Good going, GOP House: Thanks for increasing the debt by $1 trillion in 10 months

posted at 6:35 pm on January 11, 2012 by Tina Korbe

Yesterday, as the New Hampshire returns rolled in, I tweeted wearily, “I’d hoped for something different.” The incomparable Stephen Kruiser tweeted back, “You’re young. Get used to saying that if you plan on staying in the GOP.”

That wisdom returned to me this morning when I read this from CNSNews.com:

When the Republican-controlled House approved its first CR on March 4, 2011, the national debt was 14,182,627,184,881.03, according to the U.S. Treasury. As of the close of business on Jan. 9, 2012, the national debt was 15,236,506,139,986.86.

That means the debt increased by $1.05 trillion over the past ten months.

That equals approximately $8,964 for each of the 117,572,000 American households estimated by the Census Bureau.

At the current rate, the Republican-controlled House is agreeing to allow the U.S. Treasury to borrow approximately an additional $896 per month in the name of each American household.

Already, I can hear the excuses, starting with, “We’re just one-half of one-third of the government; what did you expect us to do?” Yes, but take away excuses and all that’s left are results. Complacency is not the way to change the status quo, as John Hawkins reminds us:

If you want to see a great example of how weak kneed much of the conservative movement has become, look back to the Bush years when the GOP controlled the House, the Senate, and the White House. What did the GOP do to move the country to the Right? Nothing of consequence besides the Bush tax cuts, which weren’t even permanent. In fact, you could make a good argument that the most significant piece of legislation during the Bush years was Medicare Part D, which moved the country to the LEFT, not the right. During the Bush years, there was even a push for comprehensive immigration reform, which was a politically suicidal attempt to pass legislation that was anathema to conservatives, would have hurt America, and would have handed several million additional votes to the Democratic Party. That is how cowed and intimidated many conservatives have become.

The refusal of conservatives in power to show the courage it takes to move the ball forward for conservatism puts the rest of the movement in an impossible position. We’re like a football team with a great defense and a mediocre offense that’s down by 21 points at the start of the fourth quarter. How do we catch up? We end up throwing Hail Marys in hopes that we’ll get lucky. We get overly excited about incendiary rhetoric, “pure” but unelectable candidates, or huge, almost impossible-to-pass bills. We propose Balanced Budget Amendments, the Fair Tax, The Ryan Plan — and it’s not that these are bad ideas. To the contrary, they’re great ideas that would be phenomenal for the country if they passed. But, there’s the rub. The American people are instinctively skeptical of big changes, every Democrat will oppose these bills, and we’d probably need 65 Republicans in the Senate to pass anything of consequence because they’re so meek. So, in the end, we propose these massive changes, we talk about them endlessly, and yet very few small steps to the right actually happen in practice. This is the political logjam conservatives have lived with from the late-nineties onward.

Perhaps Republicans in the House think they are thinking for the long-term. They are, no doubt, thinking about their own reelections, fearing the smears Democrats are so skillful at spreading. In every CR fight, they’ve shuddered at the thought of a government shutdown because they assumed they’d be blamed. Perhaps they were right — but, in the end, perhaps they might also have accomplished something had they allowed that to happen. If they really feared a shutdown for non-political purposes — that is, if they really thought a shutdown would be too harmful to government workers and others who couldn’t afford to sit in darkness for a week or two — then they should have passed legislation like Rep. James Lankford’s to forestall it — and to ensure that any time Congress came up against a shutdown, they’d be forced to make spending cuts.

To be sure, the Democratic Senate is largely to blame for the spotty way in which Congress has managed the nation’s fiscal affairs. The Senate has not passed a budget in 987 days. That was and is and will be inexcusable for as long as they refuse to put a plan to paper. But I’ve come to expect that from this crop of Ds. From the new Republican majority in the House, I’d hoped for something different.

Update: This post originally said the Senate had not passed a budget in more than 1,000 days, when, in fact, the correct count is 987 days. The post has been corrected above.


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Comment pages: 1 2

They’re going for the record. They’re ambitious.

RBMN on January 11, 2012 at 6:37 PM

The “Leadership” of the GOP must be voted out. 2012 is our chance to do it

jake-the-goose on January 11, 2012 at 6:37 PM

Pres.Romney coupled with this congress will make the whole thing 10 times worse.

promachus on January 11, 2012 at 6:38 PM

“…Power of the purse…”

aquaviva on January 11, 2012 at 6:38 PM

To be sure, the Democratic Senate is largely to blame for the spotty way in which Congress has managed the nation’s fiscal affairs. The Senate has not passed a budget in more than 1,000 days. That was and is and will be inexcusable for as long as they refuse to put a plan to paper. But I’ve come to expect that from this crop of Ds. From the new Republican majority in the House, I’d hoped for something different.

The House ultimately holds the pursestrings. No excuses. Just because somebody has an (R) by their name means NOTHING. Especially in the case of Mittens Flopney.

Daikokuco on January 11, 2012 at 6:39 PM

But dont worry, they’ll push Romney to the right if he is ever elected. /sarc

Flapjackmaka on January 11, 2012 at 6:39 PM

This wasn’t quite what I expected when the GOP won the House. Silly me.

JellyToast on January 11, 2012 at 6:40 PM

As long as the average (????) American watches 24 hours of TV per week, They would be blamed.

No excuse for lack of n@ds though.

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:41 PM

I guess it could be worse, right?
Right?

JellyToast on January 11, 2012 at 6:42 PM

The “Leadership” of the GOP must be voted out. 2012 is our chance to do it

jake-the-goose on January 11, 2012 at 6:37 PM

ONLY after the leadership of the DNC

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:43 PM

Thought the tea party was all about cutting debt?

It’s a little bit difficult to cut the debt when you are all about giving billions of tax breaks to the so called “job creators” who ship jobs overseas.

Try to point this out and they scream class warfare.

Uppereastside on January 11, 2012 at 6:43 PM

Good thing we’ll have Mitch McConnell and John Boehner to make sure President Romney follows the conservative line!

Why, we might manage to not even increase the Obama deficits for his whole administration!

18-1 on January 11, 2012 at 6:45 PM

Thanks for this reminder of how badly the Republican party is performing.

GaltBlvnAtty on January 11, 2012 at 6:46 PM

The House ultimately holds the pursestrings. No excuses. Just because somebody has an (R) by their name means NOTHING. Especially in the case of Mittens Flopney.

Daikokuco on January 11, 2012 at 6:39 PM

Indeed. The Republicans did not lack the power to make changes to Obamanomics, they lacked the will.

18-1 on January 11, 2012 at 6:46 PM

There were some who ran as conservatives (like Renee Ellmers: NC-2) who were immediately co-opted by the Three Stooges (Boehner, Cantor and McCarthy). When Boehner says, “Get you a$$es in line,” Renee starts looking for where to que up. She ran as a conservative; now she’s even a member of the Ripon Society.

Ellmers is the biggest disappointment I ever contributed to.

bw222 on January 11, 2012 at 6:47 PM

Good thing we’ll have Mitch McConnell and John Boehner to make sure President Romney follows the conservative line!

Why, we might manage to not even increase the Obama deficits for his whole administration!

18-1 on January 11, 2012 at 6:45 PM

All things considered, that WOULD be an accomplishment….

goose-the-jake

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:47 PM

Boehner and the wussy gop leadership killed the Tea Party.

I despise the ilk running the party in Congress. They are just pansies not worth a bucket of Possum spit.

And I’m being charitable.

PappyD61 on January 11, 2012 at 6:48 PM

You (some of) will all like it so much better when the DNC retakes the house…..

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:48 PM

Pres.Romney coupled with this congress will make the whole thing 10 times worse.

promachus on January 11, 2012 at 6:38 PM

Nothing can be worse then an all-Dem government.

chai on January 11, 2012 at 6:48 PM

Thought the tea party was all about cutting debt?

It’s a little bit difficult to cut the debt when you are all about giving billions of tax breaks to the so called “job creators” who ship jobs overseas.

Try to point this out and they scream class warfare.

Uppereastside on January 11, 2012 at 6:43 PM

You mean like Fiskars??? Please stay there.

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:50 PM

Boehner and the wussy gop leadership killed the Tea Party.

I despise the ilk running the party in Congress. They are just pansies not worth a bucket of Possum spit.

And I’m being charitable.

PappyD61 on January 11, 2012 at 6:48 PM

Yep. Makes me half sick.

Frobenius on January 11, 2012 at 6:51 PM

Here’s a good place to start cutting, remember that Congress owns the checkbook and writes the checks so give this list a read and ask yourself, why?
http://www.usa.gov/directory/federal/index.shtml

mixplix on January 11, 2012 at 6:51 PM

Thought the tea party was all about cutting debt?

Uppereastside on January 11, 2012 at 6:43 PM

Dont see the tea party running anything, do you?

Sultanofsham on January 11, 2012 at 6:53 PM

Imagine what President Romney could do with a House and Senate who won’t stand up to him, and won’t hold him responsible.

Oof.

portlandon on January 11, 2012 at 6:53 PM

Here’s a good place to start cutting, remember that Congress owns the checkbook and writes the checks so give this list a read and ask yourself, why?
http://www.usa.gov/directory/federal/index.shtml

http://dirtyspendingsecrets.com/

mixplix on January 11, 2012 at 6:54 PM

THis is why I have given up on the GOP and the entire “bought and sold” gov’t in general and am voting for Ron Paul, no matter what happens. What good that will do in NJ I have no idea.

tarznatz on January 11, 2012 at 6:55 PM

The Rs lost the country after Reagan. They have always been unwilling to teach the country the basics of what America is. W was a dynastic choice that demonstrated the lack of depth of the conservative movement.

W was a centrist who didn’t build the party, didn’t message conservative values, and didn’t even pick a VP who could be a successor

McCain wanted Lieberman as VP…sort of fusion with liberals (as opposed to the Left). So we got the Left.

the current fiasco is totally part of the ongoing failure of the R party…it has been failing in it’s mission for 20 years. And now represents a center (or maybe center-left) party in contrast to a left party.

There’s endless speculation on why this is…perks, $$$$, smart conservatives go into business, and so on. But it is what it is.

At this point there’s every possiblity that the R party is doomed…that trump will run, barry may get 45 percent, Trump 10 percent, the R gets 35%

r keller on January 11, 2012 at 6:57 PM

“Yes, but take away excuses and all that’s left are results.”

Hey…

… just like the Democrats!

What? Oh,…

Seven Percent Solution on January 11, 2012 at 7:03 PM

Boehner learned budget negotiations at the feet of a master.

During the talks that led up to the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990, Newt Gingrich, then House Minority Whip, signed off on a budget compromise that included a five cent hike in the gasoline tax.

(Chief of Staff John) Sununu said that as an agreement with the Democratic majority was being reached, “I specifically asked Newt Gingrich if he would support it, and he said, ‘yes.’

“We then went to the President and told him we had” the support of both Gingrich and the chief Senate GOP negotiator Phil Gramm, “and then the White House put out a statement saying that there was an agreement.”

The next day, Newt reneged, walking away as the group assembled to announce the agreement, saying that he could not support new taxes. Led by Newt, over 100 Republicans voted against the legislation, tanking it. When Bush then vetoed a continuing resolution, the government shut down for three days.

Forced back to the negotiating table, a greatly weakened Bush administration signed off on a new agreement, which raised the top income tax rate to 31%, and included new excise taxes on alcohol and tobacco products, automobiles and luxury yachts. This legislation, substantially worse than the agreement that Newt tanked, was passed by the same legislature that voted down the earlier bill, was signed into law by Bush, and may have been the single biggest contributing factor to his reelection defeat in 1992.

WINNING!

Mr. Arkadin on January 11, 2012 at 7:04 PM

It’s funny, but when the excuses are actually physical limitations put on one body of Congress in order to keep it from going over the head of other bodies of Congress, it kinda stops being an excuse and becomes something called a limitation.

Really, for all we talk about the Democrats not understanding the reach and limit of government, you’d think that all these people here in Hot Air wailing about one half of one third of the government not being able to impose policy on the rest of it have flunked Civics repeatedly.

WealthofNations on January 11, 2012 at 7:07 PM

I can’t, for the life of me, understand how any conservative could want anything to do with this duplicitous republican party. And now the scoundrels want to foist Romney on us. I’m now convinced that all Romney supporters are either democratic party shills or, frankly, simple.

noeastern on January 11, 2012 at 7:07 PM

One party government.

Congress is a giant feedbag full of virtual taxpayer “dollars”. The pigs consume and sycophants get the spoils.

ONE>PARTY>GOVERNMENT

rickyricardo on January 11, 2012 at 7:07 PM

Same old same old. Only one Republican is talking about real spending cuts.

Valiant on January 11, 2012 at 7:08 PM

Pres.Romney coupled with this congress will make the whole thing 10 times worse.

promachus on January 11, 2012 at 6:38 PM

^ This is why I’d prefer Ron Paul, even with his non-interventionist policies, to Romney. Unfortunately, the GOP has given conservatives very few ‘limited government’ choices. (especially now that Bachmann and Cain are out)

Nephew Sam on January 11, 2012 at 7:08 PM

The Rs lost the country after Reagan. They have always been unwilling to teach the country the basics of what America is. W was a dynastic choice that demonstrated the lack of depth of the conservative movement.

Reagan was the end of an era; in retrospect he was the last gasp of trying to get th country back from socialism.

He failed; a vastly overrated president who was merely a bump in the road of progressivism.

Great man; overrated president in terms of practical long term impact

rickyricardo on January 11, 2012 at 7:10 PM

the current fiasco is totally part of the ongoing failure of the R party…it has been failing in it’s mission for 20 years. And now represents a center (or maybe center-left) party in contrast to a left party.

There’s endless speculation on why this is…perks, $$$$, smart conservatives go into business, and so on. But it is what it is.

At this point there’s every possiblity that the R party is doomed…that trump will run, barry may get 45 percent, Trump 10 percent, the R gets 35%

r keller on January 11, 2012 at 6:57 PM

Word.

Except you forgot Johnson will talk about a balanced budget, and that will peel of another 6-9%….. Our party is a complete failure. We’re screwed.

I’m supposed to vote for Mitt so he can appoint (maybe) Anthony Kennedy types to the Supreme court instead of Kagan types? Really – what is the chance Mitt will appoint a Scalia or Thomas or Roberts? 0.08%?

Or, I can vote my conscience and vote for…..who??? Gary Johnson maybe? Or Dr. RuPaul the political transvestite? We’re just so screwed.

oldroy on January 11, 2012 at 7:10 PM

Politricks, same crap different day

residentblue on January 11, 2012 at 7:11 PM

The democrat party is heading toward the cliff at 120 MPH. The GOP is heading toward the cliff at a much more reasonable 85 MPH.

There have been major battles that would not have happened with minor victories but the Tea Party just doesn’t have the muscle to win…yet. Let’s change that in 2012.

jukin3 on January 11, 2012 at 7:12 PM

despise the ilk running the party in Congress. They are just pansies not worth a bucket of Possum spit.

And I’m being charitable.

PappyD61 on January 11, 2012 at 6:48 PM

They’re not pansies, they’re crooks, they’re charlatans – they’re politicians. No more career politicians for me – unless you prove your worth first. Look, eventually all you “realists” (i.e. Romney/Bush/McCain supporters) will come to our side. The only questions that remains is what will it take? Amnesty? $20,000,000,000 dollar debt? $25,000,000,000 dollar debt? $50,000,000,000 dollar debt?

noeastern on January 11, 2012 at 7:15 PM

We get overly excited about incendiary rhetoric, “pure” but unelectable candidates, or huge, almost impossible-to-pass bills.

That’s junk. Every conservative candidate is “unelectable” by some idiot definition that makes independents 50% of the electorate, pining for God to go into a basement and the government to protect Roe.

It’s crap.

This is the political logjam conservatives have lived with from the late-nineties onward.

And I just got done living with it. Thank you John Hawkins. I was starting to feel like a pretzel anyway.

Axe on January 11, 2012 at 7:17 PM

Boehner is a stooge of the establishment. McConnell is the same. Both houses of congress need a good dose of Roundup.

ultracon on January 11, 2012 at 7:19 PM

Reagan was the end of an era; in retrospect he was the last gasp of trying to get th country back from socialism.

He failed; a vastly overrated president who was merely a bump in the road of progressivism.

Great man; overrated president in terms of practical long term impact

rickyricardo on January 11, 2012 at 7:10 PM

It’s amazing he’s seen as some sort of conservative God. Those that praise at the alter completely ignore amnesty and the beginning of huge deficits.

noeastern on January 11, 2012 at 7:22 PM

I used to have a fantasy that all of this would lead to a Red Dawn sort of world in which I could run around and hunt Cuban soldiers.

Now I have a new fantasy: PBHO and all of Congress reenacting the evacuation of Saigon in 1975. Outraged Americans by their millions streaming through D.C., breaking past the barricades as congress critters try desperately to cram themselves into helicopters. Obama and Mooch clinging to the skids of an old Huey as it rises precariously into the sky.

I have a dream.

Bishop on January 11, 2012 at 7:22 PM

I’ve always had mixed feelings about this.

It’s easy and understandable to blame the tea party for failing to live up to their promise to reign in spending. There have been moments myself when I succumbed to frustration and did that myself. The fact of the matter is, without a clear-cut political advantage its hard to cut spending when the other side is suicidally attached to their spending. Fifteen years ago we could’ve worked with moderate democrats to get something done, even without a majority. Now all such moderates are extinct, and the tea party continues finds themselves negotiating with a brick wall.

Not that the tea party has been without fault. As much as I want big cuts, smaller cuts would have been acceptable, had they been actual cuts. The tea party keeps getting roped into situations that appear like satisfactory baby-steps, only to learn later that what they agreed to was purely illusory.

I mean, I agree that they have to play the politics game, I agree that avoiding a government shutdown was likely in the countries best interest, but the GOP needs to find itself some better negotiators!

Well, that or they need to take the senate and expand their majority in the house. Whatever comes first.

WolvenOne on January 11, 2012 at 7:23 PM

I realize the gloominess here is a symptom of our current case of Romney-itis, but I have to ask, do we conservatives really believe in small government? Our focus on national politics is certainly understandable, but there are far more productive uses of our time. I honestly believe that we will reap an immense electoral reward on every level of government if we simply act like we really believe in local and state government.

See, the heart of our problem lies in the flow of power to D.C. If we elect, or run as small government conservatives on those two levels, we drastically increase our chances of 1) reinvigorating the natural animosity between states/localities and Fedzilla and 2) taking over the GOP party apparatus. Does anyone really believe the feds are going to be able to continue to fund their Stone Age government? Get your localities weaned off federal subsidies and into survival mode, and then start on your state. We can do this. We just gotta show up. We ARE the tireless, irate minority setting brushfires of liberty in people’s minds. Let’s roll!

Nom de Boom on January 11, 2012 at 7:25 PM

The democrat party is heading toward the cliff at 120 MPH. The GOP is heading toward the cliff at a much more reasonable 85 MPH.

jukin3 on January 11, 2012 at 7:12 PM

Heading toward the cliff at 85 MPH is reasonable? It’s that kind of thinking that elects a Romney and sets back the conservative movement 50 years.

noeastern on January 11, 2012 at 7:27 PM

Nom de Boom on January 11, 2012 at 7:25 PM

Man. Did God send you, or what? I was about to paint a big red A on my wall and put a circle around it.

Talk me down man, talk me down.

(You reminded me of what I was thinking before everything turned red.)

Axe on January 11, 2012 at 7:30 PM

W H A T
L E A D E R S H I P ?

KOOLAID2 on January 11, 2012 at 7:30 PM

I realize the gloominess here is a symptom of our current case of Romney-itis, but I have to ask, do we conservatives really believe in small government? Our focus on national politics is certainly understandable, but there are far more productive uses of our time. I honestly believe that we will reap an immense electoral reward on every level of government if we simply act like we really believe in local and state government.

See, the heart of our problem lies in the flow of power to D.C. If we elect, or run as small government conservatives on those two levels, we drastically increase our chances of 1) reinvigorating the natural animosity between states/localities and Fedzilla and 2) taking over the GOP party apparatus. Does anyone really believe the feds are going to be able to continue to fund their Stone Age government? Get your localities weaned off federal subsidies and into survival mode, and then start on your state. We can do this. We just gotta show up. We ARE the tireless, irate minority setting brushfires of liberty in people’s minds. Let’s roll!

Nom de Boom on January 11, 2012 at 7:25 PM

Great Post!

noeastern on January 11, 2012 at 7:31 PM

noeastern on January 11, 2012 at 7:22 PM

The defecits are a product of congressional spending, Republicans are to blame for the current situation as well as Democrats from 2006 to ’10, however when Reagan was in office, the House was controlled by the Dems. Reagan couldn’t spend a dime without congress, they never passed his proposed budgets and he doesn’t have line item veto power. The treasury actually took in more money every year during his presidency due to the tax cuts he was able to push through because they put more hands into the hands of job creators and investors and increased the tax base.

celtnik on January 11, 2012 at 7:34 PM

In every CR fight, they’ve shuddered at the thought of a government shutdown because they assumed they’d be blamed. Perhaps they were right —

This is hilarious. Every time the GOP refuses to budge and the Democrats lock up government in favor of a trillion dollars in new debt, Eeyore and the modestly conservative punditocracy remind us that the polls show Americans are going to blame the GOP for a shutdown.

Here is this little RINO and she laments that the Republicans didn’t actually shut down the government. The House conservatives must be shaking their heads at you people…you’re quite obviously insane, collectively.

Jaibones on January 11, 2012 at 7:41 PM

Man. Did God send you, or what? I was about to paint a big red A on my wall and put a circle around it.

Talk me down man, talk me down.

(You reminded me of what I was thinking before everything turned red.)

Axe on January 11, 2012 at 7:30 PM

LOL. I just get tired of never hearing the national pundits re-orient people to the true center of conservative philosophy, which is that the people closest to the situation have the best chance of getting it right. It’s understandable that the pundits forget this; they get captured by the news cycle. But (and please don’t ban me for this), I would argue that the thousands of man-hours I know a lot of us spend on this site, stewing in our impotent rage, could actually be put to better use by simply getting away from the computer and getting involved. No, that’s not a monetizable business model, but it is a great way to save a country.

Seriously, find out where your local Tea Party group meets and just go. Quit making excuses, and just go. If they aren’t involved in local issues, start your own group. Do a meetup, make some signs, whatever. Just get it done.

Nom de Boom on January 11, 2012 at 7:42 PM

Reagan was the end of an era; in retrospect he was the last gasp of trying to get th country back from socialism.

He failed; a vastly overrated president who was merely a bump in the road of progressivism.

Great man; overrated president in terms of practical long term impact

rickyricardo on January 11, 2012 at 7:10 PM
It’s amazing he’s seen as some sort of conservative God. Those that praise at the alter completely ignore amnesty and the beginning of huge deficits.

noeastern on January 11, 2012 at 7:22 PM

WRONG. He bought this country, and the people who pay taxes and vote, the time to see the natural progression of liberalism/progressivism. Let’s all watch what happens to Europe…Shall we???

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 7:44 PM

Apparently whenever somebody gets sent to Washington, you should assume he’ll have degenerated into plutonium in a couple of years, and you should start looking for a replacement for him as soon as he’s elected.

Aitch748 on January 11, 2012 at 7:45 PM

Good thing we’ll have Mitch McConnell and John Boehner to make sure President Romney follows the conservative line!

18-1 on January 11, 2012 at 6:45 PM

Actually, we won’t. When all the overweight redneck dimwits in their super-sized “Anyone but Mitt” T-shirts have “stayed home” on election day (and Lord, just how insufferably tedious is that phrase getting?), or waddled sweatily away to their pews and gun ranges to vent their frustration at the vast GOP establishment conspiracy, the incumbent will crush the inevitable Republican contender with heavy use of the firepower now being provided by the pitifully sad sack of Republican aspirants.

And there’ll be an awful lot of keening and wailing and gnashing of teeth when the Occupy the Fringe Movement wakes up to the fact that a steady diet of Fox and Rush and Glenn makes you marginal, not mainstream.

JackieB on January 11, 2012 at 7:45 PM

Actually, we won’t. When all the overweight redneck dimwits in their super-sized “Anyone but Mitt” T-shirts have “stayed home” on election day (and Lord, just how insufferably tedious is that phrase getting?), or waddled sweatily away to their pews and gun ranges to vent their frustration at the vast GOP establishment conspiracy, the incumbent will crush the inevitable Republican contender with heavy use of the firepower now being provided by the pitifully sad sack of Republican aspirants.

And there’ll be an awful lot of keening and wailing and gnashing of teeth when the Occupy the Fringe Movement wakes up to the fact that a steady diet of Fox and Rush and Glenn makes you marginal, not mainstream.

JackieB on January 11, 2012 at 7:45 PM

Can’t say I agree with your assessment of the GOP base, but that was a lot of hilarious imagery. “Waddled sweatily” LOL.

Nom de Boom on January 11, 2012 at 7:48 PM

Well, that or they need to take the senate and expand their majority in the house. Whatever comes first.

WolvenOne on January 11, 2012 at 7:23 PM

EXACTLY!!!!!

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 7:48 PM

Apparently whenever somebody gets sent to Washington, you should assume he’ll have degenerated into plutonium in a couple of years, and you should start looking for a replacement for him as soon as he’s elected.

Aitch748 on January 11, 2012 at 7:45 PM

Yup.

Nom de Boom on January 11, 2012 at 7:49 PM

The refusal of conservatives in power to show the courage it takes to move the ball forward for conservatism

If they don’t “move the ball forward for conservatism” then they’re not conservatives. It doesn’t matter if they’re in the GOP. It doesn’t matter what they say to get elected.

Not every Republican is a conservative. I repeat: Not every Republican is a conservative. Judge people by their actions.

visions on January 11, 2012 at 7:50 PM

And yet, people still won’t vote for Ron Paul.

That’s right, fools, put warmongering above fiscal sanity.

Aizen on January 11, 2012 at 7:53 PM

All the same, just different shades of power grabbing, turf enlarging, money spenging politicians.
They all turn into self-serving blowhards who want to spend enough time in D.C. so they can become rich lobbyists after they are voted out.

albill on January 11, 2012 at 7:54 PM

Tina, I know I’m a total noob commenter here, but in all seriousness, why don’t you guys try to come up with some ways to highlight localism as a serious strategy for conservatives to implement? Maybe you could reach out to some of the local Tea Party groups, since it’s pretty difficult to find stories of local successes in the national media. Even one post a week would be incredibly beneficial, just to let people know what is possible if you take the time to get involved at that level of government. Sort of like the spotlight you did on the Congressional candidate from Utah, but even more local than that.

Nom de Boom on January 11, 2012 at 7:56 PM

Actually, we won’t. When all the overweight redneck dimwits in their super-sized “Anyone but Mitt” T-shirts have “stayed home” on election day (and Lord, just how insufferably tedious is that phrase getting?), or waddled sweatily away to their pews and gun ranges to vent their frustration at the vast GOP establishment conspiracy, the incumbent will crush the inevitable Republican contender with heavy use of the firepower now being provided by the pitifully sad sack of Republican aspirants.

And there’ll be an awful lot of keening and wailing and gnashing of teeth when the Occupy the Fringe Movement wakes up to the fact that a steady diet of Fox and Rush and Glenn makes you marginal, not mainstream.

JackieB on January 11, 2012 at 7:45 PM

That settles it for me. Anyone but Mitt – even googly eyed Gary Johnson. Gotta go wash my sweaty t-shirt – I’ll be back in a while…the laundry-and-suds is having a “one-wash-one-beer” special, probably Pabst Blue Ribbon. Or maybe I’ll just put one of my wife-beater shirts on – I always have a clean one of those as I wash them in a bucket out back.

Do you have no idea how the whole condescension thing has got under people’s skin when it comes to the Mitt?

oldroy on January 11, 2012 at 8:00 PM

The refusal of conservatives in power to show the courage it takes to move the ball forward for conservatism puts the rest of the movement in an impossible position

.

And Romney, the flip flopping, let me see which way the wind is blowing, grandfather of Obamacare, gave the Mass. dems. every thing they wanted and then some, is going to change anything?

Fat chance!

they lie on January 11, 2012 at 8:01 PM

Tina throwing raw meat to the fanatical; this is an absurd story. It’s like saying, LSU should have been able to do something against Alabama; that’s what we cheered them to do…
2013 will be the year of the of the conservative agenda…

Oracleforhire on January 11, 2012 at 8:05 PM

And yet, people still won’t vote for Ron Paul.

That’s right, fools, put warmongering above fiscal sanity.

Aizen on January 11, 2012 at 7:53 PM

Brilliant strategy from the supporter of RuPaul – Political Transvestite, who is too small of a player, or just to gut-less to run for President as the candidate of the Libertarian party.

If he’s libertarian, let him run as one. Didn’t he run as Libertarian candidate last time? Has he moved to the right somehow since then?

oldroy on January 11, 2012 at 8:05 PM

Tina throwing raw meat to the fanatical; this is an absurd story. It’s like saying, LSU should have been able to do something against Alabama; that’s what we cheered them to do…
2013 will be the year of the of the conservative agenda…

Oracleforhire on January 11, 2012 at 8:05 PM

Or next time title it “GOP prevents 2 trillion dollar deficit”

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 8:06 PM

You’re finally getting somewhere. Reminds me of the last line of Portnoy’s Complaint: “Now Vee May Perhaps to Begin”.

Conservatives are to the Republican Party what blacks are to the Democratic Party.

Randall Hoven on January 11, 2012 at 8:09 PM

Conservatives are to the Republican Party what blacks are to the Democratic Party.

Randall Hoven on January 11, 2012 at 8:09 PM

Except…It’s always better to go down fighting the good fight…

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 8:18 PM

Thanks for the link to your tweet or I wouldn’t have believed you quoted yourself accurately.

SirGawain on January 11, 2012 at 8:22 PM

If you want to see a great example of how weak kneed much of the conservative movement has become, look back to the Bush years when the GOP controlled the House, the Senate, and the White House. What did the GOP do to move the country to the Right? Nothing of consequence besides the Bush tax cuts, which weren’t even permanent.

The Senate Democrats extracted a heavy price for allowing Bush to defend the country.

Count to 10 on January 11, 2012 at 8:23 PM

In every CR fight, they’ve shuddered at the thought of a government shutdown because they assumed they’d be blamed. Perhaps they were right —

I’m sorry…who is shuddering?

Jaibones on January 11, 2012 at 8:27 PM

We all knew this was coming when Boehner was elected as Speaker.

Russ in OR on January 11, 2012 at 8:27 PM

“But the Tea Party House will make sure Romney sticks to conservative principles!”

- typical Mitt apologist

DRayRaven on January 11, 2012 at 8:37 PM

noeastern on January 11, 2012 at 7:22 PM

The defecits are a product of congressional spending, Republicans are to blame for the current situation as well as Democrats from 2006 to ’10, however when Reagan was in office, the House was controlled by the Dems. Reagan couldn’t spend a dime without congress, they never passed his proposed budgets and he doesn’t have line item veto power. The treasury actually took in more money every year during his presidency due to the tax cuts he was able to push through because they put more hands into the hands of job creators and investors and increased the tax base.

celtnik on January 11, 2012 at 7:34 PM

This is complete and utter B.S. While he didn’t have the line item veto – he did have veto power. You also conveniently state he couldn’t spend a dime without congressional approval, while failing to state he had the ultimate say over the size of the budget – he signed them. He compromised which is what all you Romeny supporters and republican establishment apologists are insisting we all must do – and now we’re $17,000,000,000.00 in debt.

noeastern on January 11, 2012 at 8:54 PM

If the Dems were still in control, it would be more like 3 trillion.

Norky on January 11, 2012 at 8:58 PM

Actually, we won’t. When all the overweight redneck dimwits in their super-sized “Anyone but Mitt” T-shirts have “stayed home” on election day (and Lord, just how insufferably tedious is that phrase getting?), or waddled sweatily away to their pews and gun ranges to vent their frustration at the vast GOP establishment conspiracy, the incumbent will crush the inevitable Republican contender with heavy use of the firepower now being provided by the pitifully sad sack of Republican aspirants.

And there’ll be an awful lot of keening and wailing and gnashing of teeth when the Occupy the Fringe Movement wakes up to the fact that a steady diet of Fox and Rush and Glenn makes you marginal, not mainstream.

JackieB on January 11, 2012 at 7:45 PM

$17,000,000,000.00 says you’re a JO or simple.

noeastern on January 11, 2012 at 8:59 PM

Nom de Boom on January 11, 2012 at 7:25 PM

In total agreement – however, we can’t forget that the local governments have to actively resist overreach from above (think Arizona with the illegals situation or Louisiana during the BP spill)…

affenhauer on January 11, 2012 at 9:00 PM

hey! where’d my comment go..?

affenhauer on January 11, 2012 at 9:01 PM

never mind…

affenhauer on January 11, 2012 at 9:02 PM

$17,000,000,000.00 says you’re a JO or simple.

noeastern on January 11, 2012 at 8:59 PM

Sorry guy. That was only Billion. Isn’t that scary?

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 9:04 PM

$17,000,000,000.00 says you’re a JO or simple.

noeastern on January 11, 2012 at 8:59 PM

That’s only billions. (someday I’ll figure this out)

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 9:05 PM

JackieB on January 11, 2012 at 7:45 PM

Now there’s a fool.

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 9:07 PM

And this makes Ron Paul a bad alternative because ….

manwithblackhat on January 11, 2012 at 9:15 PM

Aah but how much larger would the debt be if the “obstructionist Republicans” weren’t there?

Oxymoron on January 11, 2012 at 9:17 PM

“You’re young. Get used to saying that if you plan on staying in the GOP.”

This weak-minded attitude, typical of our non-office-holding ‘conservative’ leadership, is exactly why we find ourselves where we do.

Some months ago, on a local radio show, they had some guy from the Heritage Foundation on. This was right after Boner screwed us on budget deal.

I asked an obvious question: why don’t you public figures call for a primary challenge to Boehner.

This spineless coward basically told me to be careful what we wish for, we might get something worse.

The best our conservative media/pundits/etc. can muster is to write timid articles mildly criticizing the GOP, turning immediately to the dims, playing ‘two wrongs make a right’. Organize to achieve real results? Don’t make me laugh. Actually primary the GOP ‘leadership’? Please. So why on earth should the GOP do any different? They don’t take us seriously and they don’t have to. They won’t get real criticism from the right, and they know our punditry will tell us to get in line like good little sheep and vote for whatever RINO trash they stick us with, year after year. And we do.

The left has fire in it’s belly; it’s members are crazy, but they have guts. That’s why they’re winning and we’re getting rolled.

Tina, you’re young and you have a platform. Maybe you can change this dynamic.

avgjo on January 11, 2012 at 9:18 PM

omg TK — excellent material

I sense strength, intellect, integrity, and incisiveness

MOAR!

DaMav on January 11, 2012 at 9:20 PM

I can understand the hesitation to raise flags right now. It’s election season. I know it’s easy to just write it off as standard politician fare, but let me ask you this. What do Republicans gain from a long drawn out debt fight? It would be raising ruckus for no reason other than to raise the ire of the general population towards Republicans. Republicans did not escape unscathed from the debt ceiling “crisis” (blame edged yoward GOP in polls) and starting up that fight is something Dems and Obama are begging them to do. What a wonderful narrative it would hand them (do nothing congress anyone?) with the law of recency working to double or triple the damage. They don’t want to villify just Romney, they want to villify the entire party because then Romney falls along with all the “obstructionists”.

No. Better for the GOP to lay low, remove Dem talking points as much as they can and let the American people remember how bad of a situation Dem policies put us in, than to pop off in congress over an unwinnable battle and sour public opinion of the GOP (conservative newbies would fare especially poor).

Hopefully once the elections are over and the GOP holds the excutive and legislative branches then we will see movement to the right. So it may sound like an “excuse but it is for he better. For now at least.

sublibertate on January 11, 2012 at 9:30 PM

This only strengthens my belief that things are only going to get a lot worse before our elected officials actually do something about it. What’s it gonna take… hyperinflation because of the Fed’s printers on overdrive? China cutting us off and demanding we pay all of their loaned money back? S&P downgrading the Treasury’s bond rating to their absolute lowest after the debt passes $50,000,000,000,000?

Time to grow a spine and not fear the shutdown, folks.

TMOverbeck on January 11, 2012 at 9:34 PM

FFS…just reading this gives me heartburn. The handful of real consevatives in government is so low, it just makes me want to give up, and take defeat with as much grace as possible. Why the hell cant we find representatives of substance who will actually do what they say, just once, for pete’s sake, and bring conservative values into play. Im not asking for the Second Coming of Reagan (although…), but at least pass something that lowers our debt, limits government, stifles borrowing etc, etc, etc… Something…anything…

MooCowBang on January 11, 2012 at 9:42 PM

Time to grow a spine and not fear the shutdown, folks.

TMOverbeck on January 11, 2012 at 9:34 PM

KUDOS!!!!

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 9:45 PM

It’s happening on a local level too. Here in NC, the republicans won back the house and senate. Immediately went after planned parenthood, gay marriage….and passed two tax increases. spending!!!111!!!11

peachaeo on January 11, 2012 at 9:46 PM

FFS…just reading this gives me heartburn. The handful of real consevatives in government is so low, it just makes me want to give up, and take defeat with as much grace as possible. Why the hell cant we find representatives of substance who will actually do what they say, just once, for pete’s sake, and bring conservative values into play. Im not asking for the Second Coming of Reagan (although…), but at least pass something that lowers our debt, limits government, stifles borrowing etc, etc, etc… Something…anything…

MooCowBang on January 11, 2012 at 9:42 PM

Because “Its GOOD to be the king!!”

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 9:47 PM

Pretty soon, I’ll get you to say “Bo(eh)ned again”.

Steve Eggleston on January 11, 2012 at 9:49 PM

But of course, to fail to vote for these same crooks and imbeciles would be unthinkable, right Tina?

james23 on January 11, 2012 at 9:54 PM

There were some who ran as conservatives (like Renee Ellmers: NC-2) who were immediately co-opted by the Three Stooges (Boehner, Cantor and McCarthy). When Boehner says, “Get you a$$es in line,” Renee starts looking for where to que up. She ran as a conservative; now she’s even a member of the Ripon Society.

Ellmers is the biggest disappointment I ever contributed to.

bw222 on January 11, 2012 at 6:47 PM

You have to make her pay, this time. Kick her butt out.

I voted straight GOP last time, first time since 94. I’m not sure I’m voting for ANY Republicans this time. The party is rotten from top to bottom. Have to flush the whole smelly mess and start over.

james23 on January 11, 2012 at 10:01 PM

They’re going for the bi-partisan reach around or whatever McCain always says.

borntoraisehogs on January 11, 2012 at 10:01 PM

Well, at least they passed a tax increase on those that make over $110,000. It’s in the payroll tax extension (2% increase) that will be assessed when you file your 2012 taxes. Why aren’t the GOP highlighting this fact? Why aren’t they exposing Obama’s rhetoric of helping so many Americans when they will have to pay it back at the end of the year? How does this spur economic activity? Especially when the people who will spend it (and not pay down debt) will have to pay it back?
This is what frustrates me with the GOP. So many battles lost due to cowardice. That’s why Gingrich has done so well. He has confronted the enemy (the media) and called them to task. Same with Christie and Palin.

djaymick on January 11, 2012 at 10:02 PM

Hey, I am not saying the establishment repubs sukc at much as the dems. But until we have a four or five party system, YOU DANCE WITH THE ONE WHO BROUGHT YA.

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 10:04 PM

Fiscally speaking, the difference between the R’s and the D’s is………………….

Boy are we screwed!

GFW on January 11, 2012 at 10:17 PM

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