Internet bigwigs consider a novel way to stop SOPA

posted at 2:30 pm on December 30, 2011 by Tina Korbe

Just congressional consideration of legislation that amounts to Internet censorship might have unintended consequences. As the House Judiciary Committee prepares to vote on the Stop Online Piracy Act and as the Senate prepares to debate the Protect IP Act on Jan. 24, opponents have demonstrated the creativity, efficiency and depth of their commitment to quash the bills.

Take, for example, the planned GoDaddy boycott that effectively pressured the domain registrar to denounce SOPA and its Senate counterpart, PIPA. In the past, GoDaddy spokespeople had expressed support for an expansion of copyright law to cripple piratical websites. More specifically, GoDaddy general counsel suggested that Domain Name System blocking could be an effective way to combat online piracy. Anti-SOPA activists have serious concerns about the practice of DNS blocking — so they proposed a protest of GoDaddy, urging opponents of SOPA to transfer their domain names from GoDaddy to other registrars. Yesterday, GoDaddy completely reversed its support for SOPA and PIPA.

Now, executives of major Internet companies are considering a novel way to armtwist members of Congress. Declan McCullagh reports:

It was Google co-founder Sergey Brin who warned that the Stop Online Piracy Act and the Protect IP Act “would put us on a par with the most oppressive nations in the world.” Craigslist founder Craig Newmark, Twitter co-founders Jack Dorsey and Biz Stone, and LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman argue that the bills give the Feds unacceptable “power to censor the Web.”

But these companies have yet to roll out the heavy artillery.

When the home pages of Google.com, Amazon.com, Facebook.com, and their Internet allies simultaneously turn black with anti-censorship warnings that ask users to contact politicians about a vote in the U.S. Congress the next day on SOPA, you’ll know they’re finally serious.

True, it would be the political equivalent of a nuclear option–possibly drawing retributions from the the influential politicos backing SOPA and Protect IP–but one that could nevertheless be launched in 2012.

“There have been some serious discussions about that,” says Markham Erickson, who heads the NetCoalition trade association that counts Google, Amazon.com, eBay, and Yahoo as members. “It has never happened before.”

It’s an interesting idea — and one that simultaneously draws on and proves the strength of online communities. It’d be great if the men and women in Congress saw the flaws with the legislation without this kind of full-court press from online users, but, if not, the exercise of this “nuclear option” would be a surefire way to demonstrate the advantage of direct relationships with users.

Update: This post originally incorrectly referred to the “Stop Online Privacy Act,” when, in fact, the bill is the “Stop Online Piracy Act.” Rather different, don’t you think? Sorry for my error. The post has been corrected above.


Related Posts:

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

I say do it. Do not give the government any power to say what should and should not be on the web.

gophergirl on December 30, 2011 at 2:35 PM

the planned GoDaddy boycott

Many of us have long boycotted GoDaddy because of their perverted ads.

itsnotaboutme on December 30, 2011 at 2:36 PM

SOPA is second only to the Patriot Act in violating American’s protections and liberties under the Bill Of Rights. It, too, is a disgrace to America and every member of CONgress that supports it (and the Patriot Act) should be put in prison (or subject to death) for high treason.

TeaPartyNation on December 30, 2011 at 2:39 PM

I’ve never taken GoDaddy seriously enough to look at what they offer.

southsideironworks on December 30, 2011 at 2:39 PM

I can’t boycott GoDaddy. “They” don’t know what they are asking. It would just be bad business, and take a couple months to do anyway.

But these companies have yet to roll out the heavy artillery. [...] you’ll know they’re finally serious.

But until then, we know they aren’t.

Axe on December 30, 2011 at 2:39 PM

It SOPA any surprise after the senate and house voted to allow the president to detain US citizens indefinitely?

angryed on December 30, 2011 at 2:40 PM

How bad is this bill? I could post a comment with a link to a pirated torrent of, say, “Dreams of My Father” ANYWHERE on the HotAir website, and the government could come in and shut down the entire website. That’s the website meaning anything that’s starts with “hotair.com/”

What would stop a political opponent of conservative values from pasting a link in the comments of a thread that is years old that wouldn’t possibly be moderated, then alerting the authorities?

You could, because the bill is so stupidly written, still log on to Hotair through their IP address, which is: 74.84.198.233. Might want to save that.

Meric1837 on December 30, 2011 at 2:41 PM

Government needs to remember that a ‘limited time’ for intellectual property does NOT mean one second less than the life of the universe. Nor is it natural life plus some decades to satisfy Disney. It was originally down in the 10 years plus 10 renewable ONCE range… and was 16+16 when Disney was alive. That was what Disney EXPECTED but a corporation can live and lobby forever to get it extended and that isn’t right, at all.

ajacksonian on December 30, 2011 at 2:41 PM

All congresscritters s/b thrown out in 2012, to teach them a lesson. Only 25% of the people still believe to be represented by Congress. It’s sad that 25% are such utter fools. Actually more than that are.

Schadenfreude on December 30, 2011 at 2:47 PM

Professor Jacobson at LI has a good post on this today

Concerns about Google unilaterally being able to shut down a Blogger blog was one of the motivations for me moving to a self-hosted platform.

Now WordPress.com has pulled the plug on BareNakedIslam blog under pressure from CAIR. (Note, although Legal Insurrection uses WordPress software, this blog is not hosted on WordPress.com.)

If the claims about SOPA are accurate, then the entire internet will be like being hosted at WordPress.com, leaving politically incorrect blogs like Legal Insurrection at risk. There will be nowhere to run.

So out of an abundance of caution, consider me part of STOP SOPA.

http://legalinsurrection.com/2011/12/sopa-will-make-the-whole-internet-like-wordpress-com/

beacon on December 30, 2011 at 2:47 PM

You could, because the bill is so stupidly written, still log on to Hotair through their IP address, which is: 74.84.198.233. Might want to save that. Meric1837 on December 30, 2011 at 2:41 PM

I did. Thanks!

Akzed on December 30, 2011 at 2:47 PM

How could the government possibly enforce such a bill?

Why, they’ll just create a new bureaucracy and hire tens of thousands of bureaucrats to police the Internet!

What’s not to like about a cool new government department?

/

Dack Thrombosis on December 30, 2011 at 2:49 PM

Did not stop Obamacare
Did not stop Debt Ceiling Increase.
Will not stop anything really. Congress is no longer America. It is its own land, where those who work there are not held to account for anything they do. Even with our current mood, the people in congress today know they are almost 100% certain to be in office after the next election cycle.

astonerii on December 30, 2011 at 2:52 PM

When the home pages of Google.com, Amazon.com, Facebook.com, and their Internet allies simultaneously turn black with anti-censorship warnings that ask users to contact politicians about a vote in the U.S. Congress the next day on SOPA, you’ll know they’re finally serious.

DO IT.

Stop SOPA: http://americancensorship.org/

petefrt on December 30, 2011 at 2:55 PM

As the House Judiciary Committee prepares to vote on the Stop Online Privacy Act

I think you meant the Stop Online Piracy Act.

veryapropos on December 30, 2011 at 2:56 PM

Many of us have long boycotted GoDaddy because of their perverted ads.

itsnotaboutme on December 30, 2011 at 2:36 PM

Perverted. Did they show nudity? Was anybody harmed? Did the actors get paid? Were they working under duress? CAN YOU CHANGE THE CHANNEL?

Capitalist Hog on December 30, 2011 at 2:59 PM

I remeber the good ol days when PIPA was just a show-stealing, Princess’s sister. Things have gotten so complicated…

phineasgage on December 30, 2011 at 2:59 PM

____ SOPA.

Capitalist Hog on December 30, 2011 at 3:00 PM

Do not meddle in the affairs of Internet Wizards, for they are subtle and quick to anger.

Socratease on December 30, 2011 at 3:00 PM

For a proper mea culpa Go Daddy needs Danica Patrick and a Superbowl TV ad.

tmitsss on December 30, 2011 at 3:00 PM

“Black pages”? Gimme a break. Like the buffoons who came up with this would give a crap.

Pocketbooks, folks. Their pocketbooks and your votes, that’s what they care about. The pockets are being filled by Hollyweird et al., so votes is all ya got to work with.

Get to it.

mojo on December 30, 2011 at 3:01 PM

Many of us have long boycotted GoDaddy because of their perverted ads.

itsnotaboutme on December 30, 2011 at 2:36 PM

I like GoDaddy’s “perverted” ads.

As far as the nuclear option goes, I think they should go for it. I’m all for anything to show these corruptocrats in Washington that we don’t need Big Brother censoring the internet.

DRayRaven on December 30, 2011 at 3:02 PM

I oppose SOPA. But a couple of things.

1) It’s ironic that many of the same people who want government to control their health care and purchasing habits go nuclear when the government wants to control websites.

2) There won’t be a website blackout on that scale. The companies may oppose the bill but they’re not stupid. They’re not going to lose that much money and risk people starting to use someone else to make a point.

3) Lots of people have opposed the bill responsibly.

But others — particularly those whose interests are rooted in pirated material still being available — have taken to demonizing anyone who dares not staunchly oppose the bill.

Apparently we need to preserve speech on the net by demonizing anyone who disagrees with us and attempting to shut down companies that don’t jump on board with our political message. No thanks.

amerpundit on December 30, 2011 at 3:03 PM

As mentioned before, anyone showing a few-second clip of a movie, videogame or piece of music as an example to review could have their whole site shut down. Or if another site links to their site, THAT site could be shut down. This is big entertainment working hand in hand (again) with government to control creative content.

Put another way, remember when the people who produced Downfall temprorarilly got You-tube to pull all the parodies of Hitler yelling (despite it falling under fair use?)
Now, instead of getting You-tube to pull the videos, that company could have informed on You-tube and had all of You-tube SHUT DOWN over it.

Think about how many movies, TV shows and music clips are on You-tube. This is a nightmare of an overreach.

DrAllecon on December 30, 2011 at 3:03 PM

Meric1837 on December 30, 2011 at 2:41 PM

The registrar would be forced to block the domain name. The webhost would be forced to block the content. The site owner is saddled with the exact challenge you describe.

The workarounds exist. But most web-based businesses would be seriously screwed.

Capitalist Hog on December 30, 2011 at 3:04 PM

…As the House Judiciary Committee prepares to vote on the Stop Online Privacy Act…

Calling Dr. Freud, calling Dr. Freud…

eeyore on December 30, 2011 at 3:06 PM

By the way, Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook — the guy who doesn’t want government with control of the web — is a supporter of Barack Obama. You remember him. The guy who wants to control your health care.

amerpundit on December 30, 2011 at 3:06 PM

Why would congress stop this? They have been instructed by the people who bought them off to pass this.

rndmusrnm on December 30, 2011 at 3:06 PM

That would mean 15.3 million people in the U.S. think Congress is doing a CrackerJack job. So family members, staffers, and people reliant on money from Congress. Sounds about right.

Meric1837 on December 30, 2011 at 3:06 PM

…wrong post. Stupid tabbed browsing…

Meric1837 on December 30, 2011 at 3:07 PM

amerpundit on December 30, 2011 at 3:06 PM

All of the on-line bigs are. Boycott them all.

Schadenfreude on December 30, 2011 at 3:07 PM

Isn’t it interesting that our elected officials would waste so much time and money coming up with SOPA…

yet this is still a problem.

Seven Percent Solution on December 30, 2011 at 3:08 PM

This whole SOPA idea is absolutely ridiculous. I’m all for certain things having a copyright, presumably for $$$, and piracy costs companies billions of lost revenue. But SOPA is akin to putting a cast on an arm to stop a paper cut.

Anti-SOPA activists have serious concerns about the practice of DNS blocking — so they proposed a protest of GoDaddy, urging opponents of SOPA to transfer their domain names from GoDaddy to other registrars. Yesterday, GoDaddy completely reversed its support for SOPA and PIPA.

Truth. GoDaddy was losing a heck of a lot of domains hosted there, went into panic mode, and flipped their decision to support that bill.

JetBoy on December 30, 2011 at 3:09 PM

amerpundit on December 30, 2011 at 3:06 PM

Classic NIMBY.

Meric1837 on December 30, 2011 at 3:09 PM

Hollywood, catch up or perish.

YouTube is where people see movie trailers. And that’s what this is really all about, movies and tv clips.

Keep advancing access through hardware like Roku. People are paying for premium content. Otherwise you’re cutting off your hand to scratch your back.

Capitalist Hog on December 30, 2011 at 3:10 PM

and flipped their decision to support that bill.

Tepidly at best, they still get the finger.

Capitalist Hog on December 30, 2011 at 3:11 PM

So what … they want to turn the whole internet into one giant prypal/fleebay account?

kregg on December 30, 2011 at 3:11 PM

amerpundit on December 30, 2011 at 3:06 PM

As if nobody knows this. What’s your point?

Capitalist Hog on December 30, 2011 at 3:12 PM

Many of us have long boycotted GoDaddy because of their perverted ads.

itsnotaboutme

Oh, LIGHTEN UP, FRANCIS!!!

Now, back in your pretentious nunnery, sniffy one. I have no idea what sort of ads you thought a redblooded, former Marine CEO would have (Ever seen his annual Marine Corps Birthday vids? OUTSTANDING!), but they rock. Now he has rocks in his head, but that’s a whole different story.

tree hugging sister on December 30, 2011 at 3:14 PM

Government needs to remember that a ‘limited time’ for intellectual property does NOT mean one second less than the life of the universe. Nor is it natural life plus some decades to satisfy Disney. It was originally down in the 10 years plus 10 renewable ONCE range… and was 16+16 when Disney was alive. That was what Disney EXPECTED but a corporation can live and lobby forever to get it extended and that isn’t right, at all.

ajacksonian on December 30, 2011 at 2:41 PM

Wasn’t there a study that put the bell curve of economic benefit from © at about 30 years, as well?

It’s a hijack, but: I’m with you on the current state of copyright. Also, it is hard to feel like you’ve committed a crime when everything in a healthy conscience says you didn’t.

Want to do something about piracy? Fix copyright.

Axe on December 30, 2011 at 3:15 PM

amerpundit on December 30, 2011 at 3:06 PM

I remember you now. I’m sorry I even replied. /ignore

Capitalist Hog on December 30, 2011 at 3:16 PM

I’m fairly confident that a SOPA would produce a number of alternate offshore root DNSes, some of which would be trustworthy and some of which would not.

I still don’t get it. The MPAA/RIAA/content industry and the GOP are like Lucy, Charlie Brown, and the football. In the short term they promise money, in the long term they’re poison.

JEM on December 30, 2011 at 3:17 PM

Do it, and start researching workarounds in case this abomination still gets passed. This is the Internet version of the Patriot Act on five different kinds of steroids. Freedom of speech on the ‘net may well live or die on this hill.

MelonCollie on December 30, 2011 at 3:18 PM

…wrong post. Stupid tabbed browsing…

Meric1837 on December 30, 2011 at 3:07 PM

Heh. Yeah. It was the technology :)

j/k — hate when I do that too.

Axe on December 30, 2011 at 3:21 PM

eh, not exactly novel – my understanding is that they borrowed the idea from the italian wikipedia doing the same thing when faced with a censorious law over there, but it would certainly be attention-getting if they really did it. I hope they do.

AndStatistics on December 30, 2011 at 3:23 PM

O/T

5% Think Congress Doing a Good Job: New Low

:) 5%

Axe on December 30, 2011 at 3:26 PM

All of this portends that Congresscritters actually give a crap what constituents think. They got a “full court press” on the Obamacare bill…didn’t give a flip and voted the way they wanted to anyway. Why would this bill be any different.

Only difference here is the pressure from the heavy breathers at Google, GoDaddy, Facebook, etc. And THAT may well be the only reason this bill fails…because of their big wallets.

If you really care about your freedom of speech, you should be calling those guys to lend your support…not your congressman to voice your objection. The internet big wigs give a crap about your opinion.

Whodathunkit? The free market, protector of freedoms. The hell you say.

CycloneCDB on December 30, 2011 at 3:27 PM

O/T I found GetALife!

Check the comments in this Daily Caller story.

Charlemagne on December 30, 2011 at 3:27 PM

Single out the IP blocks used by the Feds and every time someone from those addresses accessed anything turn the screen black with a message opposing it for 30 seconds before going on with the requested action.

clippermiami on December 30, 2011 at 3:28 PM

GoDaddy has not stopped supporting SOPA. They’re loosing more than 100,000 domain registrations to date because of their support for SOPA – which they are exempted from – read the legislation.

GoDaddy also directly competes with Web Developers who register their clients domain name there. GoDaddy is not above sending direct e-mails to end-user companies soliciting their business – away from those who give them business.

Finally, GoDaddy initially prevented whois look-ups as part of a strategy to prevent domain transfers – a technical violation of ICANN rules.

In short, GoDaddy Sux!

CiLH1 on December 30, 2011 at 3:32 PM

(Ever seen his annual Marine Corps Birthday vids? OUTSTANDING!),
tree hugging sister on December 30, 2011 at 3:14 PM

Bob’s Happy Birthday, USMC vids are some of the most awesome America-loving videos anywhere. The passion and pride run deep. If the artificially-enhanced babes in wife-beaters offend you (though I’m sure Ms Patrick is all genuine), we should all take a moment to appreciate the MC tributes before you click away.

rwenger43 on December 30, 2011 at 3:35 PM

If they can have Internet in Syria or Iran when there are snipers shooting people crossing the street for bread and smokes. There will be some form of Internet everywhere. The time to stop it under the cover of copyright was around 1992.

Is sure is a good thing that the Tea party small government won in 2010, then as soon as the bags where unpacked the big government Republican progressive told them how things work and nothing you can do to change it. They love big government as long as they are the one holding the kill switch. Which is why this bill of more government has not died already.

If this bill with no entitlements does not die a quick and fast death how could Obamacare go anywhere by just a few changes in the seating arrangements at the adults table.

tjexcite on December 30, 2011 at 3:35 PM

If you really care about your freedom of speech, you should be calling those guys to lend your support…not your congressman to voice your objection. The internet big wigs give a crap about your opinion.

Whodathunkit? The free market, protector of freedoms. The hell you say.

Don’t be stupid. These “Internet big wigs” are only on the right side of this issue because they know that SOPA will hurt them. (Google, owner of YouTube, especially, for obvious reasons.) They’re not valiant, ideological defenders of free speech.

theodore on December 30, 2011 at 3:38 PM

This bill wont stop anything. You can still pirate things even with censorship. The internet is more than just .com and .net. All the piraters will just go to a country that doesnt violate our first ammendmant. The govt is stupid for thinking they can out smart anyone. Theyll be lucky if the internet communities dont black list them. Write a code that permanently dissables their ip address. How about ddos attacks that pop their networks. All kinds of things can be done that these buffoons cant even imagine.

speekr on December 30, 2011 at 3:39 PM

Anyone else think that the people in Congress supporting this technology crackdown are probably the same people who call their grandkids to help them install a printer…and think the internet is a series of tubes.

nextgen_repub on December 30, 2011 at 3:43 PM

Isn’t it Piracy not Privacy? Not that they’re probably that much different in intent…

UnderstandingisPower on December 30, 2011 at 3:45 PM

Anyone else think that the people in Congress supporting this technology crackdown are probably the same people who call their grandkids to help them install a printer…and think the internet is a series of tubes.

nextgen_repub on December 30, 2011 at 3:43 PM

+1. How much you wanna bet that without their staff, they’d be clueless to operate anything more complicated than a cell phone?

MelonCollie on December 30, 2011 at 3:47 PM

theodore on December 30, 2011 at 3:38 PM

It’s not their job to defend free speech. Lots of Americans already died dong so. If they didn’t defend their interests they would not be any good to their shareholders or mission statements.

Stop looking for a way to get in a dig. Dig in against SOPA.

Capitalist Hog on December 30, 2011 at 3:49 PM

One of the main problems we have in this country is the idea that should an industry need regulation to protect its consumers that somehow it must be through the force of the US Congress. This internet bill, which is as bad as everyone says in my opinion, is just one more example.

Take for instance the requirement for meat inspection by the FDA. We assume that there must be federal standards and federal intervention. However, what happens is that barriers to entry are created and a few companies end up in an ologarchial industry that is protected by the regualtions. You can’t just open a meat packing plant, you have to have lawyers and bureaucrats whose job is to fill out paperwork to comply with the regs. This costs money and makes it hard to compete against the larger players who have enough market share.

We think the tradeoff is that we have safer products however in the example above the meat packing industry will lobby the government and the politicians will allow product that is not as safe as could be when it affects the bottom line of everyone of the players. The government collects the data and regulates. This is a segregation of duties issue. The person recording a transaction should never be the individual responsible for performing the actions or authorizing them. Yet the FED
Agency does both.

Any regulation by congress should be general in nature. The specifics should be set by state agencies and the regulators performing the examinations should be independent professionals completely independent of the government.

One of the reasons that congress keeps granting itself power to regulate in areas requireing no regulation such as the internet is because they end up with total control and a constituency in the industry that are beholden to send them donations in order to stay in business.

The downside is that the economy shrinks as innovative startups are limited if not effectively banned by the legislation.

Just my two cents, now worth $0.0098 thanks to Tim Geitner.

Individualist on December 30, 2011 at 4:21 PM

Don’t be stupid. These “Internet big wigs” are only on the right side of this issue because they know that SOPA will hurt them. (Google, owner of YouTube, especially, for obvious reasons.) They’re not valiant, ideological defenders of free speech.

theodore on December 30, 2011 at 3:38 PM

The point is that they are on the right side.

McDuck on December 30, 2011 at 4:25 PM

Axe on December 30, 2011 at 3:15 PM

From memory only, the maximum amount of earning was within 12 years and then tailed off thereafter. In fact most published works get the majority of their cash in the initial release and the tail only becomes important for top authors or if you have works at Baen books, as they are demonstrating that free text gets book sales… that is amazing, quite frankly, and would actually shake the industry if it wasn’t given the life + extra.

What is even worse is that there are works in limbo, that are covered under copyright but have no real holder: the author is dead, the estate gone, and the publisher also disappeared. Yet you dare not put those into the public domain as someone might dig up the copyright and sue… geneologists are hit with this, but so are some compilers of fictional works who want representative examples of lesser known authors and can’t utilize the works.

It is absolutely insane what Congress has done to please large companies.

ajacksonian on December 30, 2011 at 4:33 PM

“Stop Online Privacy Act”

No, you had it right the first time.

SansJeux on December 30, 2011 at 4:39 PM

What if every pol that supported either of these pieces of 1984 crap suddenly lost their Facebook pages, Twitter feeds, blog coverage and showed up dead last at #10,000 in the search engines? And were deluged with angry e-mail. They might pause and ask if it’s worth the effort.

ironked on December 30, 2011 at 4:42 PM

What if every pol that supported either of these pieces of 1984 crap suddenly lost their Facebook pages, Twitter feeds, blog coverage and showed up dead last at #10,000 in the search engines? And were deluged with angry e-mail. That would hit them right in their greedy little online fund raising pockets. They might pause and ask if it’s really worth the effort.

ironked on December 30, 2011 at 4:44 PM

How bad is this bill? I could post a comment with a link to a pirated torrent of, say, “Dreams of My Father” ANYWHERE on the HotAir website, and the government could come in and shut down the entire website. That’s the website meaning anything that’s starts with “hotair.com/”

What would stop a political opponent of conservative values from pasting a link in the comments of a thread that is years old that wouldn’t possibly be moderated, then alerting the authorities?

You could, because the bill is so stupidly written, still log on to Hotair through their IP address, which is: 74.84.198.233. Might want to save that.

Meric1837 on December 30, 2011 at 2:41 PM

Yup. This website – any website – can be shut down for one link in the comments section to copyrighted material.
This legislation guts the DMCA and strips out the safe harbor provision that basically says as long as the website acts in good faith (takes down a link to copyrighted material when it is brought to their attention or they notice it) then they will not be held liable.
I’m all for making stopping online piracy easier, but this legislation is bad news. Any member of Congress who claims to be for smaller government should oppose this bill.

SleightOfHand on December 30, 2011 at 4:47 PM

In tough debates it’s always best to harken back to the original Republican debater:

“The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. The occasion is piled high with difficulty, and we must rise — with the occasion. As our case is new, so we must think anew, and act anew.”

Knott Buyinit on December 30, 2011 at 4:54 PM

As an artist, I am all for intellectual property rights. There is nothing more disheartening than to get online an see that someone has stolen your design and is selling it. But seriously, SOPA is a crap sandwich from beginning to end. Congress can’t get anything right.

Kristamatic on December 30, 2011 at 5:11 PM

Any member of Congress who claims to be for smaller government should oppose this bill.

SleightOfHand on December 30, 2011 at 4:47 PM

I would have thought the last year would have disabused you of the belief that members of congress are for smaller government.

chemman on December 30, 2011 at 5:16 PM

the nation is drowning in debt, government spending is completely out of control, unemployment is ridiculously high, half the nation is on the public dole and wanting more, almost 50 million people on food stamps……. the US is broke and broken…… someone tell me how the F*** legislation like this comes to light and why there are folks on the public payrolls crafting this garbage? there’s NO PRIORITIES. SOPA is not only stupid, it just not a priority. No wonder they are at 5% approval….

maineconservative on December 30, 2011 at 5:29 PM

Let’s just hope that if this SOPA obscenity becomes a real possibility that the Net giants will follow through and have their anti-SOPA day. That will drown those scumbag legislators in rage and anger. Just imagine the high school kid who knows nothing about politics yet logs on to Facebook and gets … nothing. What fun.

This is just another example of an out-of-control, oppressive government trying to exert even more authority over our lives. Here is a healthy, vibrant Internet right before their greedy eyes – it’s an irresistible prize. After the 2012 elections we MUST start a 3rd party. A conservative party.

Samantha on December 30, 2011 at 5:55 PM

Of course, the premiere conservative corporate shill, Grover Norquist, supports SOPA. Take look at the Scribd PDF a ways down on this link:

http://venturebeat.com/2011/12/22/list-of-sopa-supporters/

BocaJuniors on December 30, 2011 at 6:09 PM

Many of us have long boycotted GoDaddy because of their perverted ads.

itsnotaboutme on December 30, 2011 at 2:36 PM

Perverted. Did they show nudity? Was anybody harmed? Did the actors get paid? Were they working under duress? CAN YOU CHANGE THE CHANNEL?

Capitalist Hog on December 30, 2011 at 2:59 PM

Reading comprehension’s not your long suit, I see.

Solaratov on December 30, 2011 at 6:21 PM

Oppressive, overpowering big government trying to grab more control over the people.
The real 1% is in Government…everyone else is the 99%.

albill on December 30, 2011 at 6:27 PM

O/T

5% Think Congress Doing a Good Job: New Low

:) 5%

Axe on December 30, 2011 at 3:26 PM

WARNING. Low ratings for Congress is good. But I had a really bad wake up call yesterday with my banker. She was saying everybody is whining about the economy – I know she voted for the one of course so I replied right away that you get what you voted for. It’s because of Congress she said. I kind of agreed – throw them all out – but then the surprise: “if they would listen to him and do what he says things would be much better”…HUH???

So according to this moron, if the US is going down it is because of Congress…well, because Congress does not listen to obama!

I guess all your excitement with Congress disapproval numbers will disappear. Mine did.

American Dream 246 on December 30, 2011 at 6:39 PM

My wife and I think it’s appropriate that this proposed law is called SOPA. In Greek that means “Be Quiet!”

Tzetzes on December 30, 2011 at 6:54 PM

“Nuclear option”? Please! Ooooh, turning your pages black is gonna really show the Man what power you have! /major eyeroll/

You want to do something revolutionary? Do something like block all requests to Google from addresses in a .gov domain. Block access to Facebook and youTube from .mil. Do a little DNS blocking of your own to show how ugly it will get. Those would be “nuclear options”!

GWB on December 30, 2011 at 7:29 PM

I guess all your excitement with Congress disapproval numbers will disappear. Mine did.

American Dream 246 on December 30, 2011 at 6:39 PM

I have to acknowledge some tempering has now occurred.

Axe on December 30, 2011 at 7:43 PM

I read GoDaddy’s briefing of Congress and could find nothing technically wrong with it — including the exhortation for voluntary industry action — but the intimation that pre-emptive Government action, absent a lawsuit, should be allowed is scary.

The thought that all you need is the equivalent of a warrant to shut down a site is chilling.

Disclosure: I myself have all of my domain names with GoDaddy because they have been proactive in dealing with spam. GoDaddy’s terms of service state that they will not provide any services to spammers, be it DNS, server space, or registry.

Do there’s a lot to be said for GoDaddy’s voluntary position with respect to privacy and copyrights.

CiLH1 on December 30, 2011 at 3:32 PM

I think you’ve missed the “why” — which GoDaddy didn’t do a very good job of explaining.

Spammers harvest registry records — in essence downloading the entire registry database — which in GoDaddy’s case is in the millions in terms of records. GoDaddy’s response was to restrict the numbers of records a given IP address could download in a given unit of time — thus slowing considerably the attempts by spammers to get the all-important list of e-mail address of the Name Holders who have registered domains at GoDaddy — which are certain to be a valid e-mail addresses and therefore quite valuable from a spammer’s point of view.

GoDaddy has implemented a method whereby the firewall is made transparent for other registrars who contact GoDaddy and give them the necessary netblock information.

I use this same workable technique at home to shield my SSH port on my server — because, for some strange reason, the Chinese are really interested in owning it.

In addition, it’s possible to get the registry records directly from the GoDaddy website if you are willing to deal with a CAPTCHA mechanism — thus allowing GoDaddy to claim that they meet all ICANN regulations — which regulations do NOT say that a registrar MUST provide bulk access to TCP/UDP Port 43 (Whois) records — only that they may provide such access to third parties.

See http://gnso.icann.org/issues/whois/whois-service-requirements-final-report-29jul10-en.pdf

unclesmrgol on December 30, 2011 at 7:49 PM

BocaJuniors on December 30, 2011 at 6:09 PM

Well, it’s not like he’s Barack Obama or someone else who requires our complete allegiance no matter what he says…

We aren’t liberals, in other words.

unclesmrgol on December 30, 2011 at 7:51 PM

I would have thought the last year would have disabused you of the belief that members of congress are for smaller government.

chemman on December 30, 2011 at 5:16 PM

Article I, Section 8, Clause 8, United States Constitution:

To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.

So, as badly conceived as SOPA is, it does deal with a right contained within our Constitution.

unclesmrgol on December 30, 2011 at 7:54 PM

Free Speech and Copyright are two different things. I don’t think SOPA is actually workable and is poorly written but the issue of piracy does need addressing. Legislators need to go back and come back with something better and a lot less draconian.

lexhamfox on December 30, 2011 at 8:03 PM

Many of us have long boycotted GoDaddy because of their perverted ads.

itsnotaboutme on December 30, 2011 at 2:36 PM

…CAN YOU CHANGE THE CHANNEL?

Capitalist Hog on December 30, 2011 at 2:59 PM

Just an observation: Taking your business somewhere else IS changing the channel!

APasserBy on December 30, 2011 at 8:17 PM

APasserBy on December 30, 2011 at 8:17 PM

Prudes unite.

Capitalist Hog on December 30, 2011 at 8:26 PM

because, for some strange reason, the Chinese are really interested in owning it.

unclesmrgol on December 30, 2011 at 7:49 PM

Isn’t it bizarre?

Some Russian is running a script against every scrap of server software I’ve heard of and a few I haven’t — I want to drive traffic just so my 404 count is not such an embarrassing fraction of my total hits :)

No point, Comrade! No point! Even if you cracked me, what are you going to do? Go through my Bacon essays and misspell all the words?

As far as my home network, if it’s my copy of Rebecca Black’s Friday, I’ll give it to you!

Glasnost!

Axe on December 30, 2011 at 9:04 PM

*Only have 80 and a few custom SQL ports open. Using scripts + patience instead of SSH :) Not that it matters.

And sorry; fell into “Shop” mode — didn’t mean to hijack.

Axe on December 30, 2011 at 9:26 PM

The House and Senate versions of the law should be named SOPA and ROPA. They’d go well together.

Archivarix on December 30, 2011 at 10:07 PM

Perverted. Did they show nudity? Was anybody harmed? Did the actors get paid? Were they working under duress? CAN YOU CHANGE THE CHANNEL?

Capitalist Hog on December 30, 2011 at 2:59 PM

Oh, LIGHTEN UP, FRANCIS!!!

Now, back in your pretentious nunnery, sniffy one.

tree hugging sister on December 30, 2011 at 3:14 PM

Your definitions of “perverted,” “pretentious,” “nunnery,” and no doubt the old standby “prude” could use some work. Either you’re ignorant of GoDaddy or your attitude simply speaks volumes about how we’re “defining deviancy down.”

CanofSand on December 30, 2011 at 10:20 PM

Just my two cents, now worth $0.0098 thanks to Tim Geitner.

Individualist on December 30, 2011 at 4:21 PM

Great line. : )

listens2glenn on December 30, 2011 at 10:44 PM

Good. SOPA is quite possibly the worst idea that Congress has come up with in quite some time, and that’s saying something.

I honestly think that Congress is using the MPAA as an excuse to help give themselves some cover. The Internet is the great leveling field where anything goes. People in power have seen how governments were toppled with help from the internet. They also saw how a “safe” politician in NY suddenly found himself out of a job because of the internet.

Politicians have only one goal in office, stay in office. The Internet is quite possibly the most dangerous thing for a politician. With the rise of Blogs and Social Media it doesn’t take much for a political gaff to turn into a scandal.

Blu3Yeti on December 30, 2011 at 11:02 PM

After the 2012 elections we MUST start a 3rd party. A conservative party.

Samantha on December 30, 2011 at 5:55 PM

Yes, yes, and yes.

squint on December 30, 2011 at 11:08 PM

Will not stop anything really. Congress is no longer America. It is its own land, where those who work there are not held to account for anything they do. Even with our current mood, the people in congress today know they are almost 100% certain to be in office after the next election cycle.

There is a tipping point for all things. They can push and push and push…

As fictional Tyler Durden said…

“On a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero.”

This goes for political systems and the tyrants that oversee them as well.

SilverDeth on December 30, 2011 at 11:33 PM

After the 2012 elections we MUST start a 3rd party. A conservative party.

Samantha on December 30, 2011 at 5:55 PM

THIS +100000000000

SilverDeth on December 30, 2011 at 11:34 PM

he nation is drowning in debt, government spending is completely out of control, unemployment is ridiculously high, half the nation is on the public dole and wanting more, almost 50 million people on food stamps……. the US is broke and broken…… someone tell me how the F*** legislation like this comes to light and why there are folks on the public payrolls crafting this garbage? there’s NO PRIORITIES. SOPA is not only stupid, it just not a priority. No wonder they are at 5% approval….

maineconservative on December 30, 2011 at 5:29 PM

Because we upon an election year and the special interests who are pushing for this legislation is probably funneling a large sum of money at politicians who need the funds for their reelection campaigns. Of course that doesn’t apply to every member of Congress, but sadly it applies to most of them.

SleightOfHand on December 30, 2011 at 11:37 PM

Legislators need to go back and come back with something better and a lot less draconian.

lexhamfox on December 30, 2011 at 8:03 PM

Addressing piracy is like addressing polution: It doesn’t matter the results, as long as the politicans can say they “did something.” As the diminishing returns get more and more expensive, there will be more and more of a “problem in search of an answer,” and guys and gals like Lex here will wonder how the government got so gosh darned tyrannical.

gryphon202 on December 31, 2011 at 12:49 AM

It’s east to switch domains, and much of the time it’s free. Moving from Go Daddy would be a relatively easy thing to do.

I do not believe Go Daddy no longer supports SOPA, since they helped write the legisltation in the first place. There’s a big difference between no longer publically showing support for the legislation and coming out against it.

eyedoc on December 31, 2011 at 8:14 AM

After the 2012 elections we MUST start a 3rd party. A conservative party.

Samantha on December 30, 2011 at 5:55 PM

THIS +100000000000

SilverDeth on December 30, 2011 at 11:34 PM

Do you suppose this is what Palin plans to do?

piglet on December 31, 2011 at 9:01 AM

Consumers have been had by the media industry in so many ways and for so many years. It is time to zip up and just say no.

NORUK on December 31, 2011 at 1:04 PM