Poll: 43% think God is helping Tebow succeed

posted at 8:47 pm on January 13, 2012 by Allahpundit

The media’s treating this as a poll on whether people think God is helping Tebow to win, but the way the actual question was phrased is subtly different. Direct quote: “Do you believe that any of Tim Tebow’s success can be attributed to divine intervention?” (Emphasis mine.) Correct me if I’m wrong, but that’s a much easier question for a believer, no? Everyone’s “success” is, supposedly, attributable to providence to some degree. God gives you certain talents, you put them to use, you make something of yourself, voila, you’ve succeeded — even if you don’t win the Super Bowl. Which is not to say there aren’t Christians out there who think God’s actually picking favorites on Sunday afternoon. Said one Colorado pastor to TMZ last month, “It’s not luck. Luck isn’t winning 6 games in a row. It’s favor. God’s favor.” That was published on December 15; the Broncos lost three in a row starting the following Sunday.

Could there be a partisan divide on this question? There’s a partisan divide on everything, my friends:

Among the 70% of Americans who say they know of Tebow’s success, here’s how people by political affiliation responded to this question: “Do believe that any of Tim Tebow’s success can be attributed to Divine Intervention?”

– Republicans: 54% yes, 32% no, and 14% no opinion.

– Democrats: 38% yes, 48% no, 14% no opinion.

– Independents: 35% yes, 49% no, 16% no opinion.

Interesting that independents are even less likely than Democrats to say yes. Incidentally, Tebow himself apparently does not pray for victory. No one knows for sure except him, but when he was mic’d up for the Bears game in December, this is what he said:

“Lord put a wall of protection around me and my teammates today, and we go out there and we can honor you with everything we do and say. I love you in Jesus’ name.”

And later in the game:

“Dear Jesus, I need you. Please come through for me. No matter what happens, win or lose, give me the strength to honor you.”

As Deadspin noted at the time, those are poignant sentiments coming from a QB whose career isn’t likely to last long due to all the hits he takes while scrambling. Hopefully he’ll endure, but if not, I know what he can fall back on. How about national chairman of the Make-a-Wish Foundation? Rick Reilly:

Every week, Tebow picks out someone who is suffering, or who is dying, or who is injured, flies them and their families to the Broncos game, rents them a car, puts them up in a nice hotel, buys them dinner (usually at a Dave and Buster’s), gets them and their families pregame passes, visits with them just before kickoff (!), gets them 30-yard line tickets down low, visits with them after the game (sometimes for an hour), has them walk him to his car, and sends them off with a basket of gifts…

Take 9-year-old Zac Taylor, a child who lives in constant pain. Immediately after Tebow shocked the Chicago Bears with a 13-10 comeback win, Tebow spent an hour with Zac and his family. At one point, Zac, who has 10 doctors, asked Tebow if he has a secret prayer for hospital visits. Tebow whispered it in his ear. And since Tebow still needed to be checked out by the Broncos’ team doctor, he took Zac in with him, but only after they’d whispered it together…

Isn’t that a huge distraction?

“Just the opposite,” Tebow says. “It’s by far the best thing I do to get myself ready. Here you are, about to play a game that the world says is the most important thing in the world. Win and they praise you. Lose and they crush you. And here I have a chance to talk to the coolest, most courageous people. It puts it all into perspective. The game doesn’t really matter. I mean, I’ll give 100 percent of my heart to win it, but in the end, the thing I most want to do is not win championships or make a lot of money, it’s to invest in people’s lives, to make a difference.”

If Make-a-Wish doesn’t work out, there’s always politics: His favorable rating among Republicans in South Carolina per PPP’s new poll is 76/7, which is nearly 20 points better than Romney’s. Tebow 2024?

Via the Daily Caller, here’s Krauthammer et al. previewing tomorrow night’s battle of good and evil on the fields of Megiddo in New England. I don’t know how anyone can root against this guy.


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joy to Tebow’s life will not have changed. Can his critics say the same?

HatfieldMcCoy on January 13, 2012 at 10:16 PM
From their tone I really doubt some of the critics on this thread have much joy.

CW on January 13, 2012 at 10:23 PM

And when their life is over…what will they have?

KOOLAID2 on January 13, 2012 at 10:43 PM

Strong believer here, but somehow I doubt God gets into the weeds of a football game or, for that matter, a major war. He does get into the heart business, hence the creation of a nation based on God-given natural rights, about which you know the rest.

At the same time great strength, against the odds, has been seen the world over among believers in God, their strength coming from Him, as they believe it does. Does that prove God was on their side in some way in some conflict or challenge? Of course not. It only proves that they were on God’s side and that their belief in Him gave them some extra strength or motivation.

It’s not about the water but the fountain.

TXUS on January 13, 2012 at 10:45 PM

If you’ve seen him work out (YouTube the ESPN “The Chosen One” or something like that) he’s as tough as nails. I bet he’s Crossfit. If he says so, it will grow even bigger than it is.

I rarely go, but the challenge is great and months later you can accomplish what you’d think impossible. Check out the ESPN CrossFit competitions. I will ask my FIL to take the wheel of one of his largest John Deer tractors and have Mr. PPF flip it-or push an SUV (sometimes while the dude has the foot on the pedal ?!!?!??!). Brass ballz.

I wish there was an NFL CrossFit competition via ESPN and watch them have at it. Hawaii-pfft.

ProudPalinFan on January 13, 2012 at 10:47 PM

Why is this so hard to believe? There are people succeeding in different aspects of their lives all of the world because they are putting God first. Why is it so unbelievable just because it’s sports?

Some people used to think America succeeded because we put God first. Obviously, we don’t do that anymore and we’re not really succeeding much anymore are we.

Anyone remember the movie Chariots of Fire? That was another man who put God first in sports.

The tragic thing is, there are a lot of people out there who can’t wait to see him fall on his face. Just because.. he’s putting God first.

JellyToast on January 13, 2012 at 11:16 PM

Does that prove God was on their side in some way in some conflict or challenge? Of course not. It only proves that they were on God’s side and that their belief in Him gave them some extra strength or motivation.

It’s not about the water but the fountain.

TXUS on January 13, 2012 at 10:45 PM

Amen and well said!

4Grace on January 13, 2012 at 11:16 PM

It really isn’t about the game of itself. It’s about displaying Jesus to the world, win or lose, and Tebow is doing that.

Honestly, I think things like this used to be a bit more common around the nation. In small towns and communities and sometimes in national arenas. We just aren’t as used to seeing it today.

JellyToast on January 13, 2012 at 11:23 PM

The tragic thing is, there are a lot of people out there who can’t wait to see him fall on his face. Just because.. he’s putting God first.

JellyToast on January 13, 2012 at 11:16 PM

I’ve never heard that put better.

Axe on January 13, 2012 at 11:32 PM

you religious football nuts are delusional.

nice_poltergeist on January 13, 2012 at 11:14 PM

From their tone I really doubt some of the critics on this thread have much joy.

CW on January 13, 2012 at 10:23 PM

CW on January 13, 2012 at 11:38 PM

CW on January 13, 2012 at 11:38 PM

Exactly, CW. They chase temporary happiness, which is so very different than true joy.

4Grace on January 13, 2012 at 11:49 PM

nice_poltergeist on January 13, 2012 at 11:14 PM

Careful how you use the most powerful name that exists.

listens2glenn on January 13, 2012 at 11:51 PM

Interestingly, the young Mr Tebow is not popular at all as another struggling NFL quarterback.

You have to add to that his sincere beyond any doubt faith in a Jewish prophet that he publicly honors, and then suddenly nobody can take their eyes off the kid.

His disciples once asked that prophet about the events of last days and His reply written in Luke 21: 12-15 was .”…you will be brought before kings and governors and all on account of my name. And so you will bear testimony to me…”

The entire world’s TV networks are now putting the young Mr Tebow in front of all on account of His name, where we see Tebow bears testimony to that prophet.

jimw on January 13, 2012 at 11:53 PM

I know God follows female beach volleyball in which case we all win

ronsfi on January 13, 2012 at 11:56 PM

TXUS on January 13, 2012 at 10:45 PM

At the same time great strength, against the odds, has been seen the world over among believers in God, their strength coming from Him, as they believe it does. Does that prove God was on their side in some way in some conflict or challenge? Of course not. It only proves that they were on God’s side and that their belief in Him gave them some extra strength or motivation.

It’s not about the water but the fountain

I may not be the first to thank you for this post..but I thank you all the same…God Bless!

ccrosby on January 14, 2012 at 12:00 AM

The tragic thing is, there are a lot of people out there who can’t wait to see him fall on his face. Just because.. he’s putting God first.
JellyToast on January 13, 2012 at 11:16 PM

I’ve never heard that put better.
Axe on January 13, 2012 at 11:32 PM

Tim Tebow is just a physical manifestation of who they’re really angry with.
They need a visible target to “vent” upon, so they attack a person they can see, who represents the God they can’t see.

listens2glenn on January 14, 2012 at 12:00 AM

I know God follows female beach volleyball in which case we all win

ronsfi on January 13, 2012 at 11:56 PM

: O

listens2glenn on January 14, 2012 at 12:02 AM

listens2glenn on January 13, 2012 at 9:20 PM

And I predict that Tebow will bring more people closer to God. That is the real fear of these haters.

CW on January 13, 2012 at 9:23 PM

You are, of course, exactly right.

I’ll confess that my 9:20 PM post was a deliberate attempt on my part to provoke a reaction.
But they were too smart for me, and didn’t take the bait.
Ding dang darn drat dang . . . . .

listens2glenn on January 14, 2012 at 12:10 AM

It all depends on the meaning of “success”.

unclesmrgol on January 14, 2012 at 12:12 AM

Once again a clip from the late 2011 Obit of longtime New Orleans Archbishop Phillip Hannan.

What did he discover about New Orleans?

“As a religion,” said the Archbishop, “I learned football ranked just behind Catholicism.”

When Hannan saw the size of the headline on Page 1 of The Times-Picayune on Nov. 1, 1966 — “N.O. GOES PRO” — he wondered if World War III had been declared.

It was All-Saints Day. The city had been awarded an NFL franchise, and Gov. John McKeithen would shortly be asking the Archbishop his view on calling the team “Saints.”

Question: “Would that be sacrilegious?”

Reply: “I told the governor I’d have no objection. But I also reminded him, from the viewpoint of the Church, most of the Saints were martyrs.”

For quite some time, so were the expansion Saints.

No NFL team ever received a more religious sendoff and responded with a longer period of drought and famine.

“God, we ask your blessing upon all who participate in this event and all who have supported our Saints.”

Those were Archbishop Hannan’s opening words to a crowd of more than 80,000 in Tulane Stadium before the Los Angeles Rams kicked off to the Saints on the opening day of the 1967 season.

He went on: “Grant our Saints an increase of faith and strength so that they will not only overcome the Lions but also the Bears, Rams, Giants, and even those awesome people in Green Bay. May they continue to tame the Redskins, and fetter the Falcons and the Eagles. Give our owners and coaches the continued ability to be as wise as serpents and simple as doves, so that no good talent will dodge our draft. Grant to our fans perseverance in their devotion and unlimited lung power tempered with a sense of charity to all, including the referees. May the ‘Saints Come Marching In’ be a victory march for all, now and in eternity.”

After John Gilliam returned the opening kickoff 94 yards, Archbishop Hannan was comparing it to “Charlton Heston parting the Red Sea.”

After the Rams came back to hand the Saints the first of 11 defeats that season, quarterback Billy Kilmer said, “Prayers are great, but you also need players.”

Let the record show Archbishop Hannan never stopped offering special prayers for Geaux Saints Touchdowns.

At a game-day mass before Super Bowl XLIV on Feb. 7, 2010, the word was in Las Vegas: Never bet against the prayers of a 96-year-old archbishop.

Prayers (and players) answered with a final score of 31-17.

Del Dolemonte on January 14, 2012 at 12:13 AM

You’re most likely right about the fate of the Broncos against the Pats, but no one thought the Saints would lose to Seattle either:

Funny how that game worked out.

Rovin on January 13, 2012 at 9:57 PM

Fair enough. Better team doesn’t always win. Hasselback’s still half the quarterback that Brees is.

…and yet… he’s still twice the quarterback that Tebow is. :)

Arnold Yabenson on January 14, 2012 at 12:13 AM

Ding dang darn drat dang . . . . .

listens2glenn on January 14, 2012 at 12:10 AM

Went back and read it. To put this in my words and not yours, you put your smart-assery under too many reasonable things. :) I didn’t even notice your last line when I read it the first time, all I saw was:

I predict that a Denver loss will not alter Tim’s relationship with God, one iota. I also predict that a Denver loss will not alter the ‘absence of a relationship’ between either one of you and God, one iota.

After that, your goad was just a little rim-shot. I probably wouldn’t have answered you even if it were about me.

Could do worse though l2g, then to be accidentally too profound to get a rise :)

Axe on January 14, 2012 at 12:20 AM

If God wanted to show he exists to as many non God fearing people as he could, what might he (more accurately it but I digress) do? Might he use a willing vessel to do something completely improbable in such a way that those who did not believe might begin to?

airmonkey on January 13, 2012 at 10:02 PM

In all sincerity, why not simply go the giant magic carpet route, and descend into the middle of Time Square, radiating unbearable light in all directions? For good measure, He could preceed it with a blast email to all the major media outlets so that the event could be beamed to the world’s 6 billion or so people to witness.

I’ve never understood why an omnipotent god would choose to be so coy.

Arnold Yabenson on January 14, 2012 at 12:23 AM

I think that’s part of what drives all the anti-Tebow crowd crazy. They don’t understand that it’s not about football and/or who is the better qb. It is about this young man who remains remarkably unaffected by the fame and attention. He is living his life for a higher cause. He is in this world, but not OF this world. In everyday word and deed he impresses both the believer and many non-believers.

His goal is to glorify God. If the venue he uses is football, that’s awesome. I suspect that many non-believers will be pulling for the guy tomorrow. I will not pray for Denver to win the game (though I hope they do pull off the upset), but I will pray for hearts to be softened as a great example of a young brother in Christ takes the field.

4Grace on January 14, 2012 at 12:29 AM

As an atheist, I certainly don’t believe that God is picking him to win football games. However, I do believe that Tebow gets his strength and focus from his belief in God and Jesus and that’s just fine. It’s good to see such a good man using his fame and money for the force of good, rather than for bling, partying, and Cadillac Escalades. It’s good to see someone with such sincere convictions. He’s happy and positive and brings that out in others.

There’s just something about him that brings out the best in his teammates. It’s also made this football season a lot of fun to watch. My family have always been big Broncos fans, but I haven’t watched since the John Elway days, I just have better things to do with my time. But I started watching when Tebow took over at QB and it’s been a blast. My husband has been over the moon with excitement, I’m so glad he and our youngest son were able to go to the game last weekend. They said that it was incredible.

We all look forward to the game tomorrow night. Go Tebow!!

Common Sense on January 14, 2012 at 12:33 AM

In all sincerity, why not simply go the giant magic carpet route, and descend into the middle of Time Square, radiating unbearable light in all directions? For good measure, He could preceed it with a blast email to all the major media outlets so that the event could be beamed to the world’s 6 billion or so people to witness.
I’ve never understood why an omnipotent god would choose to be so coy.
Arnold Yabenson on January 14, 2012 at 12:23 AM

And heal all the amputees and cripples etc on his way down too…

kastor on January 14, 2012 at 12:43 AM

I’ve never understood why an omnipotent god would choose to be so coy.

Arnold Yabenson on January 14, 2012 at 12:23 AM

Would you believe he was God? If that happened? I would think alien invasion. And then, if he was very clear about the fact that he was God, I’d think the aliens were looking for absolute control.

Or try this:

“. . . and then to stagger you a little, make you understand, as much as you were ever going to, I wrapped the — what did you call it? ‘universe’ or something? — around you, so there could be no doubt. So what happened? I was everywhere!

“I figured it was just sort of … there.”

“What?”

:) You and I will just chase each other’s tails over this if we tried to walk it, Arnold Yabenson. Been there, you probably have too. I appreciate your courtesy, though.

Axe on January 14, 2012 at 12:49 AM

As a long-suffering Cowboys fan, I’m glad to have another team to root for this year!

4Grace on January 14, 2012 at 12:53 AM

Would you believe he was God? If that happened?

It’d be more convincing than Tebow’s play at quarterback. ;)

Or try this:

“. . . and then to stagger you a little, make you understand, as much as you were ever going to, I wrapped the — what did you call it? ‘universe’ or something? — around you, so there could be no doubt. So what happened? I was everywhere!”

“I figured it was just sort of … there.”

“What?”

:) You and I will just chase each other’s tails over this if we tried to walk it, Arnold Yabenson. Been there, you probably have too. I appreciate your courtesy, though.

Axe on January 14, 2012 at 12:49 AM

:)

The mysteries of the world and universe are mind-blowing. I’m a seeker. I find no conceit in having no particular faith. There is an objective truth, and I continue to seek an understanding of what it is to the best of my limited cognitive abilities. Science has answered some questions, but even the brightest astrophysicists can only speculate at what preceded the singularity, or if “preceded” even has any meaning in that discussion. Was/Is it God? Something else?

I don’t know, and the answers presented by the various religions to which I’ve been exposed haven’t been persuasive to me. Certainly something is all around me… and inside me for that matter. I haven’t found (and may never find) a convincing definition for what that is (beyond the physical descriptions of atoms, galaxies and fingernails).

Cheers.

Arnold Yabenson on January 14, 2012 at 1:56 AM

It’d be more convincing than Tebow’s play at quarterback. ;)

Arnold Yabenson on January 14, 2012 at 1:56 AM

:) Laughed out loud at that.

There is an objective truth, and I continue to seek an understanding of what it is to the best of my limited cognitive abilities.

And with you here, as well as in other thoughts.

My very best.

Axe on January 14, 2012 at 2:06 AM

In all sincerity, why not simply go the giant magic carpet route, and descend into the middle of Time Square, radiating unbearable light in all directions? For good measure, He could preceed it with a blast email to all the major media outlets so that the event could be beamed to the world’s 6 billion or so people to witness.

I’ve never understood why an omnipotent god would choose to be so coy.

Arnold Yabenson on January 14, 2012 at 12:23 AM

Because then you wouldn’t have a choice. That is not to say that God doesn’t reveal himself to people, he has and does, but not usually in the way we think he should. The Jews missed Jesus because they were waiting for the messiah to come take out all of their enemies (mainly Rome). Instead, Jesus came in a humble form. He lived a carpenter’s life and died among criminals.

That answer is rather poor because it leaves a lot of holes to the full answer (it is over simplified). It would take a bit longer (and a “brief” walk through the Bible) to fully explain it. If you were seriously asking though, there is a place to start. You can either delve further or plug your ears, close your mind, and reject the premise based on the little information you’ve been given.

Pattosensei on January 14, 2012 at 2:17 AM

The glass half way to look at this nonsense is that 57% of the population probably aren’t paste eating, drooling, idiot mouth breathers with a brother and sister for parents, you know the religious. Still, unfortunately, there are 43% of people outthere that are breathtakingly stupid with this “god” imbecility. Grow up you cowards and stop believing in imaginary sky friends that have super power. “god” and his make believe gay kid the Jesus(When he moved to Hollywood he had to go door to door to tell everyone he was a pederast.) DON’T EXIST you fools.

Your Mamma loves me on January 14, 2012 at 2:25 AM

Your Mamma loves me on January 14, 2012 at 2:25 AM

Such a hateful post.. Remind me again why I am suppose to believe that all atheists have morals that aren’t selective?

melle1228 on January 14, 2012 at 3:29 AM

with a brother and sister for parents

Your Mamma loves me on January 14, 2012 at 2:25 AM

… what?

Axe on January 14, 2012 at 3:35 AM

I suppose it’s quite possible.

DarkCurrent on January 14, 2012 at 3:45 AM

Perhaps God created the universe just so there might be football games and He would be entertained. Perhaps that was the purpose all along.

DarkCurrent on January 14, 2012 at 3:51 AM

DarkCurrent on January 14, 2012 at 3:51 AM

Aside: Thank you for the link the other day. You may not remember. It was to contemplative music meant to usher one along the path of enlightenment. Though the poke was well taken — and thank you for that — I actually enjoyed it. :)

lol … got it bookmarked.

Axe on January 14, 2012 at 3:57 AM

Your Mamma loves me on January 14, 2012 at 2:25 AM

keep shaking that tiny fist bro!

tom daschle concerned on January 14, 2012 at 4:04 AM

lol … got it bookmarked.

Axe on January 14, 2012 at 3:57 AM

I’m glad you enjoyed it. I hope you’ll enjoy this too.

DarkCurrent on January 14, 2012 at 4:20 AM

I’ve never understood why an omnipotent god would choose to be so coy.
Arnold Yabenson on January 14, 2012 at 12:23 AM

Why wouldn’t he?

tommyboy on January 14, 2012 at 4:25 AM

Y’all can argue the silly theological stuff. I think Tebow’s a lot of fun to watch. The kid isn’t the awesomest talent in the league but he knows how to win. He’s a competitor and performs best when it counts.

I like good D (go Ravens and Niners!) more then O in football, but the NE game should be fun. NE has no D and should give TT a lot of opportunity to show his stuff.

As for his sideline prayer thingy, good for him. His TD dance adds fun to the game as well, whether one admires it or laughs at it.

MJBrutus on January 14, 2012 at 6:15 AM

The mysteries of the world and universe are mind-blowing. I’m a seeker. I find no conceit in having no particular faith. There is an objective truth, and I continue to seek an understanding of what it is to the best of my limited cognitive abilities. Science has answered some questions, but even the brightest astrophysicists can only speculate at what preceded the singularity, or if “preceded” even has any meaning in that discussion. Was/Is it God? Something else?
I don’t know, and the answers presented by the various religions to which I’ve been exposed haven’t been persuasive to me. Certainly something is all around me… and inside me for that matter. I haven’t found (and may never find) a convincing definition for what that is (beyond the physical descriptions of atoms, galaxies and fingernails).
Cheers.
Arnold Yabenson on January 14, 2012 at 1:56 AM

Like you said, science has answered some questions and over time will answer more. Current religious/spiritual beliefs have answered nothing (filling in unknown gaps with “god/gods” is not answering the question).

If our entire recorded history and all technology were all wiped out today and humans had to start over, we would still be able to recreate all the math and science we know but not a single religion would continue on or be recreated as we now know it. .

kastor on January 14, 2012 at 6:48 AM

MA is a wacky state…

MA Witches are gathering to end Tim Tebows season

catquilt on January 14, 2012 at 7:05 AM

kastor on January 14, 2012 at 6:48 AM

Well put. Or as I like to say, we’re all born atheists. The first time we fall we discover physics for ourselves, but we have to be taught religion.

MJBrutus on January 14, 2012 at 7:21 AM

catquilt on January 14, 2012 at 7:05 AM

And if that doesn’t work, they’ll burn him at the stake :-)

MJBrutus on January 14, 2012 at 7:29 AM

MJBrutus on January 14, 2012 at 7:29 AM

How ironic! :-)

catquilt on January 14, 2012 at 7:35 AM

GOD WILL HELP PERRY

The latest “Perry Woman” video ABSOLUTELY OUTSTANDING
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mt7c4mQbaZ4

nancysabet on January 14, 2012 at 8:50 AM

nancysabet on January 14, 2012 at 8:50 AM

Now I ain’t much of a hand in the theology department, so I’m relying on your help here. I’ve learned now that this god critter is good at fixing football games. Does he fix elections too? If Romney wins does that mean god’s a Mormon?

MJBrutus on January 14, 2012 at 9:28 AM

Current religious/spiritual beliefs have answered nothing (filling in unknown gaps with “god/gods” is not answering the question).

Science can never discern a universal from the particulars. Only the God of the bible can do so. Kant’s catagorical imperative is a tacit admission to this as the existentialists so vocally pointed out.

tommyboy on January 14, 2012 at 9:32 AM

If Romney wins does that mean god’s a Mormon?
MJBrutus on January 14, 2012 at 9:28 AM

No, it would mean that God has given us over.

tommyboy on January 14, 2012 at 9:43 AM

tommyboy on January 14, 2012 at 9:43 AM

Thanks. I find these deep, mystifying religious ideas so confusing. So then god’s a real jerk if he makes Romney win, right? Are you a Broncos’ fan? Just wondering because if TT loses too, you’ll have all kinds of reason to pissed off at that god dude.

MJBrutus on January 14, 2012 at 9:47 AM

This thread has taken a turn toward the dark side. The bitterness and anger over that which one does not believe seems out of place in this community.

The original question was,

“Do you believe that any of Tim Tebow’s success can be attributed to divine intervention?”

Read this thread article from ESPN to understand how Tebow defines success.

Tebow has been criticized for his faith in the midst of winning football games, yet quietly lives for others, as he has been doing for much of his life.

For people of faith, it is not surprising that God works through professional football. However, to understand divine intervention as either focused on, or limited to, wins and losses shows a lack of understanding of God, his character, and his ways.

STL_Vet on January 14, 2012 at 9:48 AM

Thanks. I find these deep, mystifying religious ideas so confusing.
MJBrutus on January 14, 2012 at 9:47 AM

Obviously

tommyboy on January 14, 2012 at 9:51 AM

tommyboy on January 14, 2012 at 9:51 AM

What are you aimin’ to do to the little feller if he chooses the wrong guy?

MJBrutus on January 14, 2012 at 9:55 AM

The glass half way to look at this nonsense is that 57% of the population probably aren’t paste eating, drooling, idiot mouth breathers with a brother and sister for parents, you know the religious. Still, unfortunately, there are 43% of people outthere that are breathtakingly stupid with this “god” imbecility. Grow up you cowards and stop believing in imaginary sky friends that have super power. “god” and his make believe gay kid the Jesus(When he moved to Hollywood he had to go door to door to tell everyone he was a pederast.) DON’T EXIST you fools.

Your Mamma loves me on January 14, 2012 at 2:25 AM

Are happy now, AllahPundit? Is this the kind of comment you’re looking for everytime you post one of these articles? What profound emptiness do atheists have that causes them to spend so much time obsessing about a subject that – by their own insistence – is not their concern?

The reality here is that there’s nothing that Tebow does with regards to his faith during a game that is new or unique. Players have been pointing skyward and taking a knee after touchdowns for a long, long time. They have been referencing God when they accept awards for a long, long time. But many of them are black and so the cowardly douchebags on the Left won’t say a word about it. But, of course, Tebow is fair game. The point being that if Tebow is “offensive” or “ridiculous” for what he does then so are all the other players who do the same thing, and have been for a long time. And if you’re going to continually focus on it then have the intellectual honesty to admit that Tebow is not unique in this and therefore doesn’t deserve to be singled out.

cicerone on January 14, 2012 at 9:58 AM

I’m not aiming to do anything to anybody

tommyboy on January 14, 2012 at 9:58 AM

So what this basically says is that 43% of Americans are dangerous. They believe that a god is intervening in football games. FOOTBALL GAMES. While people starve all over the world, and die of horrible diseases, a god is concentrating on one guy throwing a pass. Or, as in the movie “Angels in the Outfield”, moving the foul pole to allow a foul ball to be a home run. This is the height of delusional.
Instead of a guiding hand moving foul poles, how about this for a reason; Tebow is a leader. He steps into that huddle and says, “OK boys, we’re winning this game.” And they believe him. All that man needs is for something to be shown to him once for it to attach itself to him, and that first come from behind win, combined with Tebow’s personality and ability to inspire, has gotten it done.

libertarianlunatic on January 14, 2012 at 10:19 AM

This is the height of delusional.

Why?

tommyboy on January 14, 2012 at 10:22 AM

Put me in the Atheists For Tebow camp. It’s impossible not to like a guy who seems so selfless.

flipflop on January 14, 2012 at 10:27 AM

Since we have plenty of time before the games, I have an off topic question for my hot gas brethern. Has anyone heard of an HBO series called “Boardwalk Empire”? A couple people have told me it’s really good and season one just came out on DVD. It is worth checking out?

tommyboy on January 14, 2012 at 11:20 AM

a god is concentrating on one guy throwing a pass.v

libertarianlunatic on January 14, 2012 at 10:19 AM

I don’t think God is intervening and I suspect most people who answered to the positive simply think that God plays a role in Tebow’s life. As I stated earlier I would have answered yes just to yank your chain. I am sure there were a few of those too.

Oh and IF God were to take a direct part in a football game what makes you think he could not do many many things at once. I have to say I get a kick out of such simplistic think even though you and I agree that God does not decide what happens in a football game.

CW on January 14, 2012 at 11:40 AM

*think-ing

CW on January 14, 2012 at 11:44 AM

So what this basically says is that 43% of Americans are dangerous. They believe that a god is intervening in football games. FOOTBALL GAMES. While people starve all over the world, and die of horrible diseases, a god is concentrating on one guy throwing a pass. Or, as in the movie “Angels in the Outfield”, moving the foul pole to allow a foul ball to be a home run. This is the height of delusional.
Instead of a guiding hand moving foul poles, how about this for a reason; Tebow is a leader. He steps into that huddle and says, “OK boys, we’re winning this game.” And they believe him. All that man needs is for something to be shown to him once for it to attach itself to him, and that first come from behind win, combined with Tebow’s personality and ability to inspire, has gotten it done.

libertarianlunatic on January 14, 2012 at 10:19 AM

this^

it’s not to say tebow isn’t a good guy, but there are plenty of people who are good people who do good things and get rewarded for it in their own way, yet are atheiest or of a different religion. to believe that god/gods has a hand in anything anyone does at any given time is a ridiculous notion.

kastor on January 14, 2012 at 11:46 AM

to believe that god/gods has a hand in anything anyone does at any given time is a ridiculous notion.

kastor on January 14, 2012 at 11:46 AM

And just as ridiculous to think that one’s belief in God has nothing to do with their success or actions.

CW on January 14, 2012 at 11:47 AM

Jesus wears a football helmet.

Please. People are reading too much into this. I’m sure this thread will garner some traffic for Hot Air, but please please please stop with the Tebowmania (as much as I want the Broncos to bury the whoever it is they’re playing against).

=P

Ugly on January 14, 2012 at 12:06 PM

43% of those polled are hopelessly superstitious. Religion is ancient thought that projects human characteristics onto mythical beings which people then turn around and worship for their own selfish benefit. I am always tickled when Christians criticize Islam or Mormonism when their own Bible is nothing more than fiction and fables cobbled together by a ruling elite to control, exploit and oppress the masses. Promise people everlasting life and they will fall for ANYTHING, and criticize all those who don’t fall dutifully in line.

Bandit13 on January 14, 2012 at 12:29 PM

And just as ridiculous to think that one’s belief in God has nothing to do with their success or actions.

CW on January 14, 2012 at 11:47 AM

And just as ridiculous to think that one’s belief in god has nothing to do with their failures or shortcomings.

if you think god has something to do with your success, then he also has something to do with your shortcomings. except when it’s a positive thing, it’s “praise god” and when it’s something bad, it’s “god was meant to teach you a lesson… of some kind.”

so when tebow loses tonight, he’ll learn a serious lesson: you can’t play with the big boys.

kastor on January 14, 2012 at 12:54 PM

God doesn’t interfere in football games.

Karmashock on January 14, 2012 at 1:20 PM

As a long-suffering Cowboys fan, I’m glad to have another team to root for this year!

4Grace on January 14, 2012 at 12:53 AM

I was going to ask “How long?” — but then realized that all of us Cowboy fans have been suffering for the same length of time. Sure am glad to have Dez Bryant though. And whatever they’re paying DeMarcus Ware, it’s not enough.

I don’t think it’s a stretch for most evangelical Christians to say, “Of course God helps Tim Tebow play football. God’s not out to ‘make’ one team win over another. The Tebow-football question is kind of a metaphor for life. God’s great project isn’t our football team, our company, or our nation — it’s each of us, as an individual.”

J.E. Dyer on January 14, 2012 at 4:16 PM

kastor on January 14, 2012 at 12:54 PM

———————–
I know the faith of other’s scares you. Don’t worry it will be okay.

-

As usual dimwit you did not read every word of my post. Actions.

CW on January 14, 2012 at 4:50 PM

Atheists are sad clowns who try to fill the void in them with bitterness and envy of those who aren’t as lacking. I suspect that all the snarky comments and childish pranks designed to do nothing more than irritate their fellow citizens who have faith and respect just doesn’t quite fill the void. Isn’t that right, atheists? Setting up strawmen and then attacking them is a poor substitute for the intellectual honesty that is required for this kind of discussion. So when you’re ready to be real and not caricatures let somebody know.

cicerone on January 14, 2012 at 7:07 PM

Jesus wears a football helmet.

Please. People are reading too much into this. I’m sure this thread will garner some traffic for Hot Air, but please please please stop with the Tebowmania (as much as I want the Broncos to bury the whoever it is they’re playing against).

=P

Ugly on January 14, 2012 at 12:06 PM

The reality is that almost all of these threads, both on Hot Gas and elsewhere are started by atheists or other sad clowns who are critical of Tebow. Neither Tebow nor people who appreciate him or share his beliefs start these discussions. We are secure enough to not need the constant attention. Apparently the same can’t be said of atheists and other haters who have an itch that can’t be scratched. Christopher Hitchens knows the truth now. He may even be at peace.

cicerone on January 14, 2012 at 7:12 PM

kastor on January 14, 2012 at 12:54 PM
———————–
I know the faith of other’s scares you. Don’t worry it will be okay.
-
As usual dimwit you did not read every word of my post. Actions.
CW on January 14, 2012 at 4:50 PM

You crazy faith people do scare me. I prefer reality, which tebow just experienced.

kastor on January 15, 2012 at 12:12 AM

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