Yesterday was the 39th anniversary of Roe v Wade.  Tomorrow is President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address, but it’s also an anniversary of sorts, too.  It will be 1000 days since the last time the Senate passed a full budget, and what better way to commemorate it than with a couple of videos?  Speaker John Boehner’s office and the GOP have this movie-trailer style video, with a warning that the film and subject matter has been rated AA+ … by Standard & Poors:

A thousand days seems like an awfully long time, doesn’t it? The conservative activist group ForAmerica reminds us just how much has transpired in that time, while Senate Democrats failed at their core responsibility to produce a full budget for the federal government:

Wait a minute — Brett Favre retired? And stayed retired?  A thousand days ago, if you told me that Favre could successfully stay retired before Senate Democrats successfully produced a full budget, I’d have laughed out loud.  These days, the joke is on us.

Update (Tina): In a statement, House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan and Senate Budget Committee Ranking Member Jeff Sessions contrast the failure of the Senate to act with the House’s prioritization of the passage of a budget. They also pressure the president to address the lack of action of his own party in the State of the Union address tomorrow:

Senate Democrats abandoned their official duty to prioritize Americans’ hard-earned tax dollars and tackle our nation’s most pressing economic challenges—dealing a painful blow to fiscal progress that may be felt for some time.

This contrasts sharply with the record of the House Republicans. Last spring, the new House Majority publicly produced a budget plan before the nation, brought it forward in committee, and passed it on the floor. The budget’s principled solutions honestly confront our nation’s most difficult challenges, putting the budget on a path to balance and the country on a path to prosperity.

The president and his party’s leaders have yet to detail a credible budget plan to prevent the fiscal crisis that awaits us should we continue down the current path to debt, doubt, and decline. Such a crisis would threaten the economic security, health security, and retirement security of every American. If the president wishes to begin a genuine dialogue with the American people in tomorrow’s State of the Union address, then he must hold his own party accountable for its dogged refusal to produce a plan to prevent this crisis and lift this cloud of uncertainty from the economy. The president must also deliver what he has so far refused: serious reforms to change our debt course and prevent fiscal disaster.