Santorum: Not every kid has to go to college

posted at 10:30 am on January 8, 2012 by Jazz Shaw

Call it low-brow or populist if you wish, but Rick Santorum took aim at Barack Obama this weekend in the arena of education and reminded the president of one aspect of social development which often gets lost in the shuffle. While an admirable goal and extremely important under the right circumstances, not every high school student will wind up going to college. And for those who don’t, not all of them are “losers” in any way shape or form. Roll 212.

Former Sen. Rick Santorum expanded his populist message into education Saturday, accusing President Barack Obama and others of “snobbery” for pushing all kids to go to college.

“We are leaving so many children behind,” Mr. Santorum said at a forum sponsored by the Atlantic, the National Journal and Saint Anselm College. “They’re not ready to go to [college.] They don’t want to go to college. They don’t need to go to college. I was so outraged that the President of the United States [said] every student should go to college.”

“Who are you to say that every child in America goes” to college, he continued. “I have seven kids. Maybe they’ll all go to college. But if one of my kids wants to go and be an auto mechanic, good for him! That’s a good-paying job.”

This is a theme we’ve covered here before, such as our story about good jobs going unfilled, and I always try to be careful about how we handle it. A college education is, in and of itself, obviously not a bad thing. On average, workers with a college degree earn more money and have a lower rate of unemployment than those with only a high school diploma. But those figures don’t tell the entire story by a long shot.

Rick Santorum is correct here. While many people with less education go on to face problematic situations, that doesn’t cover nearly all of them. Some go from high school directly into the military and find rewarding careers there, or learn valuable trade skills which they take to good paying jobs in civilian life afterward. Others go to trade schools or apprenticeship programs, with the opportunity to earn very significant incomes in fields like heating and air conditioning, construction trades, plumbing and more.

This isn’t a one size fits all world. Insinuating that every student must go to college or be seen as some sort of lesser individual is snobbish, elitist, and any other similar term you’d care to apply. President Obama should take time out to read Matthew B. Crawford’s book, Shop Class as Soulcraft. Our schools need to prepare students for life, in addition to gearing them up for college. Some of them may profit more from shop class than a liberal arts progression. I’m sure Santorum will catch some flack for these comments on the campaign trail, but I found his remarks refreshing.


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Beats a third rate Junior Senator from Chicago 5 ways to Sunday, in my book.

Cleombrotus on January 8, 2012 at 5:51 PM

Don’t disagree with that. I would say almost anybody is better than the Community Organizer in Chief, as long as they’re a Conservative.

Do you have a logo? A graphic trademark you use? I was reading, you are already marketing. You need some media attention an interview write up with a big enough publication, like say Texas Monthly, would get you state wide exposure. I don’t know what you have already done, but submitting material to different types of media outlets, and getting an interview published, would start getting you more name recognition, and raise your public profile.

Dr Evil on January 8, 2012 at 3:58 PM

I’ve mostly done online interviews on book blogs, mostly because I’m still not sure I’m ready for prime time, so to speak. I tried the Dallas Morning News, but they said I’d have to have some kind of huge news to be featured in their books section. I’m doing fairly well for what I’ve done so far as far as selling my novels, but I’m not anywhere near JA Konrath, John Locke, or Amanda Hocking when it comes to sales as an indie author, and I don’t think I want to be, since that would be too much attention. lol

cebj25 on January 8, 2012 at 6:30 PM

When the president states all kids should go to college everyone makes out except for the poor shlub holding a degree(if he finishes)in Poetry of the Renaissance and $150,000 in student loans. But this is to be expected when our manufacturing base is allowed to depart for cheaper climes.

LizardLips on January 8, 2012 at 7:13 PM

I’ve always advocated for people to get the best education they can in the way that works best for them, whether it’s done formally in a classroom at an institution or by some other means. The cliche “learning never stops” may sound trite, but it’s true.

single stack on January 8, 2012 at 6:19 PM

What a terrific comment about a subject that’s close to my heart.

In a nutshell, this was the attitude of my mom and her two sisters and brother. Even though they had only high school diplomas (and that was only my mom and younger aunt; my oldest aunt and only uncle quit before they graduated), they were constantly encouraging me and my cousins to “learn all we could,” no matter what form it took. It happened that we all got college degrees in vastly different subjects (engineering, finance and English for me, with an emphasis on technical writing). But just because I got a degree, it never meant to me that my learning was finished. That love of lifetime learning is what I consider one of the best and most valuable thing my parents taught me.

PatriotGal2257 on January 8, 2012 at 8:23 PM

Coolczech, I discouraged my National Merit scholarship son from applying to Harvard. I didn’t want him in that kind of environment where patriotism and belief in religion is looked down upon and he might pick up the “I’m elite and better than everyone else” attitude – or at least put up with it. He would have been accepted with his gradepoint and extra-curricular stuff and IQ, but I would rather have had him go to a junior college than Harvard. To some of us, the prestige thing is not at all important.

lukjuj on January 8, 2012 at 8:53 PM

You can find students at colleges who are learning fractions. We are talking elementary school/junior high level. Even worse, most of the folks needing to learn about fractions at age 20 are failing miserably at the attempt. No joke. This has been true for decades.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on January 8, 2012 at 11:36 AM

When I was in my junior year at college a little over 30 years ago, I took a job as an English tutor, administered through the university. The three students who came to me were flunking Freshman English Composition, which they were required to pass to be able to earn their eventual degree.

Of the three, only the first showed any desire to improve enough to get a passing grade. She really worked at it and eventually brought her grade up to a C. I was proud of her and I could tell she was proud of herself.

The other two were — how shall we say — not motivated. Not only that, they either could not or did not want to connect the dots to a.) pass the class, or b.) learn that even though English wasn’t their major, they still might have a need for it in whatever career path they chose.

For instance, my second student had the single-minded ambition to be an accountant. She told me as much at our first meeting. “Why do I need to know this when I’m going to be working with numbers all day?” I replied that it was laudable that she wanted to be an accountant and that I was sure she’d be a good one, but first she had to learn to write a complete sentence. I also casually mentioned that someday she’d likely have to compose both a cover letter and resume, and even business reports for her boss. My attempt to try to make her see that learning the basics of composition could be of use to her as an accounting student pretty much fell flat. She disappeared in no time and I never found out what happened to her.

My third and final student had somewhat the same attitude, except she was in the School of Journalism (which I myself considered also, but changed my mind once I had an intro class with the department head and discovered her relatively inflexible attitudes about how one went about studying journalism). In my student’s case, her question to me was: “I want to write for magazines. Why can’t I just write what I want?” I told her she could write about anything she wanted, as passionately as she wanted, but it still remained that she had to pass Freshman Comp before she could do any of that. She didn’t see the point, either, and she never showed up after that. In her case, knowing what I knew about the School of Journalism, I was mildly curious as to how she got along in those writing classes when she was failing her English writing class, but again, I never found out.

Fast forward to today, where I teach Introductory Typography and Graphic Design part-time at a small technical school. Probably the most valuable advice I’ve received was from a photographer friend of mine, who also taught at the same school before he was hired full-time, regarding these types of students: “You can teach everything you know about a subject, but the one thing you can’t teach is motivation.”

PatriotGal2257 on January 8, 2012 at 9:31 PM

The shovels weren’t ready. Too many kids carrying too much debt majoring in some sort of “studies”. I have yet to ever have the need for anyone with a BS in psychology or an MA in women studies, but I sure have had need of a plumber and/or a car mechanic. Once on the same day.

Registered Nic on January 8, 2012 at 9:35 PM

I’m able to write well because writing was still taught in school when I was a kid.(I’m 56)

As for my screen name, I grew up around guns and have always been a fan of the Model 1911 pistol, as well as of Col. Jeff Cooper. A slang term for a pistol magazine that carries the cartridges in a single column, one on top of the other, is a single stack, as opposed to high capacity pistols which carry their ammunition in a two column, or double stack, magazine.

single stack on January 8, 2012 at 3:15 PM

Appreciate the reply. Sounds like your childhood was much like mine…spent reading adult books. I taught college English for a few years. It’s easy to spot the voracious readers.

Thanks for confirming the reference I inferred from your screen name. Since “stack” is also a plumbing term, I thought I might be missing something. Good shooting. Thanks again for the reply.

Thanks again for the reply.

Owen Glendower on January 8, 2012 at 10:20 PM

Santorum: Not every kid has to go to college

He’s right-and college isn’t for everyone.

However, most of our immigrant ancestors came over here wanting something better for their children, thus the expansion of public schools and universities-now it seems to be that many parents want their kids to have “good enough”.

Dr. ZhivBlago on January 8, 2012 at 10:50 PM

Santorum is correct.

Example:

Kid “A” goes to a snooty university, gets a joint-degree in “Art History” and “General Studies,” which leaves an $89,000 student loan debt.

Kid “B” goes to the local community college or tech school and learns to do all types of welding and do it well. Gets an Associate’ degree and leaves with $3,000 in student loan debt.

Query: Which kid finds a good job first and why?

Horace on January 8, 2012 at 11:47 PM

Santorum: Not every kid has to go to college
posted at 10:30 am on January 8, 2012 by Jazz ShawCall it low-brow or populist if you wish, but Rick Santorum took aim at Barack Obama this weekend in the arena of education and reminded the president of one aspect of social development which often gets lost in the shuffle. While an admirable goal and extremely important under the right circumstances, not every high school student will wind up going to college. And for those who don’t, not all of them are “losers” in any way shape or form. Roll 212.
Former Sen. Rick Santorum expanded his populist message into education Saturday, accusing President Barack Obama and others of “snobbery” for pushing all kids to go to college.
“We are leaving so many children behind,” Mr. Santorum said at a forum sponsored by the Atlantic, the National Journal and Saint Anselm College. “They’re not ready to go to [college.] They don’t want to go to college. They don’t need to go to college. I was so outraged that the President of the United States [said] every student should go to college.”
“Who are you to say that every child in America goes” to college, he continued. “I have seven kids. Maybe they’ll all go to college. But if one of my kids wants to go and be an auto mechanic, good for him! That’s a good-paying job.”
This is a theme we’ve covered here before, such as our story about good jobs going unfilled, and I always try to be careful about how we handle it. A college education is, in and of itself, obviously not a bad thing. On average, workers with a college degree earn more money and have a lower rate of unemployment than those with only a high school diploma. But those figures don’t tell the entire story by a long shot.
Rick Santorum is correct here. While many people with less education go on to face problematic situations, that doesn’t cover nearly all of them. Some go from high school directly into the military and find rewarding careers there, or learn valuable trade skills which they take to good paying jobs in civilian life afterward. Others go to trade schools or apprenticeship programs, with the opportunity to earn very significant incomes in fields like heating and air conditioning, construction trades, plumbing and more.
This isn’t a one size fits all world. Insinuating that every student must go to college or be seen as some sort of lesser individual is snobbish, elitist, and any other similar term you’d care to apply. President Obama should take time out to read Matthew B. Crawford’s book, Shop Class as Soulcraft. Our schools need to prepare students for life, in addition to gearing them up for college. Some of them may profit more from shop class than a liberal arts progression. I’m sure Santorum will catch some flack for these comments on the campaign trail, but I found his remarks refreshing.
Tags: education, Election2012, Rick Santorum
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Beats a third rate Junior Senator from Chicago 5 ways to Sunday, in my book.

Cleombrotus on January 8, 2012 at 5:51 PM
Don’t disagree with that. I would say almost anybody is better than the Community Organizer in Chief, as long as they’re a Conservative.

Do you have a logo? A graphic trademark you use? I was reading, you are already marketing. You need some media attention an interview write up with a big enough publication, like say Texas Monthly, would get you state wide exposure. I don’t know what you have already done, but submitting material to different types of media outlets, and getting an interview published, would start getting you more name recognition, and raise your public profile.

Dr Evil on January 8, 2012 at 3:58 PM
I’ve mostly done online interviews on book blogs, mostly because I’m still not sure I’m ready for prime time, so to speak. I tried the Dallas Morning News, but they said I’d have to have some kind of huge news to be featured in their books section. I’m doing fairly well for what I’ve done so far as far as selling my novels, but I’m not anywhere near JA Konrath, John Locke, or Amanda Hocking when it comes to sales as an indie author, and I don’t think I want to be, since that would be too much attention. lol

cebj25 on January 8, 2012 at 6:30 PM

When the president states all kids should go to college everyone makes out except for the poor shlub holding a degree(if he finishes)in Poetry of the Renaissance and $150,000 in student loans. But this is to be expected when our manufacturing base is allowed to depart for cheaper climes.

LizardLips on January 8, 2012 at 7:13 PM

I’ve always advocated for people to get the best education they can in the way that works best for them, whether it’s done formally in a classroom at an institution or by some other means. The cliche “learning never stops” may sound trite, but it’s true.

single stack on January 8, 2012 at 6:19 PM
What a terrific comment about a subject that’s close to my heart.

In a nutshell, this was the attitude of my mom and her two sisters and brother. Even though they had only high school diplomas (and that was only my mom and younger aunt; my oldest aunt and only uncle quit before they graduated), they were constantly encouraging me and my cousins to “learn all we could,” no matter what form it took. It happened that we all got college degrees in vastly different subjects (engineering, finance and English for me, with an emphasis on technical writing). But just because I got a degree, it never meant to me that my learning was finished. That love of lifetime learning is what I consider one of the best and most valuable thing my parents taught me.

PatriotGal2257 on January 8, 2012 at 8:23 PM

Coolczech, I discouraged my National Merit scholarship son from applying to Harvard. I didn’t want him in that kind of environment where patriotism and belief in religion is looked down upon and he might pick up the “I’m elite and better than everyone else” attitude – or at least put up with it. He would have been accepted with his gradepoint and extra-curricular stuff and IQ, but I would rather have had him go to a junior college than Harvard. To some of us, the prestige thing is not at all important.

lukjuj on January 8, 2012 at 8:53 PM

You can find students at colleges who are learning fractions. We are talking elementary school/junior high level. Even worse, most of the folks needing to learn about fractions at age 20 are failing miserably at the attempt. No joke. This has been true for decades.

ThePrimordialOrderedPair on January 8, 2012 at 11:36 AM
When I was in my junior year at college a little over 30 years ago, I took a job as an English tutor, administered through the university. The three students who came to me were flunking Freshman English Composition, which they were required to pass to be able to earn their eventual degree.

Of the three, only the first showed any desire to improve enough to get a passing grade. She really worked at it and eventually brought her grade up to a C. I was proud of her and I could tell she was proud of herself.

The other two were — how shall we say — not motivated. Not only that, they either could not or did not want to connect the dots to a.) pass the class, or b.) learn that even though English wasn’t their major, they still might have a need for it in whatever career path they chose.

For instance, my second student had the single-minded ambition to be an accountant. She told me as much at our first meeting. “Why do I need to know this when I’m going to be working with numbers all day?” I replied that it was laudable that she wanted to be an accountant and that I was sure she’d be a good one, but first she had to learn to write a complete sentence. I also casually mentioned that someday she’d likely have to compose both a cover letter and resume, and even business reports for her boss. My attempt to try to make her see that learning the basics of composition could be of use to her as an accounting student pretty much fell flat. She disappeared in no time and I never found out what happened to her.

My third and final student had somewhat the same attitude, except she was in the School of Journalism (which I myself considered also, but changed my mind once I had an intro class with the department head and discovered her relatively inflexible attitudes about how one went about studying journalism). In my student’s case, her question to me was: “I want to write for magazines. Why can’t I just write what I want?” I told her she could write about anything she wanted, as passionately as she wanted, but it still remained that she had to pass Freshman Comp before she could do any of that. She didn’t see the point, either, and she never showed up after that. In her case, knowing what I knew about the School of Journalism, I was mildly curious as to how she got along in those writing classes when she was failing her English writing class, but again, I never found out.

Fast forward to today, where I teach Introductory Typography and Graphic Design part-time at a small technical school. Probably the most valuable advice I’ve received was from a photographer friend of mine, who also taught at the same school before he was hired full-time, regarding these types of students: “You can teach everything you know about a subject, but the one thing you can’t teach is motivation.”

PatriotGal2257 on January 8, 2012 at 9:31 PM

The shovels weren’t ready. Too many kids carrying too much debt majoring in some sort of “studies”. I have yet to ever have the need for anyone with a BS in psychology or an MA in women studies, but I sure have had need of a plumber and/or a car mechanic. Once on the same day.

Registered Nic on January 8, 2012 at 9:35 PM

I’m able to write well because writing was still taught in school when I was a kid.(I’m 56)

As for my screen name, I grew up around guns and have always been a fan of the Model 1911 pistol, as well as of Col. Jeff Cooper. A slang term for a pistol magazine that carries the cartridges in a single column, one on top of the other, is a single stack, as opposed to high capacity pistols which carry their ammunition in a two column, or double stack, magazine.

single stack on January 8, 2012 at 3:15 PM
Appreciate the reply. Sounds like your childhood was much like mine…spent reading adult books. I taught college English for a few years. It’s easy to spot the voracious readers.

Thanks for confirming the reference I inferred from your screen name. Since “stack” is also a plumbing term, I thought I might be missing something. Good shooting. Thanks again for the reply.

Thanks again for the reply.

Owen Glendower on January 8, 2012 at 10:20 PM

Santorum: Not every kid has to go to college
He’s right-and college isn’t for everyone.

However, most of our immigrant ancestors came over here wanting something better for their children, thus the expansion of public schools and universities-now it seems to be that many parents want their kids to have “good enough”.

Dr. ZhivBlago on January 8, 2012 at 10:50 PM

Actually, they came here to escape crushing debt and economic opportunity, but seeing as we’ve got so much of the first and so little of the second, perhaps ponying up 300k for a BA isn’t such a good idea rigght now.

WryTrvllr on January 8, 2012 at 11:57 PM

However, most of our immigrant ancestors came over here wanting something better for their children, thus the expansion of public schools and universities-now it seems to be that many parents want their kids to have “good enough”.

Dr. ZhivBlago on January 8, 2012 at 10:50 PM

Actually, they came here to escape crushing debt and economic opportunity, but seeing as we’ve got so much of the first and so little of the second, perhaps ponying up 300k for a BA isn’t such a good idea rigght now.

WryTrvllr on January 8, 2012 at 11:57 PM

It wasn’t all about money. Opportunity and Freedom don’t necessarily equate into dollars. There seems to have been a major change in values since then. From what I’ve been seeing, that’s not working out too well for us.

The Statue of Liberty isn’t a huge $ sign, though it seems many modern Americans see it that way.

Dr. ZhivBlago on January 9, 2012 at 12:13 AM

It wasn’t all about money. Opportunity and Freedom don’t necessarily equate into dollars. There seems to have been a major change in values since then. From what I’ve been seeing, that’s not working out too well for us.

The Statue of Liberty isn’t a huge $ sign, though it seems many modern Americans see it that way.

Dr. ZhivBlago on January 9, 2012 at 12:13 AM

It was mostly economic opportunity. But look at it this way, if the next generation has it tougher than we did, perhapsthey will rediscover some of that old fashion work ethic that seems to be dying off with our parents. All the largesse our generation has been given has only helped to create a spoiled, lazy culture of ME. And without responsibilty and work ethic, there is no such thing as frredom or liberty.

WryTrvllr on January 9, 2012 at 12:29 AM

I recently toured a local short-run manufacturer that makes, among other things, surgical simulators and parts for the V-22 Osprey.

They have a number of very large, very sophisticated CNC machines. The CEO told me they pay operators $25/hr starting out, IF they can find people to run them.

You don’t need a bachelor’s degree, but a two-year AS degree will give you the math you need to do the setup, the humanities background to get along with your coworkers, boss, and customers / subordinates (when you eventually get promoted), the work ethic to show up for your shift, and the on-your-feet problem-solving skills to not just fix problems when they occur but to anticipate and prevent them.

Unfortunately, the NCLB-inculcated “teach-to-the-test” mindset of K-12 doesn’t produces workers with those skills.

Community colleges rock.

skydaddy on January 9, 2012 at 12:30 AM

And without responsibilty and work ethic, there is no such thing as frredom or liberty.

WryTrvllr on January 9, 2012 at 12:29 AM

I’m not disagreeing with that, but I’m not so sure about the “economic opportunity” part. That sounds like the stuff that Libtard social scientists/historians have been foisting upon us-the notion that America was founded solely by atheists looking to make a fast buck.

Even for those that came here poor, and stayed poor, America was the one place on earth they could live as free men and women-in short, where they could actually live as human beings. In Europe and elsewhere everybody was locked into a particular rung of the social ladder depending on who their parents were (what class). There was always somebody to rule over you.

In America you could be the king of your own domain. Even the poorest Appalachian hillbilly got that.

Dr. ZhivBlago on January 9, 2012 at 12:39 AM

skydaddy on January 9, 2012 at 12:30 AM

And my father was a machinist and mother a QA inspector. Neither graduated college at all, but were able to raise a family. But those were the days when the government didn’t nickle and dime everyone into poverty. Couldn’t live on the their inflation adjusted income today.

WryTrvllr on January 9, 2012 at 12:40 AM

I’m not disagreeing with that, but I’m not so sure about the “economic opportunity” part. That sounds like the stuff that Libtard social scientists/historians have been foisting upon us-the notion that America was founded solely by atheists looking to make a fast buck.

Even for those that came here poor, and stayed poor, America was the one place on earth they could live as free men and women-in short, where they could actually live as human beings. In Europe and elsewhere everybody was locked into a particular rung of the social ladder depending on who their parents were (what class). There was always somebody to rule over you.

In America you could be the king of your own domain. Even the poorest Appalachian hillbilly got that.

Dr. ZhivBlago on January 9, 2012 at 12:39 AM

I’m sorry. I wasn’t trying to imply the only people coming here were schiesters (sp?). From the beginning many were trying to escape religious persecution and more recently ovens and gas chambers. But still, the vast majority came for economic opportunity. The wors at the bottom say “your hungry, your tired, your poor”. AND there is nothing wrong with coming here for oppotunity. Their work ethic made this country great. I just don’t think an overpriced BA bestows that. In fact, it might actually harm it.

WryTrvllr on January 9, 2012 at 12:45 AM

Wow, my fingers aren’t working tonight. Sorry

WryTrvllr on January 9, 2012 at 12:46 AM

He’s right about that. Voc Ed is fine and it shouldn’t take more than high school for that. But we’ve let our public school deteriorate due to unionization and job protection for incompetents.

flataffect on January 9, 2012 at 12:55 AM

What is the average age of the farmer in the US? In their mid-50′s I’ve read… so in a decade, who will be our farmers?

For all the ‘infrstructure’ jobs the D’s keep talking about, we lack about a half-million welders. Jobs get tied up for months or often years waiting for a welder to shake some time free to work on infrastructure projects.

ajacksonian on January 8, 2012 at 11:12 AM

Great points you made.
I would like to make one point, though.
Living in a farming & ranching community, I do think students planning on being farmers or ranchers should take courses like chemistry & physics in HS.
And I also think if possible, they should go for a 2 year degree if they can.
The ND colleges, and nearby states, have 2 year ‘degrees’ focsuing on ranch management, range management, agriculture business, etc.
But there are also classes available through various venues on those topics, too.
In agriculture, there’s actually a lot of opportunities to continuing education, through things like conventions etc.
So really, there is no need for college, but it can help.
Farming & ranching has gotten pretty technical in some areas. Computers in equipment & being able to run your business efficiently in today’s world is not for the uneducated.
My husband, a rancher, HATED school. But he’s gone to seminars for things to learn to do things better.
So colllege really isn’t all that necessary.
Half of my 7 years of college was a waste of time & money.
I’m still pi$$ed off about it.

Badger40 on January 9, 2012 at 8:23 AM

What is great about this country is that knowledge you used to be able only to get in college is available through print media & the Internet.
You could self educate, then find someone willing to take your $$ to klep you out for a degree, & you’d never have to go.

A lot of people can self teach & be much more successful than a college grad.

Badger40 on January 9, 2012 at 9:05 AM

Nothing like someone with an undergraduate, graduate and law degree extoling the virtues of tackling life with only a high school education. And, of course, Obama was not implying that kids who do not want to go to college should be compelled to do so.

plewis on January 9, 2012 at 9:54 AM

Proof? Look what college did for Mr. Obama.

Obviously promoted way beyond his abilities, he is obviously totally incapable of dealing with real-life situations once someone is not holding his hand, blowing sunshine up his behind or patting him on the back for tying his shoes.

What other line of work Mr. Obama would have been successful at sans college, can only be left to ones’ imagination.

Marcus Traianus on January 9, 2012 at 10:10 AM

“The world needs ditch diggers too!” – Ted Knight in Caddyshack

TMOverbeck on January 9, 2012 at 10:45 AM

In South Carolina we have South Carolina technical schools/colleges that were based on the German model. Some high school students were to go onto college and others to technical schools to learn a trade. It has worked out pretty darn well, except that in my opinion the technical school system has sort of now become a junior college system. Electricians, plumbers, machinists, HAVC techs and people in the trades make really good money. My nephew who got a college business degree is currently enrolled in the TEC system to become a heating and air conditioning technician.

SC.Charlie on January 9, 2012 at 11:32 AM

My dad is a long-haul driver and has been a truck driver since before I was born (over 24 years). He is now making roughly 80,000/yr. I work at a university and a professor I had makes roughly that much as well. It was probably harder for my professor to get to where he is, but that isn’t the point. The point is to get an education because you want to. You either know what you want to do or you want to learn, but you should never get a degree to please anyone but YOU.

RDE2010 on January 9, 2012 at 11:48 AM

Bill Gates never went to college.

Scorched_Earth on January 9, 2012 at 12:43 PM

Rush didn’t go to college. Your child is as good as Rush.

borntoraisehogs on January 9, 2012 at 1:08 PM

He’s right – not everyone should go to college. Some are not suited for college and some just don’t want to be there. The Dems push for everyone to go to college is nothing but a jobs program for liberal elitest professors.

My oldest son is in a state college – because that’s what he wants – majoring in business and looking at law school (ok, not entirely thrilled about that – but he thinks he knows everything, is right about everything, and likes to argue) – and costing us a lot of money. But he should be able to make a very good living once he’s done. So I’m ok with that.
My younger son went straight from high school last spring into a full time restaurant position and only a year into it and at age 19 he now makes almost as much as my wife does with a Masters degree and 13 years in a public library. And I’m darn proud of what he’s doing also.

dentarthurdent on January 9, 2012 at 1:20 PM

Bill Gates never went to college.

Scorched_Earth on January 9, 2012 at 12:43 PM

Actually he did – but he dropped out.

dentarthurdent on January 9, 2012 at 1:20 PM

Thank God Despite the best efforts of their high schools to prevent it, I made sure every one of my children left for college with a marketable job skill to begin with, whether it was a food handle/bartender certification, high end photography skills, welding, construction, electrical or basic auto shop – They have something in their pockets, that allow them to find part time work when they need it or if something were to happen that would keep my husband and I from covering their tuition.

2nd Ammendment Mother on January 9, 2012 at 1:33 PM

In my 74 years I’ve seen men at fourteen and boys at forty, many times. Some with degrees and some not.

mixplix on January 9, 2012 at 2:55 PM

Bill Gates never went to college.

Scorched_Earth on January 9, 2012 at 12:43 PM

He did go, he dropped out, plus he was a million dollar trust fund kid…oh, and he befriended people who actually knew how to write programs.

Dr. ZhivBlago on January 9, 2012 at 3:29 PM

Finally, Rick Santorum said something I can heartily agree with. I’m a Yale and Harvard grad, and its certainly helped my career, but I see far too many kids who will never be top students racking up tons of debt to go to college when they could be learning useful job skills that would help their career.

Santorum’s absolutely right– being an auto mechanic (like my father-in-law) or an electrician or one of many other skilled professions out there that don’t require a degree can be an absolutely great carer. And if one or more of my sons wanted to take that path, I would support him 100%

constitutionalconservative on January 9, 2012 at 4:04 PM

I’m an engineer. When my kids graduate they can do whatever they want — but I won’t pay for them to get a liberal arts degree. I’ll help them if they want to get a useful skill, but I know way too many people with useless degrees, doing jobs that they could have done without college at all.

I’d buy my kid a farm before I’d pay for him to get a communications degree.

CambellBrown on January 9, 2012 at 4:24 PM

Just when you thought you’d reached the limits of what Obama doesn’t know or understand, he has to open his mouth and start talking. Is there anything this man realizes he doesn’t know diddly about? Somehow, I doubt it.

It’s been three years and I’m still shaking my head over Candidate Obama’s audacity in lecturing Gen. Petreaus on the subject of war fighting. Fortunately, the good General had the class and a sufficiently tolerant composure not to kick Barry’s skinny little butt out of his hooch.

PorchDawg on January 9, 2012 at 5:02 PM

My oldest son is in a state college – because that’s what he wants – majoring in business and looking at law school (ok, not entirely thrilled about that – but he thinks he knows everything, is right about everything, and likes to argue) – and costing us a lot of money. But he should be able to make a very good living once he’s done. So I’m ok with that.
My younger son went straight from high school last spring into a full time restaurant position and only a year into it and at age 19 he now makes almost as much as my wife does with a Masters degree and 13 years in a public library. And I’m darn proud of what he’s doing also.

dentarthurdent on January 9, 2012 at 1:20 PM

Please Rethink Law School. He will not make a good living anymore, in fact most of my husbands classmates from 2 years out are still unemployed or working for free. Thank Heavens my husband had a former career to go back too, but the debt, it is overwhelming. The law schools just keep cranking out more graduates that have no shot at work. If they by some miracle do find work, in a large metro area start pay is 30-40K, not enough to pay that loan debt and live.

idrathernot on January 9, 2012 at 5:18 PM

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