Quotes of the day

posted at 8:00 pm on December 24, 2011 by Allahpundit

“Vice President Joe Biden unleashed a biting critique of Mitt Romney’s policies Friday and the Republican came swiftly back at him – a full-contact preview of what the general election might look like should Romney win the GOP nomination to challenge President Barack Obama…

“In essentially placing its bets on Romney, the Obama camp elevated his stature in the race, particularly in Iowa where he is running neck-and-neck with Gingrich and Texas congressman Ron Paul.

“Romney was clearly ready – and eager – to engage with the White House. While he generally has to be asked, or even pressed, to criticize Gingrich, he hit back at Biden at the first opportunity.

“‘I think they realize what’s coming,’ he said. ‘I hope they’re right. I hope I’m the nominee.’”

***

“Mitt Romney is set to close out the fourth fundraising quarter of the year with his largest haul yet of at least $20 million, several fundraising sources told POLITICO…

“While there is still a week left in the quarter, high-dollar fundraising is essentially finished for the season thanks to the holidays — and Romney is closing strong…

“Instead of the Newt Gingrich surge prompting donors to hesitate, it impelled them to give more, two sources said, mirroring fear among establishment Republicans of the former House speaker capturing the nomination.”

***

“The sense had been growing that the GOP race was effectively over barring a major surprise in Iowa from Rick Perry or Rick Santorum, but this news out of Virginia is very revealing about the lack of general election preparedness of every organization except Team Romney. The only thing that the president has going for him is a political organization honed by a half-dozen years in the field and a well-refined ruthlessness when it comes to tactics. It is hard to imagine an organization that cannot gather 10,000 signatures over many months staying on the field with the Chicago gang much less outmaneuvering them in the week to week battles of the year ahead.

“Fence sitters among the electeds who were waiting to see if there would be a prolonged contest have got to be spending their Christmas Eves wrapping gifts and considering that Mitt Romney has this campaign in hand and that a quick conclusion to the primary season would be in the interests of everyone. Watch for endorsements next week before Iowa caucuses and certainly before New Hampshire votes.”

***

“The irony is that Mr. Paul’s campaign may so far have made Mr. Romney’s path easier. It has released exceptionally effective commercials against Mr. Gingrich, while also feuding with Mrs. Bachmann. If Mr. Paul was a more traditional candidate, this strategy might make sense, since Mrs. Bachmann and especially Mr. Gingrich are threats to win Iowa. Weakening these candidates might also tend to help Mr. Romney, but that would not be Mr. Paul’s major concern.

“But Mr. Paul is an unusual candidate; his ability to influence the Republican race depends as much upon the order of finish among the rest of the candidates as how well he does for himself. If Mr. Romney finishes a strong second in Iowa behind Mr. Paul, for instance, that showing will be in line with expectations — enough so that Mr. Romney will probably not relinquish his 17-point lead in New Hampshire and should book a solid win there. That would put Mr. Romney on the inside track for the nomination, with Mr. Paul proving to be little more than a footnote.”

***

“Some voters, however, weren’t overly impressed with Romney’s standing in the state.

“‘Of course, he’s going to win here,’ said Concord’s Deb Jacobs. ‘So what? The story would be if he lost. He’s been here for years. And all those other jokers — you can call them candidates — have made sure he won’t lose.’”

***

“Earlier this year, I asked Santorum why he didn’t push smaller government principles more aggressively during the Bush era, and he told me: ‘I could only go so far because we didn’t have a Tea Party movement that was moving the country in that direction.’

“It wasn’t until 2009 and 2010 that candidates who represented the post-bank bailout, purified GOP, began getting elected. And because it takes time for politicians to mature into credible presidential candidates, none of them were ready to run in 2012.

“So the root of the frustration that many conservatives are feeling right now is that philosophically, they are a several election cycles ahead of the available pool of GOP presidential candidates. And they have Bush to blame for that.”

***

“What about his reform principles? Mr. Romney talks only in general terms. ‘Moving to a consumption-based system is something which is very attractive to me philosophically, but I’ve not been able to sufficiently model it out to jump on board a consumption-based tax. A flat tax, a true flat tax is also attractive to me. What I like—I mean, I like the simplification of a flat tax. I also like removing the distortion in our tax code for certain classes of investment. And the advantage of a flat tax is getting rid of some of those distortions.’

“Since Mr. Romney mentioned a consumption tax, would he rule out a value-added tax?

“He says he doesn’t “like the idea” of layering a VAT onto the current income tax system. But he adds that, philosophically speaking, a VAT might work as a replacement for some part of the tax code, ‘particularly at the corporate level,’ as Paul Ryan proposed several years ago. What he doesn’t do is rule a VAT out.”

***

“‘There’s nothing new about politicians making promises they are in no position to keep. Herbert Hoover’s 1928 campaign promised a ‘chicken in every pot and a car in every backyard, to boot.’ Michele Bachmann is promising $2 a gallon gasoline. President Obama promised ‘hope and change.’

“But when it comes to political pandering, it’s hard to beat a promise Mitt Romney made on Thursday in New Hampshire to a 21-year-old college student named Kallie Durkit, who wanted to know why college students should support Romney instead of Obama.

“‘What I can promise you is this – when you get out of college, if I’m president you’ll have a job. If President Obama is reelected, you will not be able to get a job,’ Romney said.”

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So many excellent comments, yet so little time and space to address the naysayers, i.e., PaulBots and MittBots.

Ron Paul’s characterization of a border fence is laughable, naíve, and perhaps worst of all dangerous to our country. One would think that a Texan would know better.
I’m sure that most of you informed posters have seen the 50 year old film of a young woman being knocked down and strangled by barbed wire while trying to flee East Germany. Now, I axe you (ØbaEbonics), would that ever happen to an American CITIZEN on our border?

Ron Paul is a kook. Every party has one. Unfortunately, we currently have a POTUS and Veep who epítomize kookiness.

As for the Mittens supporters, read the Book of Mormon and get back to us. You wanna talk about “bigots”, well let’s address the LDS (“latter day saints” … of all the nerve) writings re: Blacks aka “mud people”.
Besides being raised and performed as a bigot himself, who the hell is going to vote for him?
Romney’s core belief system is as putrid as ØbaMaØ, hiding under the cover of “religious freedom”.
Well, narcissism, racism (ØbahØlder) and self-righteousness hasn’t yet served us well. Why should that change with either Paul or Romney?

Romney is our worst nightmare possible. A Liberal snake in Republican clothing with the mega-millions to buy people off and a maniacal lust for power that drives him to destroy any true conservative who opposes him. Romney’s purpose isn’t just to win, it’s to destroy conservatism and hammer the final nail in its coffin.
cyclo on December 25, 2011

Ya nailed it. Congrats.
~(Ä)~

Karl Magnus on December 26, 2011 at 10:15 AM

PatriotGal2257 on December 26, 2011 at 12:08 AM

One of the best comments regarding “Establishment” Republicans I’ve read in a long time. Thanks PatriotGal!

Just Sayin on December 26, 2011 at 10:23 AM

Hrm….I don’t think romney supporters understand that “anyone but romney” is changing to “will not choose between romney and obama”.

Both of them are or will be horrible presidents and shouldn’t be anywhere near the office.

Their are some elections when you can choose between the worse of two evils, this isn’t one of them. For every advantage romney would bring, he would essentially kill off the tea party and totally complete the conversion of the GOP into democrat lite + no principles/will pander shamelessly for votes.

I and I think many hot air readers are just not going to agree to that. If Romney is nominated, better he lose and establishment republicans learn they need to give us someone with at least a semblance of principles and convservative values if they want our votes…not just pick the richest establishment governor with the greatest ego and whose waited longest in line. No. No way.

deploylinux on December 25, 2011 at 8:43 AM

How do you know what a Romney presidency will be? To my knowledge, Romney has never been in the WH?

Give me a break, anybody but Obama will be a vast improvement over what we have now. Romney is going to surprise you. Bet on it.

Redford on December 26, 2011 at 10:23 AM

One of the best comments regarding “Establishment” Republicans I’ve read in a long time. Thanks PatriotGal!

Just Sayin on December 26, 2011 at 10:23 AM

Thanks! Really appreciate that. I guess I could have been less wordy and said that the establishment GOP are essentially political opportunists of the worst sort. :)

In fact, that might just describe Romney right there.

PatriotGal2257 on December 26, 2011 at 11:25 AM

Thanks! Really appreciate that. I guess I could have been less wordy and said that the establishment GOP are essentially political opportunists of the worst sort. :)

In fact, that might just perfectly describes Romney right there.

PatriotGal2257 on December 26, 2011 at 11:25 AM

There, that’s better. :-)

Just Sayin on December 26, 2011 at 11:49 AM

PatriotGal at 12:08 AM -

Interesting explanation about the “establishment” concept. I listen to Rush, when I have the chance, and find him to be entertaining and informative, but I don’t take everything he says as gospel. The idea of some amorphous establishment which keeps us, small citizens, from voting to whomever we want to, sounds a little bit to concpiratorial for my taste.

mexdem on December 26, 2011 at 11:56 AM

Their are some elections when you can choose between the worse of two evils, this isn’t one of them. For every advantage romney would bring, he would essentially kill off the tea party and totally complete the conversion of the GOP into democrat lite + no principles/will pander shamelessly for votes.

While it’s true that might happen, I think what is more likely is that the Tea Party groups will become stronger and more focused. The average voter must understand is that there are two adversaries here: the Dems and the establishment GOP. I’ve found it hard myself to realize that there are some in the GOP who never had the best interests of their constituents in mind, and they are the ones who need to go.

I and I think many hot air readers are just not going to agree to that. If Romney is nominated, better he lose and establishment republicans learn they need to give us someone with at least a semblance of principles and convservative values if they want our votes…not just pick the richest establishment governor with the greatest ego and whose waited longest in line. No. No way.

I certainly wouldn’t agree to that either. But here’s the thing: the Tea Party has to take over the GOP and not the other way around. The establishment GOP does not want to learn. They only want to keep whatever power they have amassed for themselves and to hell with everyone else.

Like it or not, the process of taking over is going to take time. I’m not saying to give up, it’s impossible; it’s just that it won’t happen immediately, even though we all want it to. We need to think and plan and accomplish long-term. When you think about it, that is exactly what the Left in both parties has done and is doing. It’s a chess game rather than checkers.

PatriotGal2257 on December 26, 2011 at 12:01 PM

Just Sayin on December 26, 2011 at 11:49 AM

LOL! Definitely a better choice of words. :)

PatriotGal2257 on December 26, 2011 at 12:03 PM

Your bigotry is astounding.

gyrmnix on December 26, 2011 at 2:36 AM

It’s true: I greatly admire the late William F. Buckley, Jr. For the record, Bill Buckley later (in the 1960s) completely and publicly repudiated the views on race he held as a younger man. While he readily admitted his mea culpa didn’t forgive or excuse his former beliefs, he did all he could to balance the moral scales and make up for it. You could look it up yourself, if you like. Wikipedia, for example, isn’t exactly a hotbed of conservative support, yet their article on him is relatively fair. Buckley grew and changed over the decades, just like most of the country.

Ron Paul, on the other hand, freely associates with men such as Willis Carto, Lew Rockwell, and Alex Jones, has been photographed with Don Black of Stormfront and receives a great deal of enthusiastic support from the white supremacy movement as evidenced on that site. You can see for yourself, but I won’t link to putrid little loser dens like Stormfront on here. Ron Paul uses Stormfront as a fundraising venue. He has also accused the state of Israel of running concentration camps and has compared Israel to ‘national socialists’. So far, he hasn’t repudiated either his associations or his previous public statements.

And me, personally? I’m primarily descended from Germans and Native Americans (Cherokee and Wyandotte), along with the usual Heinz 57 of other races common to most Americans whose families have been in this country for a few hundred years. Racial bigotry, for me, would be an exercise in irony and self-loathing.

troyriser_gopftw on December 26, 2011 at 12:05 PM

I certainly wouldn’t agree to that either. But here’s the thing: the Tea Party has to take over the GOP and not the other way around. The establishment GOP does not want to learn. They only want to keep whatever power they have amassed for themselves and to hell with everyone else.

PatriotGal2257 on December 26, 2011 at 12:01 PM

That’s a pretty broad brush, especially since ‘establishment Republicans’ aren’t exactly the monolithic bloc you make them out to be. Where I live and grew up, the term we use for the people you’re talking about are ‘Country Club Republicans’, that part of the party most attracted to those aspects of the GOP platform and ideology dealing with economic freedom and espousing free market principles and entrepreneurship. They’re rich or would very much like to be. I don’t have a problem with them, myself. I like rich Republicans like the Koch brothers who put their money where their beliefs are. In the old days, we called men and women like that patriots.

If the Tea Party wants the kind of clout these people wield, I would suggest the Tea Party actually come up with a semblance of an organization and put fundraising mechanisms in place that fuel the campaigns of marketable candidates sharing their views. That’s how it works. It isn’t chess.

troyriser_gopftw on December 26, 2011 at 12:20 PM

Interesting explanation about the “establishment” concept. I listen to Rush, when I have the chance, and find him to be entertaining and informative, but I don’t take everything he says as gospel. The idea of some amorphous establishment which keeps us, small citizens, from voting to whomever we want to, sounds a little bit to concpiratorial for my taste.

mexdem on December 26, 2011 at 11:56 AM

Actually, neither do I take everything Rush says as gospel. But I do think he’s right more often than not.

I also don’t see it as conspiratorial as such. It’s much more subtle than that. When you know the Left’s control of the media and the ability they have to choose what gets into print or broadcast and, more importantly, what doesn’t, you begin to look at the whole picture with skepticism. I sometimes look at it as if it’s an Interpretive Literature class — in any communication, what is being left out? How is the information being presented in the first place? Why is one thing emphasized over another? There is often a reason for all of it, and I don’t doubt that there is an agenda being pushed. Think of advertising. Think of Cass Sunstein’s book “Nudge.” I don’t for a minute put it past the establishment GOP to advance a certain point of view in as many subtle ways as possible to influence people. Usually the reason is simple: they want to keep what they have and it’s to their advantage that the status quo remains.

PatriotGal2257 on December 26, 2011 at 12:51 PM

If the Tea Party wants the kind of clout these people wield, I would suggest the Tea Party actually come up with a semblance of an organization and put fundraising mechanisms in place that fuel the campaigns of marketable candidates sharing their views. That’s how it works. It isn’t chess.

troyriser_gopftw on December 26, 2011 at 12:20 PM

Yes, that’s it. They do need to work on this aspect, absolutely. I used the chess analogy to illustrate how they should promote their overall philosophy of free markets, limited government and entrepreneurship as a long-term plan. Fundraising and choosing marketable candidates fits right into that.

And true, the establishment GOP isn’t a monolithic bloc. However, I do think there are some within the establishment who don’t like the competition that the Tea Party represents and they would rather see it either being co-opted or gone altogether.

PatriotGal2257 on December 26, 2011 at 1:04 PM

troyriser_gopftw on December 26, 2011 at 12:05 PM

Nope, doesn’t matter if he repudiated them. You have to take the whole package. It’s not one set of rules for me and another set of rules for you. By admiring Buckley, you have admitted to being a racist.

gyrmnix on December 26, 2011 at 1:34 PM

I think the problem many have with Mitt Romney is the trust issue:

Mitt seems to change his views and core principles daily, which means he has no core principles.

He’s a MA liberal trying to pass himself off as a conservative. His unswerving loyalty to his MA Romneycare creation belies his so called conversion to conservatism.

He and his staff wiped the computers clean and bought the hard drives when he left the governor’s office in MA. What is he hiding?

Romney said recently that he won’t release his tax returns, even if he wins the nomination. What is he hiding?

He refuses to reveal his campaign bundlers; well-connected fundraisers that collect stacks of checks that total hundreds of thousands. What is he hiding?

On and on and on.

IndeCon on December 26, 2011 at 1:53 PM

Nope, doesn’t matter if he repudiated them. You have to take the whole package. It’s not one set of rules for me and another set of rules for you. By admiring Buckley, you have admitted to being a racist.

gyrmnix on December 26, 2011 at 1:34 PM

Yes, it does matter, at least from a rational perspective: Buckley repudiated views he held as a young(er) man. Paul, on the other hand, has become–if anything–even more extreme as he’s headed off into his addled twilight years.

And no, the logic doesn’t follow in re if I admire Buckley then I must be a racist. For one thing, Buckley wasn’t a racist–his public disavowals of his earlier positions and beliefs make that clear. For another, I admire George Washington too, and he owned slaves. Does admiring George Washington make me a racist? How about Thomas Jefferson? Other slave-owning Founding Fathers? Please note, too, that I haven’t called you a bigot or a wild-eyed conspiracy theorist simply because you revere a conspiratorial crackpot who closely resembles one of the cartoon buzzards in Snow White.

Look, buddy, I hate to say it, but you Ron Paul people don’t hold up too well in reasoned argument. Stick to stuffing ballot boxes and packing online polls. Attempting to sell a Ron Paul candidacy on the basis of his positions simply won’t do the job.

troyriser_gopftw on December 26, 2011 at 9:00 PM

troyriser_gopftw on December 26, 2011 at 9:00 PM

Interesting, you still seem to think different rules apply to you.

Don’t conservatives believe in being treated equal? Perhaps politics just isn’t for you…

Look, you overplayed your hand. You behaved like you had a flush when you were only holding a pair and got called on it. Time to accept it and move on. Maybe next time you will have more a more reasonable argument.

gyrmnix on December 27, 2011 at 9:32 AM

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