New PSA: You should feel very, very badly about your obese child, you know

posted at 10:16 pm on January 4, 2012 by Allahpundit

Via Breitbart TV, the controversy du jour. When I first watched the clip, I thought their strategy was to discourage overeating by simply depressing the viewer until he/she has no appetite left. But no, they’re going for something different. I’m just … not sure what.

Critics say the ads will further ostracize children such as Tina. In posts on the Strong4Life Facebook page, they accuse the campaign of building a “climate of hate.”…

But the disagreements arise when it comes to the central question: Will the ads work? While the harsh approach has proved effective in combating smoking, research has found that making people feel badly about their weight doesn’t work as an agent of change, Davis said.

“I guess it depends on what we want to do with these ads,” she said. “If we want to get attention to say obesity is a problem, maybe they will be effective. In terms of the social stigma about weight — it might actually make people feel worse about that.”

It might be more effective, Davis said, to highlight behaviors that lead to obesity and offer help to those who want to change. “We need to fight obesity,” she said, “not obese people.”

Yeah, not a lot of constructive tips here beyond “your child will be despised if you let them look like this.” The spots are arresting, though, insofar as they’re off the beaten path of reassuring insecure kids that they’re wonderful as is. The spots have to be that way — they’re addressing a health problem, after all — but obesity is one of those conditions in which behavior and identity begin to blur, so the usual “love yourself for who you are” message is implicated. Imagine how different the vibe would be for an ad opposing, say, teen smoking. Exit question: Second look at banning Happy Meals?

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As to “cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 1:20 AM” assertion that it’s the formula — I have 3 formula-fed kids who are no where near overweight.
thekytikat on January 5, 2012 at 8:39 AM

Good for your kids. They were able to take an inferior product and manage to get around its deficiencies.

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 9:25 AM

hawkdriver on January 5, 2012 at 9:16 AM

There’s a contrary nature to my weight gain. I usually am the one who loses weight in the fall and winter (when most people gain) and gain it in the spring. It makes no sense but I also get an inverse seasonal affective disorder. Too much heat, sun and bright sunshine make me ill.

I figure I just screwed up my health when I was young (and ‘perfect’, lol) and am paying for it now. My older sister was “chubby” as a child and now is quite thin. Go figure.

Anyways, the pressure to be thin for girls (and boys) is already way over the top. This campaign is going to cause so much more harm than good because it isn’t just the “chubby” kids who are going to hear they are too fat. Kids who already have body issues are going to apply it to themselves as well. But too thin is awesome. ‘Cause you can’t be too thin or too rich, right?

Fallon on January 5, 2012 at 9:32 AM

I left my appointment wanting to into full starvation mode.

annoyinglittletwerp on January 5, 2012 at 9:20 AM

Oh, now it makes sense. The doctor was trying to keep me from relapsing. I guess I can stop being mad at him, lol. I am tall and could carry quite a bit of weight without anyone noticing. I actually had a nurse write down my weight as 50 lbs lighter than the scale read because she just assumed what I weighed.

I know I have to get control of my weight again. As hawkdriver said, it’s about catching it before the big slide comes. I seem to miss that point more and more as I get older.

Fallon on January 5, 2012 at 9:40 AM

Fat kids make the Dear Leader cry.

RobertE on January 5, 2012 at 9:40 AM

Good for your kids. They were able to take an inferior product and manage to get around its deficiencies.

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 9:25 AM

I consider breast-feeding to be obscene. Boobs are great for the conception-but after that …keep your ‘girls’ in your shirt except behind closed doors. My son was bottle-fed and he’s 6′ and around 135.
My sister–in-law teat-fed her young-uns…and they are ALL over-weight.
My brother and I were also bottle-fed.
Neither of us are over-weight.
You were saying…

annoyinglittletwerp on January 5, 2012 at 9:40 AM

Fallon on January 5, 2012 at 9:40 AM

Though we ‘disagree’ at times I know from your posts that you’re beautiful.
That has NOTHING to do w/how much you weigh.
-Barb

annoyinglittletwerp on January 5, 2012 at 9:42 AM

I consider breast-feeding to be obscene. Boobs are great for the conception-but after that …keep your ‘girls’ in your shirt except behind closed doors. My son was bottle-fed and he’s 6′ and around 135.
My sister–in-law teat-fed her young-uns…and they are ALL over-weight.
My brother and I were also bottle-fed.
Neither of us are over-weight.
You were saying…

annoyinglittletwerp on January 5, 2012 at 9:40 AM

It doesn’t matter what you think. Facts are facts, and formula is inferior.

Also, 45 states have laws that say that breastfeeding is allowed in public. My state says “it is the public policy of Kansas that a mother’s choice to breastfeed should be supported and encouraged to the greatest extent possible and that a mother may breastfeed in any place she has a right to be.” There is no mention of having to be “subtle” or “discrete” or “having to go to a separate room”

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 9:47 AM

Energy cannot be created or destroyed. If you don’t burn more calories than you take in you’ll gain weight. Simple as that, with the rare exception of glandular issues.

This is exactly what Bill C. was talking about. There is a HUGE amount of ignorance out there about what causes increased body fat. That ignorance is perpetuated by the medical community and the media. The human body is extremely complex, and “calories in/calories out” is barely the tip of the iceberg. So many things go into one’s metabolism, as many here have been discussing. Genetics, physical disorders and diseases, thyroid function, hidden intestinal infections that interfere with digestion, etc. The type of food you eat will influence your metabolism. The right types of fats help you burn fat (like the conjugated linoleic acid in butter and fish oil). One of the major things that has changed about the American diet that parallels the rise in obesity is the type of fat we consume. Most of us are highly deficient in fish oil and get too much vegetable oil. People have found they begin to lose weight by simply taking 6 fish oil capsules per day without changing their diet in any other way.

Beyond these physical factors, however, are the emotional factors. People who are afraid of being hurt put on fat that’s called “body armor.” Their bodies hold onto weight and will keep holding onto it no matter how they exercise or eat because they feel they NEED the weight to protect themselves. PSAs or parents or teachers or peers who shame people for their weight only compound the problem and make those people get fatter.

My husband hasn’t figured it out yet. He shamed my kids when, just before puberty, they began to put on some weight. If he hadn’t made an issue of it, they’d probably have slimmed down just fine in a couple of years. Instead, they got fatter and fatter the more he shamed them. Now that he’s been out of the house for 18 months, the kids are finally starting to trim down. On their own. Because they feel safe.

So the issue is horribly complex. These PSAs won’t help and will probably hurt.

wordmum on January 5, 2012 at 9:48 AM

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 9:47 AM

My nephew and my son are both 17 and high school seniors. They are roughly the same height. My son could use to gain a little weight-my nephew is obese.
Them are the ‘facts’ too.
Btw: My son was lactose-intolerant so I HAD to bottle-feed him…but he was going to get bottle-fed anyway.
Boob-feeding is just plain gross.

annoyinglittletwerp on January 5, 2012 at 9:52 AM

Fallon on January 5, 2012 at 9:32 AM

Great comment. I don’t know that it’s okay to be too thin but trending to slender is better for me. I do not envy the additional challenge women face balancing their weight and health with having their children. Men are very lucky in that regard.

hawkdriver on January 5, 2012 at 9:53 AM

Also, 45 states have laws that say that breastfeeding is allowed in public. My state says “it is the public policy of Kansas that a mother’s choice to breastfeed should be supported and encouraged to the greatest extent possible and that a mother may breastfeed in any place she has a right to be.” There is no mention of having to be “subtle” or “discrete” or “having to go to a separate room”

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 9:47 AM

I believe in breastfeeding (I fed all four kids until they were 9 – 12 months old) but I also believe in modesty and in taking into account that others didn’t necessarily want to partake in my lovely mother nature moments. I had no problem going to a car, another room or even into a restroom to nurse. La Leche and a number of pro nursing organizations are like boob nazis. Nursing is beautiful and healthy but it’s a private thing. Forcing others to watch you is just self-centered and belligerent. These laws are stupid.

Love you, ALT. You do not mince words.

Fallon on January 5, 2012 at 10:05 AM

I love these ads. I would like to see similarly dark ads about high heels for women. For instance, they could have a woman in the hospital after back surgery.

thuja on January 5, 2012 at 10:10 AM

Good for your kids. They were able to take an inferior product and manage to get around its deficiencies.

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 9:25 AM

For my kids, it wasn’t a matter of choice. My “equipment” seems to be purely aesthetic since they never functioned properly enough to feed my kids, and not for lack of trying. Believe it or not — some boobs just don’t work right.

I hate it when people start the Breast V Bottle wars. I don’t care if women breastfeed in public – tho I heartily appreciate those who are discreet about it. But I hate when people start demeaning those who use formula. I tried. My equipment failed. I felt like a bad enough failure as a mom without the “Breast is best!” crowd beating me up about it.

Truth is, formula doesn’t have much to do with obesity. My own family – I & my sister#2 were bottle-fed. Sister#2 is a skinny-minnie. My weight problems stem from early onset arthritis, thyroid problems, and the drugs to control my pain and depression that lead to weight gain.

Obesity can be a genetic problem or a self-control issue. It’s not about formula or breast milk.

thekytikat on January 5, 2012 at 10:15 AM

Beyond these physical factors, however, are the emotional factors. People who are afraid of being hurt put on fat that’s called “body armor.” Their bodies hold onto weight and will keep holding onto it no matter how they exercise or eat because they feel they NEED the weight to protect themselves.

wordmum on January 5, 2012 at 9:48 AM

Wordmum, I have never heard someone phrase this so well, thank you. I am not bragging but when I was young and thin I attracted too much attention, constantly, from unwanted sources. Later, when I gained weight, they eventually left me alone. Everytime I lose weight, it happens all over again. People start to compliment me and I get very self-conscious, uneasy in my own skin and sabotague my own efforts. Thus the yo-yo.

I was sexually abused as a child and flattery is one of the weapons that pedaphiles use on their intended victims. “Body armor” is a perfect description. Sometimes, when I see others who are overweight but with “pretty faces” I think, I know what you are doing.

Fallon on January 5, 2012 at 10:16 AM

My nephew and my son are both 17 and high school seniors. They are roughly the same height. My son could use to gain a little weight-my nephew is obese.
Them are the ‘facts’ too.
Btw: My son was lactose-intolerant so I HAD to bottle-feed him…but he was going to get bottle-fed anyway.
Boob-feeding is just plain gross.

annoyinglittletwerp on January 5, 2012 at 9:52 AM

Anecdotal stories and personal inhibitions change nothing.

Formula is not at good as breastmilk.

Is it possible that your attitude towards breastfeeding made you think your baby was lactose intolerant and decided to formula feed him? True lactose intolerance in an infant when being exclusively breastfed is very rare. Perhaps you had a foremilk/hindmilk imbalance that produced the symptoms.

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 10:18 AM

I believe in breastfeeding (I fed all four kids until they were 9 – 12 months old) but I also believe in modesty and in taking into account that others didn’t necessarily want to partake in my lovely mother nature moments. I had no problem going to a car, another room or even into a restroom to nurse. La Leche and a number of pro nursing organizations are like boob nazis. Nursing is beautiful and healthy but it’s a private thing. Forcing others to watch you is just self-centered and belligerent. These laws are stupid.

Love you, ALT. You do not mince words.

Fallon on January 5, 2012 at 10:05 AM

Good for you. That is your choice.

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 10:19 AM

For my kids, it wasn’t a matter of choice. My “equipment” seems to be purely aesthetic since they never functioned properly enough to feed my kids, and not for lack of trying. Believe it or not — some boobs just don’t work right.

I hate it when people start the Breast V Bottle wars. I don’t care if women breastfeed in public – tho I heartily appreciate those who are discreet about it. But I hate when people start demeaning those who use formula. I tried. My equipment failed. I felt like a bad enough failure as a mom without the “Breast is best!” crowd beating me up about it.

Truth is, formula doesn’t have much to do with obesity. My own family – I & my sister#2 were bottle-fed. Sister#2 is a skinny-minnie. My weight problems stem from early onset arthritis, thyroid problems, and the drugs to control my pain and depression that lead to weight gain.

Obesity can be a genetic problem or a self-control issue. It’s not about formula or breast milk.

thekytikat on January 5, 2012 at 10:15 AM

It is very rare that equipment does not work. About 2% of women have problems breastfeeding. I am sorry if you truly couldn’t. That sucks. Many times women are given the wrong information and are sabotaged before they can really get breastfeeding established.

Obesity CAN be a formula or breast milk issue, no matter what proud bottlefeeders say.

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 10:22 AM

Now lemme get this straight:
“You put the lime in the cocoanut and …”
Oh wait, wrong analogy.

Ever since the busybodies who want to control America’s children by rescuing them from attending those eevil Physical Education classes every year were successful, why all of a sudden kids are getting fatter? I thought “self-esteem” mattered to the chattering classes.
Sooooooo … In typical fashion, Leftist hypocrites blame the kids.
BTW, I wonder from where Moochelle gets her Arugula these days?
Another Vomitus Maximus dictum from Dear Leader and his ilk.

~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 10:29 AM

These “Fat takes the fun out of being a kid” ads really try to take the fun out of being a kid. What’s wrong with an occasional abba zabba or snicker’s bar? The “eat all your peas” crowd wants kids to eat nothing but broccoli and carrots. Why isn’t there a campaign for simple moderation? Geez, maybe they should just distribute reprints of “Gods of the Copybook Headings”, but most people would be too stupid to understand it’s meaning. The immutable truth is, “you overeat and you get fat, you moderate and you don’t get fat”

NOMOBO on January 5, 2012 at 10:30 AM

I like this ad. Childhood obesity (as obesity is in general) out of control. How many billions of dollars are spent on this self inflicted condition? Spare me the excuses, reduce your caloric intake and get off your fat ass and move.

flyfish on January 5, 2012 at 10:32 AM

The ads act like if your child is fat they won’t have friends. That’s not true. When I was growing up one of my friends was fat. I didn’t hold it against her and neither did her other friends. She was popular. My yonger brother (also not friendless) was fat as a child but after he graduated from HS he grew six inches and became tall and thin. (the tallest of my 3 brothers) We always had balanced meals together as a family and John, my brother, was a good veggie eater too. I’m not sure it can be prevented all the time. What about genetics? I’m just not sure what the obsession is with childhood obesity. For kids who are at health risk this is a conversation to be had with their doctor. I don’t like the ads. I think they’re mean and a complete overeaction.

magicbeans on January 5, 2012 at 10:35 AM

That ignorance is perpetuated by the medical community and the media. The human body is extremely complex, and “calories in/calories out” is barely the tip of the iceberg. So many things go into one’s metabolism, as many here have been discussing. Genetics, physical disorders and diseases, thyroid function, hidden intestinal infections that interfere with digestion, etc. The type of food you eat will influence your metabolism. The right types of fats help you burn fat (like the conjugated linoleic acid in butter and fish oil). One of the major things that has changed about the American diet that parallels the rise in obesity is the type of fat we consume. Most of us are highly deficient in fish oil and get too much vegetable oil. People have found they begin to lose weight by simply taking 6 fish oil capsules per day without changing their diet in any other way.

I agree with this very good post, but would point out that the calories in/Calories out (“cico”) IS the bottom line standard and always works. Of course the trick is to maximize the “out” side and minimize the “in” side as best as possible. That is VERY complex and hits on all the issues you raise. My experience (and science supports this) is that while the “in” side of the equation you focused on is important, it is the “out” side that gets the best results and ultimately decides success or failure in most cases. This comes down to exercise, but for more and different reasons than you would think. A little exercise goes a very long way and if you do it your diet will naturally fall into shape – you will be motivated to do so. I’ve never EVER met a person who exercises regularly (3-4 times a week) at a mild pace who I considered “overweight”. Never. And I bet you haven’t either.

The key is to build muscle. Not body-builder muscle but more than you have now. That’s the biggest secret to exercise and it is ultimately more important than the calories you spend during the exercise itself. In a given day your body burns the most calories just by doing the stuff it has to do to stay alive. This is your resting metabolism and it accounts for 60% of the calories you burn daily no matter how much you exercise. So, the most efficient way to burn calories is to increase your resting body metabolism. How do you do this? – Muscle. Man or woman, if you have a larger muscle mass you will burn more calories on a daily basis – even when you are sleeping. Again, we’re not talking body builder, “muscle-bound” levels of muscle here, just more than you have now. It is more efficient, and effective, and easier, than cardio activity. (running, swimming, treadmill, aerobics, etc.)

Accordingly, I think the problem of “obesity” (whatever that means anymore) is more a function of our laziness than our over-consumption although the quality of the food being sold to us is certainly a factor.

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 10:37 AM

I happen to know one of the parents of the boy used in this campaign. This is the shock part of th campaign, and next comes the positive part with solutions and advice and results from the kids involved. I’m a little mixed, but honestly when I read everyone saying they should have focused on healthy eating and exercise, I only want to say, umm, haven’t other campaigns done that for years, with no results? The ads are targeted to the parents – to get their attention.

As for any money for doing the ads, what the kids and parents did receive was very special attention from professional nutritionists and doctors to get them on the right path. Her son has since joined the school theatre program because he loved being an ‘actor’ so much.

I do think parents “ignore” the issue with their kids and believe it will rectify itself somehow. I have mixed feelings, but I don’t believe parents can continue to bury their heads.

redutah on January 5, 2012 at 10:47 AM

I liked the ad. One of the jobs of a parent is to feed our children healthy foods from day one and encourage them to get outside and play. My kids went outside right after breakfast and didn’t come back in until lunchtime. We all ate dinner together, homework, bath and bedtime. I guess that’s too simple and old-fashioned for most nowadays.

lea on January 5, 2012 at 10:48 AM

flyfish, you think you’ve got the answer, but you don’t. It’s really more complicated. I am slender and am likely to remain so. I am careful about my diet and excercise. Yet when I eat anything and everything and lie around a lot like a slug I don’t usually gain weight and if i do it falls right off.

SarahW on January 5, 2012 at 11:00 AM

The problem with Monday morning quarterbacking other people’s lives is that you cannot possibly know everything that is going on with anyone. This is more nanny state crap.

Fallon on January 5, 2012 at 11:00 AM

The rise in childhood obesity, and obesity in general is not due to kids eating significantly more calories and “unhealthy” foods. And its not because kids stopped eating their veggies.

This is all about a lack of energy expenditure due to physical inactivity.
Translation- More people are sitting on their asses more often and not burning calories in any significant way.

That’s basically all there is to it.

p.s. Did you know that up until 1990, McDonalds used to cook their french fries in lard (beef tallow)?

bugle boy on January 5, 2012 at 11:05 AM

It is very rare that equipment does not work. About 2% of women have problems breastfeeding. I am sorry if you truly couldn’t. That sucks. Many times women are given the wrong information and are sabotaged before they can really get breastfeeding established

My first child developed an iron deficiency between birth and his checkups because he was four weeks old. The doctors didn’t catch it. He was too week to bring my milk down, and I didn’t know it. I was told that if the baby wasn’t getting any milk that he would cry. My son never cried. At three months, I took him in for failure to thrive- and after spending a week in the hospital getting a battery of tests- the doctors figured out that it was my milk.

I couldn’t breastfeed my second child. Pregnancy put my auto-immune disease in remission, but the doctors were afraid after the pregnancy that I would go into a terrible flare. They made me go back on medication.

I think breastfeeding if fine, but I don’t think woman should be made feel guilty if they don’t. Losing your milk happens more often than is cited.

melle1228 on January 5, 2012 at 11:22 AM

*My first child developed an iron deficiency between birth and his checkups because he was four weeks old. early.

melle1228 on January 5, 2012 at 11:23 AM

redutah on January 5, 2012 at 10:47 AM

So is your friend a bad parent who ignored the needs of her son? Was she unaware that he was chubby? Did she not care about his health?

See. That’s the distressing part about these ads bullying little kids. They already know they’re fat. So do their parents. If it was simply about offering nutritional advice, that’s what they’d be doing. But no. It’s about “shocking them”. Should we do that in a more literal way? Is it okay to put an electrode on a kid and then shock him every time he looks at a Pop Tart? If that’s not okay, why is this kind of emotional bludgeoning okay?

Murf76 on January 5, 2012 at 11:29 AM

I think breastfeeding if fine, but I don’t think woman should be made feel guilty if they don’t. Losing your milk happens more often than is cited.

melle1228 on January 5, 2012 at 11:22 AM

Who is making you feel guilty? I am just stating facts.

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 11:31 AM

That’s basically all there is to it.

bugle boy on January 5, 2012 at 11:05 AM

I knew a man who was the father of a volleyball player on my daughter’s team. At one tournament where the girls weren’t doing so well, he was furious. He said there was no reason why all the girls shouldn’t be serving at 100%. There was a basic arm movement and that was all there was to it.

Obviously, there is more. There is the part about being human and not being perfect and there is emotions. I asked him about professional baseball players and why they weren’t all batting 1000. Well, there are other factors in baseball, he said.

There are always other factors to be considered.

Fallon on January 5, 2012 at 11:32 AM

The rise in childhood obesity, and obesity in general is not due to kids eating significantly more calories and “unhealthy” foods. And its not because kids stopped eating their veggies.

This is all about a lack of energy expenditure due to physical inactivity.
Translation- More people are sitting on their asses more often and not burning calories in any significant way.

That’s basically all there is to it.

p.s. Did you know that up until 1990, McDonalds used to cook their french fries in lard (beef tallow)?

bugle boy on January 5, 2012 at 11:05 AM

Actually Lard/beef Tallow is better for you than the hydrogenated vegetables oils aka poison everything is cooked in now. If you haven’t noticed our forefather exercised more, at more natural fats(butters, lards, etc) more natural meats and vegetables. The introduction of cheap grain products and the excess of carbohydrate reliance has ruined our food supply. Calories in vs calories out matters as much as what those calories consist of and the individual metabolisms of each person.

Self inflicted obesity is the leading cause of diabetes, heart disease, cancers, and metabolic disorders in this country. It has put huge financial and systematic strain on our healthcare system. , cost tax payers millions of dollars in dependent disability cost and dependent medical cost. And it is now the leading cause of preventable death in the US.

Parents have control over what their children eat and do. Parents are getting fat and inflicting this on their helpless children from the moment of birth.

Liberty has a cost.

Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 11:33 AM

So is your friend a bad parent who ignored the needs of her son? Was she unaware that he was chubby? Did she not care about his health?

Murf76, I don’t know her “that” well, but I do know that yes, she was in denial over her child’s weight arguing that he was not overweight at all. I do believe she is a loving parent, but loving parents don’t always make the right, meaning, tough, choices.

By shock, I meant the ads are geared to grab the parent’s attention. I’m not going to argue “for” these ads, but I will say that the nice, Play 60 type campaigns have not changed these parent’s behaviors either as the obesity problem in our youth is growing.

redutah on January 5, 2012 at 11:58 AM

My first child developed an iron deficiency between birth and his checkups when he was four weeks old. The doctors didn’t catch it. He was too week to bring my milk down, and I didn’t know it. I was told that if the baby wasn’t getting any milk that he would cry. My son never cried. At three months, I took him in for failure to thrive- and after spending a week in the hospital getting a battery of tests- the doctors figured out that it was my milk.
melle1228 on January 5, 2012 at 11:22 AM

Did your doctor recommend that you pump and add an iron supplement to the milk? Did your doctor recommend that you use donor milk?

That is what I am really railing against…doctors pushing women into feeding their babies formula without exploring other options to keep the babies on breastmilk. You did what your doctor told you; there is no shame in that. But having the doctors immediately jump to formula when there are other, better, options is wrong.

Here is some information about iron and breastmilk. You may not be interested, but others might be:

http://kellymom.com/nutrition/vitamins/iron.html#lowiron

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 12:10 PM

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 10:37 AM

I agree consistent physical activity is key. It will lower your “fat thermostat,” the body weight that your body wants to maintain (“set point”). This seems to be the biggest hurdle for so many people. I am a very consistent, routine-oriented person. I exercise every morning pretty much without fail. Other people who aren’t as routine-oriented don’t seem to be able to develop that habit so easily. How to motivate them to do so seems to be the biggest problem with the obesity issue. It’s hard to force kids to exercise. Once they’ve gotten the idea that they are “fat,” they will resist every attempt to make them exercise because they see it as someone trying to “fix” what’s wrong with them. I am hoping my example and my loving my kids for who they are will win the day in the end. It seems to be starting to work now. Anyway, it is having better results than my husband’s approach of telling them they are lazy, out-of-shape, and obese.

wordmum on January 5, 2012 at 12:38 PM

To be quite honest when I see such ads as these my initial reaction is to tell whoever wrote the add to stuff it up. I was grossly overweight a few years ago. However with Bariatric surgery plus being dianosed with thyriod problems I have last in the last six years over 100 pounds. Most people who are overweight know it. However is is not always as simple as calories in calories out.

logicman_1998 on January 5, 2012 at 12:44 PM

redutah on January 5, 2012 at 11:58 AM

One of those little boys was only shown from the neck up, so I can’t really tell how big he is. The other one doesn’t look all that obese. As a parent, and having observed it in many other boys other than my own, some tend to pack on the pounds during adolescence before experiencing the growth spurts they’ll get when their height comes in.

A better PSA, one that could be done without battering the fragile self-esteem of overweight children, would’ve been a quick recommendation and tutorial on keeping a food diary for a few weeks. It’s surprising how many calories and how much saturated fat we find in our daily intake when we record every bite. There’s no value in “shock therapy” if it’s not constructive. And finding out that you’re taking in alot more fat and calories than you thought is a real eye-opener.

Murf76 on January 5, 2012 at 1:06 PM

wordmum on January 5, 2012 at 9:48 AM

It is tough for kids because they depend on their parents knowing what is right. And when they don’t it is a huge let down. I know from personal experience.

Accordingly, I think the problem of “obesity” (whatever that means anymore) is more a function of our laziness than our over-consumption although the quality of the food being sold to us is certainly a factor.

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 10:37 AM

Please watch Gary Taubes’ lecture at Berkeley discussing his book, Why We Get Fat. The CICO model is contradicted by many examples of populations of people who were active but who changed their diets to the western diet; i.e., high in carbs, white flour, sugar. It is very eye opening, please take the time to educate yourself.

Bill C on January 5, 2012 at 1:08 PM

Pretty sad seeing little 2-6 year old kids with rolls of fat at the kiddie splashpads.

That falls on irresponsible parenting…no excuse for it.

Absolutely. I looked through my sixth grade yearbook (1975) and saw only one overweight kid. And in HS she started to exercise, changed her diet and by our senior year was a knockout.

Unlike Her Excellency.

Ygritte on January 5, 2012 at 1:14 PM

Hi there. Not to toot my own horn here, but I have a doctorate in nutrition, with an emphasis on alternative medicine. Every time one of these stupid diets come out, I could just tear my hair out. Atkins made me absolutely crazy.

sage0925 on January 5, 2012 at 2:08 AM

Maybe you should open your mind to an alternative hypothesis or maybe should just ask for your money back. Do you know how many Econ PhDs are Marxists? Your doctorate means nothing if you are wrong.

You might not like what Atkins and Taubes have to say but appeals to authority are no answer to the science of fat accumulation.

Everyone, please take the time to watch this lecture if you consider the Calories in/calories out model to be correct. At least educate yourselves about the possibility that cico is wrong and there is a more healthy way to live. (Excercise is great but if you have to spend an hour a day at the gym to maintain your wright something is wrong.)

Bill C on January 5, 2012 at 1:25 PM

To be quite honest when I see such ads as these my initial reaction is to tell whoever wrote the add to stuff it up. I was grossly overweight a few years ago. However with Bariatric surgery plus being dianosed with thyriod problems I have last in the last six years over 100 pounds. Most people who are overweight know it. However is is not always as simple as calories in calories out.

logicman_1998 on January 5, 2012 at 12:44 PM

Here’s the problem. You had a lazy thyroid which is obviously your fault. If you exercise for 3 hours a day and got your thyroid off the couch you would have rock hard abs. /sarc

Have you seen this site? One of my favorites. It’s amazing how dumb doctors can be.

Bill C on January 5, 2012 at 1:29 PM

How’d you like to be the kid who posed for this poster?

Crusty on January 5, 2012 at 1:49 PM

Wouldn’t it be nice if the government actually fulfilled Constitutional duties and stopped sticking it’s collective thumb into every other pie?

Axion on January 5, 2012 at 1:50 PM

“Please watch Gary Taubes’ lecture at Berkeley discussing his book, Why We Get Fat. The CICO model is contradicted by many examples of populations of people who were active but who changed their diets to the western diet; i.e., high in carbs, white flour, sugar. It is very eye opening, please take the time to educate yourself.”
Bill C on January 5, 2012 at 1:08 PM

I’m familiar with this. These people also changed their activity level to western styles along with their diet. They also have low muscle mass. Thus the “out” end of the equation is also messed up along with the diet. “CICO” is the rule and diet can effect each end of that equation but not as much as activity can. Bottom line though: People who take the time to exercise regularly (and stick to it) generally adjust their food intake to a healthier diet. Their motivation seems to compel most people to do this and they just are not as hungry. BUT, there is no evidence that if someone goes on a diet and sticks to it that they will eventually get around to exercising. Trying to maintain your optimal weight, especially after 35, by dieting alone is a difficult, and generally unpleasent, task.

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 1:54 PM

(Excercise is great but if you have to spend an hour a day at the gym to maintain your wright something is wrong.)
Bill C on January 5, 2012 at 1:25 PM

If the rest of one’s lifestyle is rather sedentary, an hour in the gym every day is the best deal going. Such a small time for such incredible benifits is awesome and there is nothing “wrong” with it. In addition to weight loss, the cardiovascular and other health benefits to be gained from low duration high intensity physical activity are astounding.

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 2:00 PM

Trying to maintain your optimal weight, especially after 35, by dieting alone is a difficult, and generally unpleasent, task.

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 1:54 PM

That’s right and it contradicts CICO. Most people notice that they have a harder time keeping weight off when they get older. Why is that? Does everyone start eating more unhealthy as they get older? Actually, I think the opposite is true. Does everyone become more sedentary? Since the weight gains usually start up in the late twenties and early thirties I doubt it. Being a parent is hard work and many people who did not exercise in their teens start going to gyms in their twenties. What changes for everyone in their thirties? Well we all start producing less testosterone and estrogen. Is there a connection between these hormones and other hormones, thyroid disease, and weight gain? Yes, there is. Do we know for a fact that insulin is directly involved in fat storage? Yes.

Maybe fat accumulation is more a problem of hormone regulation than of balancing how many calories we eat, not that easy to determine, and how many we expend, impossible to determine.

BTW, just take an hour to listen to Taubes lecture. At least know the other sides arguments.

Bill C on January 5, 2012 at 2:09 PM

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 2:00 PM

I am not saying working out is bad. Do it for all of the reasons you mention. But don’t do it for weight loss. Exercising is a poor way to removing fat from your body. Your body will fight like hell to keep weight if you are expending energy and it will demand to be fed. If you feed yourself with bread, pasta, and white rice you will completely negate the possibility of losing weight.

Bill C on January 5, 2012 at 2:14 PM

“What changes for everyone in their thirties?”

Their resting metabolism slows down and for many their regular activity level decreases significantly. More exercise = more hormones especially with high intensity, low duration weight training. Weight training also increases muscle mass which increases resting metabolism.

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 2:15 PM

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 2:15 PM

How does being insulin resistant play into your CICO model?

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 2:17 PM

How does being insulin resistant play into your CICO model?
cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 2:17 PM

It certainly can result in less calories going out. Never a plus to be storing energy rather than burning it.

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 2:23 PM

Some of this is silly; remember “baby fat”? Many of these children will outgrow it, literally. Some children are rolly polly, then they take a growth spurt, become slim and start the cycle over. Some start to fill out while a pre-teen, continue getting rounder,then shoot up like a weed. That is one of the main reasons I hate these campaigns. They don’t seem to take into account genetics. At least let the children become older teens unless there is a clear health problem before we start creating eating disorders and psychological damage on people who may very well just grow into the body weight they have.

delicountessa on January 5, 2012 at 2:28 PM

So…instead of changing your diet to produce less insulin (low carb), you should work out more? Eat the same high carb/starchy foods but just less of them?

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 2:33 PM

So…instead of changing your diet to produce less insulin (low carb), you should work out more? Eat the same high carb/starchy foods but just less of them?
cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 2:33 PM

Why not do both? Each option increases caloric output.

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 2:41 PM

Changing your diet to produce less insulin is different than eating the same high/carb starchy foods but less of them.

Adding exercise to low carb does give added punch, though!

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 2:43 PM

Adding exercise to low carb does give added punch, though!
cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 2:43 PM

Gotta have enough carbs though to fuel that exercise!

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 2:55 PM

Simple fact…everything in moderation. Butter will clog your arteries…margarine can cause cancer. I use both…in small amounts.

sage0925 on January 5, 2012 at 2:08 AM

Yeah, that’s pretty much my view of it as well. I’m over 35 now, and losing weight takes longer, but my old approach of cutting calories / exercise (aerobic, no weight lifting) five days a week is working. The last ten pounds are a bear, though (I’m ten pounds from my goal weight).

I’ve been mostly tuning out the conflicting studies and advice I keep hearing in the media or from lay persons on blogs. (I’ll read it, but I don’t take it to heart.)

Even in this thread, there are a few who have jumped in to insist it’s not calorie counting, it’s those evil carbs, etc.

I appreciate they’re trying to help people, but all the conflicting advice and news stories only drives me nuts and confuses me. I’ll just keep doing what’s always worked for me personally.

(And I still eat carbs – and fats – and low fat stuff. Everything in moderation.)

TigerPaw on January 5, 2012 at 3:06 PM

Shame works. If you do it right.
Shame works quite well for people who are not inherently naughty and have a conscience.
Shame does not work well when you are dealing with someone with rotten character.

Badger40 on January 5, 2012 at 8:14 AM

I don’t entirely agree with shaming people. I’m the sort where the carrot works more than the stick.

Most people already feel shamed or condemned enough as it is without someone beating them up some more for being imperfect.

And for all of you libs thinking that Europe is somehow immune, think again. My observations abroad is that it’s happing in all cultures and regions.

hawkdriver on January 5, 2012 at 9:02 AM

Looks like you are right:

U.K. Kids Getting Fatter at Twice the Rate of Americans

American Kids Aren’t the Fattest After All: Go Spain and Italy! (from 2010)

TigerPaw on January 5, 2012 at 3:22 PM

That ignorance is perpetuated by the medical community and the media. The human body is extremely complex, and “calories in/calories out” is barely the tip of the iceberg.

Excuse me, but that is unadulterated BS. CICO is a basic and immutable truth of the human body. I’m not talking about every last single human being, but 95% of us. Eat more, gain weight. Eat less, loose weight or stay the same. If you people touting all this “psuedo science” would get the hell off the computer and move around while eating fewer calories, you would see results. Moderation in eating will keep 95% of us at a healthy body weight. If it doesn’t work for you, then go see your doctor for some metabolic and endocrine blood work to rule out disease.

Disclaimer: Yes, I am a doctor

NOMOBO on January 5, 2012 at 3:23 PM

Gotta have enough carbs though to fuel that exercise!

tommyboy on January 5, 2012 at 2:55 PM

tommyboy, that is actually not true. Although a low/no carb diet is extremly dangerous, it will not cause a decrease in energy available to your body. Fat and protein are just as certainly metabolized to glucose as a simple carb is, just not nearly as fast. What a no carb diet will do is cause ketoacidosis, where protein is peed out. Protein not only from what you’re eating, but also protein from the metabolism of your muscles. This is what happens in uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. Great way to lose weight, don’t you think—NOT.

NOMOBO on January 5, 2012 at 3:31 PM

Yeah, that’s pretty much my view of it as well. I’m over 35 now, and losing weight takes longer, but my old approach of cutting calories / exercise (aerobic, no weight lifting) five days a week is working. The last ten pounds are a bear, though (I’m ten pounds from my goal weight).

I’ve been mostly tuning out the conflicting studies and advice I keep hearing in the media or from lay persons on blogs. (I’ll read it, but I don’t take it to heart.)

Even in this thread, there are a few who have jumped in to insist it’s not calorie counting, it’s those evil carbs, etc.

I appreciate they’re trying to help people, but all the conflicting advice and news stories only drives me nuts and confuses me. I’ll just keep doing what’s always worked for me personally.

(And I still eat carbs – and fats – and low fat stuff. Everything in moderation.)

TigerPaw on January 5, 2012 at 3:06 PM

Carbs spike insulin. Insulin tells the body to quit metabolizing fat and to focus on the influx of sugar it just received. Most people don’t need all this energy so it is stored as fat. Constantly flooding your system with refined carbohydrates will prevent fat loss and lead to metabolic damage and insulin resistance. The average person can get all the carbs they would need in life in the form of fibrous vegetables and fruits. Grains, whole or not, are not needed. Carbohydrates in of themselves are not evil. But there are many people that are carb sensitive or insulin resistant and don’t know it. They do high amounts of cardiovascular activities, eat very low in terms of calories, and either not lose weight, gain weight while even at a caloric deficit, or have a massive rebound if they miss a 5 hour session of cardio.

Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 3:34 PM

Disclaimer: Yes, I am a doctor

NOMOBO on January 5, 2012 at 3:23 PM

Seriously? You’re doctor? Have you read about the alternative hypothesis? Why is it “psuedo science”(sic)?

Bill C on January 5, 2012 at 3:38 PM

The fact is that numerous studies have shown that thin people eat more carbs than obese people.

“Without exception, a high-complex-carbohydrate, high-vegetable-protein diet is associated with low body mass.”- Linda Van Horn of Northwestern University

bugle boy on January 5, 2012 at 3:50 PM

NOMOBO on January 5, 2012 at 3:23 PM

Here is a video with Gary Taubes and Dr. Thomas Dayspring, a specialist in lipids, discussing the science. Take a look at this and tell me if they seem like quacks.

Bill C on January 5, 2012 at 3:51 PM

The fact is that numerous studies have shown that thin people eat more carbs than obese people.

“Without exception, a high-complex-carbohydrate, high-vegetable-protein diet is associated with low body mass.”- Linda Van Horn of Northwestern University

bugle boy on January 5, 2012 at 3:50 PM

It matters what kinds of carbs. Broccoli is good, a twinkie is bad. Heck, if they are eating broccoli, asparagus, steak, and cheese they are on the Atkins diet. Throw in refined sugar and the whole thing goes to hell.

Bill C on January 5, 2012 at 3:53 PM

The fact is that numerous studies have shown that thin people eat more carbs than obese people.

“Without exception, a high-complex-carbohydrate, high-vegetable-protein diet is associated with low body mass.”- Linda Van Horn of Northwestern University

bugle boy on January 5, 2012 at 3:50 PM

Post of the rest of the conclusions of that study. Which goes to Bill C’s point.

“Don’t be misled. The high-carb diet that’s keeping the pounds off is full of high-fiber vegetables, not french fries.

“The point we are trying to make is that what we consider desirable carbohydrates are complex, or high-fiber-containing carbohydrates: whole grains, fruits, and vegetables — not doughnuts or even polished rice,” Van Horn said. “We are looking at legumes and vegetables that offer fiber as well as protein. We’re not talking about refined carbohydrates, commonly known as sugar.”

Not surprisingly, people who exercised more also tended to be less heavy. This was true even though they tended to consume more calories. “

Actually you’d probably find out that these people are eating less carbs in the form of sugars. Fiber is indigestible and is excreted. The body does not use it for energy nor does it metabolize it. You poop it out. I bet if you drilled down deep into what these “thin” people are eating they are eating less carbs (in the form of sugars) in relation to their protein/fat intake. Fiber also creates bulk and fullness and these individuals probably ate less.

Again the type and source of carb matters.

Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 4:14 PM

It matters what kinds of carbs. Broccoli is good, a twinkie is bad. Heck, if they are eating broccoli, asparagus, steak, and cheese they are on the Atkins diet. Throw in refined sugar and the whole thing goes to hell.

Bill C on January 5, 2012 at 3:53 PM

+++

tommyboy, that is actually not true. Although a low/no carb diet is extremly dangerous, it will not cause a decrease in energy available to your body. Fat and protein are just as certainly metabolized to glucose as a simple carb is, just not nearly as fast. What a no carb diet will do is cause ketoacidosis, where protein is peed out. Protein not only from what you’re eating, but also protein from the metabolism of your muscles. This is what happens in uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. Great way to lose weight, don’t you think—NOT.

NOMOBO on January 5, 2012 at 3:31 PM

What is the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis? Because my Atkins books talk about ketosis, not ketoacidosis…

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 4:15 PM

Actually you’d probably find out that these people are eating less carbs in the form of sugars.

Now you are getting into an association between sugar consumption and weight. But the studies have shown no clear link between them.
The fact remains that thin people eat more carbs of all types than obese people.

bugle boy on January 5, 2012 at 4:27 PM

Now you are getting into an association between sugar consumption and weight. But the studies have shown no clear link between them.
The fact remains that thin people eat more carbs of all types than obese people.

bugle boy on January 5, 2012 at 4:27 PM

Your not using the word “Sugar” in the same form I’m using sugars. For example. If I’m eating a slice of egg plant. Its carbohydrate total is 9 of which 2 of that is fiber, 3 is sugars, and the rest is structural content that cannot meet any of the other categories of fat or protein, sugar or fiber. So while I would be ingesting 9 grams of carbohydrates I will only be consuming 3 grams of sugars aka energy.

I just showed you what the person YOU quoted says. These people are eating where most of the carbohydrate content is in the form high of fibrous vegetables and fruit. Not twinkies or cookies.

Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 4:42 PM

What is the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis? Because my Atkins books talk about ketosis, not ketoacidosis…

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 4:15 PM

Ketosis is where the body is creating ketones from fat metabolism but it still can metabolize sugars that enter the body via insulin.

Ketoacidosis is a medical disorder, usually present in the form of Type 1 Diabetes inherently in a person or developed through organ transplants (ie. liver. The body does not have the ablity to distribute glucose for energy usage nor metabolize sugars via insulin. The body then attacks other tissues to consume in order to survive but it still can’t properly create nor utilize the glucose produced from trying to consume these other tissues.

Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 4:50 PM

Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 4:50 PM

;)

I was kind of being a sh1t…and trying to prove a point that NOMOBO was wrong…

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 4:54 PM

@ cptacek – OH, lol

Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 5:02 PM

hey, it was good info anyway :)

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 5:06 PM

I just showed you what the person YOU quoted says

Yes, that was ONE person talking about ONE study. Again, numerous studies have shown a link between a high carb diet and “thinness,” for lack of a better word.

And the Twinkies reference just proves my point. They are loaded with sugar, not fat. As I mentioned, there is no clear link between high sugar intake and obesity.

I’m not here arguing about eating more Twinkies, btw.

bugle boy on January 5, 2012 at 5:18 PM

Common sense must prevail. Do you like celery? Too bad because there is arsenic in celery. It’s bad for you, can kill you, should be banned.
Yes, that is a stupid conclusion. To say that you shouldn’t have an occasional twinkie or big mac is equally stupid. Please show me a peer reviewed study that shows that calorie control is not effective for weight control in the vast majority of people. Yes there are people who are medically compromised metabolically. But are you ready to go through the “peanut allergy” crap one more time?

NOMOBO on January 5, 2012 at 5:29 PM

The fact remains that thin people eat more carbs of all types than obese people.

bugle boy on January 5, 2012 at 4:27 PM

When I was in my early and mid 20s and did lots and lots of swimming, in addition to jogging five times a week, I craved carbs (pasta, bread, etc), ate tons of it, and got very, very skinny.

I was also eating a lot of chocolate candy at that time and still got very skinny.

(I was jogging to stay in shape but swimming for fun.)

I’m just speaking for myself here and my experience. I don’t mean to get wrangled into the back and forth over sugar vs. carbs vs. carbs in veggies or carbs in Twinkies and such going on.

TigerPaw on January 5, 2012 at 5:37 PM

Seriously? You’re doctor?

Bill C on January 5, 2012 at 3:38 PM

Yes, Bill, I am a doctor. USC 1977

NOMOBO on January 5, 2012 at 5:48 PM

NOMOBO, you didn’t answer my question regarding ketosis and ketoacidosis…

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 5:53 PM

Also, 45 states have laws that say that breastfeeding is allowed in public. My state says “it is the public policy of Kansas that a mother’s choice to breastfeed should be supported and encouraged to the greatest extent possible and that a mother may breastfeed in any place she has a right to be.” There is no mention of having to be “subtle” or “discrete” or “having to go to a separate room”

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 9:47 AM

I just love this. It’s like using the “f” word in a loud voice in every sentence while waiting in a line. It’s discourteous. It makes the people around you very uncomfortable. Exibitionism may be a wonderful thing to the exibitionist, but it’s rather a nasty thing to do to strangers. It’s a particularly difficult thing when you’re with a 10 to 14 year old boy and the testosterone is just starting to flow. I can almost guarantee that your public display of your pulchritudinous charms doesn’t elicit visions of good mothering and I’d rather not have my child exposed. You may think you have rights here, but you have them while destroying everyone else’s. Just like mic checks.

What other bodily functions and needs do you need to be free to do in public? How old is the child you’re pulling your breast out to feed? And why bother with a top at all?

It’s all rather like filming the birth of your child and showing it to the neighbors. It may be beautiful and it may be joyous and it may be necessary, but it’s also meant to be private.

Portia46 on January 5, 2012 at 5:55 PM

Exibitionism may be a wonderful thing to the exibitionist, but it’s rather a nasty thing to do to strangers.

It isn’t exhibitionism. It is feeding a baby.

It’s a particularly difficult thing when you’re with a 10 to 14 year old boy and the testosterone is just starting to flow.

You can tell them “she is just feeding a baby. Cool it.”

I can almost guarantee that your public display of your pulchritudinous charms doesn’t elicit visions of good mothering and I’d rather not have my child exposed.

So don’t go out.

You may think you have rights here, but you have them while destroying everyone else’s.

I do have rights here. Period, end of story.

What other bodily functions and needs do you need to be free to do in public?

No other bodily functions feed a baby.

How old is the child you’re pulling your breast out to feed? And why bother with a top at all?

My baby is 7 months old, and isn’t pulling my shirt off.

It’s all rather like filming the birth of your child and showing it to the neighbors. It may be beautiful and it may be joyous and it may be necessary, but it’s also meant to be private.

It is my right to feed my baby anywhere I need to feed it. You can go somewhere else if you are offended.

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 6:05 PM

Government-run ads criticising citizen eating habits are incompatible with the concept “Government Of the People”!!!

This is pure “Government ON the People”…it is completely illegitimate, and it must STOP!!

landlines on January 5, 2012 at 6:58 PM

Its really disgusting how people sexualize feeding a child. It’s really perverted. Tearing and sweating is also a bodily function. They aren’t complaining about that. And they are too lazy to teach their children that’s what breast are for and to get over it.

I breast fed my daughter in public, private, and in front of my parents and siblings. Sometimes in a sling, sometimes with a blanket, sometimes without. No problems. Nobody was traumatized. I didn’t take my top off and swing it around the top of my head shouting “EVERYONE LOOK AT MY BOOBS” like some *looks up* nasty people think. Doubt anyone saw my boob as my child’s big head and half my shirt was covering it.

Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 7:13 PM

Its really disgusting how people sexualize feeding a child. It’s really perverted. Tearing and sweating is also a bodily function. They aren’t complaining about that. And they are too lazy to teach their children that’s what breast are for and to get over it.
Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 7:13 PM

Thank you, Magnus! If someone gets turned on watching a baby eat, doesn’t that make them a ped0phile?

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 7:19 PM

Thank you, Magnus! If someone gets turned on watching a baby eat, doesn’t that make them a ped0phile?

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 7:19 PM

Goodness no.

Just because someone is uncomfortable with it does not mean they’re a pervert or that they look at children sexually.

Its really disgusting how people sexualize feeding a child. It’s really perverted. Tearing and sweating is also a bodily function. They aren’t complaining about that. And they are too lazy to teach their children that’s what breast are for and to get over it.
…Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 7:13 PM

It’s not the baby who is being looked at or thought of in sexual terms- it’s the grown woman’s uncovered breast that’s getting the attention.

Nude female breasts are considered sexual in American culture, regardless of why they’re being taken out for display or use.

I remember taking a sociology class in college. One chapter in our textbook dealt with this kind of thing. It turns out that this stuff differs from culture to culture.

We read about a tribe (in Africa, I think) where female breasts don’t do a thing for males – they get hot and bothered there by elaborate face paintings that the women wear.

Tearing and sweating is also a bodily function. They aren’t complaining about that.
…Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 7:13 PM

Urination is a bodily function, and I’ve never felt comfortable with people doing that in front of me, like the time I was 12 years old and a male construction worker didn’t realize my friends and I were playing in the woods behind a housing development where he was working, and he did his business out in the open.

TigerPaw on January 5, 2012 at 7:32 PM

Urination is a bodily function, and I’ve never felt comfortable with people doing that in front of me
TigerPaw on January 5, 2012 at 7:32 PM

You would feed your child urine?!? Gross!!

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 7:34 PM

Urine is human waste and if someone is doing it in front of you that you can see whats going on and all their business out in public chances are they are peeing somewhere that the general public comes in contact with making it unsanitary. The reason breastfeeding makes you uncomfortable is that breast are seen as a sexual organ and a baby sucking on a breast becomes a sexual act, not an act of nourishment.

Let’s talk about liberty. Liberty is being able to feed your children their natural God given nourishment when you want and how you want (breast or bottle) and nobody has the right to impose their personal choices on you because it makes them uncomfortable. Just like the above commenters whining and crying about the government imposing on a parents rights to make themselves fat disease bags and do the same to their children.

Also women shouldn’t be made to feel guilty because they chose formula feeding. While breast milk is far superior than anything man made, breast feeding is hard, takes a lot of time, and can be uncomfortable or painful. I ended up having to do both and going to a hypoallergenic formula. Sometimes you can’t produce enough milk, you work and can’t pump, you have your own health issues and maybe on medication which would taint any milk, and sometimes children have digestive problems and you have to supplement.

Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 7:50 PM

Also women shouldn’t be made to feel guilty because they chose formula feeding. While breast milk is far superior than anything man made, breast feeding is hard, takes a lot of time, and can be uncomfortable or painful. I ended up having to do both and going to a hypoallergenic formula. Sometimes you can’t produce enough milk, you work and can’t pump, you have your own health issues and maybe on medication which would taint any milk, and sometimes children have digestive problems and you have to supplement.

Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 7:50 PM

Why would anyone feel guilty?

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 8:03 PM

You would feed your child urine?!? Gross!!

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 7:34 PM

I don’t have kids. Whether you like it or not breasts are considered sexual, like a man’s genitalia, so to many people you exposing your nude breast is like a man taking his thing out to urinate.

TigerPaw on January 5, 2012 at 8:08 PM

The reason breastfeeding makes you uncomfortable is that breast are seen as a sexual organ and a baby sucking on a breast becomes a sexual act, not an act of nourishment.

Magnus on January 5, 2012 at 7:50 PM

I pointed that information out in a post above.

Let’s talk about liberty. Liberty is being able to feed your children their natural God given nourishment when you want and how you want (breast or bottle) and nobody has the right to impose their personal choices on you because it makes them uncomfortable

But you have to do this in public?

No, I do not eat my dinner in a bathroom (before you drag out that old saw) – but then, I eat my dinner fully clothed when dining at a table in public (and in private at home).

TigerPaw on January 5, 2012 at 8:10 PM

But you have to do this in public?

No, I do not eat my dinner in a bathroom (before you drag out that old saw) – but then, I eat my dinner fully clothed when dining at a table in public (and in private at home).

TigerPaw on January 5, 2012 at 8:10 PM

Here’s the thing…you don’t have a say. It is my right to feed my child wherever I am, and if you don’t like it, you can leave.

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 8:19 PM

Here’s the thing…you don’t have a say. It is my right to feed my child wherever I am, and if you don’t like it, you can leave.

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 8:19 PM

I can also speak up and tell you on a blog I disagree or confront you in public and tell you I find it inappropriate – also my rights.

Women in New Orleans at Mardi Gras are known for lifting their shirts up and yelling, “Throw me something Mister!” at men in parades.

I don’t see how that female display is different from a woman exposing herself in public to feed a baby. Motive is different but result is same – naked female chest in public.

TigerPaw on January 5, 2012 at 8:24 PM

Portia46 on January 5, 2012 at 5:55 PM

Wow. I can’t believe people are so uptight about breastfeeding babies. I mean, seriously, before Similac how do some of you folks think infants were fed? Sanitation being what it was, and homogenized milk undiscovered, babies were often breastfed until age 2 in order to prevent infant mortality.

These days of course, the decision to breastfeed, whether to do it or not, when and where to do it… should be between moms and babies. Frankly, there are just too many skinny bottle-fed kids and too many chubby breast-fed kids to take any militant LeLeche League busybodies seriously on the subject of weight management. And while I don’t envy anyone their sexual hang-ups when it comes to what are essentially fleshy baby bottles, there’s no point in reasoning with the unreasonable.

People ought to just leave one another alone. Freedom is about doing whatever the hell makes you happy… just so long as you’re not actively impinging upon the rights of other citizens to do the same. So for those bashful folks who are traumatized at the sight of a functional breast, there’s no Constitutional right to never be offended.

Murf76 on January 5, 2012 at 9:28 PM

Please watch Gary Taubes’ lecture at Berkeley discussing his book, Why We Get Fat.

Fascinating. Good stuff. My husband is a chiropractor, so we’ve been teaching our patients some of these principles for a decade or more. Nice to see the mainstream educational institutions are catching on. I wonder how long until the average M.D. will get it?

wordmum on January 6, 2012 at 1:45 AM

I can also speak up and tell you on a blog I disagree or confront you in public and tell you I find it inappropriate – also my rights.

That’s fine. I’ll just laugh at you and your hangups. However, if you own a business or work in one, if you tell someone to leave, they could sue you. Or instigate a nurse in.

Women in New Orleans at Mardi Gras are known for lifting their shirts up and yelling, “Throw me something Mister!” at men in parades.

I don’t see how that female display is different from a woman exposing herself in public to feed a baby. Motive is different but result is same – naked female chest in public.

TigerPaw on January 5, 2012 at 8:24 PM

You are pretty sad, then. You can’t even see anything! It looks like you are holding a sleeping baby.

cptacek on January 6, 2012 at 2:07 AM

TigerPaw, you might find some interesting photos here:

Or you might pee yourself because you are such a prude. Whatever.

cptacek on January 6, 2012 at 2:15 AM

Yes, Bill, I am a doctor. USC 1977

NOMOBO on January 5, 2012 at 5:48 PM

NOMOBO, you didn’t answer my question regarding ketosis and ketoacidosis…

cptacek on January 5, 2012 at 5:53 PM

I find it interesting that NOMOBO didn’t point out what kind of doctor s/he is. There are a great many people with a PhD who aren’t medical doctors (MD), and a great many MDs who don’t focus significantly on endocrinology, so they might be more likely to make a bone-headed mistake like substituting ketoacidosis for ketosis.

Ketoacidosis is a life-threatening condition that is almost entirely limited to type 1 diabetics. Ketosis is a perfectly natural state for a normal human being to be in… in fact, one could largely consider it a de facto state for most human beings over the span of the last two million years or so.

I’m currently successfully using the Primal Blueprint, which emphasizes not only keeping carbs low, but exercising proper moderation in protein intake as well (get as much protein as you need, but don’t go substantially overboard on a long-term basis), eating a proper amount of vegetables (and fruits in moderation) making up your balance of calories with healthy fats, and focusing on the types of exercise that most effectively activate gene expression that is in-line with our genetic heritage.

That means avoiding sugars and grains (yes, including whole grains), moving around a lot at a moderate pace, lifting heavy things from time to time, and at roughly 7-10 day intervals, briefly (less than 10 minutes) sprinting as if your life depended on it.

Mark Sisson has done a really good job of putting this program together, and it meshes extremely well with Gary Taubes’ findings.

Mark and Gary seem to agree that insulin is almost certainly the key to understanding obesity and getting healthly… and insulin resistance is one of the components to understanding why the American populace has gotten into the “bad shape” that we see today.

VekTor on January 6, 2012 at 4:48 PM

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