Occupy LA: “The bourgeoisie won’t go without violent means”

posted at 9:25 am on October 12, 2011 by Ed Morrissey

Last week, I wrote that leftist populist uprisings always start with talk about justice, but always end up demanding redistribution — and the guillotine.  Zombie and Ringo at Pajamas Media gets a great example of this at the Occupy LA protest, where a speaker scoffed at the notion of change through non-violent protests.  Calling Mahatma Gandhi a “tumor” that the rich use to keep the 99% down, this philosopher instead prefers the “bloody” French Revolution.  The fun starts at about thirty seconds in:

One of the speakers said the solution is nonviolent movement. No, my friend. I’ll give you two examples: French Revolution, and Indian so-called Revolution.

Gandhi, Gandhi today is, with respect to all of you, Gandhi today is a tumor that the ruling class is using constantly to mislead us. French Revolution made fundamental transformation. But it was bloody.

India, the result of Gandhi, is 600 million people living in maximum poverty.

So, ultimately, the bourgeoisie won’t go without violent means. Revolution! Yes, revolution that is led by the working class.

Long live revolution! Long live socialism!

I’ve been to a few Tea Party events and don’t recall anyone on stage advocating the “bloody” overthrow of the United States.  I have seen on occasions people carrying signs with the famous Thomas Jefferson quote from 1787, “The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants.  It is its natural manure.”  The media usually uses those images to paint Tea Party activists as an angry, violent mob.

With that in mind, I’m sensitive to taking things out of context, but that hardly seems to be the case with this clip.  This person appears to be a leader of the protest, as he has the microphone without wrestling it from the man holding it.   At least one previous speaker must have spoken about the virtues of nonviolent protest, but this rebuttal gets quite a few cheers, too.  Perhaps subsequent speakers scolded this man and a show of jazz hands exiled him from the Occupy Movement, but somehow I think he captures the true intent of this movement.

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