Breaking: Steve Jobs dead at 56

posted at 8:59 pm on October 5, 2011 by Allahpundit

We knew it was coming but that doesn’t make it easier. Horrendous.

We are deeply saddened to announce that Steve Jobs passed away today.

Steve’s brilliance, passion and energy were the source of countless innovations that enrich and improve all of our lives. The world is immeasurably better because of Steve.

His greatest love was for his wife, Laurene, and his family. Our hearts go out to them and to all who were touched by his extraordinary gifts.

Apple’s homepage tonight is a requiem for the departed. I’m straining to find a cultural analogy for Jobs and am struck by the fact that I have to leave the business/tech fields entirely to do it. You can do it if you go back far enough — Henry Ford and Edison pop to mind, but … that’s awfully far. The obvious modern comparison is to Bill Gates, but that doesn’t work. Gates, like Jobs, is capital-I Important to the computer age, but in sort of the same way that ancient cave painters were important to the development of art. Jobs started out as a cave painter too but kept at it until he turned into Rembrandt. I think Lileks is close to the mark in comparing him to Walt Disney; my first thought when I heard the news was that only Steven Spielberg’s passing today would hit quite as hard. The common thread among those three is that they all made magic, but Jobs put it in your hands so that you felt like you were the one making it. That’s the crucial difference between Apple and Microsoft — Gates made computers easier to use but Jobs made them objects of wonder. He made magic, literally. There’s no greater epitaph.

Here’s his commencement address at Stanford in 2005. I’ll leave you with a quote:

No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.

When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog, which was one of the bibles of my generation. It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch. This was in the late 1960′s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.

Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.

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Comment pages: 1 2

We won’t see his likes again.
StarLady on October 5, 2011 at 10:09 PM

No you won’t, we’ll see better, or our kids will.

Bishop on October 5, 2011 at 10:28 PM

RIP Mr. Jobs.

An everyman geek in an era where not every man thinks like a geek.

He had a truly spectacular ability to remove complexity in a realm that adores it. Steve imparted elegance where every other geek on the planet sought intricacy.

I didn’t think I would say this, as someone who owns very few Apple products, but the world is poorer. Before the iPod and iPhone, the world was spinning into a technological landscape that would have made interfaces on items we now consider ubiquitous indecipherable to most non-nerds. He saved cell phones and music players and maybe even computers from turning into things that look and feel engineered by Texas Instruments.

Today the goal is intuition: making a device that not only functions in its intended manner, but does so without head-scratching or looking up man pages or calls to customer service. I believe we owe much of the modern technological landscape to Steve Jobs’ return to Apple in the late 90′s. And for that alone his mark on modern society is indelible.

Sgt Steve on October 5, 2011 at 10:29 PM

Consider this – Apple was in real danger of going under until they introduced the iPod. It wasn’t their computers that got people hooked.

crazy_legs on October 5, 2011 at 10:25 PM

Yeah, that’s why people are talking about Jobs’s influence in the whole tech sector, not just computers. In just the realm of computers, Gates is a bigger name.

Good Solid B-Plus on October 5, 2011 at 10:29 PM

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 10:21 PM

Thanks for providing some perspective.

Christien on October 5, 2011 at 10:30 PM

I wonder how many of the bozos taking part in the Occupy Wall Street protests are walking around with an I-Phone or other Apple product? They are railing against the very institution that allowed Jobs (and others) to bring to them the technological innovations they enjoy today. Apple went public with an IPO in 1980, three years after its incorporation. If any of those older moonbat protesters had the foresight to have purchased 100 shares of Apple in 1980 at the IPO price of $22, their $2,200 investment would be worth well over $300,000 now. But they would rather get free handouts from the government.

May Jobs rest in peace.

The Good Doctor on October 5, 2011 at 10:32 PM

Steve Jobs RIP. I thank you, my iMac thanks you, my MacBook Pro thanks you, my iPod thanks you,
Yes, Apple made my a fangirl who delights in putting apple stickers on my car window.
It’s a sad, sad day.

lonestar1 on October 5, 2011 at 10:33 PM

crazy_legs on October 5, 2011 at 10:25 PM

Hango — my PJB-100 still works.

Ok, now I’m really done. Closing the window.

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 10:33 PM

I first met Steve when I was a kid and my father was an early investor in Apple and marketed the firm to other institutional investors. The Apple II was in the pipeline.

Sad that he is gone now but he leaves quite a legacy behind.

…on to the next life Steve!

lexhamfox on October 5, 2011 at 10:36 PM

Like I said, though, it’s not always who comes first.

Without Ralph Baer, there’s no Nolan Bushnell, but who had more lasting impact? Bushnell.

Bushnell’s company also lent some parts to two young kids who were working on a crazy project in their garage. The company was Atari; the kids were Wozniak and Jobs.

Good Solid B-Plus on October 5, 2011 at 10:38 PM

By the way, let us not forget that Steve Jobs probably saved the music business with the invention of iTunes. He figured out a way to get people to stop pirating music via the Internet and pay for it. There are many, many successful musicians out there today only because of iTunes. People like my son can discover obscure and quirky bands that they would never have heard otherwise, and those bands can get heard and their music bought by kids 1000 miles away. Kids can get their own music published and spread around.

And it sure has made gift-giving for teens easy. ;-)

rockmom on October 5, 2011 at 10:40 PM

I’m a Windows guy, but Apple is a tremendous success story in that it takes vision to make something succeed. When Apple didn’t have Job’s they suffered. He was able to streamline simplicity and package it in truly innovative industrial designs.

You-Eh-Vee on October 5, 2011 at 10:46 PM

People like my son can discover obscure and quirky bands that they would never have heard otherwise, and those bands can get heard and their music bought by kids 1000 miles away. Kids can get their own music published and spread around.
And it sure has made gift-giving for teens easy. ;-)
rockmom on October 5, 2011 at 10:40 PM

Actually that has never been much of problem, rockmom. “Obscure and quirky bands” have used the internet as an marketing and sales outlet since pretty much the beginning using, for example, MP3.com which started in 1997.

whatcat on October 5, 2011 at 10:47 PM

After first Apple 1, what did Apple “invent” that wasn’t already out there. Even the Apple 2 was just a locked down platform for people who didn’t want have to bother with programming themselves. They weren’t the first in that case either.

As a computer animator, that’s a really silly way to look at it. Everything, and I do mean everything, has ‘existed’ before. Your ‘I had Win 95 on a tablet’ is eye roll worthy, mostly because I know exactly what you’re referring to, but that’s beside the point.

The company/person who gets the credit is the one who can package it and sell it successfully. simple/sexy GUI’s, great hardware, and integration are what people want, and Apple has it spades – borrowed or not.

You-Eh-Vee on October 5, 2011 at 10:50 PM

Actually that has never been much of problem, rockmom. “Obscure and quirky bands” have used the internet as an marketing and sales outlet since pretty much the beginning using, for example, MP3.com which started in 1997.

whatcat on October 5, 2011 at 10:47 PM

So has MySpace. The problem is that they’re not heavily browsed, and both suffer from cumbersome interfaces.

You-Eh-Vee on October 5, 2011 at 10:51 PM

Malcolm Gladwell recently penned a very good essay about the Xerox Research Lab and Steve Jobs’s visit there that sparked menu interface. Sometimes an innovator isn’t the person who thought of it first, it’s the person who understands how to deliver it better. Steve Jobs had a remarkable ability to see beyond the invention to expanded possibilities. That takes tremendous imagination and ingenuity and we should celebrate him for those qualities.

RIP Steve Jobs

Written on my iPad

piglet on October 5, 2011 at 10:58 PM

So that picture that TMZ had recently was legit, even though all the tech bloggers said it was a fake.

It was an awful picture. The man look like he weighted less than 100 pounds.

Jobs turned Apple from a computer company to a gadget company, and that is why their product launches are headline news now. Before, it was Apple geeks only.

Moesart on October 5, 2011 at 11:01 PM

Actually that has never been much of problem, rockmom. “Obscure and quirky bands” have used the internet as an marketing and sales outlet since pretty much the beginning using, for example, MP3.com which started in 1997.

whatcat on October 5, 2011 at 10:47 PM

So has MySpace. The problem is that they’re not heavily browsed, and both suffer from cumbersome interfaces.

You-Eh-Vee on October 5, 2011 at 10:51 PM

Among musicians MySpace is considered more as just an internet presence service than a music distribution tool. More or less a joke. You’ll find more of what I mean listed Here.

whatcat on October 5, 2011 at 11:01 PM

Among musicians MySpace is considered more as just an internet presence service than a music distribution tool. More or less a joke. You’ll find more of what I mean listed Here.

whatcat on October 5, 2011 at 11:01 PM

My point is that both these sites don’t come within a million miles of itunes – both in the exposure it has given indie artists, or the sales it has generated.

You-Eh-Vee on October 5, 2011 at 11:06 PM

Moesart on October 5, 2011 at 11:01 PM

I sat a couple seats away from him nearly two years ago at a concert. He looked incredibly frail then and when I told my date it was Steve Jobs she did not believe me until Yo Yo Ma pointed him out to the audience before playing a piece that he commissioned.

lexhamfox on October 5, 2011 at 11:09 PM

Among musicians MySpace is considered more as just an internet presence service than a music distribution tool. More or less a joke. You’ll find more of what I mean listed Here.
whatcat on October 5, 2011 at 11:01 PM

My point is that both these sites don’t come within a million miles of itunes – both in the exposure it has given indie artists, or the sales it has generated.
You-Eh-Vee on October 5, 2011 at 11:06 PM

Ah, but my point is that if a person is looking to find “obcure and quirky”, up-and-coming artists and new music – much of it for authorized free download – that’s where they’ll be lookin’.

whatcat on October 5, 2011 at 11:18 PM

Lately, I’ve gotten to look at and handle pre-production units of a couple of new tablets coming in the next two months from different PC makers, and neither of them were nearly as slick or easy to use as the iPad.

It was announced at the iPhone 4S launch yesterday that the iPad currently has 74 percent of the tablet market. Think about it – all those other manufacturers are chasing just 26 percent of the tablet market.

Apple’s genius has been creating user interfaces that are bulletproof and easy to use, and just making things work with minimal hassle. And it’s Jobs that inspired that genius among the designers, programmers, and engineers. Rest in peace, Steve.

Ward Cleaver on October 5, 2011 at 11:41 PM

This has me so sad that I just colored my apple car sticker black. We’re in mourning.

lonestar1 on October 5, 2011 at 11:53 PM

My son is in his room playing TAPS on his clarinet in honor of Jobs. The kid is a major fanboy.

lonestar1 on October 5, 2011 at 11:58 PM

An excellent quote that captures the poetry and brilliance through which Jobs changed our world. So few in our past can match his legacy of brilliance as a business leader and perhaps none were literally as irreplaceable in the sum of their contributions. It might be another century before another single individual so boldly defines the arc of how humans interact with technology. Steve’s legacy spans far beyond Apple products and his memory will live through generations of ideas inspired by his achievements.

bayam on October 6, 2011 at 12:04 AM

That his birth mother chose to accept responsibility and bring her baby into this world was indeed a blessing.

RIP Mr. Jobs and condolences to his family and friends.

RedRobin145 on October 6, 2011 at 12:17 AM

Gone, gone, gone beyond.
Gone beyond beyond.
Hail the goer!

Kenosha Kid on October 6, 2011 at 12:22 AM

Rest in peace.

I always liked my PC, but I really love my iPad, so bless the genius of your sweet soul.

I know I sound ego-centric, so forgive me, but I really thank you, Steve, for my iPad!

marybel on October 6, 2011 at 12:52 AM

A truly great American.

Never forget my first experience with an Apple Macintosh in college.

I’d been using PCs, which booted from a 5.25″ floppy. With the PCs of that era, you put the disk in the drive, a red LED on the drive would light up, the drive would whir and grind, and then some cryptic messages would scroll up the monochrome monitor. There was such and such amount of RAM, and the ROM BIOS was such and such a version, and something.SYS was loaded, and on and on. It was all Very Serious Computing.

One day, all the PCs were in use and I had to do my work on a Mac. I was given a 3.5″ floppy as a boot disk. It slid into the funky little Mac with a satisfying clunk. A picture of a Mac computer appeared in the center of the screen and after a few seconds — after the operating system booted up — it smiled. And I did, too.

RIP, Steve.

Purple Fury on October 6, 2011 at 12:57 AM

Well, if you’re gonna call my views silly. . . let’s play.

As a computer animator, that’s a really silly way to look at it.

Really? A computer animator you say? You mean like an ILM guy using Sun Ray 2′s? Or a guy who makes flash vids on a mac?

I’m sure as a computer animator, you’re fond of Jobs and Pixar. Are you willing to admit that Jobs had NOTHING to do with the Pixar Image Computer, that’s right, it was built by Lucasfilm. Apple bought Pixar in the mid 80′s and the PIC was already built and being used.

Jobs had ZERO to do with the development of the Pixar Image Computer, it’s was Lucas’ baby.

But you know that as a computer animator, right?

Everything, and I do mean everything, has ‘existed’ before.

Really? Any pre-existing cathode ray tubes out there before 1897? How about solid state devices before 1930? How about electric
wireless optical transmission before Bell and Tainter in 1880?

Everything, and I do mean everything, has most certainly NOT ‘existed’ before.

Your ‘I had Win 95 on a tablet’ is eye roll worthy, mostly because I know exactly what you’re referring to, but that’s beside the point.

Really, you do? Let’s see, are you talking about my Fujitsu? Or my Motion? Or perhaps the Walkabout, or perhaps the Itronix? Which one am I EXACTLY referring to? The one that used to run a Restaurant POS? Or perhaps the one I got from Michoud that was used for QC inspections on the SSET?

The company/person who gets the credit is the one who can package it and sell it successfully. simple/sexy GUI’s, great hardware, and integration are what people want, and Apple has it spades – borrowed or not.

NO, the inventor of the invention gets the credit for the invention, the marketer gets credit for marketing the product.

Childish GUI’s/mediocre hardware combos chosen by the proprietor/integration with limited products is what some people want.

Other people want choice, serious comuputing power, scalability and near universal integration. Apple fails on those points.

Sorry folks, I just couldn’t let such ignorant assertions lie. My bad.

Jason Coleman on October 6, 2011 at 1:24 AM

“I don’t expect the Federal government to break up Microsoft for a lot reasons, the least of which is the Federal government is also a monopoly. They’re buddies!” – Steve Jobs, WWDC 1997

RIP, Steve. You made innovation and capitalism cool.

ExUrbanKevin on October 6, 2011 at 1:30 AM

How absolutely sad it is to see the comments of young pinheads who try to suggest that the ghastly cretins at IBM invented, or were somehow responsible for, the personal computer. In fact, IBM totally ignored the development of the personal computer, initially treating it as a “toy”. That is why they so casually adopted, for the first time in their history, an “out of house” operating system that had been originally purchased by a young hustler by the name of Gates. Furthermore, the IBM turkeys were so negligent as to agree to allow the young hustler Gates to market the ghastly Disc Operating System (DOS) to anyone else that was interested, thus instantly creating the vast “PC” market. This grotesque stupidity, combined with IBM’s failure to take seriously the advent of the personal computer market, came very close to resulting in the bankruptcy of the IBM Corporation. In the meantime, Jobs, having seen the amazing GUI interface and mouse developed at PARC (the Xerox Corporation Research Center in Palo Alto, California), which was also operated by management cretins, took advantage of this wonderful innovation and developed the first MAC. Good for Mr. Jobs! Let us not distort the record friends, these are the facts!

John Adams on October 6, 2011 at 2:08 AM

Jason Coleman on October 6, 2011 at 1:24 AM

I think you’ve managed to miss the point of pretty much every point you responded to, but I wanted to address this…

NO, the inventor of the invention gets the credit for the invention, the marketer gets credit for marketing the product.

Yeah, like how the Wright brothers get credit for inventing the airplane (actually invented by Samuel Pierpont Langley).

Or how Henry Ford gets credit for “inventing the car” (not even close to actually inventing). Or how Ford gets credit for the assembly line (actually Eli Whitney, and later Random Olds for cars before Ford).

Or how Thomas Edison gets the credit for the incandescent light bulb (as many as 22 previous inventors and per Wikipedia: “Another historian, Thomas Hughes, has attributed Edison’s success to the fact that he developed an entire, integrated system of electric lighting.”… gee, that almost sounds like something Steve Jobs would do).

Or how Alexander Graham Bell gets credit for inventing the telephone (actually invented many years previously by an Italian fellow named Antonio Meucci).

Or how Einstein gets credit for relativity (not his idea… Henri Poincaré is the one you’re looking for).

No… credit has always gone to the person who makes ideas and things accessible to the most people. Sometimes they are invented, but usually they take existing ideas and repackage them into something that consumers want before they even know they want it. That was the essence of Jobs’ genius.

DaveS on October 6, 2011 at 2:37 AM

How absolutely sad it is to see the comments of young pinheads who try to suggest that the ghastly cretins at IBM invented, or were somehow responsible for, the personal computer.

Who did that?

—————————–

As for “young pinheads” you, who I can only assume must consider yourself to be an “old fathead” seem to be quite ignorant of everything that came before IBM Gates and DOS.

Kit computer manufacturers, Wang, HP and Xerox all had marketed and sold “personal computers” (computers owned and operated by individuals for personal use), a full decade before Gates and the IBM 5150′s. The term “personal computer” was in common computing parlance already when IBM started using “IBM PC”.

PARC didn’t invent the mouse, Englebart did at Stanford Research. The ball mouse was invented in Germany. Both were in use a full decade before Jobs saw it at PARC.

Opening your comment with ad hominems only makes your gross ignorance and misrepresentations throughout the comment more laughable.

Let us not distort the record friends, these are the facts!

Yeah, let’s not let fathead, turkey, cretins like you distort the the record, with false claims that you have masqueraded as facts.

Jason Coleman on October 6, 2011 at 3:02 AM

DaveS on October 6, 2011 at 2:37 AM

Please point me to any reference to any powered aircraft created by Langley which carried a human prior to the Wright’s?

I don’t know of too many valid references to Henry Ford inventing the automobile.

I certainly have never claimed that Einstein is responsible for “relativity”, I don’t know any scientists who would state that either. I think it is safe to say that Einstein is the author of the “Special Theory of Relativity”.

You seem to be creating some facts out of wholecloth as well as John Adams above.

Jason Coleman on October 6, 2011 at 3:14 AM

Jason Coleman on October 6, 2011 at 3:14 AM

Whatever, this has apparently went way over your head. Sleep tight.

DaveS on October 6, 2011 at 3:17 AM

Sure Dave, you too. Have yourself a dream about Aerodromes.

Jason Coleman on October 6, 2011 at 3:24 AM

PARC didn’t invent the mouse, Englebart did at Stanford Research. The ball mouse was invented in Germany. Both were in use a full decade before Jobs saw it at PARC.
Jason Coleman on October 6, 2011 at 3:02 AM

Correct. I suspect some of the young folks here might be shocked upon viewing this: Doug Engelbart 1968 Demonstration. While the passing of Jobs is sad, he shouldn’t be re-invented into a latter day Nikola Tesla in death.

whatcat on October 6, 2011 at 3:26 AM

I haven’t read all the links, but this one says it all..
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4oAB83Z1ydE

R.I.P. Steve Jobs.. thanks

uddercha0s on October 6, 2011 at 3:32 AM

Correct. I suspect some of the young folks here might be shocked upon viewing this: Doug Engelbart 1968 Demonstration. While the passing of Jobs is sad, he shouldn’t be re-invented into a latter day Nikola Tesla in death.

whatcat on October 6, 2011 at 3:26 AM

6 years before that, Steve Russell and crew created Spacewar on a PDP-1 at MIT. And ten years before that, someone made a tic-tac-toe game on an EDSAC. But few people credit them for launching an industry. Russell was a smart guy, but he lacked the vision and ego of Bushnell, Baer and other great innovators.

It’s not just being first, it’s being damn sure you’re the best…even if you’re not :)

Good Solid B-Plus on October 6, 2011 at 4:22 AM

I’m gonna exit before I get too frustrated with the people that feel the need to come here and shit on this man’s company right now.

The few that are stopping short of anointing Jobs as God’s Gift to Man are simply adding reason to an ocean of hyperbole.

It’s remarkable how short people’s memories are — basically claiming Apple’s (admittedly laudable) ability to mass-market gadgets ranks as one of the great achievements in human history. Even calling him an “inventor” falls short of the facts.

Part of being a great capitalist is being a great marketer. Who cares that IBM actually invented the PC? They sucked at design and marketing, and eventually got run out of the business.

It matters because many are claiming Steve Jobs invented/created technology that wouldn’t otherwise exist. Being a great marketer does not equate to being a great inventor.

That drive innovation, because other companies have to do even better than they would in an Apple-less market.

Wait, so it wasn’t capitalism that made it possible like I’m reading conservatives pontificate, but just personally Steve Jobs? All the talk that “I couldn’t even do this if it weren’t for x iToy” — aside from being laughably untrue — also contradicts this claim. If the reason for innovation were capitalism (it is), then one would acknowledge the technology would still exist, just with a different logo (it would be, sorry cultists).

How do I know it would be? Because it was. I know many pretend today’s tech wasn’t developing until our Savior Steve Jobs Dreamed a Dream, but Apple wouldn’t have even been in the picture had they not successfully repackaged an existing technology, the MP3 player, into the iPod.

Don’t get me wrong. He and Apple succeeded in jaw-dropping fashion in persuading the masses. He is to be praised as a great business man, marketer, and yes, innovator (but to a less extent than what is being claimed). More than anything, I respect him most for his ability to tweak existing technology that was hardly noticed into a must-have, “new” technology for millions of people because of the company sticker. (They’ve done this so well that many actually believe the iToys originated in Steve Jobs imagination, then created in an Apple lab.) Please, let us not compare THAT to the contributions of a Ford or Edison.

jjraines on October 6, 2011 at 5:00 AM

Rest in Peace, Mr. Jobs.

Condolences to the Jobs family.

dogsoldier on October 6, 2011 at 5:57 AM

John Adams on October 6, 2011 at 2:08 AM

Not quite true about IBM.

It is definitely true that IBM did not think the microcomputer industry was worth getting into. However, once they realized the enormity of the industry they went into it with both feet, and in ways as groundbreaking as Apple.

Under the direction of Don Phillip Estridge, a team of engineers and designers was allowed to bypass the normal IBM procedures and get a product to market rapidly. Their major contribution was to create an open archectiture system and the building of the system from off-the-shelf parts. Furthermore, IBM allowed the cloning of their systems by other manufacturers and independent vendors to build parts for the PC. From here, companies like Hayes, Seagate, Logitech, and others started building parts to use on the IBM platform. With the proliferation of multiple businesses building compatible parts for the PC’s, prices plunged downward, allowing the use of personal computers to spread to all corners.

The saddest day in IBM’s short wild ride to success was the day Don Estridge died on Flight 191 to Dallas, the flight where wind shear was finally diagnosed as a major contributor to air crashes. He was only 48. Think of Steve Jobs if he would have died and wouldn’t have contributed the last 8 years of his life.

Jobs was a great entrepreneur and probably had his greatest contribution in how people interface with computers. However the computer industry owes a great favor to IBM and their vision of the Personal Computer

itsspideyman on October 6, 2011 at 6:41 AM

May God bless and protect the soul of Steve Jobs on his journey home. And to Steve, you made some remarkable contributions during this lifetime. Congratulations, and thank you, for a life well lived.

AZCoyote on October 6, 2011 at 6:42 AM

Part of being a great capitalist is being a great marketer. Who cares that IBM actually invented the PC? They sucked at design and marketing, and eventually got run out of the business.

As a marketer, I remember those days, and they were great at marketing. At one time they owned 45% of the market, even though compatibles were around for 30-40% less.

IBM’s failure was their willingness to give up the platform they created and move to the micro-channel. It was a superior buss but they wanted to close the archectiture to other vendors. The PC industry, following the path of least resistance, designed their own extended buss, and thus IBM failed in the lesson they taught the rest of the industry.

itsspideyman on October 6, 2011 at 6:47 AM

It was announced at the iPhone 4S launch yesterday that the iPad currently has 74 percent of the tablet market. Think about it – all those other manufacturers are chasing just 26 percent of the tablet market.

You make it sound like they will always have 74%. They’ll be below 50 soon. Probably before we replace Obama next year.

They had a high percentage of personal computers too, once — in the days of the Apple IIe. But no matter how fast you are out of the gate, keeping it all to yourself eventually sends the numbers south.

Dirty Creature on October 6, 2011 at 7:23 AM

RIP Mr. Jobs. I’m still trying to figure out if you made my life simpler or more complex.

iceman1960 on October 6, 2011 at 7:42 AM

@Jason Coleman
Reading your conversations between posters was like watching Monty Python’s King Arthur dismantle the Black Knight. Well done sir.

nootch on October 6, 2011 at 8:23 AM

nootch on October 6, 2011 at 8:23 AM

Yes, well done. Everyone *loves* a heckler at a eulogy.

“I come to bury Jobs, and criticize him (and his eulogers) too!”

JohnTant on October 6, 2011 at 8:31 AM

Well, I don’t think anyone here will be giving the eulogy.

Ronnie on October 6, 2011 at 8:36 AM

The argument about Steve Jobs contribution to computing versus IBM or Xerox Parc reminds me a bit of people who downgrade the importance of the Founding Fathers because the ideas of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence can be be found in other, earlier, documents written by other people.

Yes, no one’s creation is solely their own: there are always antecedents, but Jobs was an innovator and visionary worthy of comparison to Edison and Ford.

PackerBronco on October 6, 2011 at 8:37 AM

RIP

The history books will include the name Jobs with Carnegie, Ford, Rockefeller and other giants. Deservedly so.

I really like his words:

Remembering That You Are Going To Die Is The Best Way I Know To Avoid The Trap Of Thinking You Have Something To Lose

Bradky on October 6, 2011 at 8:44 AM

Before he passed on, Steve Jobs made certain to bequeath his inventions to China.

fall from grace to hell’s glory

maverick muse on October 6, 2011 at 8:45 AM

I feel a little the way I did when Jim Henson died. A brilliant man who’s given so much to the world, yet had so much more to give leaving far too soon.

RIP Mr. Jobs.

DrAllecon on October 6, 2011 at 9:07 AM

Vaya con Dios, Steve. And thank you.

Midas on October 6, 2011 at 9:19 AM

RIP, another victim of Obummers anti-Jobs policies.

anikol on October 6, 2011 at 10:00 AM

Gotta go back Henry Ford to find someone with as much impact on business and technology as SJ has had.

He will be missed. RIP Mr. Jobs-you were a man of great wisdom and skill.

rickyricardo on October 6, 2011 at 10:12 AM

Rather than give credit for inventions I prefer to think one of his major contributions to technology was making it elegant and relatable.

While it may not equate to “superior” technology or capability – a product that just feels good in one’s hand(s), functions seamlessly and is intuitive to use feels more…friendly.

Beautiful design does have a place even in objects we use for mundane tasks.

Just a thought.

RDuke on October 6, 2011 at 10:19 AM

Thank you, Steve Jobs, for your innovation and great contribution to our society, and you will be remembered for every Mac and iPod and iPhone people use today. It’s a terrible shame you had to leave us so soon, like the Mozart of personal computers.

How ironic that Steve Jobs passes away when young ignoramuses are demonizing Wall Street and communicating with iPhones, which Steve Jobs invented and sold with venture capital from…Wall Street.

Isaac Newton once said that he could see far by standing on the shoulders of giants. There may have been earlier “giants” who enabled Steve Jobs to achieve what he did, but Steve Jobs has become one of the “giants” for future visionaries.

As for comparisons with Henry Ford and Thomas Edison, it’s interesting to note that Ford and Edison were close friends, and spent winters next door to each other in Fort Myers, FL, where there are now museums dedicated to each of them. True genius is not only having a great idea, but convincing others of its usefulness and leading a group of people to make it work.

Steve Z on October 6, 2011 at 10:21 AM

I’m sure as a computer animator, you’re fond of Jobs and Pixar. Are you willing to admit that Jobs had NOTHING to do with the Pixar Image Computer, that’s right, it was built by Lucasfilm. Apple bought Pixar in the mid 80′s and the PIC was already built and being used.

Jobs had ZERO to do with the development of the Pixar Image Computer, it’s was Lucas’ baby.

But you know that as a computer animator, right?

It was Ed Catmull’s baby and that of his direct colleagues. Lucas sold it in 86, and arguably would have shut it down if Jobs had not bought it. To make a point about the initial Pixar hardware and software system as if that was Pixar’s technology during all the subsequent years of innovation is inaccurate. It was the software that was essential and that continued to be innovated for the 25 years since Jobs bought the company, preserved it, grew it, IPO’d it and sold it to Disney, giving Lasseter et al the ability to renew things there. As an ex Disney, ex DreamWorks, ex Fox tech exec, producer, and inventor in software and hardware this field for 25 years, focusing on the initial groundbreaking work to the exclusion of all the breakthroughs since, which would not have not been possible without the vision and business leadership of Steve Jobs and his support of Catmull & co., is bizarre. (from Ann NY’s husband)

Ann NY on October 6, 2011 at 10:23 AM

The Westboro idiots have already tweeted that they would be picketing the funeral of Steve Jobs…

From their iPhone…

theflyonthewall on October 6, 2011 at 10:32 AM

Death comes to us all. Yet, his passing over feels personal. I cannot imagine a world where there are no Macs, no I-PODS and no I-Pads, a world where pixar would have gone under. No pixar, no magic.

He is missed.

nyx on October 6, 2011 at 10:36 AM

@JohnTant on October 6, 2011 at 8:31 AM

lol, I’m sorry if the truth offends you. BTW, Heckling, really? I wasn’t aware that this was a funeral service.
A little dose of reality was needed amongst the exaggerated claims made by some here, and I thought that Mr. Coleman provided that. If you think that’s heckling, then perhaps you need to remove your I-product from your posterior.

nootch on October 6, 2011 at 11:07 AM

nootch on October 6, 2011 at 11:07 AM

Or you could exercise a little decorum instead of appointing yourself as the Steve Jobs Fact Checker/Cheerleader. You aren’t the arbiter of “wnat is needed” in a tribute thread.

And there’s something up someone’s ass alright, but I tend to think you need to look behind you instead of on your computer screen as to its location.

Life would be a little nicer if people didn’t feel the need to act like class-free pieces of crap in sad attempts to buttress their own egos. Jerk.

JohnTant on October 6, 2011 at 11:17 AM

Fringe religious organization Westboro Baptist Church plans to picket former Apple CEO Steve Jobs’ funeral, according to a tweet by top member Margie J Phelps.

J_Crater on October 6, 2011 at 11:41 AM

I turned 60 this year and know my time is running out. Here is a piece from his commencement address at Stanford in 2005 that is very true. I don’t know where the last 40 years have gone:

No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true. – Quote from Steve Jobs’ 2005 Commencement speech.

SC.Charlie on October 6, 2011 at 11:54 AM

JohnTant on October 6, 2011 at 8:31 AM

Dude, shut it.

If you were at an actual memorial for say. . . Ronald Reagan. And someone stood up to praise the man and then started claiming that RR ended WW2, invented the Submarine and wrote the Magna Carta, you’d be pretty damn offended, wouldn’t you?

Jason Coleman on October 6, 2011 at 11:58 AM

Someone needs to hack into the Westboro Church website and make it crash. How in the heck do these people find the time and money to go to some many funerals? Who are the other nuts who fund them?

SC.Charlie on October 6, 2011 at 11:58 AM

SC.Charlie on October 6, 2011 at 11:58 AM

The antidote to offensive speech is not censorship.

Let Westboro come, remind people who are offended by them, that Phelps and his gang are the epitome and best example of what the far left is.

Phelps ran in the D primary for gov of Kansas 3 times in the 90′s pulling 15% of Democrat votes. He ran for Senate and got 31% of the Dem vote.

Phelps Jr. hosted Gore fundraisers and was a delegate for Gore.

There is a positive when viewing the evil that Phelps is, he’s a Democrat who gave up hiding what that actually means.

Rather than erase him, turn the spotlight on him and his ultra-left ideology.

Jason Coleman on October 6, 2011 at 12:13 PM

@John Taint
QQ more fanboy.

nootch on October 6, 2011 at 12:38 PM

My goodness…what crazy, demented loons…

StarLady on October 6, 2011 at 12:40 PM

Malcolm Gladwell recently penned a very good essay about the Xerox Research Lab and Steve Jobs’s visit there that sparked menu interface.

piglet on October 5, 2011 at 10:58 PM

You mean Xerox PARC and their invention of the GUI (graphical user interface). Yes, that’s where Jobs first saw it, and then expanded upon it. He did not come up with the idea of the GUI.

Xerox PARC also was the first place to have a Local Area Network (LAN) where computers were linked together communicating and exchanging data. This was in the early 1970s. Two famous and successful companies came out of Xerox PARC — Adobe and 3COM.

The best book to get a quick historical perspective about how this industry took off is called Accidental Empires by Robert Cringely.

Rest In Peace, Steve Jobs. You were an innovator and a man with a distinct vision.

eanax on October 6, 2011 at 12:42 PM

Correct. I suspect some of the young folks here might be shocked upon viewing this: Doug Engelbart 1968 Demonstration. While the passing of Jobs is sad, he shouldn’t be re-invented into a latter day Nikola Tesla in death.

whatcat on October 6, 2011 at 3:26 AM

6 years before that, Steve Russell and crew created Spacewar on a PDP-1 at MIT. And ten years before that, someone made a tic-tac-toe game on an EDSAC. But few people credit them for launching an industry. Russell was a smart guy, but he lacked the vision and ego of Bushnell, Baer and other great innovators.

It’s not just being first, it’s being damn sure you’re the best…even if you’re not :)

Good Solid B-Plus on October 6, 2011 at 4:22 AM

True – most folks know who Jay Leno is but not too many people can tell you who Philo Farnsworth was. (YouTube video of “I’ve Got A Secret”: funniest question “Is this some kind of a machine that may be painful when it’s used?”).

The actual genius behind Apple was Steve Wozniak, though Jobs certainly turned out to be it’s great pitchman/frontman.

whatcat on October 6, 2011 at 12:58 PM

The actual genius behind Apple was Steve Wozniak

Some of you are absolutely clueless. In the realm of computer software and machine interfaces, there’s always an engineer somewhere in the world who first conceptualized or even prototyped a given artifact of invention. But that amounts to almost nothing in terms of real, game-changing innovation.

There were undoubtedly engineers at Microsoft who first conceptualized aspects of the iPhone. Yet those singular inventions never had a chance of transforming mobile phones. You could have combined a dozen various inventions related to the final iPhone product in a new device and would have ended up with another brick-like gadget as relatively useless as every other smartphone that proceeded the iPhone.

I use a PC to this day but can’t deny the genius of Jobs at so many levels. God help us with another dozen Steve Jobs and one day our trade deficit will vanish.

bayam on October 6, 2011 at 1:27 PM

The actual genius behind Apple was Steve Wozniak

Some of you are absolutely clueless.
bayam on October 6, 2011 at 1:27 PM

Indeed some are:
“By 1975, Wozniak withdrew from the University of California, Berkeley and developed the computer that eventually made him famous. By himself he designed the hardware, circuit board designs, and operating system for the Apple I. With the Apple I design, he and Jobs were largely working to impress other members of the Palo Alto-based Homebrew Computer Club, a local group of electronics hobbyists very interested in computing, one of several key centers which established the home hobbyist era, essentially creating the microcomputer industry over several years.”
Fire in the valley:
the making of the personal computer

Again, that’s not to take away from the salesman vision of Jobs. But without Wozniak he would just be pitching empty boxes.

whatcat on October 6, 2011 at 2:08 PM

iMourn.

RIP, Mr. Jobs.

fgh on October 6, 2011 at 2:13 PM

But without Wozniak he would just be pitching empty boxes.

And you actually believe that no one else had the same vision or was actively going down the same path? Woz made a great contribution over 20 years ago and we’re looking forward to his next achievement.

bayam on October 6, 2011 at 2:42 PM

But without Wozniak he would just be pitching empty boxes.

And you actually believe that no one else had the same vision or was actively going down the same path?
bayam on October 6, 2011 at 2:42 PM

Didn’t say that. And, in fact, by virtue of the above noted fact of existing computer clubs it’s likely we could just as easily be hailing someone else now as the great innovators instead of Jobs and Woz. But we are talking about Apple and it’s history in specific here, not a fantasy scenerio.

whatcat on October 6, 2011 at 2:57 PM

has anyone ever claimed that Jay Leno invented TV?

Jason Coleman on October 6, 2011 at 3:07 PM

has anyone ever claimed that Jay Leno invented TV?
Jason Coleman on October 6, 2011 at 3:07 PM

LOL. No, but not many people know how the idiot box came to be so they can watch him on it.

whatcat on October 6, 2011 at 3:15 PM

It is very sad when such a young husband and father passes away. I pray that the media leaves his wife and children alone during this awful, difficult time.

Thank you Jason Coleman for injecting sanity into the discussion. You sir are a visionary and genius. The cult of personality surrounding Steve Jobs is just creepy. I always found it odd that entire audiences at these Apple events would endlessly cheer and give standing ovations when Mr. Jobs announced some mediocre product. It almost seemed like they were drugged or something.

Check out this book. The foreword’s written by Steve Wozniak.

dave_lantos on October 6, 2011 at 4:52 PM

It is very sad when such a young husband and father passes away. I pray that the media leaves his wife and children alone during this awful, difficult time.
Thank you Jason Coleman for injecting sanity into the discussion. You sir are a visionary and genius. The cult of personality surrounding Steve Jobs is just creepy. I always found it odd that entire audiences at these Apple events would endlessly cheer and give standing ovations when Mr. Jobs announced some mediocre product. It almost seemed like they were drugged or something.
Check out this book. The foreword’s written by Steve Wozniak.
dave_lantos on October 6, 2011 at 4:52 PM

It’s always sad when someone passes on, in a “for whom the bell tolls” sense. But I too am not much for riding the business-celeb (or any other celeb) train. He was a good pitchman for the company’s products, however.

whatcat on October 6, 2011 at 6:05 PM

The cult of personality surrounding Steve Jobs is just creepy.

Princess Diana’s cult was creepy. I find Steve’s cult refreshingly different and one of substance.

The fact that a generation plus of hip youngsters can hold up a capitalist, an entrepreneur, and an intelligent businessman as a roll model, is a healthy thing.

rickyricardo on October 6, 2011 at 7:16 PM

The fact that a generation plus of hip youngsters can hold up a capitalist, an entrepreneur, and an intelligent businessman as a roll model, is a healthy thing.

rickyricardo on October 6, 2011 at 7:16 PM

It’s role model :), but that’s an excellent point.

Disturb the Universe on October 6, 2011 at 9:51 PM

Jobs now knows if it is REBOOT or DELETE.

And that billions are still ineffective against a cell gone mad.

profitsbeard on October 6, 2011 at 10:00 PM

And that billions are still ineffective against a cell gone mad.

profitsbeard on October 6, 2011 at 10:00 PM

Cancer shows no favorites – equal opportunity killer. Unfortunately, if Turdboy gets his way, there will be no incentive to continue the search for the key to eradicating this scourge. Oh, I know…the government will fund the research. We are doomed.

Extrafishy on October 7, 2011 at 1:51 PM

10 years ago we had Steve Jobs, Bob Hope and Johnny Cash.
Now we have no jobs, no hope and no cash.

itsnotaboutme on October 7, 2011 at 7:37 PM

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