GOP moves to ensure secret ballot union elections

posted at 11:25 am on October 7, 2011 by Jazz Shaw

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is beginning to look like the olden times prisoner who is dying the death of a thousand cuts. After gaining far more attention than they ever wanted by sticking their collective nose into the business of Boeing, a number of new regulatory reforms proposed under the Obama administration have been coming under fire. Chief among these are the continued efforts by the board to “fast track” union elections in the workplace, essentially robbing employees of the opportunity for an assured secret ballot to determine their future regarding collective bargaining.

The week Congress is set to at least attempt to nip this in the bud.

A key House Republican chairman, frustrated with what he calls a pattern of “union favoritism” by the National Labor Relations Board, said Wednesday he is stepping up efforts to roll back new rules issued by the agency.

House Education and the Workforce Committee Chairman John Kline, Minnesota Republican, introduced the “Workforce Democracy and Fairness Act,” yet another attempt to rein in an agency that has become a partisan flash point and an early issue in the 2012 presidential campaign.

“It’s apparent that the White House isn’t going to stand up to this,” the congressman told a small group of reporters. “In fact, argument could be made that they may be encouraging it. But we’re going to stand up to it.”

This is still in the early phases, but you can keep track of HR 3094 here. There will be a legislative hearing next week and Kline expects the bill to head to markup shortly thereafter. What the bill seeks to accomplish is to ensure that workers have a reasonable period of time to consider a union proposal before being rushed to a decision and that they can be assured of a secret ballot to avoid backlash from union bosses if they oppose such a collective bargaining agreement.

I have to wonder if the Democrats are even going to be able to summon up any serious, vocal opposition to the bill at this point. The NLRB’s reputation is pretty much mud these days, and their actions have become symbolic of opposing job creation during a time when the entire country is screaming for more work. Coming out in favor of anything which furthers the NLRB in these goals sounds pretty much like falling on your own sword coming into an election cycle.

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Racists. Clearly.

Washington Nearsider on October 7, 2011 at 11:27 AM

Good news: Cain up 20 over Romney.

Bad news: It’s a Zogby poll.

lorien1973 on October 7, 2011 at 11:28 AM

Coming out in favor of anything which furthers the NLRB in these goals sounds pretty much like falling on your own sword coming into an election cycle.

There is going to be so much sword falling in the next 12 months, it will make August 1945 in Tokyo look like Kabuki theatre.

Vashta.Nerada on October 7, 2011 at 11:29 AM

Good luck Kline! I wonder if bho would veto the bill if it passed the house and senate? bho is just slimy enough to do so!
L

letget on October 7, 2011 at 11:30 AM

Of course Democrats will vocally oppose it. They’ll just say how evil Republicans are trying to take away “workers rights”.

They don’t have to explain what that means. They just need to use that buzz phrase and set the media in motion to constantly say it over and over and over.

Haven’t you noticed how “fair share” is the latest buzz phrase used over and over? People don’t question what it means, they just know they want something that sounds like that.

ButterflyDragon on October 7, 2011 at 11:31 AM

Secret ballots, what is this, North Korea?

Bishop on October 7, 2011 at 11:31 AM

Politicians rarely fall on the sword. They’ll sell their souls to satan to gain re-election. If their constituents scream loud enough, the only way they’ll touch this, is to go against NLRB. For now.

If they ever gain majority again, they’ll put the pedal to floor, and ram ever social idea down our throats…and they won’t care who does, or does not like it.

capejasmine on October 7, 2011 at 11:32 AM

Why does the GOp always have to attack the working man? Can’t a guy just get a job threatening others that don’t conform?

WashJeff on October 7, 2011 at 11:36 AM

Unions are bad for this country.
The entire entitlement mentality is bad for this country.

KMC1 on October 7, 2011 at 11:37 AM

Good news: Cain up 20 over Romney.

Bad news: It’s a Zogby poll.

lorien1973 on October 7, 2011 at 11:28 AM

Yeah, but even if he’s only really up 5-10 points or even in a statistical dead heat, he’s got some serious momentum. And don’t discount the possibility that with Palin and Christie finally officially out and the field presumably set, the non-Romney portion of the electorate can start to coalesce around a candidate. Right now it looks to be Cain. Granted, he could blow it or these voters could decide to give Perry a second look, but we’re likely looking at a 3-man race at this point.

Doughboy on October 7, 2011 at 11:37 AM

Who’s kidding whom here. The left will eradicate this bill by attaching a poison pill to it (save the children or the right to kill them or something devious) and with the filibuster gone the gOP will just continue to play these “see conservatives-we’re on your side” games. This is electioneering at its finest.

Don L on October 7, 2011 at 11:37 AM

lorien1973 on October 7, 2011 at 11:28 AM

And for some reason that will equate to him being Romney’s VP. This is the worst election ever.

Cindy Munford on October 7, 2011 at 11:40 AM

I don’t see this getting through both chambers and signed by The Won, at best it keeps it in the public eye.

Cindy Munford on October 7, 2011 at 11:43 AM

This is the worst election ever.

Cindy Munford on October 7, 2011 at 11:40 AM

Yep. We are gonna get the crappiest candidate in 2012.

Romney is our Kerry.

lorien1973 on October 7, 2011 at 11:43 AM

No matter who we have, it will be better than the Won we have.

OT – I think I have found a real capitalist pig:

http://themorningspew.com/2011/10/07/a-genuine-capitalist-pig/

bloggless on October 7, 2011 at 11:46 AM

Coming out in favor of anything which furthers the NLRB in these goals sounds pretty much like falling on your own sword coming into an election cycle.

Ya can’t fix stupid, Jazz. The unions will lean on the Democrats with a very effective phrase; “You looking for campaign donations for 2012?”

GarandFan on October 7, 2011 at 11:51 AM

he National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is beginning to look like the olden times prisoner who is dying the death of a thousand cuts.

Unfortunately, they still cost as much as they did when hearty and hale.

Eliminate. Zero-Out.

That goes for Obama’s new “Consumer Practice Finance Practice Protection Market Bureau Board,” or whatever that new board of busybodies is that’s going to do for bank services what Carter did for gasoline.

HitNRun on October 7, 2011 at 11:53 AM

GarandFan on October 7, 2011 at 11:51 AM

Nice campaign ya got there, Congressman. Be a shame if something happened to it.

SKYFOX on October 7, 2011 at 12:00 PM

Three words for ya (channeling Joltin’ Joe Biden here), Jazzbo:

Harry. Reid.

You wasted a lot of time coming up with a post about a nothing that will never be anything but a nothing.

MrScribbler on October 7, 2011 at 12:06 PM

Secret ballots, what is this, North Korea?

Bishop on October 7, 2011 at 11:31 AM

LOL!

capejasmine on October 7, 2011 at 12:08 PM

I have to wonder if the Democrats are even going to be able to summon up any serious, vocal opposition to the bill at this point.

Not vocal, no. But they’ll take in a back room and quietly smother it to death first chance they get, you can bet on it.

Socratease on October 7, 2011 at 1:25 PM

This thing will pass the House, but die in the Senate. The Dems don’t care how they’re perceived, because they know that the MSM will carry water for them.

Ward Cleaver on October 7, 2011 at 2:22 PM

The union workaround to secret ballots in the recent CA grocery strike vote: have one box with Yes on it and another box across the aisle with No on it.

The workers thus clearly indicate their preference by whatever line they are in.

Goons, however you slice it.

PattyJ on October 7, 2011 at 2:53 PM

Secret, schmecret. Unions and striking are passe and irrelevant. If you don’t like your job, you don’t strike. You go in every day and do it really half-assed. That’s the American way. All this hoo hah over nothing.

Mason on October 7, 2011 at 4:49 PM

All States should adopt a ‘Right to Work’ clause. The intent of ‘Right to Work’ is in not to start a physical conflict, but to open up the entrenched liberal view of work itself.

Conservatism believes in a strong work ethic and consists of individuals proud of what they do and do what they enjoy, while leadership sees these types of persons as assets to the organization that a duly rewarded.

However Liberalism view these individuals as slaves must be justly rewarded (paid) whether they are productive or not, and that pay must be increased as long as they are employed (step increases). Ironically, this methodology must be reversed.

If Unions should try a different technique to gain membership that helps to member and the company they work for. Instead of demanding wages based on a arbitrary system, Unions should let the Company set the pay for each position based on merit, and the offering of other benefits packages. Then the Union can develop a package of increases in the form of offering training programs to improve the employees capabilities. Also, they can examine an employees health care package offered by the employer and find a method to increase the value of the health care plan or increased levels of insurance coverage.

Therefore, employees gain tangible benefits through Union membership and they can join or increase their coverage as their position in the company increases, or as their needs dictate, marriage, death, births, etc.

The bottom line, the creation of a symbiotic relationship.

MSGTAS on October 8, 2011 at 10:23 AM