Haley Barbour: Time to go to work

posted at 10:00 am on January 6, 2012 by Jazz Shaw

Mississippi Governor Haley Barbour, being term limited to eight years in office, prepares to leave for the private sector on January 10th after what most rate as a highly successful run. For a time he had conducted a very public process of considering running for the presidency, eventually deciding against it. (I’m still rather disappointed about that, as I think the governor would have made a very interesting and viable candidate with a firm grasp on energy policy.) For those who are running, however, he recently supplied a few thoughts about what he’d be doing right now had he decided to toss his hat in the ring.

Before leaving, though, he had some parting words for the legislature in his home state.

Barbour said the federal government should allow states to collect taxes on sales made over the Internet. He said this would not be a tax increase; it was simply being able to collect the money that is already owed.

“Don’t ever forget, government doesn’t have any money. Every dollar you vote to spend comes from the earnings of families and businesses, who often can do a lot more for themselves and their communities if government let them keep a greater portion of what they work for and earned,” Barbour said.

He was getting in a few parting shots regarding his support of the Marketplace Fairness Act, which would empower states to force online retailers such as Amazon and e-Bay to collect sales taxes.

Indeed, good public policy says it is past time that our brick-and-mortar merchants on Main Street and in our shopping centers get a level playing field with Amazon and the Internet — that they get fair treatment for paying our taxes, said Barbour, who served as chairman of the Republican National Committee during the 1990s.

The National Retail Federation, which represents traditional stores, is lobbying hard for the online tax. Amazon also backs the measure, arguing the country needs a single national framework for collecting Internet sales taxes.

But many Web companies, including eBay, are lobbying against the bill. They say it would stifle online commerce and destroy jobs.

So what’s next for Barbour? If he’s not running for president, you might think that a gentleman of his age might be considering retirement and spending more time with the family. Not so much.

Marsha says it’s time for me to make some money.” And with that, Haley Barbour will hitch up his own britches and head back to the nation’s capital, the place from which he cometh.

And where will he make that money? While it may come as a disappointment to some, he’s heading back to the Washington, DC based lobbying firm which he founded. He will also join the speaking engagement circuit and provide consulting services.

I’m going to miss Haley Barbour. He was controversial at times, particularly in his early career, but he struck me as a good man. I interviewed him at CPAC last year, and found him to be an engaging, intelligent man with a tremendous dedication to public service. It’s rather admirable that he’s living up to his own advice for elected officials, finishing his term and going back to work. Best of luck, Governor.


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He’s going to admit that he lobbies? Again?

Cindy Munford on January 6, 2012 at 10:04 AM

If only every pol was limited to 8 years in office.

Bishop on January 6, 2012 at 10:05 AM

Barbour said the federal government should allow states to collect taxes on sales made over the Internet. He said this would not be a tax increase; it was simply being able to collect the money that is already owed.

Sounds like something a democrat might say.

aryeung on January 6, 2012 at 10:08 AM

He was getting in a few parting shots regarding his support of the Marketplace Fairness Act, which would empower states to force online retailers such as Amazon and e-Bay to collect sales taxes.

Huh. And what will the states pay them for their trouble?

Akzed on January 6, 2012 at 10:09 AM

Re: lobbying
You gotta do what you know how to do, I guess. It’s the lobbying that’s done completely in secret (e.g. solar cell companies with Obama) that we need to worry more about.

RBMN on January 6, 2012 at 10:10 AM

We’re killing millions of innocent babies and losing our freedoms rapidly and this man says to put social issues aside and talk about money -so many GOP priorities are self-destructive to a well constructed society.

We have a party that is the enemy of freedom (the basis of our very foundation) and the opposition party merely assists it.

Don L on January 6, 2012 at 10:12 AM

Why must the answer to Internet sales be to implement sales taxes on that sector? Why not eliminate sales taxes on the brick & mortar sector? It’s sad that even Republicans never recognize that eliminating taxes is also a valid response to the problem. The market is trying to send a signal and no one is paying attention.

If you implement a national sales tax the Amazons of the world they will simply move their distribution to Mexico or Canada or Asia and CONTINUE not to collect sales taxes on US purchases.

Metanis on January 6, 2012 at 10:12 AM

I totally expected this…

OmahaConservative on January 6, 2012 at 10:12 AM

You did write this with tongue in cheek, I hope. The “back to work” part? Or back to Abramoffing his way through the DC lunch/cocktail circuit, within the legal limits of lobbying. Anyone else find it disgusting that all he’s qualified for after a life in “public service” is to manipulate the motives of other public servants. That said, Barbour has been one of the better politicians, but what does that really say?

Western_Civ on January 6, 2012 at 10:13 AM

The National Retail Federation, which represents traditional stores, is lobbying hard for the online tax.

.
I think that the NRF would be more successful if they could show what government-provided local services online retailers consumed rather than pandering to local brick-and-mortar establishments. How much police protection does Amazon.com get in Pungo, VA? What roads in Apalachicola, FL lead to eBay.com that require repair?
.
This whole brouhaha is designed to emphasize “fairness” not the level of services provided. Get another mule to flog (although I like mules and wouldn’t touch a one in a violent way, dear sweet animals that they are).

ExpressoBold on January 6, 2012 at 10:15 AM

If only every pol was limited to 8 years in office.

Bishop on January 6, 2012 at 10:05 AM

Ain’t that the truth. *sigh*

tencole on January 6, 2012 at 10:17 AM

Wish every state had term limits. California..Nevada…New York..
A good man, is now going to go lobby with the likes of…Harry Reids kids…Joe Bidens kids…Barbara Boxers kids…etc.

KOOLAID2 on January 6, 2012 at 10:18 AM

Gotta love the shamelessness. At least he’s not pulling a Newt about what he’s going there to do.

abobo on January 6, 2012 at 10:19 AM

How much police protection does Amazon.com get in Pungo, VA? What roads in Apalachicola, FL lead to eBay.com that require repair? ExpressoBold on January 6, 2012 at 10:15 AM

Well I’m sure they pay property taxes on their warehouses and offices.

Barbour is the consummate insider, and we’re all shocked to hear him talking about new taxes.

Akzed on January 6, 2012 at 10:21 AM

Best of luck, Governor.

Mega Dittos

Haley Barbour is a man’s man who knows how to get things done without the supervision of Uncle Sugar (compare him to LA Governess Blank). He himself said it best when asked about a Presidential run:
“No one is gonna vote for a short, fat redneck”.
Sadly, he is correct. Television made ChicagØbama and would also destroy a good ol’ boy from MissIppi.
Vaya con Dios, Haley. Don’t be a stranger.

~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on January 6, 2012 at 10:27 AM

I thought Obozo and AirPelosi already “drained that swamp”????

KMC1 on January 6, 2012 at 10:27 AM

Awww, he’s going to be a lobyist. Isn’t that nice? And guess what? He’ll lobby for the highest bidder — business, labor, socialist, communist — it doesn’t matter, so long as their money is green. He’s a capitalist, baby!

Rational Thought on January 6, 2012 at 10:27 AM

Haley Barbour is an ass.

steebo77 on January 6, 2012 at 10:30 AM

We have a party that is the enemy of freedom (the basis of our very foundation) and the opposition party merely assists it.

Don L on January 6, 2012 at 10:12 AM

the opposition party merely assists it?? you dont follow your beloved party to closely do you. your statement is a bad joke.

svs22422 on January 6, 2012 at 10:32 AM

Akzed on January 6, 2012 at 10:21 AM

.
I’m glad you got my point (you left out distribution centers).

ExpressoBold on January 6, 2012 at 10:35 AM

Oh, by the by …
Why compare Amazon with E-Bay? Apples ‘n oranges.
Now really, how many of us have purchased things on the Internet only to discover upon arrival that it wasn’t what was advertised or what you wanted? I like to see (or try on for size) in person.
Further, this is not even comparable to the Leftists whining about WalMart putting “mom and pop” shops out of business because they can’t compete with the prices. Think: Death Tax, education, and moving on by the youngins.
Just a Thawt

~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on January 6, 2012 at 10:35 AM

OT:Rubio rips obama

ConservativePartyNow on January 6, 2012 at 10:36 AM

Just donated to Perry’s victory in SC
In South Carolina veterans vote is huge and by far, Perry has the most enormous support by the veteran groups throughout the country. Below is a list of those who are already serving on the Veterans for Perry Coalition. Gov. Perry has also received numerous endorsements.
National Co-Chairs
• Major General James Everett Livingston, MOH, U.S. Marine Corp (Ret.) (South Carolina)
• Chuck Larson, Sr., Fmr. U.S. Attorney and Justice Attaché to U.S. Ambassador to Iraq, Colonel (USAR, Ret.) (Iowa)
• Dakota Meyer, Sergeant, USMC (Ret.) (Kentucky)
• William R. Mann, Lt. Colonel, US Army (Ret.) (Florida)
• The Honorable Allen B. Clark , Fmr. Assistant Secretary for Veterans Liaison and Program Coordination and Director, National Cemetery System at the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, CPT (USA-Ret) (Texas)
National Steering Committee
• The Honorable James Inhofe, U.S. Senator, Oklahoma, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• The Honorable Sam Johnson, United States Congressman, U.S. Air Force (Ret.)
• The Honorable Brian Birdwell, Texas State Senator, District 22, Lt. Col. U.S. Army (Ret.)
• The Honorable Jerry Patterson, Texas Land Commissioner, Lt. Col. U.S. Marine Corp (Ret.)
• Dr. Richard Box, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• Marcus Luttrell, Petty Officer First Class, U.S. Navy Seal (Ret.)
• Mike Thornton, U.S. Navy Seal (Ret.)
• Daniel P. Moran, Captain, U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.)
State Leadership Teams
Iowa
• State Chair: Chuck Larson, Sr., Fmr. U.S. Attorney and Justice Attaché to U.S. Ambassador to Iraq, Colonel (USAR, Ret.) (Iowa)
• State Co-Chair: The Honorable Royd Chambers, State Representative, District 5 and Master Sergeant, Iowa National Air Guard, U.S. Air Force (Ret.)
• Steering Committee:
• Dale Andres, Brigadier General, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• Gary Fischer, Captain, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• Wayne Vanderkrol, Captain, Army National Guard (Chaplain)
• Gannon Hendrick, Captain, U.S. Army Reserve
• Andy Andersen, Colonel, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• Lee D. Booton, U.S. Navy, Seaman 1st Class
• Rick LaMere, US Army, (Ret.)
• John W. Sturdy, Sgt. Major, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• Jeffrey A. Havenner, Major, U.S. Army
• Dick L. Rattray, Lt. Colonel, USMCR (Ret.)
• Tom Hanrahan, U.S. Navy
• Zac Buttercase, Army National Guard
• Gabe Haugland, Army National Guard
New Hampshire
• State Chair: The Honorable Frank McCarthy, State Representative, Major, U.S. Marine Corps (Ret. Mustang)
• State Chair: Jim Adams, Pittsfield, Petty Officer Second Class, U.S. Navy
• Steering Committee:
• The Honorable Fred Rice, State Representative, Major, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• The Honorable Larry Gagne, State Representative, Petty Officer Third Class, U.S. Navy (Ret.)
• The Honorable Emile Beaulieu, Mayor of Manchester, Senior Master Sergeant, U.S. Air Force (Ret.)
• The Honorable Chuck Douglas, Colonel, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• Ambassador Joe Petrone, Colonel, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• Dan Fleetham, Jr, Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• The Honorable Al Baldassaro, State Representative, First Sergeant, U.S. Marines (Ret.)
Florida
• State Chair: The Honorable Jeff Brandes , State Representative, District 52, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• State Chair: The Honorable George Moraitis, Jr., State Representative, District 91, U.S. Navy (Ret.)
• Steering Committee:
• Tavis McElheny, Lieutenant, U.S. Coast Guard (Ret.)
• Tony Buntyn, Colonel, U.S. Air Force (Ret.)
• Richard Sugg, Staff Sgt, U.S. Air Force (Ret.)
• Harlen Twible, Lieutenant U.S. Navy (Ret.)
• Carl Jackson, Petty Officer Second Class, U.S. Navy
• Chet Renfro, Major, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• Bill Helmich, Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.)
• Ben Warren, Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.)
• Fred Manno, Air Man First First Class – U.S. Air Force (Ret.)
• Yvonne Pillmore , Lt. Colonel, U.S. Air Force (Ret.)
South Carolina
• State Chair: James Everett Livingston, Major General U.S. Marines (Ret.)
• Steering Committee:
• Major General Bob Livingston , Adjutant General – State of South Carolina
• Herb Ellis, Colonel, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• James “Boo” Alford, Command Sergeant Major, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• Darwin Simpson, Major General, S.C. Army National Guard (Ret.)
• Todd Humphries, Staff Sergeant., U.S. Army (Ret.)
• Roger Sanderson, Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army (Ret.)
• Mark Kelly , Sergeant, U.S. Air Force (Ret.)
• Daniel Jones, Sergeant, US Army
• Charles E. Edge, Lieutenant Colonel, US Army (Ret.)

nancysabet on January 6, 2012 at 10:39 AM

If only every pol was limited to 8 years in office.

Bishop on January 6, 2012 at 10:05 AM

Actually, I wish Congress would do away with Congressional pensions and all of the other goodies that elected representatives are entitled to once they take office. If they simply received a paycheck and some health insurance (while they’re in office, only), I don’t think most of them would stick around for more than a few terms.

joejm65 on January 6, 2012 at 10:40 AM

Lobbyist or historian? I am confused.

hillsoftx on January 6, 2012 at 10:41 AM

Anyone else find it disgusting that all he’s qualified for after a life in “public service” is to manipulate the motives of other public servants. That said, Barbour has been one of the better politicians, but what does that really say?

Western_Civ on January 6, 2012 at 10:13 AM

It shows that even the “good ones” are hacks that manipulate the system for personal gain.

snoopicus on January 6, 2012 at 10:49 AM

I’m a small-government, low-tax, pro-life conservative, as well as a Mississippian, and I can assure you that Haley Barbour is as close to a dream governor as you could ever wish to have. He is certainly not “an ass.” While part of me wishes he could stay around forever, the other part of me is very happy that our governors are term-limited, and very happy that we voted in Phil Bryant, who will almost certainly be Haley 2.0. If you really want to learn about the awesomeness of Haey Barbour, you don’t even have to talk about his expert handling of Katrina, or his bringing Nissan and Toyota to the state – all you have to do is learn about how he ruthlessly, methodically marginalized the Democrat party in this state, to the point that they may never again be a factor in state politics.

Barbour has been a superb governor and would have made an excellent president. He may be shameless about going back to the private sector to make (more) money, but where’s the shame in that? The original idea of government executives in America was that they do well in business, serve their state/country, and then be left the hell alone to make the most of the rest of their lives. I don’t understand the contempt expressed by so-called conservatives that someone like Barbour wants to go back to lobbying and pocket some coin in the process.

greggriffith on January 6, 2012 at 11:04 AM

It shows that even the “good ones” are hacks that manipulate the system for personal gain.

snoopicus on January 6, 2012

Cute rejoinder, but wholly inaccurate, especially since Gov. Barbour has been very successful.
I took what I learned in “the public sector” on to private business while the lazy, life-long bureaucrats stayed behind. Since when is that a crime?
What ex-pol does not offer advice? (excepting the gracious GW Bush of course)
If you get paid for it, all the better.

~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on January 6, 2012 at 11:13 AM

he’s heading back to the Washington, DC based lobbying firm which he founded. He will also join the speaking engagement circuit and provide consulting services.

Maybe we’ve had enough of that type as President. Considering his way of “making money” is trying to steal my money to redistribute, because someone else hired him to do so…

Enough is enough.

MNHawk on January 6, 2012 at 11:19 AM

Just donated to Perry’s victory in SC

[...]

nancysabet on January 6, 2012 at 10:39 AM

???

steebo77 on January 6, 2012 at 11:24 AM

Het, Haley, don’t let the door hit you in your big gubmint lobbying fanny.

they lie on January 6, 2012 at 11:25 AM

MNHawk on January 6, 2012 at 11:19 AM

Wouldn’t you think that Gov. Barbour lobbies for conservative legislation? When the Democrats give it up, get back to me, I see no reason for the Right to be defenseless when this is legal.

Cindy Munford on January 6, 2012 at 11:27 AM

Haley Barbour supports Gov. Perry.
I found this interesting video from Iowa something that MSM and FOX does not want you to see..
http://caledonia.patch.com/blog_posts/the-adventures-of-mr-ed-and-little-punk-on-the-road-for-rick-perry-final-day-of-the-first-chapter-pt-1#video-8842375

nancysabet on January 6, 2012 at 11:28 AM

The word from my friends in Mississippi is that Barbour never really stopped running his lobbying firm BGR Group. Sort of an open secret, I’m told. Anyway, before he left to become Gov of Mississippi, Barbour was DC’s most influential lobbyist, and he’s likely to resume an elite place in DC’s lobbying culture.

Robert_Paulson on January 6, 2012 at 11:32 AM

Indeed, good public policy says it is past time that our brick-and-mortar merchants on Main Street and in our shopping centers get a level playing field with Amazon and the Internet — that they get fair treatment for paying our taxes, said Barbour, who served as chairman of the Republican National Committee during the 1990s.

Agreed. The conservative solution is to eliminate the sales tax entirely.

“Don’t ever forget, government doesn’t have any money. Every dollar you vote to spend comes from the earnings of families and businesses, who often can do a lot more for themselves and their communities if government let them keep a greater portion of what they work for and earned,” Barbour said.

Agreed. The conservative solution is to reduce spending.

And where will he make that money? While it may come as a disappointment to some, he’s heading back to the Washington, DC based lobbying firm which he founded. He will also join the speaking engagement circuit and provide consulting services.

After lobbying for “a single national framework for collecting Internet sales taxes”, perhaps Barbour would like to get behind the individual mandate.

My God, I hate these people.

Mr. Arkadin on January 6, 2012 at 11:33 AM

• Mike Thornton, U.S. Navy Seal (Ret.)

nancysabet on January 6, 2012 at 10:39 AM

Since you had previously included it with another entry, LCdr Thornton was also awarded the Medal of Honor.

TugboatPhil on January 6, 2012 at 11:36 AM

Wouldn’t you think that Gov. Barbour lobbies for conservative legislation? When the Democrats give it up, get back to me, I see no reason for the Right to be defenseless when this is legal.

Cindy Munford on January 6, 2012 at 11:27 AM

From Wikipedia:

BGR also “lobbied on behalf of the Embassy of Mexico in 2001 to promote a bill related to Section 245(i) of the Immigration and Nationality Act. This provision would have provided a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants in the United States, through family connections or job skills, without a requirement that they return to their home country for the requisite 3-10 years. This is what’s often referred to as ‘amnesty.’”[15] “As part of that work, Barbour’s firm arranged meetings and briefings with ‘Senators, members of Congress and their staffs, as well as Executive Branch Officials in the White House, National Security Council, State Department, and Immigration & Naturalization Service’. Barbour’s firm charged Mexico $35,000 a month, plus expenses.”[16]

steebo77 on January 6, 2012 at 11:42 AM

Interesting that you wish Haley Barbour well in his career as lobbyist, but deride Newt Gingrich for “supposedly” being a lobbyist for Fannie and Freddie…which is a totally bogus, non-factual piece of misinformation.

I have learned not to trust everything Hot Air spews because it is really just “Hot Air”

Sparky5253 on January 6, 2012 at 11:47 AM

Any government law or tax that has the word ‘fair’ in its name is pretty much guaranteed to be unfair. In general, the elites and state pensioners have figured out that there is a lot of new money that can be mined from lower income people as well as those living off of Social Security and savings. The approach is to implement a VAT or national sales tax. Romney, amongst others, supports this approach.

Ceteris Paribus on January 6, 2012 at 11:47 AM

MNHawk on January 6, 2012 at 11:19 AM

Wouldn’t you think that Gov. Barbour lobbies for conservative legislation? When the Democrats give it up, get back to me, I see no reason for the Right to be defenseless when this is legal.

Cindy Munford on January 6, 2012

Right On!
The GOP has a bad habit of rolling over. Some are represented here too.

~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on January 6, 2012 at 11:52 AM

Barbour said the federal government should allow states to collect taxes on sales made over the Internet. He said this would not be a tax increase; it was simply being able to collect the money that is already owed.

Ah, good ol’ Barbour, espousing that all wealth belongs to the state.

Dante on January 6, 2012 at 11:54 AM

steebo77 on January 6, 2012 at 11:42 AM

In case you haven’t noticed there are more elected Republicans embracing the pathway than fighting against it. I believe it is called “compassionate” conservatism. Just because the average American doesn’t want special treatment for people breaking the law doesn’t mean that every person who’s lives depend on the next vote won’t pander to a burgeoning voter block.

Cindy Munford on January 6, 2012 at 12:11 PM

Time to go to work war.
FIFY

Amendment X on January 6, 2012 at 12:16 PM

Barbour said the federal government should allow states to collect taxes on sales made over the Internet. He said this would not be a tax increase; it was simply being able to collect the money that is already owed.
Ah, good ol’ Barbour, espousing that all wealth belongs to the state.

Dante on January 6, 2012 at 11:54 AM

Most states that have sales tax also tax the purchaser of goods that are imported from other states. i.e. Internet sales. It is typically called a use tax and the rate is the same as the sales tax rate. The individual is responsible for reporting those purchases and pay the tax. As you can imagine, enforcement is impossible so most people believe that internet sales do not have a tax. Probably what Barbour was referring to is that the individual does in fact owe the tax.

Business that purchase out of state also have the same rules. Most states enforce the use tax by auditing the business purchases periodcally. Sort of like low hanging fruit.

dhugh on January 6, 2012 at 12:34 PM

To tag along with dhugh:

I don’t understand why we conservatives get so bent out of shape at the suggestion of the collection sales tax from the internet.

Gov. Barbour is correct when he says that the tax is owed. (At least here in KY) On my state tax return there is a line item for sales tax on items I purchase over state lines where no tax was taken at the point of sale. I technically owe that tax. But it’s a nightmare to keep up with what tax I’ve paid and haven’t paid through out a year. Some websites collected it and some don’t.

It’s conservative to be for low taxes, not tax evasion.

Think about states that have no income tax like Tennessee. This is even a bigger issue for them.

In my opinion this is a valid and proper use of the commerce clause for the federal government to step in to see that sales tax is collected in a consistent manner and transferred to the states.

It will stop all of these nonsense lawsuits that AG’s are doing to try force collection with affiliates and so forth because they have no jurisdiction outside their state lines.

I think there is a free-market point as well. It does create an unfair playing field between businesses when some have to collect sales tax and others do not.

ChipDaddy on January 6, 2012 at 1:09 PM

With his two terms, Haley has now re-established his street cred as an insider and go-to guy. He’s gonna be “the one to see if you need help in D.C.” I imagine his lobbying fees will skyrocket. Why, he might even be retained to teach history to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac for a tidy mil’ or so.

“Stand back and watch me rake in the moola, y’all.”

Horace on January 6, 2012 at 2:11 PM

Quite honestly I’m of 2 minds on this….while I don’t want to pay more for online purchases I’d rather my State (and EVERY State) rely more upon Sales/usage taxes than income taxes.

You might note that Texas (and other states that have ZERO state income tax) generally are doing better economically because…..drumroll please……a set sales/usage tax (essentially a flat tax) is more fair than a sliding-scale income tax that penalizes those who earn more.

Also note that where income taxes go up businesses, jobs, and people flee the state.(Maryland and California imposing or raising “millionaire taxes” are good examples)

SgtSVJones on January 6, 2012 at 2:13 PM

I’m glad we’re finally rid of that POS. Boss Hog, indeed.
He’s an authoritarian, big government conservative who not only thinks all the money belongs to the state, he also believes that all the property does too. His opposition to eminent domain reform and the comments he made when it was on the ballot in ’10 show that he believes the state owns your castle.

single stack on January 6, 2012 at 2:28 PM

Jeez! The purists are out en masse. Haley Barbour is not the enemy. There are things he can be criticized for, but he also did great things for the GOP as RNC Chair and as Chair of the Governor’s Assn. There is no such thing as a perfect politician (or human being as Christianity teaches, but that’s so obvious I hesitate to mention it). As I am forced to say all too often: Get a grip, people!

Buy Danish on January 6, 2012 at 2:53 PM

Haley’s wrong about sales tax. Amazon and other internet companies don’t use any services in these localities. No police protection, no fire or rescue coverage, no highway maintenance, no garbage pick-up. Why should they pay taxes when they receive NOTHING in return?

The fact that people in a city buy from someone in another city or state should not be a cause for alarm – it is what freedom is all about.

Adjoran on January 6, 2012 at 3:04 PM

On my state tax return there is a line item for sales tax on items I purchase over state lines where no tax was taken at the point of sale. I technically owe that tax. But it’s a nightmare to keep up with what tax I’ve paid and haven’t paid through out a year. Some websites collected it and some don’t.

Do you think it will be any easier for someone selling their books on half.com? Their crafts on e-bay? Do you people realize just how many podunk taxing authorities there are? Just how many money grubbers there are, all the way down to the city and school district AND FOOTBALL TEAM levels that think they are owed a half percent of what you purchased?

There’s a reason it’s up to you to self report. Whether or not you evade the use taxes is your decision.

MNHawk on January 6, 2012 at 3:09 PM

Wouldn’t you think that Gov. Barbour lobbies for conservative legislation? When the Democrats give it up, get back to me, I see no reason for the Right to be defenseless when this is legal.

Cindy Munford on January 6, 2012 at 11:27 AM

No, more sales taxes seems to be his thing. And it does’t cost millions, filtered through the “connected” for conservatives to vote conservatism. What costs millions is for one group of rent seeking wannabes to hire a Barbour, in order to siphon off millions from another group of citizens (think NFL McMansion stadiums.)

Anther poster summed it up perfectly. 8 years in office and this is all Barbour is qualified to do, in the real world. Suck millions off the productive.

MNHawk on January 6, 2012 at 3:14 PM

Why should they pay taxes when they receive NOTHING in return?
Adjoran on January 6, 2012 at 3:04 PM

While I don’t like having to advocate for a tax, it is unfair competition. And obviously we don’t all benefit equally from federal tax dollars whose largesse is hardly distributed in an equitable manner. The top 1% (or 10%!) pay the most taxes yet they get the least out of their ‘contributions’ as they are the least likely to, say, send their children to public schools or use taxpayer funded entities/services. Conversely the bottom 50% contribute the least but benefit the most…

Buy Danish on January 6, 2012 at 3:15 PM

We have a party that is the enemy of freedom (the basis of our very foundation) and the opposition party merely assists it.

Don L on January 6, 2012 at 10:12 AM

the opposition party merely assists it?? you dont follow your beloved party to closely do you. your statement is a bad joke.

svs22422 on January 6, 2012 at 10:32 AM

i might have worded this better -the GOP is the one I referred to as supposing to be the opposition party and yes, I’ve followed it closely since I voted as a vet for Ike -they’ve betrayed conservatives and the constitution too often for me.

Don L on January 6, 2012 at 3:49 PM

Huh. And what will the states pay them for their trouble?

Akzed on January 6, 2012 at 10:09 AM

The same as the states pay the retailers who actually build stores, pay taxes, hire local people and add to the local economy.

Absolutely nothing.

Which is why the online retailers can undercut prices to the great detriment of so many small merchants, while providing nothing in the way of after-sale service except ‘send it back’.

Siddhartha Vicious on January 6, 2012 at 7:16 PM

No to more taxes! I don’t care who proposes them. We are overburdened by taxes already.

sherrimae on January 7, 2012 at 1:19 AM

Haley’s wrong about sales tax. Amazon and other internet companies don’t use any services in these localities. No police protection, no fire or rescue coverage, no highway maintenance, no garbage pick-up. Why should they pay taxes when they receive NOTHING in return?

The fact that people in a city buy from someone in another city or state should not be a cause for alarm – it is what freedom is all about.

Adjoran on January 6, 2012 at 3:04 PM

Amazon & other retailers would collect the sales or use tax from the customer who resides in the state, not pay the tax to the state. Since they don’t, they may be more attractive vendors than brick-and-mortar stores.

It seems that the true conservative solution would be to remove or reduce the sales tax for all vendors, but that begs the question – is that an option if the best way to fund the government’s operations is through sales taxes instead of income taxes?

22044 on January 7, 2012 at 10:55 AM