I do believe that DNC Chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz just wrested the #Winning hashtag away from Charlie Sheen:

I’d say that Wasserman Schultz has achieved her goal of not creating jobs … except that Democrats haven’t exactly showed leadership, either. They fumbled Obama’s stinkbomb of a jobs bill, with two of their own caucus joining a Republican filibuster to stop it even after Harry Reid rewrote its tax provision.  Even if the bill had gone to a floor vote, The Hill reports that it would still have failed:

The only Democrats to vote against the measure were Sens. Ben Nelson (Neb.) and Jon Tester (Mont.), but a number of other centrists in the party indicated they would vote against the package even though they supported launching a debate on the measure.

So how did Democratic leadership, in the form of President Obama, react?  By, er, agreeing to do what John Boehner requested in the first place:

Shortly after his $447 billion jobs plan stalled Tuesday in the Senate, President Barack Obama vowed to break the broad initiative down into numerous, separate bills — potentially setting up even more showdowns between Democrats and Republics on how to boost the economy and where to get the money to do so.

The Democrat-pushed bill failed Tuesday night to get the 60 votes needed in the Senate to proceed. A total of 50 members of the chamber supported the measure, while 49 cast ballots against it.

In a statement issued Tuesday night, Obama said that despite being an obvious defeat, “tonight’s vote is by no means the end of this fight.” He then outlined his intention to work with Senate Majority Harry Reid and produce several smaller bills derived from the bigger plan.

Boehner pledged to break the bill up into component parts for consideration immediately after Obama’s joint-session speech, but it was that Democratic Party form of leadership that demanded an all-or-nothing approach on a poison-pill bill.  Obama wanted to beat the GOP with a dead bill rather than actually, you know, create jobs.  Boehner wanted to work on economic policy.  Who ended up winning the leadership contest?  It’s not the party that suddenly wants to distance itself from job creation.

Update: Just in case you need a reminder, here’s Debbie Downer from two months ago, bragging about … well, I think you can guess.  Direct quote: “We’re creating jobs each month in the private sector.”