The definitions of “blogging,” 2012 edition

posted at 5:20 pm on February 12, 2012 by Jazz Shaw

Another CPAC has come and gone, with the usual collection of fun, confrontation and controversy. And with the final day of activities, yet another Blogger of the Year was honored. (A position which Ed has already enjoyed in the past.) First, I’d like to thank everyone at the Academy who nominated and supported me, and say that it’s really a tremendous, yet humbling honor to…

…what’s that? I didn’t win again?!?! Well, poop. I guess we’ll send it over the actual winner, The Daily Caller’s Matt Lewis, who brings up the latest edition of a long running question.

I was honored to have been selected as CPAC’s “blogger of the year” on Saturday.

I’d like to thank CPAC — and everyone who nominated me. And thanks to TheDC for giving me the outlet and support and creative freedom to do this!

Since winning the award, I’ve received a lot of tweets and emails. Most of the feedback has been incredibly positive and supportive. But a few people voiced an interesting opinion that essentially went like this: “Congratulations — but I always envisioned you more as a reporter/journalist than as a blogger.”

I took this as a compliment. But it also gave me pause.

For the record, while I’m sure I wasn’t the only one, I was one of the people who said that to Matt. (Though I’d like to think I was pretty nice about it and so was he. I congratulated him sincerely and think Matt is a terrific guy deserving of all the accolades he reaps.) But he does raise an interesting question in his article. Is Matt Lewis a blogger?

The Daily Caller is clearly not a blog. It’s a news portal. In fact, they draw a clear distinction by having a button in their main navigation menu to go to “the blogs.” But on the other hand, the sub-site, Matt Lewis and the News is obviously built using a blogging application and Matt publishes material there in that fashion. But Matt is a professional, not some pajama clad geek dwelling in his mother’s basement with a laptop. He commits acts of journalism for a living, as we are sometimes wont to say, and he draws a regular paycheck for traveling and reporting on the events of the day. But does the fact that he also publishes short form items in a blog format put a blogger hat on him? That’s his take.

A blogger, in my estimation, is simply someone who sometimes utilizes a blog platform. This might be a professional journalist or a teacher or a high school dropout. What they have in common is the medium, which allows for fast (and often short) online posts, frequently updated, without the bureaucratic burdens of heavy editing.

So by this criteria, anyone who uses a WordPress template or any related species of web publishing software is a blogger. Matt cites some others in this sort of “hybrid” category such as Chris Cillizza, Ezra Klein and… Jennifer Rubin? I suppose that’s where I begin to have some reservations. If the check you receive every payday says The Washington Post on it, it seems a bit of a stretch to say you are a blogger.

But were we to say Matt isn’t a blogger, then were do we draw the line? Just because you are paid to write? Not to stick my big nose into anyone’s business, but Ed Morrissey does this for a living, not a hobby. And if memory serves, he was already getting paid as a full time job to do it when he was awarded the BotY honors. Should we have disqualified Ed for being a “pro” or split his example away from Matt Lewis simply because Hot Air is built entirely on a blogging application platform, rather than a “hybrid” as Lewis describes?

(Yes, for the record, I too am guilty of being paid to write in various spots from time to time, both political and completely unrelated technical items. Hey, you have to pay the bills.)

So who would qualify? There are still some people who continue to perfect the art of getting readers to… HIT THE FREAKING TIP JAR! That seems much more akin to an old fashioned, “singing for your supper” model of operation which should qualify. But still… you are getting paid after a fashion. But if we leave all of those behind, then are the only real bloggers the purists who do something else for a living and just get a free Blogger account and do it in their spare time? What if you sell advertising space on your blog? Your amateur status is once again in danger.

Or is it just a case of… we’re all bloggers now? Discuss.


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Comments

Every now and again, someone suggests or editorializes or proposes legislation to regulate blogs. Bloggers can’t even decide on what blogging is, so maybe it’s regulation proof.

apostic on February 12, 2012 at 5:27 PM

So if Allah ever wins were gonna see something like an episode of Delocated??

BigWyo on February 12, 2012 at 5:29 PM

Under a different name, I write book reviews on a blog. I make about 200 bucks a year off it through donations and Amazon credit. I could do the same thing and try to hustle my pieces freelance, make about the same amount of money, get a lot less published, and have a lot fewer readers. I guess doing it that way would make me a “professional writer” technically. (I have done that before, pre-blog days, so I guess I am a “professional writer.”

For me, blogging isn’t the platform, it’s the entrepreneurship. Finding your own space, making your own way, using your own voice. Ed started that way. Professor Reynolds makes plenty of money with his day job, but made his own space with his own voice. Rich blogger or poor blogger, that’s what it means to me.

Gordon Winslow on February 12, 2012 at 5:32 PM

Remember the picture “The Blog” back in the 50s starring Steve McQueen?

timberline on February 12, 2012 at 5:33 PM

Ed and Allah were robbed! What, did Lewis also buy up a bunch of tickets and hand them out?

BoxHead1 on February 12, 2012 at 5:34 PM

AP is a much better blogger than Lewis.

His anonymity severely cripples his career, but it’s his choice.

Masih ad-Dajjal on February 12, 2012 at 5:34 PM

BoTY…shouldn’t it be BloOTY, or BoOTY? …or, as Maureen Dowd would hear it…. BOY!?

ted c on February 12, 2012 at 5:34 PM

Remember the picture “The Blog” back in the 50s starring Steve McQueen?

timberline on February 12, 2012 at 5:33 PM

Not to mention the sequel “Beware of the Blog”.

squint on February 12, 2012 at 5:34 PM

Or is it just a case of… we’re all bloggers now?

Whose this “we” you speak of?

Let’s make sure we stop at the byline. A lot of us commenters want to be sure we’re exempt (it’s only a matter of time before bammie comes for you “bloggers”).

I’d like to keep my 1st ammendment rights intact, and my comments tax-free.

Tim_CA on February 12, 2012 at 5:35 PM

First, I’d like to thank everyone at the Academy who nominated and supported me, and say that it’s really a tremendous, yet humbling honor to…
…what’s that? I didn’t win again?!?!
====================================

D*mmitt……..:)

canopfor on February 12, 2012 at 5:37 PM

AP never really tells you what he thinks. He’s coy. He likes to hint at things but he never says I believe x, y, and z. A blogger doesn’t have to do that but why not?

Dr. Tesla on February 12, 2012 at 5:37 PM

I don’t think he’s a blogger, nor do I think he ever has been. But I don’t get to pick the criteria nor the winner, so it doesn’t much matter, eh?

Matt’s a good writer and a solid journalist. Because he writes on the internet, the old guard at the ACU see him as a blogger. It doesn’t make him one and there are a *lot* of very good writers who, to my thinking, would have been more worthy of the award, but as I said before, that choice isn’t mine. I’m glad the ACU recognized him. He’s a good guy and does good work.

Jimmie Bise, Jr on February 12, 2012 at 5:39 PM

And, at the other end of the spectrum, there should be a new category: Best Commenter or Tweeter Without a Blog. That’s what I want to strive for ;-)

ParisParamus on February 12, 2012 at 5:41 PM

Remember the picture “The Blog” back in the 50s starring Steve McQueen?

timberline on February 12, 2012 at 5:33 PM

Great flick….they froze that blog and dumped it at the north pole.

Tim_CA on February 12, 2012 at 5:42 PM

What in the world did I read, I thought Verum Serum was going to win this year?

Cindy Munford on February 12, 2012 at 5:42 PM

Whose this “we” you speak of?

Let’s make sure we stop at the byline. A lot of us commenters want to be sure we’re exempt (it’s only a matter of time before bammie comes for you “bloggers”).

I’d like to keep my 1st ammendment rights intact, and my comments tax-free.

Tim_CA on February 12, 2012 at 5:35 PM

First they came for the bloggers, and I said nothing…

squint on February 12, 2012 at 5:43 PM

Or is it just a case of… we’re all bloggers now? Discuss.
=========================================================

Could be,however it is amazing to see threads being pumped out,
one after another,and that takes time and research,and yes,linkys
too to boot!

And,with the News Cycle,its also a 24/7 time thingy as well,and
one has to stay on top of it,and for the H/A Bloggers,thats impress
ive to say the least!

canopfor on February 12, 2012 at 5:44 PM

Yep, no use in trying to solve the amateur/paid journo mess. Winner takes all is what most people ultimately appreciate. (i.e. BCS football vs. March Madness)

CastleDoctrine on February 12, 2012 at 5:46 PM

First they came for the bloggers, and I said nothing…

squint on February 12, 2012 at 5:43 PM

lol.

perfect.

Tim_CA on February 12, 2012 at 5:46 PM

Personally, I wouldn’t consider a salaried employee of a news organization – whose principal business is news gathering and dissemination, NOT blogging – as a “blogger” for award purposes. But that’s subject to debate, of course, and Lewis does a good job.

Hot Air and The Other McCain are more full-time blogging operations with any news feeds supplementary, IMHO.

Adjoran on February 12, 2012 at 5:48 PM

O/T,Greece is Going Up in Smoke!!
———————————

Update:
********

At least 10 buildings set on fire in Greece before parliamentary vote

Submitted 1 min ago from hosted.ap.org
http://www.breakingnews.com/
============================

http://www.breakingnews.com/topic/greece

canopfor on February 12, 2012 at 5:48 PM

Or is it just a case of… we’re all bloggers now? Discuss.

Pffft. We’re all journalists now, except bloggers have ethics.

No code for it but that’s not helped journalists.

Dusty on February 12, 2012 at 5:49 PM

But it also gave me pause.

I draw the line at “gave me pause”. Bloggers don’t write things like that.

forest on February 12, 2012 at 5:50 PM

[canopfor on February 12, 2012 at 5:48 PM]

Put a fence around it and grab some popcorn.

Dusty on February 12, 2012 at 5:51 PM

canopfor on February 12, 2012 at 5:48 PM

Statism get’s ugly and dangerous as it collapses under it’s own weight.

Hmmmmmm where could we find an example of a once-great democracy, now heading for that very cliff?

(hint: don’t look for the answer in the MSM)

Tim_CA on February 12, 2012 at 5:58 PM

I don’t see a difference b/t a blogger and what the people do over at National Review. It’s just political pundity on the internet. It opens up the door for more people to express themsleves outside of the more established vehicles like National Review. It’s a good thing b/c National Review hires a lot of horrible thinkers.

Dr. Tesla on February 12, 2012 at 5:59 PM

If you ask him nicely, Stacy McCain WILL sing for his supper. Pretty darn well, too.

JeffWeimer on February 12, 2012 at 6:00 PM

Matt Lewis had a good blog post on Paul Ryan not being all that conervative, but he also had a piece that I would call dishonest about Jim DeMint and he has shilled for McCain as well vs J.D Hayworth. I think we could have taken a shot with Hayworth being more conservative than McCain and not lived to regret it.

Dr. Tesla on February 12, 2012 at 6:02 PM

I think it’s kind of tacky how bloggers ask for money, like RSM and others. I’m not going to pay you for blogging something.

Dr. Tesla on February 12, 2012 at 6:03 PM

Wait! What??? Matt Lewis was named Blogger of the Year at a conservative convention?

I don’t get it. Well, Ogabe got a Nobel Peace Prize, so there’s that.

beedubya on February 12, 2012 at 6:17 PM

If a criterion for being a blogger is

fast (and often short) online posts, frequently updated, without the bureaucratic burdens of heavy editing

then based solely on the proliferation of typos, punctuation and grammatical errors suggesting the absence of editing, Jennifer Rubin certainly qualifies as a blogger. As does everyone at Commentary who contributes to Contentions.

But if the criterion is use of blogging software like WordPress, that’s far too broad, because the app has become practically the standard for regular, non-blog websites because of its simplicity and ease of use.

bgoldman on February 12, 2012 at 6:17 PM

My impression of Matt Lewis is he’s one of these younger Republican pundits who puts a premium on gay marriage and “gay rights” above everything else. Could be wrong about that.

Dr. Tesla on February 12, 2012 at 6:22 PM

My impression of Matt Lewis is he’s one of these younger Republican pundits who puts a premium on gay marriage and “gay rights” above everything else. Could be wrong about that.

Dr. Tesla on February 12, 2012 at 6:22 PM

Dr. Tesla:

In Reagans voice,

“Now there you go again”!!!!!
(sarc).

canopfor on February 12, 2012 at 6:24 PM

Are bloggers to journalism what rappers are to music?

I mean, at one point, rappers were an underclass of the music business–performing in shady locations to tons of adoring fans, spending their time in the salt mines. Nowadays, they’re rollin’ in dough, scorin’ all the ladies, and gettin’ big contracts..

Similarly, bloggers started as the blue collar journalists, doing the work the alphabet soupers wouldn’t do, getting the stories out there and turning opinions. After years of tedious keyboard pecking, they’ve now scored big Townhall contracts, CPAC, BooTy awards (that’s gotsta be like a rap star)/ Nowadays, they’re rollin’ in dough, scorin’ all the ladies, and gettin’ big contracts……Kinda like …well, Allahpundit??/

ted c on February 12, 2012 at 6:26 PM

AP is a much better blogger than Lewis.

His anonymity severely cripples his career, but it’s his choice.

Masih ad-Dajjal on February 12, 2012 at 5:34 PM

Of course, that didn’t stop Ace from winning a few years back.

Seriously, there are some security concerns specific to AP (namely, what the “A” stands for) which precludes him from publicly accepting the CPAC BotY award.

Steve Eggleston on February 12, 2012 at 6:30 PM

Jimmie Bise, Jr on February 12, 2012 at 5:39 PM

Jimmie has it exactly correct. Matt Lewis is a terrific political writer and commentator, but I’ve never regarded him a blogger, even more so Jennifer Rubin. Andrew Malcolm wrote for the LA Times’ blog for several years, and considers himself a blogger, but he is now at Investors Business Daily as a columnist. Is he still a blogger? Was he ever? He is paid to write and has been a reporter and journalist for as long as I can remember. This is not an attack on anyone mentioned here, as I respect them all, and enjoy their columns and essays. But since Jazz opened up this can of worms, that is festering on twitter now and asked a very good question, just what is the difference between a blogger and a professional journalist?

I write a very small blog, that has had a few posts promoted, quoted and mentioned in major blogs, so does that make me a journalist? Hardly. I don’t have the time to write on a full time basis nor the inclination. I do it for fun in my spare time. I don’t take ads and have no tip jar. To the purest I’m a blogger, and a two-bit one for sure.

I have no problem with bloggers accepting advertizing and tip jars. Some of these people expend a lot of energy writing, and perhaps fall in to the semi-pro category. The folks writing on this site, including a few front he Green Room, are pros, no doubt, but all have their roots in part time blogging and had previous jobs.

I don’t know the answer as to when you stop being a blogger and start being a journalist, and I’ll leave that open to further debate.

Way to go Jazz, you really know how to stir up the pot on a Sunday evening. :)

simkeith on February 12, 2012 at 6:31 PM

Are bloggers to journalism what rappers are to music?

I mean, at one point, rappers were an underclass of the music business–performing in shady locations to tons of adoring fans, spending their time in the salt mines. Nowadays, they’re rollin’ in dough, scorin’ all the ladies, and gettin’ big contracts..

ted c on February 12, 2012 at 6:26 PM

ted c:Ugh….my ‘middle child’ listens to that sh*t,crap,sorry,
so-called music,yes the ones that have “Ho..and the “N”
word,from start to finish.Thank-Gawd,he wears head-phones!:)

canopfor on February 12, 2012 at 6:32 PM

Dr. Tesla:

In Reagans voice,

“Now there you go again”!!!!!
(sarc).

canopfor on February 12, 2012 at 6:24 PM

Seems like every liberal and moderate is using Reagan as a prop these days but they never liked him when he was president.

Dr. Tesla on February 12, 2012 at 6:34 PM

What in the world did I read, I thought Verum Serum was going to win this year?

Cindy Munford on February 12, 2012 at 5:42 PM

Probably the BlogBash tweets (I think put on by the Franklin Center this year).

Steve Eggleston on February 12, 2012 at 6:34 PM

“the only good conservative is a dead one who I can use as my prop in a debate” Canopor

Dr. Tesla on February 12, 2012 at 6:34 PM

I thought Madison Conservative should be named blogger of the year. He inspires me.

Dr. Tesla on February 12, 2012 at 6:35 PM

In only my opinion, Eugene Robinson and Paul Krugman are bloggers.

Rovin on February 12, 2012 at 6:36 PM

In only my opinion, Eugene Robinson and Paul Krugman are bloggers.

Rovin on February 12, 2012 at 6:36 PM

No they are paid hacks for the DNC. Don’t insult bloggers by counting them in our midst.

simkeith on February 12, 2012 at 6:53 PM

There is no “catch-all” line that separates “blogger” from “journalist”. If one says it’s training, that would knock out the likes of the Boss Emeritus and the previously-linked Robert Stacy McCain, who have essentially struck out on their own. If it’s simply the major source of income, that would knock out Ed/AP (who, to the best of my knowledge, never took a journalism class in college, much less majored in journalism).

On the other side between “blogger” and “non-blogger”, if that line is frequency of posts, not only don’t I qualify anymore, but I know several people who, despite infrequency, are damn good despite never having had journalistic training. If it’s acceptance of posts, Keith wouldn’t qualify.

The only organization whose events I’ve covered that did not distinguish between “media” and “blogger” is the Republican Party of Wisconsin. The 3 years I was able to make it to their state convention, my credentials read “media” (which, until people read a bit more closely or somehow knew me, led to some strange glances).

Steve Eggleston on February 12, 2012 at 6:58 PM

steve; did allah realize the security issue after he took that name or before it?

ted c on February 12, 2012 at 7:02 PM

steve; did allah realize the security issue after he took that name or before it?

ted c on February 12, 2012 at 7:02 PM

Don’t ask me; ask him. What we know now is Islamists don’t have a sense of humor.

Steve Eggleston on February 12, 2012 at 7:03 PM

In only my opinion, Eugene Robinson and Paul Krugman are bfloggers.

Rovin on February 12, 2012 at 6:36 PM

Corrected that apparent typo … ;-)

I think I see what you did there — demoting them from the status of “journalist” maybe?

ShainS on February 12, 2012 at 7:04 PM

but Allah loves bacon….he surely can’t be an Islamist, right? Either that or he’s a lyin’ sack of an Islamist…!

ted c on February 12, 2012 at 7:05 PM

Need two awards: professional and part-time. If you hold another job at least half-time, you’re in the part-time group. Simple; don’t make it complicated.

michaelo on February 12, 2012 at 7:13 PM

So if Allah ever wins were gonna see something like an episode of Delocated??

BigWyo on February 12, 2012 at 5:29 PM

Humpbot.

Attila (Pillage Idiot) on February 12, 2012 at 7:19 PM

Don’t ask me; ask him. What we know now is Islamists don’t have a sense of humor.

Steve Eggleston on February 12, 2012 at 7:03 PM

Expect a fatwa on you in the next few days for not acknowledging and submitting to Islamists sense of humor. :)

simkeith on February 12, 2012 at 7:22 PM

simkeith— ++ on the translations of common euphemisms! ha!!

ted c on February 12, 2012 at 7:25 PM

Well. Ok, then. If I use the professional version of Adobe Photo Shop does that make me a professional photographer? My stuff has been published in three papers for no fee.

The first time I got paid to write I believed I left the amateur world behind. I blog, but I would no more want to be placed in competition with hobby writers and diarists than I want some high school kid with a two bit facebook page compared to my career as a computer engineer.

People are so damned weird. Remember the episode of South Park where Cartman was sure he’d own the Special Olympics because he was “normal”? Those kids were athletes who trained for the sport like it was their job. If something is “like your job” it ain’t a hobby and it isn’t in the same category as your average Joe with a computer and an opinion and no ethical or financial limitations.

No one edits my blog and no one pays me for that writing, but I get paid to write. End of discussion.

BrideOfRove on February 12, 2012 at 7:36 PM

But it also gave me pause.

I draw the line at “gave me pause”. Bloggers don’t write things like that.

forest on February 12, 2012 at 5:50 PM

Ahahahahahaha! Me, too!

BrideOfRove on February 12, 2012 at 7:39 PM

Not to be a drag, but — in light of eternity, what difference does it really make?

Gordy on February 12, 2012 at 8:14 PM

Or is it just a case of… we’re all bloggers now?

I blogged for a while. It’s a pain in the butt.

Fallon on February 12, 2012 at 8:53 PM

I don’t know the answer as to when you stop being a blogger and start being a journalist, and I’ll leave that open to further debate.

simkeith on February 12, 2012 at 6:31 PM

From the world’s favorite on-line dictionary, Wikipedia:

A journalist collects and distributes news and other information. A journalist’s work is referred to as journalism.

Extrapolating the implicit assumptions, the above can be construed as:
All persons who collect and distribute news and other information are journalists.

All bloggers are persons.

Therefore, all bloggers who collect and distribute news and other information are journalists.

If you are writing about news or newsworthy information, you don’t stop being a blogger and start being a journalist because you are already both.

However, the question at issue is actually this: are all journalists bloggers simply because their writings are published electronically?

All bloggers are persons who publish electronically.
Most journalists are persons who publish electronically.
But, all journalists who publish electronically are not bloggers.

A blogger, in my estimation, is simply someone who sometimes utilizes a blog platform. This might be a professional journalist or a teacher or a high school dropout. What they have in common is the medium, which allows for fast (and often short) online posts, frequently updated, without the bureaucratic burdens of heavy editing. (Matt Lewis)

Leaving aside the question of how much editing actually happens in newspapers these days (they have certainly dispensed with the copy editors who corrected spelling and grammar), most of the stories on any news-service website are published fast (sometimes too fast, leading to multiple corrections as data come in), short (what’s the equivalent of column-inch on the internet?), and not only can be updated but frequently are (the memory holes are filling fast).

I would submit that a “true” blogger is someone who doesn’t have to answer to any editor at all.

AesopFan on February 12, 2012 at 9:11 PM

I haven’t blogged in over a year, but I did blog for 5 years. No ad space or tip jars. I don’t have any issues with people being compensated for their work, but I don’t think those are bloggers either. A tip jar for the record is not the same as renumeration, neither are ad banners. Being paid by a person, an entity or a corporation ect who is paying specifically for what you are writing is a whole different ballgame. You have an authority overseeing you.

saus on February 12, 2012 at 9:57 PM

Great flick….they froze that blog and dumped it at the north pole.

Tim_CA on February 12, 2012 at 5:42 PM

Gee, with all the panic about the polar ice caps melting, expect a sequel with the thawed and resurrected blog in 10..9..8..7..

manyears on February 12, 2012 at 10:40 PM

Matt Lewis comes close… he misses with the first step:

A blogger, in my estimation, is simply someone who sometimes utilizes a blog platform. This might be a professional journalist or a teacher or a high school dropout. What they have in common is the medium, which allows for…

A journalist can use various media, whether it be Radio, TV, Internet… if their job is to be a ‘newsman’, or an opinion writer on a program/site that is for newsman, the JOB they are doing is Journalism. The medium does not define them, the job does. So, when he says instead:

fast (and often short) online posts, frequently updated, without the bureaucratic burdens of heavy editing.

he finds the definition. (I’d take issue with the word short… remember “Eject! Eject! Eject! ? Certainly a Blog… but never short. Thank God!)

If Captain Ed and AllahP are being heavily edited, or have to submit their writings to a ‘higherup’ for approval, they are no longer blogging. If Edward R. Murrow were to have written personal little articles about the news of the day, and published it without the constant over-the-shoulder approval of management, it would have been blogging.

Hot Air and others who have contracts with organizations like TownHall have to be careful… not for how they offend TownHall, but to remind us that they have a free hand in what they write. I trust the good Captain to tell me what HE wants me to read, not what his Boss thinks is acceptable. I would imagine that he would leave TownHall and refire Captain’s Quarters if they tried… and I would follow him there, rather than read the new approved guy.

When I want ‘news’ coverage, I go to my local TV station’s website for the corporate info feed. When I want an honest, personal take on the news, I go to a Blog. Different jobs, regardless of the medium.

Mr Michael on February 12, 2012 at 10:42 PM

Good piece. And if Matt Lewis is a blogger, then I am a Japanese aviator.

chunky on February 12, 2012 at 10:43 PM

I knows it when I sees it.

Jim Treacher on February 12, 2012 at 11:18 PM

This is from a Matt Lewis piece on Jim DeMint:

From his reference to health care reform being Obama’s “Waterloo” to his bandying about the label “socialism” in his book, DeMint, of course, is no stranger to controversy. Now, this controversial figure may soon be coming to knock off a Republican candidate near you.

Ok, so Matt Lewis, who is ostesibly this awesome conservative blogger and thinker, thinks that Jim DeMint referring to Obamacare as Obama’s Waterloo and “bandying” around the label “socialism” in reference to Obama, is controversial.

I’m sorry, but this Matt Lewis guy sounds like a No Labels Moderate to me. If you can’t say Obama is a socialist, you got some issues with intellectual honesty.

Dr. Tesla on February 13, 2012 at 3:19 AM

canopfor on February 12, 2012 at 5:48 PM

Maybe Greece is on to somethin. Retire the National Debt by burning down the house and collecting the insurance money.

I believe that we Southerners have a quaint expression for such nefarious activity: “Sellin it to the Yankees . . .”.

BigAlSouth on February 13, 2012 at 6:42 AM

Congratulations to Daily Caller‘s Matt Lewis.

It’s a just award! And I like Daily Caller.

Lourdes on February 13, 2012 at 7:19 AM

I haven’t blogged in over a year, but I did blog for 5 years. No ad space or tip jars. I don’t have any issues with people being compensated for their work, but I don’t think those are bloggers either. A tip jar for the record is not the same as renumeration, neither are ad banners. Being paid by a person, an entity or a corporation ect who is paying specifically for what you are writing is a whole different ballgame. You have an authority overseeing you.

saus on February 12, 2012 at 9:57 PM

You’re right — I agree.

Blogging actually means a personal weblog. Some individual writing whatever the heck they want to on their own site, meaning, a site they control.

I don’t care for the Donations/tipjar thing, either, in the context of blogging — it is a bit of a contradiction to the blogging genre, though I understand why some people engage in it (if you can garner some money from blogging from readers of your site, go ahead and do so).

The advertising on sites pronounces them “not blogs” in my view, but, err, websites of a not-blogging nature.

Lourdes on February 13, 2012 at 7:23 AM

ALSO, the whole “blogging” and “blogs” permutation of a website began when most people had those “free” hosting accounts available to them. So there was no personal expenditure to “blog” involved, other than time and labor to type and send: someone else footed the costs, managed the publishing, provided the tools with exception of a user’s computer and internet connection.

Once people began to see the liabilities of those “free” hosting accounts and that online software that failed all too often, they moved on to their own hosted accounts and developed all the rest for themselves. Therein the costs were apparent and thus, the tipjar method became popular.

But as to blogging, the actual effort means, in a literal sense, an individual journal or “weblog” — personal journal available online. Then the group blogs began, then the for-profit blogs followed, thus actually contradicting that they were “blogs” at all.

Lourdes on February 13, 2012 at 7:28 AM

I would suggest that the medium has changed over time. No longer are bloggers synonymous with “pajama clad geeks dwelling in their mother’s basement with a laptop” and with that change you are going to have a different kind of blog site and a different kind of blogger.

Happy Nomad on February 13, 2012 at 8:00 AM

And in other news, Hot Airs wins blog of the year so I am trying to figure out what you are talking about,

LINKY GOODNESS

MunDane68 on February 13, 2012 at 8:49 AM

“Hot Airs”? sigh…

MunDane68 on February 13, 2012 at 8:49 AM