Meet Moshe Kai Cavalin, who graduated college with a 4.0 … at age 9

posted at 1:20 pm on February 15, 2012 by Tina Korbe

From The Washington Times comes the story of a boy who enrolled in college at the age of 8 and earned the first of two Associate of Arts degrees at age 9, graduating from East Los Angeles Community College with a perfect 4.0 grade point average. Today, Moshe Kai Cavalin is 14 years old and about to graduate with a bachelor’s degree in math from the University of California, Los Angeles. He also happens to have just published an English version of his first book (originally published in Chinese) called “We Can Do.”

Cavalin is convinced he’s not a genius and that plenty of kids are capable of accomplishing similar academic feats:

“That’s always the question that bothers me,” Cavalin, who turned 14 onValentine’s Day, says when the G-word is raised. “People need to know you don’t really need to be a genius. You just have to work hard and you can accomplish anything.”

And maybe cut out some of the TV.

Although he’s a big fan of Jackie Chan movies, Cavalin says he limits his television time to four hours a week.

Not that he lacks for recreational activities or feels that his parents pressured him into studying constantly. He writes in “We Can Do” of learning to scuba dive, and he loves soccer and martial arts. He used to participate in the latter sport when he was younger, winning trophies for his age group, until his UCLA studies and his writing made things a little too hectic.

Indeed one of the key messages of his book is to stay focused and to not take on any endeavor half-heartedly.

Like Amy Chua’s controversial article about tiger motherhood in The Wall Street Journal, Cavalin’s story raises an important question: Might we be expecting too little from children academically? All people have a profound way of rising to expectations — and history demonstrates that children are capable of more than we give them credit for today. Cavalin’s experience teaches that children can achieve more while also still living childhood to the fullest; he doesn’t sound like the driven child of a tiger mother — just like an open and disciplined kid.

My firsthand experience also suggests public schools might expect too little from students. In middle school, when I was homeschooled, my curriculum made use of the once-standard McGuffey’s readers. In sixth grade, I was required to read Francis Bacon’s “Of Studies.” In high school, when I went to public school, I again encountered an excerpt from Bacon’s classic essay … in a senior-level English class on a practice test for the ACT. Unfortunately, schools have to work around any number of problems that are completely unrelated to education — bureaucratic red tape, for example, or out-of-control family problems that interfere with a child’s ability to concentrate. But the point is a hopeful one: More is possible.

Incidentally, it strikes me that children would be able to handle more mentally if we didn’t so saturate and overwhelm them with what they’re not prepared for emotionally. Intellectual advancement and preserved innocence can go hand-in-hand. Children, like all of us, are subject to the restraints of time and space; the time they spend learning about one subject is time they cannot spend learning about another. How much time do we really want to spend teaching kids about how to avoid obesity, manage their finances, or cope with their as-yet-undiscovered-sexuality when we could stick to the basics of reading, writing and arithmetic?


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2

Does it require a savings or checking account? No. Can I just get it cashed at the local “Checks Cashed” place next to the liquor store? Yes. Is that a good idea? I don’t know because I was never educated about finances. Please help me out.

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 2:09 PM

Common frikkin’ sense?

I didn’t need some overpaid union hack to tell me that giving up 3% of my paycheck is stupid.

Hells, failing that, sheer laziness. Takes me 30 minutes to run to a bank or check-cashing shop, or 0 minutes to let my employer directly deposit it into my checking account for me. And no one ever told me any of this! I had to learn how to use the Great Evil SUBTRACTION to figure out a check-cashing shop would give me less of my money!

Sex ed? Guess who taught me that? Here’s a hint: he had lots of practice with my mother. Took my old man about 5 minutes and a beer for each of us to cover all the important parts. Really needed a semester of preaching from the Church of the State to teach me that!

Asurea on February 15, 2012 at 3:01 PM

Asurea on February 15, 2012 at 3:01 PM

American students spend the same amount of time in class as they always have.

The difference is that today “the three R’s” are: Racism, Recycling and Reproduction.

logis on February 15, 2012 at 3:06 PM

Common frikkin’ sense?

Asurea on February 15, 2012 at 3:01 PM

And learning from others. The first time the kid cashes his check and pays a fee, he will complain to someone. That someone will most likely inform him that if he opens an account at a bank, they will cash it for free. Problem solved, no union teacher required.

Fallon on February 15, 2012 at 3:09 PM

Unless, of course, the simplistic has to be explained.

OhEssYouCowboys on February 15, 2012 at 1:55 PM

Bear in mind that you’re conversing with someone who believes the stste should teach you how to manage your finances. Then it should all fall into place.

Solaratov on February 15, 2012 at 3:09 PM

Fallon on February 15, 2012 at 3:09 PM

Fair enough.

Asurea on February 15, 2012 at 3:15 PM

Bear in mind that you’re conversing with someone who believes the stste should teach you how to manage your finances. Then it should all fall into place.

Solaratov on February 15, 2012 at 3:09 PM

Having a high school class called “Concepts of Finance” does not seem like a patently absurd idea to me. Maybe they could help people understand how mortgages work so we wouldn’t be in the mess we are in now. But apparently that’s not important as long as they know what the 45th element is in the periodic table.

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 3:23 PM

Having a high school class called “Concepts of Finance” does not seem like a patently absurd idea to me. Maybe they could help people understand how mortgages work so we wouldn’t be in the mess we are in now. But apparently that’s not important as long as they know what the 45th element is in the periodic table.

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 3:23 PM

Hrrg! Og give you meat, you give Og back more meat later!

Not a hard concept. The problem came from the government forcing banks to make high-risk loans or face being slimed as “racists”. This in turn caused increased demand for houses, which reduced supply, which increased prices, which collapsed along with the rest of the house of cards. Basic economics.

Maybe, like what would have happened in my example with Og, we should have as a society a law that allows lashings or beatings for not paying your debts. Then people would figure out that you can’t borrow what you can’t pay back. Instead, we have a number of “get out of debt free” options with few consequences.

Asurea on February 15, 2012 at 3:38 PM

I think this illustrates why homeschooled kids are doing so well. They get more indiviualized attention & they aren’t in “cookie cutter” education programs. And the person that said the the R’s (Racism, Recycling, Reproduction) hit the nail on the head too. Our public schools spend so much time indoctrinating our children, they don’t have time to teach them.
My kids are homeschooled and even though we don’t do 8 hour days 5 days a week, they test WAY above the National average every year, plus they aren’t exposed to all the crap you see in public schools. Whenever I’m out in public I can almost always spot homeschool kids, because of their manners, poise, intelligence, and overhall behaviour. Not to say kids that aren’t homeschooled don’t also have those attritubes, but I do notice a difference.

mcplumbercuda on February 15, 2012 at 3:44 PM

American students spend the same amount of time in class as they always have.

The difference is that today “the three R’s” are: Racism, Recycling and Reproduction.

logis on February 15, 2012 at 3:06 PM

Excellent! I will be repeating this often.

TugboatPhil on February 15, 2012 at 3:51 PM

“…School officials don’t want grade-skippers; someone doing well and always ready for more means higher test scores and more money, so they discourage skipping by explaining that it “stunts social growth.”..”

calbear on February 15, 2012 at 2:05 PM

I don’t know what their reason was, but, this is what happened to me.

I attempted to skip 7th grade. The district threw obstacle after obstacle at me including a requirement that I test 2 grades above grade level in all subjects (which I did). The final obstacle was an IQ test where I had to score 140. I got 138 and that was that.

Afterwards, the guidance counselor told my mom that there was no way they would ever have let me skip a grade because I was short and they worried about my social growth.

JadeNYU on February 15, 2012 at 3:51 PM

That’s because it’s too dangerous out there. You daren’t let your child leave the house without protective gear. And hand sanitizer. And a cell phone in case they skin their knee and you need to call an ambulance.

In fact, it’s a total mystery how any American children survived the last quarter-millennium without all the busybodies, nanny staters, and soccer moms scaring them to death about all the dangers of childhood.

MadisonConservative on February 15, 2012 at 1:29 PM

Right on. Kids have to dress up like Darth Vader just to ride a bike.

Wade on February 15, 2012 at 3:52 PM

I was a roads scholar.

SparkPlug on February 15, 2012 at 1:49 PM

Can tell by the skid marks on your butt.

Wade on February 15, 2012 at 3:58 PM

Many great observations in the comments here regarding public schools and the true ability of our children.

Based on a recent experience, I question not if we are expecting too little of our children, but if we are expecting too little of our schools. It’s both, I am sure.

It is rare that a 9yo would have the cognitive ability (like most dems and all libs) (reason, logic…) to undertake and pass a truly credible undergraduate level program.

I recently witnessed a doctoral candidate, who is ABD, write a short paper on a very specific question, and given specific sources of information with which to answer that question. The paper was one of the worst things I have ever read (barring some of the comments from some of the trolls here on HA). The composition made it look like this person used English as a 3rd language…and the topic (if you could even dream of an actual thesis) was not even approached by accident. It literally appeared as though he has turned in a paper from a different class by mistake.

Pay to play. Graduate programs for those that have the $ to spend. You WILL “graduate.”

Not taking anything away from the hard work and discipline of this kid…just wonder if the programs he (and many others) are involved in are really that demanding. I know lots of Ph.d’s. and better than half of them are dolts.

Hueydriver on February 15, 2012 at 4:24 PM

Whenever i see stories like this i always wonder what’s the point? What are you gaining by getting a degree at 10 instead of 22? Not much from what i can tell and you’re probably losing quite a bit of your childhood, sorry, just not that impressed.

clearbluesky on February 15, 2012 at 4:54 PM

Does he know how to tie his shoes???…

PatriotRider on February 15, 2012 at 4:56 PM

In fact, it’s a total mystery how any American children survived the last quarter-millennium without all the busybodies, nanny staters, and soccer moms scaring them to death about all the dangers of childhood.

MadisonConservative on February 15, 2012 at 1:29 PM

Go to your local police website for registered sex offenders and search your neighborhood.

It will not be a matter of if you have any, but how many.

We tried this when looking for our last house, and it was impossible to find an area that was offender-free. On the upside, you can (at least in our area) see what the offense was. Some of them are statutory-rape like charges for 19 year olds sleeping with their 15 year old girlfriends. So, maybe not great, but a bit better than some of the alternatives.

TexasDan on February 15, 2012 at 2:43 PM

Dan,

I’m with you there as well and I did the sex offender search too and my jaw dropped when I saw how many there were. There is no “safe” area when it comes to that. It’s everywhere, $1M house or $50K house, chances are there is a sex offender within a block or two.

My question is, were all these people there 25, 35 years ago as well and we didn’t know it, or has the last generation seen a sudden surge of sex offenders?

angryed on February 15, 2012 at 4:58 PM

Not a hard concept. The problem came from the government forcing banks to make high-risk loans or face being slimed as “racists”. This in turn caused increased demand for houses, which reduced supply, which increased prices, which collapsed along with the rest of the house of cards. Basic economics.

If you actually believe this you are a moron. You literally have NO CONCEPT of what actually happened. Wall Street was demanding more and more mortgages to package into MBS, CDS, and CDO deals. Lenders were singing up ANYONE for mortgages because they could immediately sell them off their books at no risk to themselves, Wall Street and the mortgage originators got rich. Homeowners defaulted, the mortgage backed securities went bad, investors lost money, homeowners lost their houses, but surprise surprise, Wall Street got bailed out and you, the taxpayer, got left with the bill. The government didn’t force anybody to make loans, the private businesses (Countrywide, etc…) were clamoring to make those loans.

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 5:00 PM

Cornell Conservative on February 15, 2012 at 1:27 PM

I had neither the time, nor the desire, for sitting on my ass, watching television.
OhEssYouCowboys on February 15, 2012 at 1:35 PM

I’ve never been a TV watcher either. As a kid, the only reason I watched shows like “The Beverly Hillbillies” and such was because I liked the theme music. I walked away as soon as it was over because I didn’t care about the actual show. And that pretty much sums it up: I have been a music freak as soon as I learned what it was and how to make it. I took piano and guitar lessons — still play both now — and acquired a record collection which encompasses virtually all pop music genres. I drew and painted, read and wrote.

Now, because I have somewhat of a non-traditional work schedule, I couldn’t name one show currently on TV that I’ve ever watched. And when I’m home, the TV is off. My hubby is a different story, but he says it helps him relax.

PatriotGal2257 on February 15, 2012 at 5:04 PM

Del Dolemonte on February 15, 2012 at 1:41 PM

God you’re sad. PBS’ children programming was educational and not propagandist at all.

libfreeordie on February 15, 2012 at 1:47 PM

Wow, your second textbook example of Alinsky 101 today. Respond to your opponent by insult.

But what’s even more revealing is that you don’t think you were brainwashed by PBS’s Propaganda for Kids Programming. That proves how well it worked on you.

In 2009, PBS was busted for accepting government funding for its kids show “Sid the Science Kid”, and HHS even featured the show on its official youtube channel. Their goal? To brainwash kids into getting shots for Swine Flu. Remember how big of a bust that “scare” was?

Last year, “Sesame Street” was also exposed for airing Propaganda-in his media bias expose called “”Primetime Propaganda”, Ben Shapiro also delved into PBS’ Kids shows.

In his book, Shaprio quotes PBS’s Mike Dann, one of the founding executives of Sesame Street, who admitted:

“it was not made for the sophisticated or the middle class.”

No, the show was made for the easily brainwashed. Hence the later admission by Dann that he used the show after 9/11 to promote an anti-war message.

In addition, in the past 3 years Sesame Street’s Elmo has been used as a shill for Michelle O’bama’s Child Nutrition Bill. This after Elmo had already happily worked as a shill for O’bama’s free broadband for the masses.

But of course PBS’s kids show propaganda pre-dates O’bama. In 2005 PBS pulled an episode of “Postcards From Buster” after a complaint from the Bush Administration’s Secretary of Education, because it advocated lesbian characters.

Back at the same time, PBS also used taxpayer money to start something called “Eeko World!”. This was an entire complex of games, cartoons and narrated stories designed to indoctrinate the kids with Leftist Ideals.

At the time, Human Events writer Mac Johnson noted:

There, spread out across the screen of my trusty iMac, was EekoWorld — a paradise over which my boy had total control of all policies, decisions, and development. Right there, I should have known that a liberal had come up with the concept for the game.

Cheeko, a winged monkey with the body of a shark and the tail of a snake (whom I’m fairly sure might be the beast from Revelation, by the way) was hovering over EekoWorld waiting for an answer to his question, which he repeated periodically in a voice that sounded a lot like Eleanor Clift in the midst of a “McLaughlin Group” free-for-all with Pat Buchanan, but even more shrill (and who knew that was possible?).

Cheeko cawed forth the question again: “People want to drill for oil in this area even though it is a wildlife preserve. What is your vote?” Below the freakish FrankenMonkey were two potential votes, “YES” or “NO.” The Texas part of me immediately took over. “Well, yes, for Pete’s sake,” I thought. I’d drill for oil through the family cemetery if I thought it would reduce our dependence on foreign oil by 0.00001%. So I clicked “Yes,” much to the horror of the boy, who knew very well what “No” looks like, but just wanted me to come play the game with him. “NO, DAD, DON”T!” he cried. But it was too late.

Cheeko pounced on us. Being a liberal abomination, he was too worried about our self-esteem to tell us that we were wrong, but squawked out instead “Here’s a better choice. Oil keeps our homes comfortable and provides us with electricity, but removing oil from a wildlife preserve can hurt the land, plants, and animals. -8 points.” “MINUS EIGHT POINTS!!!???” the boy shouted, then looked at me as if I had stepped on his goldfish and said “Why did you do that, Dad?”

2009:

After watching the fictional Grouch News Network, a friend of Oscar the Grouch says, “From now on I am watching Pox News. Now there’s a trashy news show!”

No Propaganda there!

PBS’s “Kids Go!” also encourages kids to boycott certain products.

Going back a few more years, the 2003 PBS show “Liberty’s Kids” had some very subtle propaganda-one of the prime kid characters was a “reporter”. Throughout the show, the meme was repeated that the primary job of a “reporter” was not to report the news, but to question the current government. Fittingly enough, the narrator for the series was noted Leftist C-BS Anchor Walter Cronkite.

Apparently however none of the current cast of Washington D.C. “reporters” ever saw that show. As all of them see their “job” as keeping the current Government afloat by not vetting or reporting its abuses.

Now, tell us what cartoons you were allowed to watch while growing up. You never answered that part of my question.

Del Dolemonte on February 15, 2012 at 5:11 PM

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 5:00 PM

Before you call anybody a moron, maybe you should educate yourself.

http://directorblue.blogspot.com/2010/07/andrew-cuomo-architect-of-ruin.html

mike_NC9 on February 15, 2012 at 5:12 PM

If you actually believe this you are a moron. You literally have NO CONCEPT of what actually happened. Wall Street was demanding more and more mortgages to package into MBS, CDS, and CDO deals. Lenders were singing up ANYONE for mortgages because they could immediately sell them off their books at no risk to themselves, Wall Street and the mortgage originators got rich. Homeowners defaulted, the mortgage backed securities went bad, investors lost money, homeowners lost their houses, but surprise surprise, Wall Street got bailed out and you, the taxpayer, got left with the bill. The government didn’t force anybody to make loans, the private businesses (Countrywide, etc…) were clamoring to make those loans.

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 5:00 PM

sob0727 was much funnier.

mike_NC9 has already cleaned your clock once, but let me add that subprime mortgages nearly tripled in the first 4 years of the Clinton Administration, and then his corrupt Attorney General and her Assistant, who is now O’bama’s corrupt Attorney General, threatened lenders with legal repercussions if they didn’t make mortgage loans to people who couldn’t pay them back. I’ve been in the mortgage industry for over 3 decades and witnessed it first hand.

Del Dolemonte on February 15, 2012 at 5:20 PM

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 5:00 PM
Before you call anybody a moron, maybe you should educate yourself.

http://directorblue.blogspot.com/2010/07/andrew-cuomo-architect-of-ruin.html

mike_NC9 on February 15, 2012 at 5:12 PM

Well, as much as I respect and admire that ridiculous blog you linked to, you might want to read some actual books that were legit enough for reasonable people to publish them.
Too Big To Fail.
All the Devils Are Here.
The Big Short.

Maybe you should educate yourself.

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 5:21 PM

I’m with you there as well and I did the sex offender search too and my jaw dropped when I saw how many there were. There is no “safe” area when it comes to that. It’s everywhere, $1M house or $50K house, chances are there is a sex offender within a block or two.

My question is, were all these people there 25, 35 years ago as well and we didn’t know it, or has the last generation seen a sudden surge of sex offenders?

angryed on February 15, 2012 at 4:58 PM

The problem is that these days, slapping a waitress on the backside is enough to get you a sex offender conviction. An older man in my apartment complex(in a fairly upscale part of Madison) is on there. Why? “Fourth degree sexual battery”. According to him, both he and a buddy had the cops called on them in a restaurant when they were drunk and smacked the ass of their server. For this, he’s listed on the same website with rapists and child molesters. Far from the only person I’ve known who has been on a sex offender registry for something ridiculous.

Crime, including murder and rape, has declined for the last 30 years. Yet we live as if every day is more dangerous than the last. My kid will be playing outside, riding their bike without a helmet, making mud pies, and climbing trees. I look forward to conveying my sentiments to any nosy agencies with a single finger.

MadisonConservative on February 15, 2012 at 5:24 PM

But what’s even more revealing is that you don’t think you were brainwashed by PBS’s Propaganda for Kids Programming. That proves how well it worked on you.

Del Dolemonte on February 15, 2012 at 5:11 PM

Oh, chill. I grew up on Sesame Street and Mr. Rogers, as well as ample amounts of Nature, Mystery, and Doctor Who. If parents don’t use television as a babysitter and engage their kids to ensure they’re learning properly, there’s nothing to worry about.

MadisonConservative on February 15, 2012 at 5:26 PM

sob0727 was much funnier.

mike_NC9 has already cleaned your clock once, but let me add that subprime mortgages nearly tripled in the first 4 years of the Clinton Administration, and then his corrupt Attorney General and her Assistant, who is now O’bama’s corrupt Attorney General, threatened lenders with legal repercussions if they didn’t make mortgage loans to people who couldn’t pay them back. I’ve been in the mortgage industry for over 3 decades and witnessed it first hand.

Del Dolemonte on February 15, 2012 at 5:20 PM

You witnessed it first hand? Please tell me about it. Your bank/lender was forced to approve loans? Which government agency called your private business and told them they must approve a loan to a certain individual? How did the agency know the person was applying for a loan, were they reviewing all denied loans in all the private banks in the country? That seems like a lot of work.

Sorry, but your story doesn’t check out. It wasn’t loans from during the Clinton administration that were defaulting (again, you might want to check your facts).

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 5:28 PM

If you actually believe this you are a moron. You literally have NO CONCEPT of what actually happened. Wall Street was demanding more and more mortgages to package into MBS, CDS, and CDO deals. Lenders were singing up ANYONE for mortgages because they could immediately sell them off their books at no risk to themselves, Wall Street and the mortgage originators got rich. Homeowners defaulted, the mortgage backed securities went bad, investors lost money, homeowners lost their houses, but surprise surprise, Wall Street got bailed out and you, the taxpayer, got left with the bill. The government didn’t force anybody to make loans, the private businesses (Countrywide, etc…) were clamoring to make those loans.

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 5:00 PM

Keep tilting at windmills, Don Quixote (For the reference, http://www.wikipedia.org and type “Don Quixote” into the little box in the middle. Since you didn’t get to enjoy classical literature :/) ).

You’re neglecting half the story in your rendition of it. First, see the Community Housing and Reinvestment Acts. Once you’ve read up on those, you can finish reading my post. First, the government required they make riskier (“sub-prime”) loans. Then, when their big donors started complaining about the risk, the Feds had a couple of things called “QGC’s”, quasi-governmental corporations (Fanny Mae and Freddie Mac) buy up all these bad loans. Like any casino, the brokers then found a way to make bets on these loans.

TL;DR:
Without political pressure from activist groups, and Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to eat up the bad debt for them, these lenders would have never been willing nor able to do what they did.

Asurea on February 15, 2012 at 5:37 PM

Mexicans like Jennifer Lopez love to eat tacos and burritos.

Tzetzes on February 15, 2012 at 6:45 PM

Oops, wrong thread!

Tzetzes on February 15, 2012 at 6:45 PM

Might we be expecting too little from children academically?

Yes. Behaviorally and responsibility-wise as well.

Education at every level has been dumbed down to such an extent that the average student today knows a small fraction of what a student in the 50s knew, and even less than a student in the 1800′s.

My youngest son, who graduated from high school last year, took several AP classes. So many kids are being pushed into AP classes who aren’t prepared, that those are dumbed down as well, leaving the class as a whole unprepared for the test. My son said he didn’t learn much of anything until the intense study period for the two weeks before the test.

Teachers don’t want to teach and students don’t want to learn.

Add to that our appalling trend to keep children as children until they’re 30 years old and we’re doomed as a society. The nanny rules my kids had to deal with in high school were ridiculous. Students that age should already have adult responsibilities and should be expected to behave as adults. My kids had a hard time switching from that environment to the extra-curricular activities where they WERE treated like adults. The only way they were able to do that was because I refused to be a helicopter parent and taught them how to be independent and to think for themselves.

My youngest is now in the Air National Guard in addition to his full-time job as a merchandiser with a soft drink company. He works independently with no supervision of his daily work, something most of his classmates would be unable to do.

He also reports immature behavior in his student flight group at Guard drills. He expected people going into the military to have a more adult demeanor, they drive him nuts, acting like they’re still in high school.

Common Sense on February 15, 2012 at 6:46 PM

…the time they spend learning about one subject is time they cannot spend learning about another. How much time do we really want to spend teaching kids about how to avoid obesity, manage their finances, or cope with their as-yet-undiscovered sexuality when we could stick to the basics of reading, writing and arithmetic?

Hear hear!

Tzetzes on February 15, 2012 at 6:49 PM

Might we be expecting too little from children academically?

Absolutely

boomer on February 15, 2012 at 6:51 PM

I take it there were no essay questions in his curriculum, because, what does a 9 year old know how to express?

I’m sure a savant of sorts can regurgutate anything intellectually ingested amazingly well, but know?

There hasn’t been enough life lived to know anything but formula and data at his age.

Facts machines are ultimately uninteresting.

profitsbeard on February 15, 2012 at 6:52 PM

Keep tilting at windmills, Don Quixote (For the reference, http://www.wikipedia.org and type “Don Quixote” into the little box in the middle. Since you didn’t get to enjoy classical literature :/) ).

You’re neglecting half the story in your rendition of it. First, see the Community Housing and Reinvestment Acts. Once you’ve read up on those, you can finish reading my post. First, the government required they make riskier (“sub-prime”) loans. Then, when their big donors started complaining about the risk, the Feds had a couple of things called “QGC’s”, quasi-governmental corporations (Fanny Mae and Freddie Mac) buy up all these bad loans. Like any casino, the brokers then found a way to make bets on these loans.

TL;DR:
Without political pressure from activist groups, and Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to eat up the bad debt for them, these lenders would have never been willing nor able to do what they did.

Asurea on February 15, 2012 at 5:37 PM

Uh oh, find a blanket or something to cover up with, your ignorance is showing. Fannie and Freddie didn’t back those loans, didn’t buy those loans, didn’t do anything with those loans. Check the facts. Keep spouting off your ridiculous talking points that have no facts to back them up , you idiot. Look at the percentages of loans that Fannie and Freddie had anything to do with, it is miniscule.

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 6:56 PM

The standards are too low, and it has to do with expectations from both the schools and irresponsible parents. My family and I immigrated to this country when I was a child. I was put in 1st grade not knowing any English, but being in an American school forced me to learn. One year later, in 2nd grade, I was reading at a 5th grade level (and now remember how much I loved Nancy Drew then, haha). Same thing happened with my other Russian immigrant friend – we were always in Honors classes together.

Our individual potentials are always way higher than we think (and definitely way higher than our public school system administrators think…)

Dagny__Taggart on February 15, 2012 at 7:33 PM

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 6:56 PM

either you’re an idiot or you’re uneducated. If you are older than 40 and had been paying attention, you’d know there were several key actions taken by politicians to weaken the standards for mortgage qualifications and the stick weilded by the govt for even a whiff of redlining.

Let me ask you this. When considering a mortgage, what is the rule of thumb for how much house you can afford? How much should you set aside as a rainy day fund? How much debt should you carry?

Now contrast the 3 answers with the stats on average foreclosures. Now compare our mess to the Canadian record, what key differences do we see.

It’s not like we weren’t warned about irrational exuberance multiple times in the past.

AH_C on February 15, 2012 at 7:40 PM

Uh oh, find a blanket or something to cover up with, your ignorance is showing. Fannie and Freddie didn’t back those loans, didn’t buy those loans, didn’t do anything with those loans. Check the facts. Keep spouting off your ridiculous talking points that have no facts to back them up , you idiot. Look at the percentages of loans that Fannie and Freddie had anything to do with, it is miniscule.

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 6:56 PM

Okay, just to recap, you have engaged in the straw man fallacy, ad hominem, and classical Alinsky re-defining of words. In particular, I take issue in this latest post with your use of the word “miniscule” (proper spelling: minuscule).

The Department of Housing and Urban Development sets lending rules for Fanny and Freddie. As of 2005, F&F (as I’ll be abbreviating them) had to provide at least 52% of all financing to borrowers under the median income for their area. As of 2008, they also had to have, as 28% of their portfolio, loans to borrowers with less than 60% of their area’s median income.

Fannie Mae alone owned 33% of all sub-prime mortgage-backed securities as of 2007. Both of them, together, had over $500 billion in Alt-A securities, which required minimal or zero documentation of the borrower’s ability to pay.

Just one of these two companies owned a full THIRD of the entire market.

Merriam-Webster defines the word minuscule as meaning, “very small”. A third of the market is not by any means “very small”. Especially when it fails to take into account the other GSE involved.

I know liberals love to try to re-define words, but they have actual meaning.

Since we’re throwing insults, too, I leave you with this one:
Mathematically-illiterate mongoloid.

Asurea on February 15, 2012 at 8:02 PM

Since we’re throwing insults, too, I leave you with this one:
Mathematically-illiterate mongoloid.

Asurea on February 15, 2012 at 8:02 PM

Here’s the facts, dippy. That’s a nice 33% number you’ve got there. You know what that number was in 2002? 44%. They decreased their market share. So they weren’t exactly leading the charge into subprime when they were DECREASING MARKET SHARE. You know who was increasing? Countrywide, Goldman Sachs, and AIG. Three PRIVATE companies. Oh, but private companies are our saviors. Fannie and Freddie also went from insuring 48% of subprime loans to only 24% during that time. Also, not leading the charge in that department. They were not the ones forcing these loans on people, predatory private lenders were.

Got some more info for your thick skull. “In testimony before the house committee on oversight and government reform, Lehman Brothers CEO Richard Fuld acknowledged that Fannie and Freddie’s role in Lehman’s demise was de minimis, or so small that is does not matter.”

So there are the facts, jackhole. Enjoy living in your bubble of ignorance and stupidity.

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 8:34 PM

They went from 44%, to 22%, to 33%. In other words, they started to reduce it, then bought back in. Since you are completely incapable of addressing an argument honestly and completely, I’m just going to shoot one more parting shot and leave you to spin your wheels.

Lehman Brothers is a straw man argument. They were only a piece of the collapse, and not the largest one. So their specific situation has little bearing on the situation as a whole.

Sort of like case studies claiming a link between radio waves and cancer.

Asurea on February 15, 2012 at 8:42 PM

Boy, what I wouldn’t give for a ‘Rockmom’ post right about now….

BigWyo on February 15, 2012 at 8:54 PM

Del Dolemonte on February 15, 2012 at 5:20 PM

Never mind…I see the retard just ignored you anyways…

BigWyo on February 15, 2012 at 8:58 PM

the 2003 PBS show “Liberty’s Kids” had some very subtle propaganda-one of the prime kid characters was a “reporter”. Throughout the show, the meme was repeated that the primary job of a “reporter” was not to report the news, but to question the current government. Fittingly enough, the narrator for the series was noted Leftist C-BS Anchor Walter Cronkite.

Del Dolemonte on February 15, 2012 at 5:11 PM

Actually, there are several scenes where James the 15 yr old journalist gets scolded by Ben Franklin for letting his political sympathies bias his story. It is made a real lesson that reporting must be accurate and impartial.

Liberty’s Kids was a great show. it was a genuinely patriotic and pretty accurate cartoon series about the American Revolution, from Bunker Hill to Yorktown. All the 50 episodes are on YouTube, and worth seeing even if you are an adult.

YehuditTX on February 15, 2012 at 9:03 PM

Fittingly enough, the narrator for the series was noted Leftist C-BS Anchor Walter Cronkite.

I can tell you never watched the series. Cronkite didn’t “narrate,” he was the voice of Ben Franklin. There was no “narrator,” it was a drama. They got some other stars to do voices; the only one I remember is Dustin Hoffman as Benedict Arnold.

YehuditTX on February 15, 2012 at 9:05 PM

….as long as we’re on the subject of the American Revolution….

In that era, in Europe and America, boys who were groomed for intellectual success entered college as young as 12, and most of them had had tutors, iow they were homeschooled first. (Of course you had to be rich to afford that.) I think Burr and Madison both started college very young.

YehuditTX on February 15, 2012 at 9:09 PM

They went from 44%, to 22%, to 33%. In other words, they started to reduce it, then bought back in. Since you are completely incapable of addressing an argument honestly and completely, I’m just going to shoot one more parting shot and leave you to spin your wheels.

Lehman Brothers is a straw man argument. They were only a piece of the collapse, and not the largest one. So their specific situation has little bearing on the situation as a whole.

Sort of like case studies claiming a link between radio waves and cancer.

Asurea on February 15, 2012 at 8:42 PM

What is dishonest about what I am saying? They did not lead the charge, when they went from 44% to 22% it was because private companies were killing them in this market, so they got back into it to try to get back some market share. But they did not lead the way and they were not forcing people to make these loans. There is nothing dishonest about the truth.

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 9:15 PM

Whenever I’m out in public I can almost always spot homeschool kids, because of their manners, poise, intelligence, and overhall behaviour. Not to say kids that aren’t homeschooled don’t also have those attritubes, but I do notice a difference.

mcplumbercuda on February 15, 2012 at 3:44 PM

Me too. i don’t have any kids and I am not around them that much, but the most poised and mature teens I meet always turn out to be homeschooled.

YehuditTX on February 15, 2012 at 9:20 PM

Nice achievement.

Has he met Jacob Barnett yet?

My nieces were/are home-schooled and scored 97. 98, 99 in the Iowa tests, traveled extensively on missions trips in the US, SA, EAU, sang in state youth choirs, won national writing and theater awards and well.. just on and on like that.

They were given the freedom (with some common sense, self reliant discipline) to use all of their gifts and talents to learn skills and skill-sets which taught them to learn on their own and learn , achieve, etc.

The public school system is a prison for the mind and soul.

amend2 on February 16, 2012 at 12:18 AM

Kudos to that kid – but I gotta tell ya that articles like this do nothing to aid in improving my self-image or addressing my suspicions of my intellectual inadequacy.

The public school system? A total failure. Why would anyone expect differently? It is run by liberals after all, and everything they touch turns to poop. The midass touch, so to speak.

AttaBoyLuther on February 16, 2012 at 12:33 AM

Strange reply. You’ve been shown enough info to realize that there probably would not have been a housing crisis if Fannie and Freddie had never been giving out easy money. What more do you need?

blink on February 16, 2012 at 10:58 AM

What info? The info that says Fannie and Freddie’s market share was cut in half during the first three years of the housing bubble? That seems to show that the private companies were the ones giving out the easy money. Get it through your thick skill, the numbers don’t back up your view. The in-depth books that were written on this subject all point to Countrywide and Wall Street, not the GSEs. No matter what some Hot Air commenter’s sad little blog says.

sob0728 on February 16, 2012 at 11:38 AM

We chose the “best” public school in Wisconsin. My youngest was 18 months ahead of current curriculum when we moved her – she has yet to meet a new math concept.

My oldest was reading at a college level in 6th grade and they gave her a 4th grade book. Her “enrichment” for English was to be sent to the hall.

The bell curve of Lexile levels at the middle school (6,7,8) library is centered on a 4th grade reading level – even though the school average is 2 years ahead of grade level.

They refuse to group the above average kids because it doesn’t fit the “middle school model”. However, my voice has been heard by other parents and there is now a ground swell of support for gifted classes that allow every child to learn something new every day.

Daisy_WI on February 16, 2012 at 11:39 AM

I recently witnessed a doctoral candidate, who is ABD, write a short paper on a very specific question, and given specific sources of information with which to answer that question. The paper was one of the worst things I have ever read (barring some of the comments from some of the trolls here on HA). The composition made it look like this person used English as a 3rd language…and the topic (if you could even dream of an actual thesis) was not even approached by accident. It literally appeared as though he has turned in a paper from a different class by mistake.

When I was in college, I took a geography course from a new PhD who could not find the capital of China on a map.

I had history professors with 20+ years of teaching experience who were amazingly ignorant about facts that historians really ought to know.

And though we were not required to write a senior thesis or dissertation, we did have to complete a course in “writing for history”. Many of the graduating seniors in my class could not write a decent sentence, and most could not produce a well-written paragraph.

I apologized to the professor for the poor quality of my work, but he gave me an “A” and said it was the best out of the 30+ papers submitted.

J Baustian on February 16, 2012 at 1:06 PM

sob0728 on February 15, 2012 at 5:00 PM

You need to pick up a copy of Culture of Corruption. I’m almost done with it. If ya don’t want to read the whole thing, at least read the section about the subprime mortgages. We were never really told the whole story. This book has interviews from members of obamas actual staff who finally broke and gave in. If ya really want the truth, do what I did and visit your local library. Ya won’t believe how intertwinted obama’s fingers are into EVERYTHING. How far he has reached into everything. He touched everything, there are soooo many people who owe him sooo many things. Everybody and their brother owe their homes to their careers to him and everything else. Then ya add in that 6 degrees of seperation thing and that REALLY seals the deal. It’s no wonder that obama is able to quite literally get away with bloody murder in the middle of the day at
grand Central Station in front of a crowd of people. You aren’t gonna find ANYONE who’s gonna be willing to put their life/home, career, possibly families life on the line depending on how desperate he gets. He has the good on everyone and the connection with his Chicago thugs to have things done. I’m tellin ya, pick up the book.

momof5shortstuff on February 17, 2012 at 4:23 AM

You need to pick up a copy of Culture of Corruption. I’m almost done with it. If ya don’t want to read the whole thing, at least read the section about the subprime mortgages. We were never really told the whole story. This book has interviews from members of obamas actual staff who finally broke and gave in. If ya really want the truth, do what I did and visit your local library. Ya won’t believe how intertwinted obama’s fingers are into EVERYTHING. How far he has reached into everything. He touched everything, there are soooo many people who owe him sooo many things. Everybody and their brother owe their homes to their careers to him and everything else. Then ya add in that 6 degrees of seperation thing and that REALLY seals the deal. It’s no wonder that obama is able to quite literally get away with bloody murder in the middle of the day at
grand Central Station in front of a crowd of people. You aren’t gonna find ANYONE who’s gonna be willing to put their life/home, career, possibly families life on the line depending on how desperate he gets. He has the good on everyone and the connection with his Chicago thugs to have things done. I’m tellin ya, pick up the book.

momof5shortstuff on February 17, 2012

I’ve seen some insane stuff before, but blaming for a mortgage bubble and housing collapse that happened BEFORE he took office is right at the top.
And telling me to go to the library when I have already read 3 books and countless articles on the situation is classic. Sorry if I am not reading the “correct” conspiracy theories for your taste.

sob0728 on February 17, 2012 at 9:22 AM

Comment pages: 1 2