Barbour’s final pardons spark controversy

posted at 6:00 pm on January 11, 2012 by Jazz Shaw

Former Governor Haley Barbour has left office, but he certainly hasn’t left the news, both in Mississippi and around the nation. Before taking his final bows, reports indicate that he issued a rather startling number of pardons and sentence commutations, adding up to more than 200 in a period of a few days. These included criminals doing time on some very serious charges, up to and including rape and murder.

An uproar over some of the 208 pardons — including murder cases — granted by outgoing Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour has prompted some lawmakers to propose bills to curb pardons by future governors, The Clarion-Ledger reports…

Barbour has declined to comment on the pardons.

It’s not unusual for governors to issue pardons in their final days, as they are always sure to be controversial and potentially politically poisonous, but this is definitely a fairly large number and includes some choices which raise justifiable questions. One of the recipients was Earnest Scott Favre, NFL quarterback Brett Favre’s brother, who was serving time for drunk driving and causing his friend’s death. But that wasn’t the controversial choice.

Apparently four of the men were convicted murderers who had spent time working at the governor’s mansion on a work release, trusty program, where they may have come to know Barbour and his staff. Questions of favoritism would obviously arise from that. Another was the case of Karen Irby, serving time for causing a car crash which killed two people.

As the article mentions, lawmakers are scrambling to see if they can take any legislative action regarding pardons in the wake of this, but it’s not entirely clear what they could do. One representative is proposing a bill which would call for a two week period of notification before a pardon is granted so there would be time for a hearing where victims, family members, etc. could at least comment on the case. But even he admits that there would be nothing they could do if the Governor decided to pardon them afterward anyway.

That question seems rather strange, though. I looked up the applicable portion of the Mississippi State Constitution (see Section 124) and it reads – in part – as follows:

…and in cases of felony, after conviction no pardon shall be granted until the applicant therefor shall have published for thirty days, in some newspaper in the county where the crime was committed, and in case there be no newspaper published in said county, then in an adjoining county, his petition for pardon, setting forth therein the reasons why such pardon should be granted.

So it seems to me, at least assuming the Governor’s office carried through and made sure this was done, that people did have an opportunity to comment. And if he didn’t make sure that public notification was made, there may be some remedy available through the courts to challenge some of these pardons and send them back for consideration by the new governor. (Who, having seen this firestorm, would probably be fairly unlikely to act on them in a similar fashion.)

But, assuming the constitutionally required protocol was followed, there’s little to be done now. The state constitution is pretty clear and closely mirrors the same powers held by the President of the United States. Once the deed is done, there’s not much more to be said.


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Is this really a controversy? No, Haley Barbour is simply a scum sucking pig, just like every other Congressman and the current President. No controversy.

He’s either paying off supporters or he’s hiring assassins for later use.

Gregor on January 11, 2012 at 6:05 PM

has prompted some lawmakers to propose bills to curb pardons by future governors

Do it.

Daikokuco on January 11, 2012 at 6:07 PM

Favoritism nothing….better to let people you know go…,

also, what of the people in GITMO? O’bozo beware!

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:07 PM

Does anyone remember the movie “Point of No Return?”

Gregor on January 11, 2012 at 6:07 PM

At 50k per year to keep them incarcerated? Brett Favre’s brother???

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:08 PM

What the hell is the point of a judiciary and the courts if some corrupt scumbag Boss Hawg Clintonite Jugeared scumbag can just pardon them after a fair trial and conviction? WTF

Daikokuco on January 11, 2012 at 6:08 PM

Hey Haley,

Ask Huckabee about Pardons.

portlandon on January 11, 2012 at 6:09 PM

whoah. what the eff??

not what i expected…

Drunk Report on January 11, 2012 at 6:09 PM

It’s a pity.

I have about had my fill of GOP-types.

This reminds me of former Tennessee Governor Ray Blanton who sold pardons and liquor licenses in the 1970s and went to prison within a year of exiting the Governor’s Mansion.

molonlabe28 on January 11, 2012 at 6:10 PM

Huckabee’s role model

KBird on January 11, 2012 at 6:10 PM

He doesn’t have to, of course, but I wish Gov. Barbour would explain why he did this. This move is as shocking as when, back in Sweet Home Chicago, my (pre-prison) Gov. Ryan commuted all the Death Row inmates’ sentences to Life.

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on January 11, 2012 at 6:11 PM

He’s either paying off supporters or he’s hiring assassins for later use.

Gregor on January 11, 2012 at 6:05 PM

Naah…They’re probably liberals.

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:11 PM

So Obanma releasing taliban honchos from Gitmo to rejoin their jihady buddies is OK or not ?

burrata on January 11, 2012 at 6:12 PM

Does anyone remember the movie “Point of No Return?”

Gregor on January 11, 2012 at 6:07 PM

Somehow…me thinks they didn’t look quite like that…

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:13 PM

We need to end the practice of giving pardons at the end of an executives term. The pardon privileged should be taken away at least 9 months before the end of the term is up.

ninjapirate on January 11, 2012 at 6:13 PM

I read the details of some of the murders yesterday. The victims’ families are understandably quite upset about this.

On a different note, I couldn’t believe that some were seriously suggesting that he go up against Obama in 2012. In order to think he has a chance at the presidency, you have to entirely ignore a lot of what he has said. Sorry, but what plays well in Mississippi doesn’t always play well nationwide.

McDuck on January 11, 2012 at 6:14 PM

He doesn’t have to, of course, but I wish Gov. Barbour would explain why he did this.

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on January 11, 2012 at 6:11 PM

He doesn’t need to explain it. We all know why he did it. He’s corrupt, just like the rest of the filthy b&$t&rd.

Gregor on January 11, 2012 at 6:14 PM

So Obanma releasing taliban honchos from Gitmo to rejoin their jihady buddies is OK or not ?

burrata on January 11, 2012 at 6:12 PM

It’s only not OK if it was an MVA. If you did it on purpose, for jihad, your good to go.

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:14 PM

He doesn’t need to explain it. We all know why he did it. He’s corrupt, just like the rest of the filthy b&$t&rd.

Gregor on January 11, 2012 at 6:14 PM

I am sur they made LOTS of donations…/s

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:16 PM

Hayley was merely freeing up space in the prisons to make room for some democrat politicians that will be caught trying to steal future elections. Good move, Hayley!

they lie on January 11, 2012 at 6:16 PM

He doesn’t have to, of course, but I wish Gov. Barbour would explain why he did this. This move is as shocking as when, back in Sweet Home Chicago, my (pre-prison) Gov. Ryan commuted all the Death Row inmates’ sentences to Life.

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on January 11, 2012 at 6:11 PM

Nothing shocking. You KNEW that guy was a RINO.

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:18 PM

From what I’ve heard and read about this, the folks in Mississippi are in an uproar. I mean they are livid.

I doubt this will have any electoral ramifications since the state is solid red. But Barbour’s legacy is cooked. He has little influence anymore and whatever chances he had of serving in a Republican Administration are gone.

Unbelievable.

SteveMG on January 11, 2012 at 6:19 PM

Pardons should be limited to the first half of any executive’s term.

GaltBlvnAtty on January 11, 2012 at 6:20 PM

So who paid, and how much?

GarandFan on January 11, 2012 at 6:20 PM

He doesn’t need to explain it. We all know why he did it. He’s corrupt, just like the rest of the filthy b&$t&rd.

Gregor on January 11, 2012 at 6:14 PM

I still would like to hear something from Mr. Barbour other than “No comment”. I think CNN said that among the 200 or so pardons there were 16 murderers. How many rapists? Armed robbers? It just makes no sense (to me, at least)

Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on January 11, 2012 at 6:21 PM

More details:

The Barbour administration did not publicize the pardons, which became public when family members notified the media. The Mississippi Secretary of State’s office released copies of the pardons Monday afternoon. They show Barbour has pardoned at least five men.

The former inmates are David Gatlin, convicted of killing his estranged wife in 1993; Joseph Ozment, convicted in 1994 of killing a man during a robbery; Anthony McCray, convicted in 2001 of killing his wife; Charles Hooker, sentenced to life in 1992 for murder; and Nathan Kern, sentenced to life in 1982 for burglary after at least two prior convictions.

Mississippi Corrections Commissioner Chris Epps said Monday afternoon that the inmates were released Sunday.

The 40-year-old Gatlin was sentenced to life in prison in the 1993 slaying of Tammy Ellis Gatlin and the shooting of Randy Walker, her long-time friend.

Walker’s mother, Glenda Walker, said Monday that Gatlin shot his estranged wife while she was holding their young baby, then shot her son in the head.

“He left that little baby on his dead mother’s body,” Glenda Walker said. “It was a horrendous murder.”

http://www.thegrio.com/politics/haley-barbour-pardons-4-killers-convicts-were-trustees-at-miss-governor-mansion.php

McDuck on January 11, 2012 at 6:22 PM

Pardons should be limited to the first half of any executive’s term.

GaltBlvnAtty on January 11, 2012 at 6:20 PM

Like that Idea.

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:22 PM

Free Willy (Horton)

listens2glenn on January 11, 2012 at 6:23 PM

The pardon thing is just becoming one more scam. Something that had good intentions, but has been totally corrupted.

Change the law to limit the number of pardons and pardons should only be granted during the beginning of a year and never after the second year of a second term.

If you can only bring yourself to pardon somebody hours before leaving office and hours before leaving town, chances are good they don’t deserve to be pardoned.

JellyToast on January 11, 2012 at 6:23 PM

The Barbour administration did not publicize the pardons, which became public when family members notified the media. The Mississippi Secretary of State’s office released copies of the pardons Monday afternoon. They show Barbour has pardoned at least five men.

The former inmates are David Gatlin, convicted of killing his estranged wife in 1993; Joseph Ozment, convicted in 1994 of killing a man during a robbery; Anthony McCray, convicted in 2001 of killing his wife; Charles Hooker, sentenced to life in 1992 for murder; and Nathan Kern, sentenced to life in 1982 for burglary after at least two prior convictions.

Mississippi Corrections Commissioner Chris Epps said Monday afternoon that the inmates were released Sunday.

The 40-year-old Gatlin was sentenced to life in prison in the 1993 slaying of Tammy Ellis Gatlin and the shooting of Randy Walker, her long-time friend.

Walker’s mother, Glenda Walker, said Monday that Gatlin shot his estranged wife while she was holding their young baby, then shot her son in the head.

“He left that little baby on his dead mother’s body,” Glenda Walker said. “It was a horrendous murder.”

http://www.thegrio.com/politics/haley-barbour-pardons-4-killers-convicts-were-trustees-at-miss-governor-mansion.php

Got me on that one. I’ll defer…

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:24 PM

Heck, what’s to stop a future President from pardoning his entire party?
Not much.

JellyToast on January 11, 2012 at 6:25 PM

People here are outraged. I already regretted my campaign donation for a variety of things he has done lately, but this takes the cake. Barbour really knows how to torch a bridge.

flyfisher on January 11, 2012 at 6:25 PM

Hey, Boss Hogg can pardon whoever he wants to in Hazzard County.

And ain’t nothin’ wrong with a fella payin’ off his debts.

Horace on January 11, 2012 at 6:27 PM

Ooh, I have an idea. How about when one of the corrupt sacks of crap pardons someone, they take the sentence upon themselves? Like Jesus or something. Lock Barbour UP!

Daikokuco on January 11, 2012 at 6:27 PM

We need to end the practice of giving pardons at the end of an executives term. The pardon privileged should be taken away at least 9 months before the end of the term is up.

ninjapirate on January 11, 2012 at 6:13 PM

At the very least it should end on election day until the election is certified, and then no executive who has not been reelected can issue them.

Should go for the President as well.

The reason the executive retains his power after losing election is that the state or nation needs to continue to operate, and more importantly be defended, in the interregnum. But there’s simply no reason why the executive power of pardon can’t be inoperative for two months every four years.

HitNRun on January 11, 2012 at 6:28 PM

Funny thing about pardons. Those who would SEEK a pardon to somehow relieve them of their debt to society for free are actually the ones least deserving of a pardon. Those who are most deserving would be too humble to ever ask for or accept one.

CycloneCDB on January 11, 2012 at 6:28 PM

flyfisher on January 11, 2012 at 6:25 PM

Reading these it is just insane. Is there anyone left in the GOP that has an ounce of integrity? Everybody is a freaking poser.

JellyToast on January 11, 2012 at 6:28 PM

This is a really weird and pointless tradition. Let’s get rid of it.

lexhamfox on January 11, 2012 at 6:29 PM

Arent Republicans supposed to EXECUTE convicted murderers?

now they’re PARDONING them?……..

#HOPELESS

Drunk Report on January 11, 2012 at 6:30 PM

Now, I don’t include myself in helping to uphold the old standard, but, I’m sorry, I just feel that the overall tone and quality of commentary on this site has declined after the last couple of new member sign-ups.

Knott Buyinit on January 11, 2012 at 6:33 PM

This is a really weird and pointless tradition. Let’s get rid of it.

lexhamfox on January 11, 2012 at 6:29 PM

We’ve rejected God and rejected morality.
The pardon is a wonderful gift in the right hands. A tool to correct a horrible injustice. But, it’s now just one more thing corrupted by our own immorality as a nation.

I read Barbour has a sign in his office that says “Power corrupts but ultimate power is pretty cool” or something. I guess he was feeling pretty cool as he was pardoning murderers.

JellyToast on January 11, 2012 at 6:34 PM

What the hell is the point of a judiciary and the courts if some corrupt scumbag Boss Hawg Clintonite Jugeared scumbag can just pardon them after a fair trial and conviction? WTF

Daikokuco on January 11, 2012 at 6:08 PM

It’s in the state constitution, so there is that precedent. Now if the people of Mississippi feel strongly enough about changing it, they can.

Johnnyreb on January 11, 2012 at 6:35 PM

The funny thing is that this power was always the supreme power of absolute rulers. A King / Emperor always had the power of pardon and frequently used it to remind everyone of exactly how powerful he is. Holding the power of life and death (or jail) in the palm of his hand, a show of mercy served to remind the peons to bow down.

Interesting. We got rid of the monarchy but held onto a hugely significant royal prerogative for our elected leaders. Hmmmmmmm…

CorporatePiggy on January 11, 2012 at 6:38 PM

We’ve rejected God and rejected morality.
The pardon is a wonderful gift in the right hands. A tool to correct a horrible injustice. But, it’s now just one more thing corrupted by our own immorality as a nation.

JellyToast on January 11, 2012 at 6:34 PM

Precisely

flyfisher on January 11, 2012 at 6:39 PM

Now, I don’t include myself in helping to uphold the old standard, but, I’m sorry, I just feel that the overall tone and quality of commentary on this site has declined after the last couple of new member sign-ups.

Knott Buyinit on January 11, 2012 at 6:33 PM

I’ve been here since the very beginning of Hot Air (initially under a different, and now long-forgotten, login name). I hate to agree with you, but I believe you are correct. There are still some great people here, but it has become much more difficult to have an adult discussion. Apparently the campaigns assigned teams of people to sign-up, as did a group of liberals. The trolls can now overwhelm in a way they never did before. I find myself spending much less time here, both as a reader and active participant.

flyfisher on January 11, 2012 at 6:48 PM

…….I just feel that the overall tone and quality of commentary on this site has declined after the last couple of new member sign-ups.

Knott Buyinit on January 11, 2012 at 6:33 PM

I totally agree!

silvernana on January 11, 2012 at 6:53 PM

What the hell is the point of a judiciary and the courts if some corrupt scumbag Boss Hawg Clintonite Jugeared scumbag can just pardon them after a fair trial and conviction? WTF

Daikokuco on January 11, 2012 at 6:08 PM

I always figured that the pardon power was intended to allow the courts to observe the LETTER of the law and stay out of the issues of mercy and such. The pardon was a safety for cases where the law was upheld but justice was lost. Since it would be wielded by an elected official, there would be political consequences that would not affect someone with a lifetime appointment to the bench. And courts DO make mistakes which the letter of the law sometimes has problems correcting.

But it doesn’t seem to have worked out that way.

As for those 4 on the work detail, I don;t know enough to have an opinion but if the Gov had worked around them for years, he may feel he is able to see that they no longer pose a threat to society. While this might give them an edge, it isn’t really favoritism.

OBQuiet on January 11, 2012 at 6:53 PM

flyfisher on January 11, 2012 at 6:48 PM

Wasn’t this kind of a strange thread for him to post that on though? I thought this discussion was pretty decent.

McDuck on January 11, 2012 at 6:54 PM

He doesn’t have to, of course, but I wish Gov. Barbour would explain why he did this.
Ladysmith CulchaVulcha on January 11, 2012 at 6:11 PM

Actually, he DOES have to explain each pardon. That’s part of the Constitutional “notice” requirement.

Technically, I suppose he could just say: “I did it because I damned well felt like it so screw you all!” But apparently even the minimum accountability required by law was too much bother for him.

logis on January 11, 2012 at 6:54 PM

logis on January 11, 2012 at 6:54 PM

It seems the Mississippi Attorney General is going to try to block some of them due to the failure to give notice.

McDuck on January 11, 2012 at 6:55 PM

I’m happy as long as Barbour is charged for accessory to murder if one of those freed murders kill again.

ZGMF_Freedom on January 11, 2012 at 6:58 PM

Heck, what’s to stop a future President from pardoning his entire party?
Not much.

JellyToast on January 11, 2012 at 6:25 PM

Not the whole party but Gerald Ford did just that for Nixon and it cost him election to the Presidency. Though I think it was the right decision for the nation.

With regard to Barbour, I’m sorry to see him end his term with this, he has done a credible job- particularly with Hurricane recovery.

Happy Nomad on January 11, 2012 at 7:03 PM

Eh let them have the exec privilege, it is a good thing for our country. Next offence though, look out.

jake49 on January 11, 2012 at 7:05 PM

Right before Lyin’ George Ryan left office he commuted all of Illinois death-row inmates sentences to life in prison.
Three of those who benefited from his largesse killed a pregnant woman and two of her 3 children…and as she lay dying they cut the baby out and the female killer attempted to pass the baby(the dead children were white, the two little ones were mixed but looked black. killers were black, so it was also a hate crime)as her own.
Illinois no longer has a DP.
One of the many reason why I hope Ryan dies in jail.

annoyinglittletwerp on January 11, 2012 at 7:09 PM

Somebody’s palms got greased big time. The whole political system is hopelessly corrupt – on both side.

tommyboy on January 11, 2012 at 7:10 PM

What the hell is the point of a judiciary and the courts if some corrupt scumbag Boss Hawg Clintonite Jugeared scumbag can just pardon them after a fair trial and conviction? WTF

Clintonite? Um, no. He was chairman of the RNC from 1993-1997.

He’s either paying off supporters or he’s hiring assassins for later use.

Gregor on January 11, 2012 at 6:05 PM

Naah…They’re probably liberals.

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:11 PM

Do you know who Haley Barbour is?

From what I’ve heard and read about this, the folks in Mississippi are in an uproar. I mean they are livid.

Yes we are. Livid doesn’t begin to describe the anger.

I doubt this will have any electoral ramifications since the state is solid red.

Barbour is term limited. And Mississippi is not “solid red” Large parts of the state are solid blue. 6 of the 7 statewide offices went Republican for the first time since Reconstruction in 2010 and the state House is Democrat majority with a slim Republican majority in the state Senate.

single stack on January 11, 2012 at 7:45 PM

Hayley Barbour, an attorney and a politcian, was merely performing an act of professional courtesy to his peers. SOP.

they lie on January 11, 2012 at 7:47 PM

He’s either paying off supporters or he’s hiring assassins for later use.

Gregor on January 11, 2012 at 6:05 PM

Naah…They’re probably liberals.

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 6:11 PM
Do you know who Haley Barbour is?

Yes. Quite Aware. Previous RNC chair. Now Gov of some state. I’m also aware of perps. You??

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 7:54 PM

What is it about Southern Governors?
(Carter, Clinton, Huckaboob, etc)

KOOLAID2 on January 11, 2012 at 7:57 PM

SteveMG on January 11, 2012 at 6:19 PM

From what I understand, they are livid. I had thought he would run for Thad Cochran’s seat, but I guess he decided against that.

Talk about burning bridges…

kakypat on January 11, 2012 at 8:02 PM

Ick on that picture of HB. It looks like he’s about to manhandle a pair

…of voters.

bettycooper on January 11, 2012 at 8:03 PM

Barbour’s people apparently sent out a press release trying to explain the issue by stating that the overwhelming majority of the people pardoned had already been released prior to being pardoned. That, of course, is not the issue. The issue is the few major cases (murder) where they had not been released. I hate attempts to obfuscate.

McDuck on January 11, 2012 at 8:05 PM

Just heard a judge has ordered those pardoned to not be released…

ellifint on January 11, 2012 at 8:15 PM

Those governors granting pardens should be required to supply public documentation as to the reasoning behind the decision. No support, then no pardon. Also something like no pardons 90-180 days before term end so they can be held responsible.
Clinton pardoned some of Hillary’s supporters and his own supporters, with a record number of pardons, this dirtbag did the same. But that will be nothing compared to the pardon party Obama will hold next January.

Spock of Tralfamadore on January 11, 2012 at 8:15 PM

I would like to think this is his Christian ethic at work and that he used considerable discretion in who he chose.

Also, just heard via FOXNEWSRADIO: A federal court blocked the release of the murderers. Link forthcoming.

demotheses on January 11, 2012 at 8:17 PM

It is my educated guess that the pardons can’t be undone. The freedom is a right granted to those pardoned. There is no legal proceeding to take away that freedom because of the wrongdoing of another. Certainly Barbour or the state of Mississippi could face sanctions.

Crispian on January 11, 2012 at 8:19 PM

Barbour’s people apparently sent out a press release trying to explain the issue by stating that the overwhelming majority of the people pardoned had already been released prior to being pardoned. That, of course, is not the issue. The issue is the few major cases (murder) where they had not been released. I hate attempts to obfuscate.

McDuck on January 11, 2012 at 8:05 PM

Curious.. Since several people mentioned it.. Do you support the death penalty??

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 8:20 PM

*For those not yet released, it may be possible to prevent the enactment of those pardoned…

Crispian on January 11, 2012 at 8:21 PM

It is my educated guess that the pardons can’t be undone. The freedom is a right granted to those pardoned. There is no legal proceeding to take away that freedom because of the wrongdoing of another. Certainly Barbour or the state of Mississippi could face sanctions.

Crispian on January 11, 2012 at 8:19 PM

Apparently some of the inmates did not meet the requirements of the constitution to give public notice.

demotheses on January 11, 2012 at 8:21 PM

Apparently some of the inmates did not meet the requirements of the constitution to give public notice.

demotheses on January 11, 2012 at 8:21 PM

Which means the pardons should not have been granted. But granting the pardons was not the fault of the accused. The governor essentially waived that requirement (apparently illegally).

Crispian on January 11, 2012 at 8:28 PM

Which means the pardons should not have been granted. But granting the pardons was not the fault of the accused. The governor essentially waived that requirement (apparently illegally).

Crispian on January 11, 2012 at 8:28 PM

Good point. I think their release is indeed imminent. How long can an ‘innocent’ person be held in prison? And how much will the sue for after the injunction has lifted? haha.

demotheses on January 11, 2012 at 8:30 PM

Ick on that picture of HB. It looks like he’s about to manhandle a pair

…of voters Partons.

bettycooper on January 11, 2012 at 8:03 PM

FIFM

bettycooper on January 11, 2012 at 8:41 PM

Is Corey Maye on the list?

Another Drew on January 11, 2012 at 8:45 PM

Yes. Quite Aware. Previous RNC chair. Now Gov of some state. I’m also aware of perps. You??

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 7:54 PM

“some state” Could you be any more condescending?
He’s now the ex-governor of the state I’ve lived in for over 20 years.
And I’m very well aware of the 208 pardons the SOB gave. It’s been a matter of much discussion and anger around here.

Douchebag

single stack on January 11, 2012 at 9:01 PM

Is Corey Maye on the list?

He was released last July.

single stack on January 11, 2012 at 9:04 PM

Don’t know about Mississippi law but federally it would require a constitutional amendment to alter the pardon clause. That it is sometimes abused is not a pretext to amend it.

AH_C on January 11, 2012 at 9:09 PM

This is some really shady stuff. Haley Barbour pardoned 14 MURDERERS. Who does that? It’s as if Charles Manson was the one giving out the pardons. This is insane. I hope there is a full investigation.

SoulGlo on January 11, 2012 at 9:12 PM

single stack on January 11, 2012 at 9:01 PM

I didn’t start it. I didn’t call you any names. If you read back further you would see me recant my defense of Haley, based on him pardonning murderers.

As far as condescending towards the south? I ran from the Northeast as fast as I could. I think the south is the last bastion of sanity in this jungle.

good hog hunting to.

Buy a double.

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 9:13 PM

Oh, and Singlestack, if it makes you feel better…

when Ryan was Gov. of my previous state, he moratoriumed the death penalty. The lead, liberal attourney (sp?) pushing him to do this, was stabbed to death by his son. Makes sense doesn’t it?

WryTrvllr on January 11, 2012 at 9:16 PM

facepalm

workingclass artist on January 11, 2012 at 9:42 PM

Didn’t Schwarzenegger do something similar during his last months in office? Pardon some convicted killer who just happened to be the son of one of his political allies?

What is with these supposed “tough on crime” Republican governors (Schwarzenegger, Ryan, Huckabee, Barbour) who turn out to have a great big soft spot for murderers? Disgusting.

Hayabusa on January 11, 2012 at 10:37 PM

So this is going to become a superficiality site? This article and the comments run with it like gossip. Throw out a big number along with the fact that his term was up, boom conspiracy. The work program is not new, pardons are not new. To suggest courts might be able to interfere with this is complete nonsense. To also throw out a ‘questions of favoritism’ was the most flammable straw-man since Representative Giffords.

If you have specific beefs, you need to be specific. There’s uproar over what, 4 of the 200? Because the stories are compelling, or because he’s a Republican, and Dems think they can make transmute gold from lead? I would rather of had the murderers put to death, but they weren’t, that is the real story. Irony alert, Dems are against death penalty, for ‘rehabilitation’, less ‘criminals’ because it’s not their fault, less sentences, etc.. How many anti-Republicans anti-Conservatives, anti-Southerners, are hoping the pardonees relapse asap?

This is political, but thanks for playing along, non-substance jamboree. Now he’s going to be Huckabee’d.

John Kettlewell on January 11, 2012 at 11:27 PM

Actually, I think it’s “trustee”, not “trusty”, but the point is still the same.

JFS61 on January 12, 2012 at 1:12 AM

Well, I stand corrected – trusty is indeed correct (I’ve always seen it spelled “trustee” myself).

Anyway, as to the level of discourse around these parts, yes it has devolved quite a bit over the past 4 years I’ve been here. It first started when the C4P crowd bum rushed the place, and started acting like the Spanish Inquisition towards anyone and everyone who didn’t kneel or flagellate themselves at the feet of Our Lady of Wasilla. Now it appears that we’ve picked up of fair number of inhabitants from Media Matters/HuffPo this go round, and we’re just now beginning to see the effects here of their intolerance to opposing viewpoints that they’ve displayed elsewhere. Definitely going to make for a fun 2012.

JFS61 on January 12, 2012 at 1:34 AM

Is this really a controversy? No, Haley Barbour is simply a scum sucking pig, just like every other Congressman and the current President. No controversy.

He’s either paying off supporters or he’s hiring assassins for later use.

Gregor on January 11, 2012

Since very few facts were presented, that response is a wee bit over the top, doncha think? Unless I’m wrong of course and you know all about them.
As for Gov. Barbour being some type of swine, I smell a troll. Haley Barbour would make a dämn good President.

~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on January 12, 2012 at 6:46 AM

He might not have to explain it now, but one day when he stands before GOD he will. Especially if one of his killers, kills again.

BruceB on January 12, 2012 at 11:25 AM

Time to hear about the Romney pardons as he left Mass. ……

Carnac on January 12, 2012 at 12:16 PM

Time to hear about the Romney pardons as he left Mass. ……

Carnac on January 12, 2012 at 12:16 PM

Answered my own question. As it turns out, Romney HAS been running for President for many years now ….

“As governor of Massachusetts, Romney refused to grant a single pardon.

Massachusetts does not have the death penalty, so Romney never faced that ultimate decision. But among the pardon applicants Romney denied was a decorated veteran of the Iraq War whose only offense — at age 13 — was shooting another child with a BB gun.

The veteran, Anthony Circosta, had been awarded a Bronze Star and wanted a pardon so he could become a policeman. Romney denied Circosta’s pardon application twice, according to an Associated Press article.”

Referenced Source

Carnac on January 12, 2012 at 12:25 PM

Pardon powers are as old as the Monarchy. In theory, it permits the chief executive to right abuses by a government with great aptitude and strength over its people. For example, the next President could establish a cabinet level Secretary of Pardons, and announce the availability of pardons for anyone who defies Obamacare, therefore essentially rendering Obamacare impotent while the repeals process works its way through congress. He could announce the availability of pardons for drilling in Anwar, or to immediately neutralize multitudes of other burdensome regulations. He could also announce the availability pardons for law abiding citizens who bear arms in places like NYC, to restore the 2nd amendment. It was never intended to pardon convicted murderers.

Tripwhipper on January 12, 2012 at 1:15 PM