:32 PM

In the PC world we live in, it is NOT what you say that matters, it is what we HEAR…

“You’re fired!”

Khun Joe on February 22, 2012 at 9:40 PM

If he didn’t mean the double meaning then the article had to be about how Lin is a liability, a chink in the armor, for the Nicks. Was it?

Rancher on February 22, 2012 at 9:42 PM

Reminds me of the time when Rosie O’Donnell was fired for her “ching-chong” statement.

The Resolute Desk on February 22, 2012 at 9:51 PM

NavyMustang on February 22, 2012 at 8:32 PM

haven’t seen you commenting in a ….well, long time.

ted c on February 22, 2012 at 10:06 PM

The people whose knee-jerk reaction to common phrases like “chink in the armor”, which only means a weakness, is to scream racism are projecting their racist views on others. It is no surprise that ESPN, a paragon of leftist ideals, fired this person and it is proof they are the racists and not the author.

JBA66 on February 22, 2012 at 10:10 PM

Reminds me of the time when Rosie O’Donnell was fired for her “ching-chong” statement.

Except she wasn’t fired for that. She made some stupid comparison about 600,000 dead Iraqis and asked “who’s the terrorist?” implying our troops were. When Elisabeth Hasselbeck refused to defend her she felt betrayed. She and the show mutually agreed to separate.

Rancher on February 22, 2012 at 10:11 PM

Show mean anything in his history to suggest you are right.

CW on February 22, 2012 at 9:23 PM

Aw, come on! He’s a white male! He’s obviously racist.

John the Libertarian on February 22, 2012 at 10:15 PM

It’s possible to believe that Federico simply missed the double meaning when he was writing the headline and/or that the broadcasters thought they could get away with a dumb gag by slipping that phrase into their commentary on Lin.

First, the guy shouldn’t have been fired. Even Lin didn’t have a problem with the headline. Second, yes, the guy should’ve thought twice before posting the headline, knowing full well that he worked for one of the most PC networks known to manpersonkind. Remember, they fired Rush for merely criticizing how the media was handling/favoring Donovan McNabb because he was black, and not on his merits or lack thereof.

So, maybe there is a case for his firing — not understanding the plantation and the massah for which he toiled. I hope FOX Sports hires the guy, there’s no need for this kind of treatment even if the guy may be stupid. Hell, sports journalism is full of stupid.

TXUS on February 22, 2012 at 10:29 PM

At least he didn’t say, “eenie meenie miney moe!

Of course Southwest Airlines stood up for it’s employee, unlike Eunich SPorts Network.

Random Numbers (Brian Epps) on February 22, 2012 at 10:34 PM

His firing was justified. Bottom line is you don’t allow an employee to insult your customers.

And this isn’t an example of racism. Racism is the belief in an inherent superiority of one race over another. It was a crude double entendre joke, nothing more.

Dante on February 22, 2012 at 6:54 PM

I don’t know how anybody on earth can be so certain of this.

Not EVERYBODY’S mind works that way, ya know.

Here we have a phrase that can be and has been used by writers all over the place.

This guy uses the phrase without THINKING of the race of the guy he’s applying it to, much less deciding to call him a chink.

If he HAD thought that, he wouldn’t have written it!

Alana on February 22, 2012 at 10:50 PM

ESPiN is run by bunch of mindless idiots who don’t think long enough to be able to properly and OBJECTIVELY cover any of the sports they allegedly cover, so this inane nonsensical non-thinking action doesn’t surprise me at all.

stukinIL4now on February 22, 2012 at 11:13 PM

Fired ESPN editor: Do my actions count for nothing in judging whether my motive was racist?

.
Get a good lawyer.
.
Point out that even online dictionaries define chink thusly:

chink
Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English; perhaps chine + -k suffix ( see -ock)

From “chine”
Origin:
before 900; Middle English; Old English cinu crevice, fissure; cognate with Middle Dutch kene; compare Old English cīnan to gape, crack open

.
… and even the Urban Dictionary has a definition for “chink in the armor”:

1. Chink in the Armor 193 up, 101 down
1) An narrow opening and vunerable area in one’s armor that the opponent will usually aim for. This term relies on “chink” in the sense of “a crack or gap,” a meaning dating from about 1400 and used figuratively since the mid-1600s.

2) A figurative term for a one’s weakness, largest flaw or their prevention of success.
1) Because of the chink in the armor of Sir Lancelot, his opponent was able to break past his defense and inflict a dangerous flesh wound.

2) We would have aced this presentation if Leo wasn’t in our group. He didn’t study at all, he’s the chink in the armor.

2. Chink in the Armor 98 up, 107 down
1. An opening in a suit of armor, barrier, etc. where one can break through.

2. see: samurai
1. Dude, there’s a chink in the armor!

2. Dude, there’s a Chink in the armor!

.
.
Time to cash in on ESPN.

Arbalest on February 22, 2012 at 11:21 PM

If you give your enemies a hammer, it’s too late to complain about how they hit you with it. Any moron in the public realm has to know their words are measured, you have a job because people tune in to watch you… when they stop, so do you.

Instead of trying to make fun of someone else’s success, perhaps try saying something supportive? Instead of trying to be clever, do your job.

It’s the free market at work. And we all support the free market…. right? People aren’t mandated to watch ESPN no matter what the personalities say….. yet.

Hog Wild on February 22, 2012 at 11:23 PM

My wife, who is of Chinese ancestry, learned of this incident from her liberal friends at work, and, when she got back home, calmly asked ME over dinner whether she should be outraged. I said that the author, who used the headline to describe Jeremy Lin’s contribution to a lost game, had, in less than eight hours, had

(a) apologized,
(b) been, not suspended, but fired by ESPN, and
(c) had a California Democrat, Judy Chu, dancing a jig on his prone dead body.
Furthermore,
(d) Jeremy Lin, the guy who was targeted with the comment, had said he wasn’t hurt or harmed.
I pointed her to
(e) CNN.com, which would never ever use the N-word, but which was plastering the C-word all over its pages. She responded that
(f) her liberal friends also seemed to have delighted in using the same word when they probed her for her response.

Her final response to me was a shrug and my favorite comment about the whole situation to date, and one I’m using every chance I get:

“He’s only a basketball player? What, didn’t the piano lessons take?”

unclesmrgol on February 22, 2012 at 11:26 PM

And Biden still has a job?

How does this work?

CW on February 22, 2012 at 8:26 PM

Got that right! His mom is the right media mom!

KOOLAID2 on February 22, 2012 at 11:29 PM

I don’t know how anybody on earth can be so certain of this.

Not EVERYBODY’S mind works that way, ya know.

Here we have a phrase that can be and has been used by writers all over the place.

This guy uses the phrase without THINKING of the race of the guy he’s applying it to, much less deciding to call him a chink.

If he HAD thought that, he wouldn’t have written it!

Alana on February 22, 2012 at 10:50 PM

Good post. Funny how that happens when situations are analyzed from the common sense position! Some of our fellow posters here should try it more often.

No one could know what his motive was with certainty, unless Federico admitted that it was intentional, or his mind was read. Let’s say his headline was a Freudian slip he wasn’t conscious of, which it was, for all we now know – would a respectable person honestly believe that’d an acceptable reason fire him?

Since he doesn’t have a controversial history, by not giving him the benefit of the doubt and offering him up as a convenient sacrifice instead because of their fear of a PC backlash, it makes ESPN look like a really lousy, cowardly employer for not having his back.

I hope Lin realizes and then utilizes the pressure he could bring upon them – I hope they are boycotted until Federico gets his job back.

Bizarro No. 1 on February 22, 2012 at 11:43 PM

I should have added, “I hope Lin realizes and then utilizes the pressure he could bring upon them – I hope they are boycotted until Federico gets his job back, if he wants it, that is…

Bizarro No. 1 on February 22, 2012 at 11:46 PM

All the wonderful charity work he’s done — good for him. Yay. Whatever. It has nothing to do whatsoever with whether what he said was racist or not. I happen to think it was not, but this recitation of his saintly deeds does nothing to influence my opinion one way or the other – on the question of whether what he said was racist.

George Wallace did a lot of great charitable stuff, too. But he was also a racist. There are people at my church who have volunteered and gone to Haiti – and they’re racist. I know, because I heard the crap they were saying when they got back.

My very own dear grandmother used to take home cooked meals to an elderly black couple in her town. Didn’t change the fact that she was a racist. She damn near killed me – and did disown me – when I married “one of them,” although we eventually reconciled before she died – but she was still a racist.

This latest outburst has lost me a lot of respect for the guy. I guess I understand the feeling that might lead one to blow his own horn, but it really takes away from all the great volunteer stuff he did – that he rattles it off as some sort of proof that he’s such a great guy.

notropis on February 22, 2012 at 11:48 PM

This latest outburst has lost me a lot of respect for the guy. I guess I understand the feeling that might lead one to blow his own horn, but it really takes away from all the great volunteer stuff he did – that he rattles it off as some sort of proof that he’s such a great guy.

notropis on February 22, 2012 at 11:48 PM

It’s lost me a lot of respect for the liberals. These guys who would supposedly be mortified, were they to hear the N-word, and who would never be caught dead speaking it, bandy the C-word around like it’s candy. They’re all over the place — here, at the LA Times, on CNN. If the word is so bad, then why are they using it?

To me, it’s obvious — their rage is faux news, to use one of their favorite double entendres, and it’s merely a way for them to show how un-racist they are as they crow about the victory they have achieved over a closet racist — who must certainly be a closet conservative.

To put it another way — Lin does turn the ball over way too much. If he can get that stat down, he’s certainly All-Star material, but his opponents capitalized on his turnovers during the game in question.

http://espn.go.com/espn/page2/story/_/id/7594599/page-2-power-rankings-lin-turnover-edition

http://espn.go.com/new-york/nba/story/_/id/7588520/slow-start-jeremy-lin-turnovers-end-new-york-knicks-winning-streak

Lin’s nine turnovers left him with a record he’d rather not have: the most turnovers (45) for a player in his first seven starts since 1977-78, when the league started keeping individual stats.

“It was just a lackluster effort on my part, coming out and [being] careless with the ball,” said Lin, who finished with 26 points (8-for-18 shooting) and five assists. “Nine turnovers is obviously never going to get it done from your primary ball handler.”

unclesmrgol on February 23, 2012 at 12:34 AM

Do gooders are exempt from getting caught using racist puns?

The bigger question is, who was his editor and why didn’t they catch it, question it, and stop it? Who were the producers that copied it verbatim and let on air talent go to broadcast with it? Mistake or not, it offended people, because it’s offensive.

contrarytopopularbelief on February 23, 2012 at 12:38 AM

Of course this guy is right. But America is quickly abandoning free speech and humor unless an approved minority preapprove the same. His oriental wife, in laws, etc count for nothing. As a white male…he is expendable. In a few years he will be jailed as in the UK. For more time than a bugler will serve. Particularly if they rob a ‘white’ business.

pat on February 23, 2012 at 1:01 AM

Well it’s only fitting because ESPN cut ties with Jason Whitlock over his racist tweet.

Oh, wait…

I wonder why?

reaganaut on February 23, 2012 at 1:39 AM

I haven’t followed this, don’t ever watch ESPN..

can’t help but feel that publically burning witches has made a come back, the public torture and humiliation of a chosen “witch” who ran afoul of certain codes, like an unguarded moment leading to a careless error..

So,… are we fine with this?

Who among us is so perfect they have never once had an uguarded thoughtless minute.

and how would you react, to being dragged out to the village common for the newest ritual fad.. chest thumping our superiority over some poor smoe.. while we dance gleefully around the bonfire, before we throw him in it?

There’s a taint to this.. nothing moral was ever done in the form of a blood sport.

there is no honor or grace in this..

just,..

we should be better than this,.. haven’t we moved past our barbaric past yet?

mark81150 on February 23, 2012 at 3:23 AM

He has never claimed–even while reciting a blizzard of personal character references–not to have known that “chink” was a racial insult, and Ace over at AoS pointed out that the “chink in the armor” metaphor was strained at best for the situation it was used:

Yeah, I don’t believe that. “Chink in the armor” doesn’t really make a great deal of sense here. When I think armor I think defense. Lin’s errors were committed on offense. Seems an odd expression in that context.

Generally I would say that this is no victory for “us,” but rather yet another scalp for the headhunting cannibals of political correctness, but here the writer wasn’t speaking on his own time, and didn’t appear to just “slip up.”

In addition, there have been so many “ha ha, a Chinaman is good at basketball, isn’t that funny” jokes — far more of them made privately than have made it on to the airwaves or website headlines — that it’s just impossible to imagine this guy never heard a one of them, and therefore had no idea what the problem was.

He used his employer to make a cruddy joke, and exposed them to embarrassment.

For what? I don’t know if he’s a “racist” but it seems like he has very poor judgment.

Firing him was a rather harsh response–I’m betting that ESPN is glad they don’t have to deal with Jason Whitlock and his “two inches of pain” comment about Lin–but at the very least Federico screwed up royally at the expense of his employer, and a full court defense of him just expends capital that would be better used defending someone who actually is innocent of any wrongdoing.

M. Scott Eiland on February 23, 2012 at 4:34 AM

Well it’s only fitting because ESPN cut ties with Jason Whitlock over his racist tweet.

Whitlock works for Fox News these days–and I’d pay good money to watch Serena Williams and Jeremy Lin kick his fat @$$ for extreme obnoxiousness.

M. Scott Eiland on February 23, 2012 at 4:37 AM

Of course this guy is right. But America is quickly abandoning free speech and humor unless an approved minority preapprove the same.

pat on February 23, 2012 at 1:01 AM

Whether you realize it or not, you just cited a very good example of the dangers of a democracy ( as oppposed to a Constitutional Republic) that our Founding Fathers tried so hard to avoid.

Too many won’t be aware of the difference, however.

DevilsPrinciple on February 23, 2012 at 4:51 AM

I became disgusted with ESPN’s holier-than-thou PC attitude a long time ago, and I don’t watch very often as a result. In fact, about the only time I do watch is when they actually air an NFL game I want to watch. MNF stunk last year, so I only watched two or three times.

The guy writes headlines for a living, so he should have realized “chink” could be taken the wrong way. That said, I don’t think it was intentional, and I don’t believe he should have been fired. The apology should have been enough.

For crying out loud, we’re talking about someone’s livelihood here. It’s not worth ruining someone’s life and career over a simple mistake anywhere but in liberal PC land.

DRayRaven on February 23, 2012 at 7:35 AM

Perhaps he got fired for his muddled logic.

There are several distinctly different concepts all rolled up into one large bleating whine.

First, people get fired for “honest mistakes” all the time. In this case the mistake was a headline that could easily be viewed as a racial slur. An editor at a major media outlet should have been more thoughtful when covering a player part whose race is a big part of the story right now. I see this firing as being based on poor professional judgement not on racial bias. The guy wrote a headline that could be read in an offensive way. Somebody who claims to have written thousands and thousands of headlines should have known better.

Secondly, It is nice that this guy happened to have friend who needed a good Samaritan moment (almost verbatim from the Bible), he spends times with orphans, the homeless, and Alzheimer’s patients. That he works at soup kitchens and convalescent homes and organizes coat drives. It is even admirable that he claims that he does it for the glory of God. But the fact that he brings all this stuff up in his defense shows that at least a little part of it is for self-agrandizement. And not one of these actions go to character but do not refute charges of racism. Racists can work at soup kitchens too.

Finally, I can empathize with the idea that you want your name cleared and much of what has been said about you is blatantly unfair. But that too comes with the profession and putting things out there for public consumption. Is it fair? Probably not but it comes with the territory.

I do think outright firing is a bit on the harsh side but when you don’t have the public stature or following of media personalities like Don Imus, it is probably easier to just get rid of the problem in a knee-jerk reaction instead of having to defend “honest mistakes” to an angry public. The minute the headline becomes the news, the media outlet is on the wrong side of the ensuing discussion.

Happy Nomad on February 23, 2012 at 7:36 AM

It is yellow journalism to suggest the Lin comment was inherently racist.

Just as the “niggardly” comment at that Washington, DC meeting/conference was not inherently racist.

Just as the water buffalo comment by Eden Jacobowitz railroaded by Sheldon Hackney at University of Pennsylvania was not inherently racist.

The etymology will set them (and me, if necessary) free.

viking01 on February 23, 2012 at 7:46 AM

God, this guy’s Mother Teresa. To be honest, while the chink in the armor at first blush looks like a rather insensitive and racial headline, the fact is that Lin has a problem with turnovers. That is his weak spot, the chink in the armor.

This guy goes all Orwell explaining why he’s not racist. He isn’t. ESPN is. Any reasonable person reading that headline would assume that it referred to Lin’s inability to keep the ball. Only a race conscious person would infer that it talked about Lin’s heritage (which is Taiwanese, not Chinese).

Now, if this guy had been posting headlines with slope, dink, gook, slant-eye, yellow etc, then maybe you could say the guy is a racist. But to make someone start reciting their good works in order to defend himself truly is scary. When I read that statement all I heard was Orwell and Ayn Rand.

jcelephant on February 23, 2012 at 7:49 AM

Only a race conscious person would infer that it talked about Lin’s heritage (which is Taiwanese, not Chinese).

To be fair, the Taiwanese, with the exception of a small aboriginal population, are Chinese.

KGB on February 23, 2012 at 7:57 AM

Woo hoo. I guess my post put the moderation filters under total stress test or meltdown although the carefully chosen context means Pulitzer and Hearst, especially.

viking01 on February 23, 2012 at 7:58 AM

Once again, the lines of communication have broken down. You poor naive sports type people, listen up. As taught in Section C, Paragraph 4.2 of the PC Police Training Manual (Rev. 2012), it clearly states that there is no presumption of innocence, only presumption of guilt. This PC Police have the option of deciding what term or phrase is or isn’t racist.

Said police are also granted the specific power to simply guess whether you meant it to be racist, intended it to offend, or just used a phrase that has been used for centuries to illustrate a point. Common sense will no longer be an acceptable factor in judging your guilt or innocence.

Severity of punishment will be calculated by multiplying the seriousness of whatever Dear Leader is being criticized for at the time of the infraction, and how big of a stink is needed for cover. This product will then be divided by the political persuasion of the perpetrator to arrive at the proper squeal level.

Remember out there…keep your language at the level of dullness required to stay under PC Police radar. Our country’s PC Police Serious Crimes Squad members are highly trained and well-funded. And you are just you.

Or, alternatively, you can tell the PC Police to go up an alley and holler fish. If you choose this option, be prepared to lose your job and to be banished from proper society.

However, based on reports received here at Ground WTF, we hear that the alley/fish option, though a harder row to hoe, will help you sleep at night.

Hope this helps.

jakev on February 23, 2012 at 8:16 AM

Any reasonable person reading that headline would assume that it referred to Lin’s inability to keep the ball. Only a race conscious person would infer that it talked about Lin’s heritage (which is Taiwanese, not Chinese).

jcelephant on February 23, 2012 at 7:49 AM

It isn’t at all clear that a reasonable person would immediately assume that the headline referred to Lin’s ball handling ability. That is something that would come out in the actual story not the headline (which is designed to attract attention, in this case the wrong kind of attention).

And as KGB pointed out, 94% of Taiwanese are considered part of the Chinese ethnic group. You are right about Lin’s heritage but it is his race not heritage that is at issue with this particular headline.

Happy Nomad on February 23, 2012 at 8:17 AM

You write for a network that’s in business to appeal to the stupid, so quit whining like a little girl and take your lumps.

MNHawk on February 23, 2012 at 8:18 AM

jakev on February 23, 2012 at 8:16 AM

This story really isn’t about guilt or innocence or even intent. It is about public perception.

Happy Nomad on February 23, 2012 at 8:20 AM

You write for a network that’s in business to appeal to the stupid, so quit whining like a little girl and take your lumps.

MNHawk on February 23, 2012 at 8:18 AM

What do you expect from a society whose President has delivered three State of the Union speeches that are written at an 8th grade level? Generations of the NEA being able to keep stupid teachers in place have created a stupid public.

Happy Nomad on February 23, 2012 at 8:25 AM

At least he didn’t say, “eenie meenie miney moe!

Of course Southwest Airlines stood up for it’s employee,

I thought of that incident too. The Bride of Monster happened to have turned the car radio to NPR back when some people were talking about that incident, and an older black lady made a very interesting point: In order for the flight attendant to know not to say “Eenie, meenie, miney, moe”, someone would have had to tell her about the n-word version. The fact that the flight attendant only knew the “tiger” version is progress.

Similarly, the only way you can know not to use the word “chink” around an Asian is to be exposed to the use of the word “chink” as a racial epithet. So the fact that someone can grow up only knowing a “chink” as a break in the protection afforded by armor, or that eenie meenies catch tigers by their toes, which should be considered a Good Thing, leads to those people offending those who know the other meanings.

The Monster on February 23, 2012 at 8:32 AM

Jason Whitlock is on Fox Sports, not ESPN, just to clarify an earlier poster.

Yeah it is a double standard. Yes, you probably do good work. No, it doesn’t matter when the PC police decide you are bad and need to be taught a lesson.

See, isn’t modern America fun?

MunDane68 on February 23, 2012 at 8:58 AM

It’s good fun to advance an argument on liberal websites that maybe, just maybe, we shouldn’t overmuch about the projected feelings of a Harvard grad, who is now the biggest celebrity in Gotham.

You get 50 comments of “you racist bastard.” You might even get banned.

Good times.

johnboy on February 23, 2012 at 9:10 AM

Subsunk:Long time no see…Welcome back:)

canopfor on February 22, 2012 at 7:22 PM

It is a long, dirty and sordid business actually working hard to bring the Evil Tar Sands oil to my friends and neighbors in the US…….. but somebody has to earn these massive paychecks, I mean, take one for the team…. Just ask the Communist in Chief, who says everyone has to do their fair share. This is me helping to produce oil that runs American business and commerce….. Heh.

Besides we are practically neighbors now, I think….

Subsunk

Subsunk on February 23, 2012 at 9:38 AM

It isn’t at all clear that a reasonable person would immediately assume that the headline referred to Lin’s ball handling ability, except a race baiting nit~wit who probably told Chinese and Black jokes to his white cracker friends That is something that would come out in the actual story not the headline (which is designed to attract attention, in this case the wrong kind of attention).This makes the story and not the headline the most important aspect of this entire farce, in understanding that Federico wasn’t making an ethnic slur at all, but rather citing Lin’s poor ball handling skills)

And as KGB pointed out, 94% of Taiwanese are considered part of the Chinese ethnic group. You are right about Lin’s heritage but it is his race not heritage that is at issue with this particular headline.

Happy Nomad on February 23, 2012 at 8:17 AM

Regardless, there are only two conclusions one can draw from this incident :

1/ Federico was citing Lin’s poor ball handling skills during the game in question in his story.

2/ Only race baiting or racist dipsticks would stupidly conclude that Federico meant to marginalize Lin by way of his ethnicity in his headline or otherwise.

If you conclude more than this, you are either projecting, or you may want to consider a career as a psychic.

It’s a shame I can’t watch ESPN anymore. I always wanted Linda Cohn.

DevilsPrinciple on February 23, 2012 at 9:48 AM

He should just join MSNBC…non pc language and demonizing is permitted there..as long as it’s directed towards whitey, men, republicans or christians.

HumpBot Salvation on February 23, 2012 at 9:51 AM

There are people at my church who have volunteered and gone to Haiti – and they’re racist. I know, because I heard the crap they were saying when they got back.

You, my freind, have hit the nail on the head. The people went to Haiti, volunteered, made a conclusion based on WHAT THEY OBSERVED, and expressed their feelings. Where is the racism?

Strike Twice on February 23, 2012 at 10:36 AM

I sure feel sorry for the next poor sportswriter who has to cover a story about Vinny Del Negro

PaulMorphy on February 23, 2012 at 10:55 AM

PC speech police are out of control. The only way to win is for all of us to stand up to the bullies and say we aren’t going to take it anymore. The whole movement is aimed at limiting dialogue and limiting freedom of expression. Once they isolate individuals and make everyone afraid then they can take away our other freedoms without opposition.

henryknox on February 23, 2012 at 11:07 AM

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