WSJ warns House Republicans of “fiasco” on payroll tax holiday stand

posted at 10:05 am on December 21, 2011 by Ed Morrissey

Reminding House Republicans of Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell’s pledge that his main objective in 2011-2 is to keep Barack Obama from winning re-election, the Wall Street Journal wonders, er, what the hell the House GOP sees as its main objective.  Having turned the payroll tax holiday extension into a “fiasco” is bad enough the WSJ says, but making it a pointless fiasco feeds the notion that Obama is the only adult in the room:

The GOP leaders have somehow managed the remarkable feat of being blamed for opposing a one-year extension of a tax holiday that they are surely going to pass. This is no easy double play.

Republicans have also achieved the small miracle of letting Mr. Obama position himself as an election-year tax cutter, although he’s spent most of his Presidency promoting tax increases and he would hit the economy with one of the largest tax increases ever in 2013. This should be impossible.

And if this was in service to a greater economic point, it might be worth it.  Unfortunately …

House Republicans yesterday voted down the Senate’s two-month extension of the two-percentage-point payroll tax holiday to 4.2% from 6.2%. They say the short extension makes no economic sense, but then neither does a one-year extension. No employer is going to hire a worker based on such a small and temporary decrease in employment costs, as this year’s tax holiday has demonstrated. The entire exercise is political, but Republicans have thoroughly botched the politics. …

If Republicans didn’t want to extend the payroll tax cut on the merits, then they should have put together a strategy and the arguments for defeating it and explained why.

But if they knew they would eventually pass it, as most of them surely believed, then they had one of two choices. Either pass it quickly and at least take some political credit for it.  Or agree on a strategy to get something in return for passing it, which would mean focusing on a couple of popular policies that would put Mr. Obama and Democrats on the political spot. They finally did that last week by attaching a provision that requires Mr. Obama to make a decision on the Keystone XL pipeline within 60 days, and the President grumbled but has agreed to sign it.

The Keystone XL concession was a real victory for the GOP.  For that matter, the two-month extension would have allowed Republicans to force more concessions in the next round of negotiations.  Supposedly, the House GOP worried that having a debate over the tax in February would benefit Obama, but it’s hard to see how.  The one-year extension would mean that Obama wouldn’t have a key policy at risk, and in February most of the political attention will still be on the Republican presidential primary.

Besides, if the House GOP didn’t want this deal, why didn’t they work with McConnell to keep negotiating?  McConnell got most of the Republican caucus to vote in support of the 60-day extension after seeing the Keystone XL concession as a real victory.  The policy itself isn’t the issue, as House Republicans will apparently thunder to the roll-call vote that extends the holiday for a full year.  Now, as the WSJ says, the Republicans on Capitol Hill have formed “a circular firing squad” that will not just put the Keystone XL concession at risk, but will almost certainly boost Obama’s standing with voters at the expense of Republicans, both on and off of Capitol Hill.

The WSJ editors offer Republicans some free advice: Cut your losses and pass the bill.  Will the House GOP listen, or will they continue to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory in an effort to demand a longer time frame for a success in pandering, but a gimmicky failure in economic policy?

Update: Listen closely.  Really closely.  Don’t hear anything?  That’s Mitch McConnell signaling Boehner that he’s on that limb all by himself, according to Politico:

Speaker John Boehner stood before a band of fellow House Republicans on Tuesday and angrily demanded the Senate return to the Capitol and extend the payroll tax cut for a full year.

Left out of the photo op: Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), the co-architect of the Senate’s two-month tax cut extension. He reached an agreement that has become a throbbing political headache for Boehner and has remained unusually silent as the partisan rancor and gridlock cause a year-end embarrassment for Congress. …

“This is a colossal fumble by the House Republicans,” said a senior Senate GOP aide, requesting anonymity to speak candidly about his own party. “Their inability to recognize a win is costing our party our long-held advantage on the key issue of tax relief. It’s time for Boehner and [House Majority Leader Eric] Cantor to look these rookies in the eye and explain how the game is won or lost.”

 


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Wait, I’m confused. Is the spin that the Lame-stream media is not as powerful anymore thanks to alternative media and Fox News, or is it that the electorate is stupid and the Lame-stream media is still in control. It seems to shift when convenience for an argument is needed.

The electorate supports the pipeline, domestic energy production and jobs. This has been a consistent support shown throughout the years, except during the small stint in the Golf, and no amount of lame-stream spin has either managed to bring that support down or, in the case of the Golf, keep it down.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:06 AM

Yes, the public supports it, but they won’t know anything (if the bill were signed into law) other than that Obama cut their taxes. I actually agree with you that the GOP House should have passed it and tried to salvage what they could from this (I guess what is the least bad option). I really blame McConnell and his idiot Senate brethren for forcing this choice on the House.

besser tot als rot on December 21, 2011 at 11:11 AM

If I’m right, Jugears is cutting SS payments without any political price whatsoever. To make matters worse, the GOP is being blamed for wanting a tax increase when this isn’t a tax issue.

AND THE REST of them…. ;)

Yea, I don’t remember hearing about any language to give full credit to the SS account but charge less through the year.

Therefore, technically, would one have to make up the difference at the end of each year themselves or not to qualify for the CORRECT amounts in the future?

golfmann on December 21, 2011 at 11:12 AM

katy on December 21, 2011 at 11:07 AM

Yes, because trying to threaten me over the internet and me pointing out that making broad assumptions about a group of people are totally comparable.

You’re brilliant, really, you just are so brilliant.

Skandia Recluse on December 21, 2011 at 11:08 AM

Compared to other think tanks in Washington, CATO is the best for anyone of a conservative mind. Also, in the areas where I’m interested, limited government, economics and history, CATO is ideal.

But, yeah, let’s just go ahead and argue semantics. If it makes you feel better, I’ll pat you on the head and say you won on the semantics. Does that make you feel better~

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:12 AM

wealth, you’re the one that thinks we’ll work it out with Harry Reid in two months. You’re the one that is confident the pipeline is a done deal. And today on this thread you’re the only one.

katy, you called it right and you called it first. Good call.

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 11:12 AM

were you talking to me Steve?

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 11:01 AM

More like echoing. As for SocSecurity finances, they’re worse than you thought. Except for the “max-tax” months of January and April (when both the taxes on benefits and the quarterly estimated SECA taxes are paid), and counting the general fund contributions for both the 2010 “new-hire holiday” and the 2011 payroll-tax “holiday” as SocSecurity taxes received, the OASI fund has not had a cash-positive month since August 2009. The DI fund has not been cash-positive since April 2009.

Steve Eggleston on December 21, 2011 at 11:12 AM

Aside from the GOP’s inability to sell their message, I really don’t see the problem.

1) The Senate rejected the House’s bill first (which no one in the media is acknowledging)

2) The Senate passed a 60-day extension

3) The House passed a 360-day extension

4) #3 is more generous and makes much more sense practically and financially for taxpayers

5) It is PERFECTLY NORMAL for the two chambers to pass different bills–that’s why they have the conference process

6) The Senate ran out of town and is avoiding the PERFECTLY NORMAL AND NECESSARY conference process to merge the two bills.

So how is this Boehner’s problem again?

Nutstuyu on December 21, 2011 at 11:13 AM

besser tot als rot on December 21, 2011 at 11:11 AM

But in two months (or less) when Obama makes his decision, this comes back into the spot light. Also, in two months we get to go into another fight that we might be able to force similar concessions out of Obama. McConnell, in my opinion, did his best considering he was a minority leader in the Senate. Also, in my opinion, his best was pretty good as it concerned getting as much out of we could out of two Democratic controlled offices that would weaken their standing with the electorate.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:14 AM

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 11:12 AM

I have a sixth sense for it… ;)

He’s going to be fun..

katy on December 21, 2011 at 11:16 AM

Compared to other think tanks in Washington, CATO is the best for anyone of a conservative mind. Also, in the areas where I’m interested, limited government, economics and history, CATO is ideal.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:12 AM

I considered trying to get into CATO when I was in DC, but figured that it would hurt my chance of ever getting into politics or a judgeship. Not that I’m really interested in either.

And to answer your question – one real doctorate: PhD in chemistry; and one fake: JD (both from top schools – which is why I tend to agree with katy’s proxy about what kind of people are at universities – especially the “elite” ones.)

besser tot als rot on December 21, 2011 at 11:16 AM

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 11:12 AM

I’m confident that we could slap around old Harry Reid and Obama again in two months and get another extension as well as another concession, yes.

I’m also confident that, as it concerns the pipeline, either get the pipeline and Obama loses a core of his re-election campaign, or the pipeline is shut down, by him, and he takes an even bigger hit to his re-election.

You should actually try to read my posts than try to force in what you think I’m saying. It’ll help when you try to debate people in the future.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:17 AM

But, yeah, let’s just go ahead and argue semantics. If it makes you feel better, I’ll pat you on the head and say you won on the semantics. Does that make you feel better~

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:12 AM

Waste of time, pixels, bandwidth, and electricity.

Skandia Recluse on December 21, 2011 at 11:18 AM

besser tot als rot on December 21, 2011 at 11:16 AM

Oh I dunno, I’m wanting to get into politics myself, and I think that if you want to run as a conservative for office there’s really no place that’ll help you get the perspective and knowledge you need than to hang out with fellow conservative thinkers. An expanded knowledge base on our government and how it functions would help out a lot of politicians in this day and age.

I see. I used to be really into science before I got interested in politics and history myself, so I know the hard work hard science classes can be, especially chemistry. Really, you should pat yourself on the back for getting a PHD in Chem. I don’t really know what JD is, so you’ll have to expand it for me.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:19 AM

But in two months (or less) when Obama makes his decision, this comes back into the spot light. Also, in two months we get to go into another fight that we might be able to force similar concessions out of Obama. McConnell, in my opinion, did his best considering he was a minority leader in the Senate. Also, in my opinion, his best was pretty good as it concerned getting as much out of we could out of two Democratic controlled offices that would weaken their standing with the electorate.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:14 AM

Maybe – but I don’t think that we’re going to hear anything about it when and if Obama strikes the pipeline down. This reminds me of when the GOP allowed the debt ceiling hike in exchange for a vote on a balanced budget amendment (BBA). How much press did the BBA get? A little, but not much – and by then nobody cared. Seems to me that the same will happen here.

And really – the tax is a deal breaker for me. Especially on housing?? Unfathomable.

besser tot als rot on December 21, 2011 at 11:19 AM

Skandia Recluse on December 21, 2011 at 11:18 AM

I’m glad we agree.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:19 AM

besser tot als rot on December 21, 2011 at 11:19 AM

I dunno, I think that sense the pipeline is far more substantial and something that people can actually think of in real terms, like jobs, that it would get a lot more play than the BBA. As for the tax, I agree that’s a very bitter pill to swallow. If the Tea Party Caucus had decided to fight over that rather than the payroll tax cut, I’d think we’d be in a winning position. They got the will to fight, but they picked the wrong hill in my opinion.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:22 AM

The DI fund has not been cash-positive since April 2009.

Steve Eggleston on December 21, 2011 at 11:12 AM

Yep Steve. In my generalization I lumped the DI in with the OASI like the SS trustees did. the bottom line is Obama and dems are gutting any pretense of solvency in SS while still arguing it is fiscally sound for the next 25 years.

I spoke with Kevin Brady’s office a few minutes ago and asked them why they weren’t getting the message out. They claimed they are. I mentioned that every GOP house member talking right now is all for extending the tax cut for a full year so I asked how did Mr. Brady propose to square the immediate gap in funding that is building. The response…”Mr. Brady has said this will be the last time he votes for it”

This is where we are folks. He’s on the committee that is waiting for the senators to negotiate and they have already got at least two years of the tax cut done and there will be no way to put it back.

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 11:22 AM

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:19 AM

Just meant that, in general, I consider law degrees contemptible (thus the JD being a “fake”).

besser tot als rot on December 21, 2011 at 11:23 AM

I really blame McConnell and his idiot Senate brethren for forcing this choice on the House.

besser tot als rot on December 21, 2011 at 11:11 AM

Why can’t they get their signals straight before they stumble forward? How hard is it? What else do they have to do all day but talk to each other? They don’t have enough time in the day to talk? They’re pathetic in every political sense of the word. They pick the wrong fights for the wrong reasons at the wrong time. They rest on principle when they should be politicking and politick when they should be standing on principle.

rrpjr on December 21, 2011 at 11:23 AM

The republicans look like a bunch of fools. They take one step foward and ten steps backwards. I continue to see republicans in the news this morning, sitting in Washington calling on dems to come back. Do they honestly think dems are coming back, hell no, dems are sitting back laughing their asses off, at how stupid republicans are looking. I don’t know who’s advising republicans on strategy, but they should be fired and hired by the democrats! It’s embarrassing, especially considering both parties passed this bill a week ago, and repblicans changed their minds after the fact!

Zcat on December 21, 2011 at 11:23 AM

besser tot als rot on December 21, 2011 at 11:23 AM

Ah, I see. Well, still, good work on getting them.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:25 AM

They got the will to fight, but they picked the wrong hill in my opinion.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:22 AM

Problem is that the individual member doesn’t get much press, so we don’t really know what went into their thinking. The reasoning is generally packaged by (i) the media, who wants to frame it in the way least favorable to the GOP and (ii) the GOP leadership, who is generally incompetent.

besser tot als rot on December 21, 2011 at 11:25 AM

Maybe – but I don’t think that we’re going to hear anything about it when and if Obama strikes the pipeline down.

besser tot als rot on December 21, 2011 at 11:19 AM

I pray that you are wrong because if you are correct then the lsm is even farther gone than I thought, Full frontal propaganda.

VegasRick on December 21, 2011 at 11:27 AM

What are you people all worked up about? I really dont see where blocking the so called Payroll Tax Holiday bill is or was a half bad Ideal. Further more Speaker Boehner quickly kicked the can back into democrats lap when he requested that Obama demand that Reid reconvene so that a compromise could be work out.
Now all of the sudden so called conservatives are on the attack because a WSJ article claiming that the move could make Obama look like an adult. My God after three years of looking like a total idiot, prematurely looking like an adult now would not help him in the least way.
Also earlier on we were told that the two month payroll tax holiday would be a nightmare. Link below:

http://hotair.com/archives/2011/12/19/oops-two-month-payroll-tax-holiday-would-be-a-logistical-nightmare-say-experts/

Now in todays headlines we learn that Reid has ask Speaker Boehner to bring the house back so that they can work out a compromise, this comes after Speaker Boehners call for obama to have Reid Reconvene the Senate.

People should really think before they spew and before they attack those of their own party it really makes us look stupid and confused.

RiCkY.D. on December 21, 2011 at 11:27 AM

They got the will to fight, but they picked the wrong hill in my opinion.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:22 AM

Yep.

VegasRick on December 21, 2011 at 11:27 AM

besser tot als rot on December 21, 2011 at 11:25 AM

I’m just getting what I can from Hot Air on this issue and, according to Ed, Allah and Tina, the fight is primarily over the payroll tax cut’s length. You can argue that the GOP leadership is incompetent, but you have to at least admit that the appearance of said incompetence isn’t helped when they’re dealing with a large group of their caucus that makes the cut a fight rather than the new tax.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:28 AM

VegasRick on December 21, 2011 at 11:27 AM

Even if the lsm is silent people will still hear about it. We have alternative media, the internet and word of mouth of a reason. The lsm isn’t the end-all be all of what people know anymore.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:29 AM

Nuts,
Because harry, dear leadr and lsm said so and the gop are agreeing like meek kittens

cmsinaz on December 21, 2011 at 11:31 AM

The lsm isn’t the end-all be all of what people know anymore.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:29 AM

I have not gotten my news from the lsm for 15 or so years, still if none of them report that at all we are on the verge of pravda.

VegasRick on December 21, 2011 at 11:31 AM

psst, we read your posts…..and discovered a pattern.

Look, we freaking won. We got the pipeline.
WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 10:17 AM
The real fight was over the Pipeline. Which we won.
WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 10:38 AM
We got the pipeline in the sense that now Barack has to choke on it.
WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 10:41 AM
We ‘got’ the pipeline in the sense that we forced Obama to make that decision!
WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 10:55 AM
But in two months (or less) when Obama makes his decision, this comes back into the spot light.
WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:14 AM
I’m also confident that, as it concerns the pipeline, either get the pipeline and Obama loses a core of his re-election campaign, or the pipeline is shut down, by him, and he takes an even bigger hit to his re-election
You should actually try to read my posts than try to force in what you think I’m saying. It’ll help when you try to debate people in the future.
WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:17 AM

RAGIN CAJUN on December 21, 2011 at 11:32 AM

No, I’ll correct myself, you’re just an idiot.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 10:19 AM

I strongly recommend you be more civil in your comments. However, if you insist on being nasty, for God’s sake punctuate it properly.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/comma+fault

Pythagoras on December 21, 2011 at 11:33 AM

For once, the House has dealt with the Senate the way they need to. This is all b.s., coming up with a bill like this and then heading for the hills. Let Reid explain this to his constituents. I’m sure they had this all figured out the House would give in and they win again. Not This Time!!!!!.

bflat879 on December 21, 2011 at 11:33 AM

Now in todays headlines we learn that Reid has ask Speaker Boehner to bring the house back so that they can work out a compromise, this comes after Speaker Boehners call for obama to have Reid Reconvene the Senate.

link?

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 11:34 AM

RAGIN CAJUN on December 21, 2011 at 11:32 AM

Yes. The pipeline was the most publicly explicit argument, what was the main piece of the bill argued over and competed for/against for this past while, and what Barack Obama was threatening to veto as it concerned the payroll tax cut.

I mention it a lot because it seems to have gotten lost in the rabble as it concerned what was (and probably should’ve been) the non-fight, the payroll tax cut itself. I don’t understand why you feel the need to point that out.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:34 AM

Really disappointed with the WSJ. They should have focused on the ‘business’ end of things explaining that this 2-month extension is a worthless hoax, can’t be implmented in the real world, allows increases in future mortgages, bankrupts the so-called social security trust fund, contains billions in useless earmarks; but no no no – must bash Tea Partiers first. The ones to blame are the RINOs in the Senate who knew from the get go that the House wouldn’t swallow Reid’s crap sandwich. Why is no one blaming McConnell and Reid to concoct this 2-month and scoot for a 1-month vacation???? A Senate that is going on 1,000 days of dereliction of duty for not passing a f—-g budget!?!?!?

Bob in VA on December 21, 2011 at 11:35 AM

If republicans would have stood their ground on the year extention from the beginning it wouldn’t have been so bad, but no, they agreed with democrats, voted and passed the bill they’re now against. This makes absoulutely NO sense! Could be republicans be any more self-destructive!

Zcat on December 21, 2011 at 11:36 AM

Pythagoras on December 21, 2011 at 11:33 AM

Wow. Out of everything in my previous posts you could’ve pointed out to argue, you choose a mistake with commas, something that most Americans probably have a small problem with when it comes to grammar.

Also I’m completely capable of being civil, as seen with my above discussion with besser. But if it walks like a duck, talks like a duck, etc. I’ll go ahead and call it a duck.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:37 AM

Bob in VA on December 21, 2011 at 11:35 AM

Exactly! I heard experts say it would cost half trillion dollars to implement a two months extention. It also hurts small business, they plan for 6 mouths to a year out, not two months!

Zcat on December 21, 2011 at 11:39 AM

How do you like being blamed for what other people do?

How do you like the other people knowing you’ll be blamed?

How do you like the WSJ and other supposedly on your side media helping screw you over like that?

When the hell do the Democrats get held accountable for their scummy actions?

Speakup on December 21, 2011 at 11:39 AM

I really blame McConnell and his idiot Senate brethren for forcing this choice on the House.

I don’t think that McConnell did this in a vacuum. We know that Boehner was for the bill before he was against it. This just make him and the entire group of revolting representatives look like boneheads.

No, it is not the deal that should have been struck. Yes, I agree that the House should have insisted up front that any bill be for at least a full year. But Boehner backed a two month extension… apparently without speaking with his caucus members… and now its a mess.

jmalmberg on December 21, 2011 at 11:39 AM

I’d be more worried if this were coming up later in the game.

Sekhmet on December 21, 2011 at 11:40 AM

Ed I think you are wrong on this. In fact I also disagree with the WSJ. I don’t believe this is helpful to the Republicans cause this negativity from the right. I believe they are correct in rejecting a 2 month extension of the payroll tax. It has to be one year or nothing. It is the Democrats and Obama that have been intransigent as usual. In reality they blew it in ever agreeing to this a year ago since it was pretty obvious the Democrats would use it as a hammer against them but that part is over. making it for 2 months means it will be an issue again in 2 months. Get it over for the year so Republicans can fight on their turf again.

scharlesc on December 21, 2011 at 11:42 AM

the trust fund is in financial straits we can all agree and at a time when the number of enrollees is spiking we say hey lets send less money in than normal. But we get to have obama make a decision on the pipeline in 2 months, no guarantees just before the election, politics. Oh by the way to pay for it we decided to make it more expensive to by a house and ensure the lives of fannie and freddie when their extinction is warranted. In a jobless recovery, and no recovery ever occurred without housing first we choose to short housing and future entitlements so people keep spending now to help the failed economic policies of obama and oh by the way small business owners we don’t care if you have to jump thru your azzes to keep up with the tax policy, lets do changes bimonthly.

smitty41 on December 21, 2011 at 11:45 AM

Yep Steve. In my generalization I lumped the DI in with the OASI like the SS trustees did. the bottom line is Obama and dems are gutting any pretense of solvency in SS while still arguing it is fiscally sound for the next 25 years.

I spoke with Kevin Brady’s office a few minutes ago and asked them why they weren’t getting the message out. They claimed they are. I mentioned that every GOP house member talking right now is all for extending the tax cut for a full year so I asked how did Mr. Brady propose to square the immediate gap in funding that is building. The response…”Mr. Brady has said this will be the last time he votes for it”

This is where we are folks. He’s on the committee that is waiting for the senators to negotiate and they have already got at least two years of the tax cut done and there will be no way to put it back.

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 11:22 AM

The “Trust Funds” are solvent only so long as the Treasury Department can monetize the funds. The bad news, I don’t think the bond market can absorb, beyond the non-SocSecurity increase in debt, another $5-$7 trillion (depending on when one believes the IOUs will run out) of Treasury debt.

Say, have you read Charles Blahous’ Social Security: The Unfinished Work? Very interesting read.

As for the gap, it would have been more honest and cheaper to not have replaced the reduced payroll tax revenue. Unless my simplistic monthly model of the Trustees’ 2009 report (the last one I have any confidence in) is hosed, it would have cost the combined “trust funds” about a month of solvency. Instead, we get to pay compounding interest on $110 million of transferred general funds indefinitely.

Steve Eggleston on December 21, 2011 at 11:48 AM

Boehner needs, at least, to appear as if he’s doing his job and get the senate bill into conference. The senate repubs are all about getting reelected next year so they want to appear reasonable and moderate. Brown must be in bigger trouble in Mass than we know about. The 2 month extension of a minor reduction in the FICA is and touting as a middle class tax cut is ridiculous. A true tax cut would be a reduction in the income tax rates.

Kissmygrits on December 21, 2011 at 11:50 AM

(katy –
Thanks for the hyperlink in your name –
that site is awesome!
I thought Survival Seeds was good –
but this is much more fun…like Amway for Armageddon.)

verbaluce on December 21, 2011 at 11:51 AM

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:37 AM

Yes, my only point was about style. Frankly, you did better than a lot of folks. At least you didn’t write, “Your an idiot.” That is amazingly common on comment boards.

If you really aspire to work for CATO, you need to tone it down a bit.

Pythagoras on December 21, 2011 at 11:54 AM

Now in todays headlines we learn that Reid has ask Speaker Boehner to bring the house back so that they can work out a compromise, this comes after Speaker Boehners call for obama to have Reid Reconvene the Senate.
link?

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 11:34 AM

———————————————————

article link:

http://dailycaller.com/2011/12/21/boehner-to-senate-lets-bargain-on-payroll-tax/

3rd paragraph

RiCkY.D. on December 21, 2011 at 11:57 AM

it really makes us look stupid and confused.

RiCkY.D. on December 21, 2011 at 11:27 AM

99% of the time Pubs. fit that description. Rest of the time they are the 1%.

they lie on December 21, 2011 at 11:57 AM

Unless my simplistic monthly model of the Trustees’ 2009 report (the last one I have any confidence in) is hosed, it would have cost the combined “trust funds” about a month of solvency. Instead, we get to pay compounding interest on $110 million of transferred general funds indefinitely.

yep again Steve, and your probably right. I was reading the latest Trustees’ report and having Geithner, Solis, Sebelius as a reference is dicey at best but they do happen to mention that 2% number specifically. Note in my first post I said Obama is defying their observations? I originally wrote recommendations and the reread what they said. I really don’t detect they are trying to protect SS in its current form so I made that adjustment.

As to the financed cost? Somewhere earlier it was mentioned the fee on mortgages was something like $200. Somebody do the math and put that into a 30 year note and tell us what it really costs.

I think I recognize that Blahous name. Was he a former trustee?

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 11:58 AM

Pythagoras on December 21, 2011 at 11:54 AM

Well, of course one carries themselves differently in polite company than they would in private company and on the internet.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:59 AM

Looks like we’re turning into Greece ahead of schedule.

Scriptor on December 21, 2011 at 12:02 PM

McConnell and the GOP establishment deliberately taking a dive in order to discredit the house conservatives and TP folks? Just wondering…

bofh on December 21, 2011 at 12:07 PM

katy on December 21, 2011 at 10:30 AM

Oh my goodness. I’m so terrified. Some random tough guy/girl, who probably lives in his/her basement, is threatening me over the internet. Oh gee wiz, I better be careful. I’m just so, so very scared!

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 10:38 AM

katy on December 21, 2011 at 10:47 AM

Yes, because as we all know all University students are obviously people who go to the North Eastern Ivy-League schools, and not someone who’d double majoring in History and Political Science in the hopes of joining the CATO institute.

That’d just be stupid, it’s much easier to assume things… and you know what they say about people who assume things.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 10:49 AM

Somebody left the irony on.

Flora Duh on December 21, 2011 at 12:07 PM

Pork-Chop on December 21, 2011 at 10:51 AM

smitty41 on December 21, 2011 at 11:45 AM

two very good posts worth rereading

RiCkY.D. on December 21, 2011 at 11:57 AM

meh, not much there. Harry wants to clean up his mistake and still cancel all the other things the house put in like…
Congressman John Culberson (TX-07) issued the following statement on the Middle Class Tax Relief & Job Creation Act:
“This is not complicated. The House bill keeps everyone’s payroll taxes stable for one year. The Senate bill allows everyone’s taxes to go up in two months.
“The House bill requires people who get an unemployment check to prove they are looking for work or completing a GED or college degree. The Senate took this out.
“The House bill allows states to require you to submit to a drug test to receive unemployment benefits. The Senate took this out.
“The House bill permits business owners to immediately expense 100 percent of new investments, dollar-for-dollar, in the current year tax return. The Senate took this out.
“The House bill protects American industrial boiler manufacturers from being shut down by unachievable Obama EPA restrictions. The Senate took this out.
“The House bill stops welfare recipients from using their Lone Star-type cards at ATM machines in casinos, strip clubs and liquor stores. The Senate took this out.
“The House bill cuts off unemployment and food stamps payments to millionaires. The Senate took this out.
“The House bill requires people to produce a Social Security number before receiving a refundable child tax credit. The Senate took this out.
“The House bill protects doctors from a 27 percent cut in Medicare reimbursement payments for two years. The Senate only protects them for two months.
“These are dramatic and important differences that are unacceptable under any common sense standard. I agree with Speaker Boehner that we should always do the right thing for the right reason. The House bill is the right thing for the right reason.
“We must follow the rules everyone learned in Civics 101. When there is a difference in the bills in the House and the Senate, we go to Conference to work them out as soon as possible. I am ready to do just that and I am prepared to stay for as long as it takes to make sure that no one’s taxes go up; and we preserve as many of the House-passed common sense provisions as possible.”

But its only about the payroll tax, or pipeline, right?

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 12:12 PM

it really makes us look stupid and confused.

RiCkY.D. on December 21, 2011 at 11:27 AM

99% of the time Pubs. fit that description. Rest of the time they are the 1%.

they lie on December 21, 2011 at 11:57 AM

………………………………………………………

Were you just bored or desperate for conversation? This is a rather tipical response one would expect from a move0n maggot or Huffington Post lib-turd. If you have nothing to add to the conversation why even bother, I mean really ?

RiCkY.D. on December 21, 2011 at 12:14 PM

Boehner has to go. He’s a horrible face for the GOP, not to mention he’s an orange cry baby.

Boehner looks like a political sleazeball straight out of central casting. Why not Paul Ryan for speaker?

Go RBNY on December 21, 2011 at 12:16 PM

Why isn’t the WSJ trumpeting to the skies the fact that Obama is starving the fund that pays for Seniors’ retirement? For decades the Democrats have been screaming that Republicans were trying to take away people’s Social Security, but when they have Obama and the Democrats actually blatantly starving the fund, nobody points it out.

hachiban on December 21, 2011 at 12:29 PM

I think I recognize that Blahous name. Was he a former trustee?

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 11:58 AM

He’s a former W adviser on economics (and specifically Social Security), and was named a public trustee late last year. He and the other new public trustee, Robert D. Reischauer (ex-CBO director), have an “enlightening” append to the report summary.

Steve Eggleston on December 21, 2011 at 12:30 PM

The establishment is making them look bad for standing on principle and trying to do what is best for the country.

If they are going to blame a potential 2012 lose on this? its just sad how weak they are. Obama has done nothing to help anyone no matter what political party they are in.

boogaleesnots on December 21, 2011 at 12:31 PM

Why isn’t the WSJ trumpeting to the skies the fact that Obama is starving the fund that pays for Seniors’ retirement? For decades the Democrats have been screaming that Republicans were trying to take away people’s Social Security, but when they have Obama and the Democrats actually blatantly starving the fund, nobody points it out.

hachiban on December 21, 2011 at 12:29 PM

Because it isn’t. Rather, it’s borrowing from the general fund (don’t buy the fiction that it can be “paid for”) to replace in full the reduction of the payroll tax.

In effect, the Treasury is borrowing on the open bond market so it can borrow from Social Security (or more-properly, not have to honestly monetize as much of the “Trust Funds” until later when it will have to pay more in interest).

Steve Eggleston on December 21, 2011 at 12:33 PM

does anybody care about the doc fix? i cant understand why they dont pound this one. obamacare demands NO doc fix. all the CBO projections the ones that say it reduces the deficit, assumed NO doc fix. so how can we vote FOR the doc fix without repealing obamacare. if anyone voted FOR obamcare they CANT vote for the fix. and be consistent. they cant exist together. i dont know why they dont tie an obamcare repeal to any doc fix from now on. wasted opportunity. at least shine light ion the fact that the CBO scam is indeed a scam everytime doc fix comes up. ryan letter from cbo in mar 2010 explained it: http://www.cbo.gov/ftpdocs/113xx/doc11376/RyanLtrhr4872.pdf

t8stlikchkn on December 21, 2011 at 12:39 PM

Oh I dunno, I’m wanting to get into politics myself, and I think that if you want to run as a conservative for office there’s really no place that’ll help you get the perspective and knowledge you need than to hang out with fellow conservative thinkers. An expanded knowledge base on our government and how it functions would help out a lot of politicians in this day and age.

I see. I used to be really into science before I got interested in politics and history myself, so I know the hard work hard science classes can be, especially chemistry. Really, you should pat yourself on the back for getting a PHD in Chem. I don’t really know what JD is, so you’ll have to expand it for me.

WealthofNations on December 21, 2011 at 11:19 AM

A possible pattern?

Conservative4Ever on December 21, 2011 at 12:51 PM

As to the financed cost? Somewhere earlier it was mentioned the fee on mortgages was something like $200. Somebody do the math and put that into a 30 year note and tell us what it really costs.

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 11:58 AM

If the trusty feed reader serves, the permanent increase in the GSE guarantee fee is in both current plans. The Pubbie plan pegs the increase as 10 basis points, while the Rat plan pegs the increase as 12.5 basis points.

The intricacies of mortgage-based securities are a bit beyond my scope of knowledge, so I’ll leave it to others to do the math on it.

Steve Eggleston on December 21, 2011 at 12:54 PM

meh, it all runs together

Steve Eggleston on December 21, 2011 at 12:30 PM

In my readings last night I hit on this

http://factcheck.org/2011/02/democrats-deny-social-securitys-red-ink/

which took me to the 2011 Trustees summary that I linked earlier that has Blahous as an author. Thanks.

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 12:54 PM

come on, Ed…’the Keystone concession was a victory for the Reps’…what concession? you have no guarantee that the ‘genius’ current WH occupant would have signed on it anyways…he was just stalling, to givee him enough time to come up with a good enough reason why he wouldn’t approve of it…so all these are speculations, really, it wasn’t any real victory as long as neither you nor anyone else know 0′s real intentions….

jimver on December 21, 2011 at 1:16 PM

I still don’t see how this is a bad thing for Republicans. Too many wonks and not enough average Joes are driving this narrative.

The average person doesn’t care about most of this. All the average person knows is that Obama wanted to extend a TAX CUT for them for one year. The senate decided to extend it for two months and the house said no to that and want to extend it for the full year just like Obama wanted.

That is all the average person is going to take from this fight.

How in the world people see this is a bad thing for the House is beyond me.

ButterflyDragon on December 21, 2011 at 1:16 PM

All of the above is relevant, but you really want to know how this Band of Thieves is paying for this joke?

New home loan fees:
http://biggovernment.com/tmcclintock/2011/12/20/the-problem-with-both-payroll-bills/#more-394532

Fire them all.

Starting with Boner.

Epic fail.

“Just because you are paranoid doesn’t mean Congress isn’t out to get you…”

Tenwheeler on December 21, 2011 at 1:19 PM

How in the world people see this is a bad thing for the House is beyond me.

ButterflyDragon on December 21, 2011 at 1:16 PM

it beats me too…

jimver on December 21, 2011 at 1:20 PM

Pork-Chop on December 21, 2011 at 10:51 AM

smitty41 on December 21, 2011 at 11:45 AM

two very good posts worth rereading

RiCkY.D. on December 21, 2011 at 11:57 AM

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 12:12 PM

Thanks for the reads.

RiCkY.D. on December 21, 2011 at 1:24 PM

WSJ is either extremely hypocriticql or extremely stoopid! As the nation’s financial paper of record, they should be informing the public that the payroll tax reduction is really revenue neutral if social security is NOT a ponzi scheme. The revenue payback will be hidden as a reduction in the amount in ALL the workers’ social securit checks.

Don’t you brainiacs realize that each one of you gets a letter from the SSA each year listing how much you have paid in, how much your employer has matched and how many quarters you have worked. They even tell you what your estimated SSA payout will be at retirement if there is no change in your employment status. The amount of your social security check is based on all three. Therefore the payback will be out of your social security monthly check. As a future social security recipiant, you are merely getting more money now instead of getting what you are supposed to get later.I don’t see why Ed, AP and the Reflublicans don’t beat this into the heads of the electorate.

I guess when zeros are leading zeros and being watched by zeros and commented on by zeros, zero will be the net result.

Old Country Boy on December 21, 2011 at 1:30 PM

So, let me see if i understand correctly…..both House and Senate R’s are for a one year payroll tax cut, D’s just want a two month cut, correct? So, a one year cut not getting passed is R’s fault how?

clearbluesky on December 21, 2011 at 1:32 PM

I guess when zeros are leading zeros and being watched by zeros and commented on by zeros, zero will be the net result.

Old Country Boy on December 21, 2011 at 1:30 PM

your math is impeccable :-)…

jimver on December 21, 2011 at 1:32 PM

So, a one year cut not getting passed is R’s fault how?

clearbluesky on December 21, 2011 at 1:32 PM

by Ed’s and others in the media’s logic…and don’t forget that there is no guarantee that O would have voted for the Keystone pipeline after said two months…he was just stalling to come up with a good enough reason to say no…or else why didn’t he approve it from the start and told Harper in no ambiguous terms that he would veto keystone pipeline for as long as he is president…can’t believe that Ed and others are so gullible so as to buy into his ‘signing’ on the keystone project…

jimver on December 21, 2011 at 1:35 PM

I’m with the House R’s here.

Basically WSJ is arguing that House R’s should pass a bill that has no policy virtues whatsoever (a downside-only two-month payroll tax cut extension) to shield themselves from political risk.

The hell with that.

Btw, it shouldn’t escape anyone’s notice that the only reason the two-month extension was floated to begin with, was to create a vehicle for bashing R’s two months from now.

There’s no reasonable policy argument for a two-month extension — it increases the deficit, it cannot reasonably have a stimulus effect, and administratively it’s unworkable. It’s a lousy bill.

I’m sorry, I won’t jump on the “just pass it” bandwagon simply because all the press are writing that it’s bad politics for the R’s. Sometimes doing the right thing — in this case saying no to an asinine policy — will be the best politics in the end.

Chuckles3 on December 21, 2011 at 1:40 PM

Some of us are trying OCB. This is one of the few places that the discussion is even taking place openly. I’ve called several house members today and so far only Kevin Brady has been taking calls from those I have attempted to contact.

And I went straight to the messaging aspects of ignoring the substance of what they are doing. See my post at 11:22 am.

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 1:40 PM

Even though the tax holiday is lousy policy, someone at NRO might have a solution for Boehner. Screw calling a conference committee, amend it and return it to Reid:

http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/286237/extend-payroll-tax-cut-one-year-deroy-murdock

BuckeyeSam on December 21, 2011 at 1:43 PM

Sorry, but the WSJ is nothing but another rag, useful for fishwrap only. They have always been the insiders, elite, establishment rag and should not be listen to. Didn’t use to be this way, but it is now.

rjulio on December 21, 2011 at 2:01 PM

i really feel sorry for Rs…they really don’t know the visceral hatred that the left has for them.

The two month extension is obviously a ploy by Reid to throw a monkey wrench into the thing on behalf of barry. Barry wanted a ayear…why did Reid/Senate leftist go with 2 months

they were pissed over the pipeline. And the pipeline will be a Pyrrhic victory.

Rs underestimate the power and extension of the leftist machine/pro-barry machine.

r keller on December 21, 2011 at 2:09 PM

Well, let the middle-class seniors know that Obama is giving away for free (soc sec) that which they’ve paid into all their lives.

The payroll tax cut treats recipients as if they are actually paying into the system even when they’re not.

Think about it.

MaggiePoo on December 21, 2011 at 2:10 PM

BuckeyeSam on December 21, 2011 at 1:43 PM

sounds good. Since the only talking points being discussed relates to the payroll tax deal that is unworkable, keep the language to that and force Harry’s hand. By doing so he will have to talk about the EBT limits, requirements for unemployment, allowing the doc fix, etc. If Harry talks of any other changes then he and the media have to eat dirt again defending the silence on the other issues.

Iamgine, drup testing for benefits.

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 2:14 PM

Impotence.

Let’s face it, Barry will win re-election. The Republicans seem to be unable to do anything right. They can’t get out ahead of the media, they can’t articulate their principles, and they can’t even capitalize on a Prez whose defeat should be a gimme.
Pathetic.

chriskl99 on December 21, 2011 at 2:27 PM

The WSJ and the “senior Senate GOP aide” are spot on. Those clowns in the House need to learn to take YES for an answer. The Dems had all but capitulated with the pipeline decision – declare victory and move on. Stealing defeat from the jaws of victory sums it up nicely.

ombdz on December 21, 2011 at 2:44 PM

They can’t get out ahead of the media, they can’t articulate their principles, and they can’t even capitalize on a Prez whose defeat should be a gimme.

‘yo Eeyore, have you seen any coverage of Fast & Furious in your local media? No? then why is Holder up for another hearing where he will continue to provide fodder for his pending indictment.

Seen any positive coverage of the Tea Party in your local media? No?, Recall anything happening in Nov. 2010 that changed the tide of destruction on our nation from the dems?

Seen any coverage of the Freddie Mac/Fannie Mae fiasco in your local media? No?, you ever wonder why there a 6 defendents mounting their case against charges of rigging the books?

jeesh what trooper

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 2:51 PM

The WSJ and the “senior Senate GOP aide” are spot on.

an unsourced quote in Politico does it for you? backbone, you has none

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 2:55 PM

Unfortunately caving is what Boehner does best.

katy on December 21, 2011 at 10:13 AM

It doesn’t look like Boehner “caved in”. Rather, Boehner called Reid’s bluff and pushed it back to the Senate to extend this bill for a year, not two months. What the Senate passed was a foolish bill that would only save 160 dollars over two months and causing major headaches with all American businesses which run on quarterly tax schedules and have to trip through two months of tax rebates and one month of tax raises in one quarter. The Senate could have planned it better if they had any brains. The House is merely going by the rules of the Constitution by re-submitting this bill back to the Senate and the Senate HAS to reply to this action by meeting in conference, as stipulated by the Constitution.

timberline on December 21, 2011 at 3:12 PM

Of all the issues for Boehner and House GOP to make a stand on why this one? This is pointless mole hill and now they want to go “Alamo” on us as if this is some line and the sand conservative issue. You got XL out of the deal and that alone is going to force Obama’s hand on something the vast majority Americans are for. If the payroll tax is a hoax for two months, it will be a hoax for a year also. It just shows a total lack strategic understanding and of knowing how to pick your battles…

Just accept it and move on…the Democrats are using this to highlight the GOP as standing in the way of Obama’s saving America theme…and is just makes our side look stupid looking.

William Eaton on December 21, 2011 at 3:12 PM

Businesses have to pay QUARTERLY taxes.. how do they figure for two months and what about the third month. This two month sh!t is ridiculous. The dems just threw that in there on purpose to screw the whole thing up. If the dems are so worried about taxpayers, then why don’t they think about what two months represents. Not a whole lot, that’s for sure. I don’t feel like listening to this crap over and over every couple of months. Idiots.

NJ Red on December 21, 2011 at 10:23 AM

Nobody is watching that hand. They are too busy watching the other hand. Most people aren’t this astute.

I salute you, NJ Red. We are too few in number.

timberline on December 21, 2011 at 3:19 PM

After hearing about this WSJ editorial today, I’m so glad I did not renew my subscription. For their editorial board to do the work of the New York Times or Washington Post is unforgiveable. I’ve read every side of this issue and it seems to me the House Republicans would have been criticized no matter which way they acted on this. I tend to agree with other posters hear who think it’s being over-analyzed and that the average American isn’t even paying attention. Screw Obama and the Democrats. They haven’t passed a budget in 3 years. Under their “leadership” it’s always government by crisis. This is what needs to be said loudly and often. We need regime change in Washington.

RedHotinNJ on December 21, 2011 at 3:26 PM

‘yo Eeyore, have you seen any coverage of Fast & Furious in your local media? No? then why is Holder up for another hearing where he will continue to provide fodder for his pending indictment.

Seen any positive coverage of the Tea Party in your local media? No?, Recall anything happening in Nov. 2010 that changed the tide of destruction on our nation from the dems?

Seen any coverage of the Freddie Mac/Fannie Mae fiasco in your local media? No?, you ever wonder why there a 6 defendents mounting their case against charges of rigging the books?

jeesh what trooper

Well, you’ve changed my mind. I was sold the minute you called me Eeyore. Now I’m convinced that things are looking up. After all, Fast & Furious is going to be such a big deal for know-nothing moderates & swing-voters who will blame Obama and not Holder, right? And the Tea Party, yeah, the Republicans deserve a lot of credit for creating that… oh wait they didn’t. Freddie Mac & Fannie Mae? That’ll bring down this administration because the public is so well educated and interested in the minutia of banking regulations that they’ll be riveted to their TVs following that story… Oh wait, they won’t.

My point was that the Republicans are toothless, gutless, and scared to death that their ideas will be misinterpreted, lied about, and/or ignored. As a result, they have become completely ineffectual both in the arena of ideas and within the legislative process(not a recent development).

But, you totally changed my mind, especially with your closing statement “Jeesh what trooper”. I don’t know what that means, but it sure swayed me. The Republicans are an effective, well-organized, disciplined and on-message machine of sparkling personalities and eloquently expressed ideas.
If reading that made you throw up in your mouth a little, just imagine what it was like to type it.

chriskl99 on December 21, 2011 at 3:31 PM

There is a provision in the Senate bill. Here it is:

Paid for by increasing home loan guarantee fees charged to mortgage lenders by Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the Federal Housing Administration by one-tenth of 1 percentage point. The fee is passed on to home buyers and will apply to many new purchases and refinancings starting Jan. 1.

sandee on December 21, 2011 at 10:50 AM

In a nutshell, it is a hidden tax hike on anybody assuming a home mortgage. It is equal to 10 basis points or about $300 per year on a $300,000 mortgage by raising guarantee fees (g-fees) on Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and FHA loans.

Yes, Ma, there are no free lunches.

timberline on December 21, 2011 at 3:48 PM

Sandee/Timberline:
It’s in both bills. Rep Tom McClintock of California commented on it on Big Government. His math is a touch different that yours:

The Problem with Both Payroll Bills
by Rep. Tom McClintock (R–CA)
In all this debate, I fear both parties have missed a critical point.

Both versions of this bill impose a permanent new tax on every mortgage backed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.

To pay for an additional two months of tax relief under the Senate version or 12 months under the House version, more than $3,000 of new taxes will be imposed on every $150,000 mortgage backed by Fannie or Freddie.

A family taking out a $250,000 mortgage will pay $5,000 more in taxes–directly and solely because of this bill– hidden in their future mortgage payments.

This is atrocious public policy.

It shifts the burden for this bill to future homebuyers, kicks the housing market when it’s already down, makes it that much more expensive for home buyers to re-enter that market, and adds to the pressures that have chronically depressed everyone’s home values.

That’s the reason that both the Senate and the House versions need to go back for major revision.

Tenwheeler on December 21, 2011 at 3:55 PM

This whole deal is a fiasco. The GOP is now supporting raiding the Social Security coffers, which is irresponsible. They’re on board with the idea that giving people pocket money via small temporary tax cuts is soudn policy. And they’re being painted as opposing a tax cut.

hawksruleva on December 21, 2011 at 4:00 PM

As I slump back in my high chair and regurgitate this mess in my mind, I can’t help thinking that if Obama had not pushed job killing EPA regulations and shutting down oil exploration and picking all the wrong people to run his administration, the economy might have gotten better three years ago and companies would be hiring and the government would be getting more taxes and Obama would stop spending on Green and the borders would be closed and….just then I fell off my high chair and woke up to reality.

timberline on December 21, 2011 at 4:21 PM

This is a colossal fumble by the House Republicans,” said a senior Senate GOP aide

No, this is a colossal fumble by Senate Republicans who played into the hands of the Democrats. The WSJ and the Senate aid are putting politics above principle. Essentially, the U.S. Senate put vacation plans over the success of the year long extension. Moreover, it’s a colossal fail by GOP party leadership in both chambers for not sticking to their guns together and pushing for the year long extension from the get-go. If the two month extension had been passed by the House, Obama would have likely vetoed it. Why? It’s unworkable and he wants to make the GOP appear uncooperative. Thanks to the GOP leadership in the Senate Obama doesn’t have to wait two months. He and Jay Carney can just point to their little countdown clock as if the end of the world is coming. That same stupid clock would still be there with the vetoed two-month extension bill. By the way, it’s not the end of the world if the extension doesn’t pass by Dec. 31. I’m surprised the WSJ editorial played into such hysterics for a bill that is nothing but a phony tax cut.

Vera71 on December 21, 2011 at 4:40 PM

Ah, a basic civics lesson, a little late to make the case, it should have been made many bills ago, how many has Reid tabled?
Nevertheless, a good find by right scoop

Rep. Labrador took to the floor yesterday to explain to Democrats who were complaining about having to conference the payroll tax bill, why this is normal procedure that any 3rd grade Civics student would understand

http://www.therightscoop.com/rep-labrador-explains-grade-school-civics-to-democrats/

beacon on December 21, 2011 at 4:46 PM

chriskl99 on December 21, 2011 at 3:31 PM

somebody lose a dramaqueen? I think I found a lost one.

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 5:34 PM

Vera71 on December 21, 2011 at 4:40 PM

one of many great posts today

Tenwheeler on December 21, 2011 at 3:55 PM

another one!

and NJRed and Timberline!

So what if the average check gets whacked for $40. Get them back and make them legislate and do what right while everybody is looking. The mortgage deal is reason enough to punt this thing. A lot of GOP senators have serious egg on face for going along with Reid.

DanMan on December 21, 2011 at 5:55 PM

The Democrat party stands for only one thing; staying in power.They strategize 24/7 spend millions if not billions to figure out how to destroy us on every issue,every decision they make about anything to do with the country is politically inspired and we seldom call them on anything.I would like to know why?
Boehner should never have agreed to allowing the rats to destroy the SS fund by over 30%. Its insane.
We have been blasted by the regime /rats for years for wanting to destory SS.Here the rat actually do it and add to the deficit and we let them get away with it!! Why?Its all crazy.

ON the pipeline:

Last August the State dept.said that the Keystone pipeline would cause no problems either under construction or under operation and had little if any opposition to it.
The State Dept. is Hillary Clinton. Why are we not using this to bolster our arguments against the rats for opposing Keystone and insisting on more than 60 days for what approval now? It’s insane.

I would like to know why this is not front page news everywhere and why the pubbies have not been pointing this out.

http://www.siouxcityjournal.com/news/state-and-regional/south-dakota/state-dept-report-favors-us-canada-oil-pipeline/article_2d9ac992-d029-11e0-9a2d-001cc4c002e0.html

rodguy911 on December 21, 2011 at 9:30 PM

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