Breaking: Steve Jobs dead at 56

posted at 8:59 pm on October 5, 2011 by Allahpundit

We knew it was coming but that doesn’t make it easier. Horrendous.

We are deeply saddened to announce that Steve Jobs passed away today.

Steve’s brilliance, passion and energy were the source of countless innovations that enrich and improve all of our lives. The world is immeasurably better because of Steve.

His greatest love was for his wife, Laurene, and his family. Our hearts go out to them and to all who were touched by his extraordinary gifts.

Apple’s homepage tonight is a requiem for the departed. I’m straining to find a cultural analogy for Jobs and am struck by the fact that I have to leave the business/tech fields entirely to do it. You can do it if you go back far enough — Henry Ford and Edison pop to mind, but … that’s awfully far. The obvious modern comparison is to Bill Gates, but that doesn’t work. Gates, like Jobs, is capital-I Important to the computer age, but in sort of the same way that ancient cave painters were important to the development of art. Jobs started out as a cave painter too but kept at it until he turned into Rembrandt. I think Lileks is close to the mark in comparing him to Walt Disney; my first thought when I heard the news was that only Steven Spielberg’s passing today would hit quite as hard. The common thread among those three is that they all made magic, but Jobs put it in your hands so that you felt like you were the one making it. That’s the crucial difference between Apple and Microsoft — Gates made computers easier to use but Jobs made them objects of wonder. He made magic, literally. There’s no greater epitaph.

Here’s his commencement address at Stanford in 2005. I’ll leave you with a quote:

No one wants to die. Even people who want to go to heaven don’t want to die to get there. And yet death is the destination we all share. No one has ever escaped it. And that is as it should be, because Death is very likely the single best invention of Life. It is Life’s change agent. It clears out the old to make way for the new. Right now the new is you, but someday not too long from now, you will gradually become the old and be cleared away. Sorry to be so dramatic, but it is quite true.

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice. And most important, have the courage to follow your heart and intuition. They somehow already know what you truly want to become. Everything else is secondary.

When I was young, there was an amazing publication called The Whole Earth Catalog, which was one of the bibles of my generation. It was created by a fellow named Stewart Brand not far from here in Menlo Park, and he brought it to life with his poetic touch. This was in the late 1960′s, before personal computers and desktop publishing, so it was all made with typewriters, scissors, and polaroid cameras. It was sort of like Google in paperback form, 35 years before Google came along: it was idealistic, and overflowing with neat tools and great notions.

Stewart and his team put out several issues of The Whole Earth Catalog, and then when it had run its course, they put out a final issue. It was the mid-1970s, and I was your age. On the back cover of their final issue was a photograph of an early morning country road, the kind you might find yourself hitchhiking on if you were so adventurous. Beneath it were the words: “Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.” It was their farewell message as they signed off. Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish. And I have always wished that for myself. And now, as you graduate to begin anew, I wish that for you.

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The embodiment of American innovation and hard work.

RIP.

neoavatara on October 5, 2011 at 9:01 PM

I bought my first Mac on release day in 1984. Steve Jobs will go down as one of America’s greatest inventors, and joins the ranks of Bell, Edison and Singer. Long live Apple.

Jocundus on October 5, 2011 at 9:02 PM

Innovation.

Companies are dying to imitate what Apple produces.

Apple produces something, others follow.

RIP.

blatantblue on October 5, 2011 at 9:02 PM

Great American success story, and for that, he has my respect.
Rest in Peace

carbon_footprint on October 5, 2011 at 9:03 PM

He was truly a man who used his creative abilities to their fullest extent. I admire him for that. He had the uncanny ability to dream and execute it into reality. That is an extraordinary example.

ted c on October 5, 2011 at 9:03 PM

Sad day for America.

Edison, Ford, Jobs…… Giants in American history.

Dark days ahead, buckle up.

PappyD61 on October 5, 2011 at 9:04 PM

This is terribly sad, he was truly a pioneer. God bless him and his family in their time of sorrow.

Cindy Munford on October 5, 2011 at 9:04 PM

RIP.I know he got the boot from Apple years ago, but it took him coming back to rescue Apple from irrelevance, and to make it the powerhouse it is today. A true visionary.

Southernblogger on October 5, 2011 at 9:04 PM

One of a kind genius, RIP.

RedRedRice on October 5, 2011 at 9:04 PM

I remember when Jim Henson died just as young, and the paper had a picture of Kermit the Frog in tears. With Jobs’ passing, I envision Woody and Buzz in mourning. God bless his family.

parteagirl on October 5, 2011 at 9:05 PM

So long ol bean. Sorry to see you go…..

Confederate on October 5, 2011 at 9:05 PM

Cancer sucks.
Cancer does not discriminate; it affects us all.

carbon_footprint on October 5, 2011 at 9:05 PM

The old Motorola cinderblock mobile phone would cost about $10,000 in 2011 dollars, and you couldn’t play Angry Birds on it or watch Fox News or trade a stock. Once you figure out why your cell phone gets better and cheaper every year but your public schools get more expensive and less effective, you can apply that model to answer a great many questions about public policy. Not all of them, but a great many.

Jobs was sometimes criticized for not being a philanthropist along the lines of Bill Gates. Take this article, for example:

“Last year the founder of the Stanford Social Innovation Review called Apple one of “America’s Least Philanthropic Companies.” Jobs had terminated all of Apple’s long-standing corporate philanthropy programs within weeks after returning to Apple in 1997, citing the need to cut costs until profitability rebounded. But the programs have never been restored.”

CNN, being CNN, misses the point. Mr. Jobs’s contribution to the world is Apple and its products, along with Pixar and his other enterprises, his 338 patented inventions — his work — not some Steve Jobs Memorial Foundation for Giving Stuff to Poor People in Exotic Lands and Making Me Feel Good About Myself. Because he already did that: He gave them better computers, better telephones, better music players, etc. In a lot of cases, he gave them better jobs, too. Did he do it because he was a nice guy, or because he was greedy, or because he was a maniacally single-minded competitor who got up every morning possessed by an unspeakable rage to strangle his rivals?

The beauty of capitalism — the beauty of the iPhone world as opposed to the world of politics — is that that question does not matter one little bit. Whatever drove Jobs, it drove him to create superior products, better stuff at better prices. Profits are not deductions from the sum of the public good, but the real measure of the social value a firm creates. Those who talk about the horror of putting profits over people make no sense at all. The phrase is without intellectual content. Perhaps you do not think that Apple, or Goldman Sachs, or a professional sports enterprise, or an internet pornographer actually creates much social value; but markets are very democratic — everybody gets to decide for himself what he values. That is not the final answer to every question, because economic answers can only satisfy economic questions. But the range of questions requiring economic answers is very broad.

I was down at the Occupy Wall Street protest today, and never has the divide between the iPhone world and the politics world been so clear: I saw a bunch of people very well-served by their computers and telephones (very often Apple products) but undeniably shortchanged by our government-run cartel education system. And the tragedy for them — and for us — is that they will spend their energy trying to expand the sphere of the ineffective, hidebound, rent-seeking, unproductive political world, giving the Barney Franks and Tom DeLays an even stronger whip hand over the Steve Jobses and Henry Fords. And they — and we — will be poorer for it.

And to the kids camped out down on Wall Street: Look at the phone in your hand. Look at the rat-infested subway. Visit the Apple Store on Fifth Avenue, then visit a housing project in the South Bronx. Which world do you want to live in?

NRO says it well.

Wethal on October 5, 2011 at 9:06 PM

We all stand upon the shoulders of giants. There is some kid, somewhere that is at work at his desk sketching out his ideas..asking himself or herself “What if we had something that ________?” and then it’ll spark. Steve Jobs did that and found other people that could leverage their talents as well.

ted c on October 5, 2011 at 9:06 PM

Prayers to his family,a great American Innovator!

canopfor on October 5, 2011 at 9:07 PM

RIP Sir

Allah, very good post!

bluemarlin on October 5, 2011 at 9:07 PM

The way he changed the world can not be overestimated…

RIP Steve Jobs.

RedbonePro on October 5, 2011 at 9:08 PM

What he created and how his inventions revolutionized the world will be his legacy.

David in ATL on October 5, 2011 at 9:08 PM

To the Jobs my family, my condolences, and prayers.

I truly feel for his family, friends, and company. From what I’ve read, he was not just an innovator, creator, and great money maker. He was beloved my many…and their hearts are breaking. I feel for them.

For all who love, and lose, it’s a hard path to travel and to understand. But time does heal. I hope that’s some comfort.

capejasmine on October 5, 2011 at 9:09 PM

Rest in peace, Mr. Jobs.

And thank you, Ms. Schiebel, for choosing life. The whole world is better for it.

IrishEi on October 5, 2011 at 9:09 PM

RIP, Steve Jobs…I hope America continues to allow such pioneers to succeed…

d1carter on October 5, 2011 at 9:12 PM

Very likable guy.

Spathi on October 5, 2011 at 9:12 PM

He revolutionized my industry, and has help provide me with a pretty good living for the last 25 years. Will miss the turtlenecks. Sent this from my iPhone as a tribute.

Tommy_G on October 5, 2011 at 9:14 PM

I have, for many, many years, likened Steve Jobs to Walt Disney. Just imagine the magic they could have made together.

I am so very, very sad, on a level that discounts the sadness of the death of family/friends.

lizzieillinois on October 5, 2011 at 9:15 PM

Cancer sucks.
Cancer does not discriminate; it affects us all.
carbon_footprint on October 5, 2011 at 9:05 PM

Indeed. My grandfather was taken by melanoma last week. :(

jawkneemusic on October 5, 2011 at 9:17 PM

ent this from my iPhone as a tribute.

Tommy_G on October 5, 2011 at 9:14 PM

I was thinking moments ago:

What a fitting tribute that millions of people around the world are talking about your death on the phone you gave them.

AMAZING.

blatantblue on October 5, 2011 at 9:17 PM

What an amazing man. Condolences to his family and friends.

You said it, Allah, he put magic into our hands. He was one of the few true great men.

PattyJ on October 5, 2011 at 9:18 PM

Indeed. My grandfather was taken by melanoma last week. :(

jawkneemusic on October 5, 2011 at 9:17 PM

So sorry.

I lost my sister to kidney cancer in 2005. She was 50.

carbon_footprint on October 5, 2011 at 9:19 PM

Some people would’ve called it a good life at pancreatic cancer. But like some soldier you got up, took your gun and kept fighting. Then you got sacked with a liver transplant and, again, you soldiered on. Pushing for one more eureka moment… To create one more time.

And here I am composing this all on your iPhone because I’m at a friends’ and nowhere near my PC or laptop.

Godspeed my man. Godspeed.

Skywise on October 5, 2011 at 9:21 PM

Steve Jobs was a genius, a true visionary, in a way that Bill Gates could only dream to be. Jobs is one of the greatest capitalists in history, a person who changed the world.

Really Right on October 5, 2011 at 9:21 PM

May God welcome you home to his loving arms Steve…

… as he eases the pain of your loved ones.

“Stay Hungry. Stay Foolish.”…

… and Rest in Peace.

Seven Percent Solution on October 5, 2011 at 9:23 PM

Indeed. My grandfather was taken by melanoma last week. :(

jawkneemusic on October 5, 2011 at 9:17 PM

So sorry for your loss!

bluemarlin on October 5, 2011 at 9:25 PM

Microsoft does not have anything in their website. Suckers.

ProudPalinFan on October 5, 2011 at 9:25 PM

Never purchased any apple products. Always been a Microsoft guy myself. That said, I didn’t have anything against the guy. Sad to see him go.

Vegi on October 5, 2011 at 9:27 PM

Boruch Dayan Hoemes

moonbatattack on October 5, 2011 at 9:27 PM

RIP Mr. Jobs.

I hope you took the secret of the Reality Distortion Field to the grave with you.

ajacksonian on October 5, 2011 at 9:27 PM

…that only Steven Spielberg’s passing today would hit quite as hard

Spielberg? give. me. a. break.

bofh on October 5, 2011 at 9:27 PM

Genius – Intruppted. RIP. The world is a better place thanks to your vision.

kringeesmom on October 5, 2011 at 9:28 PM

With all respect iRIP.

shooten on October 5, 2011 at 9:30 PM

From a church publication just a few days ago:
Since this is Respect Life Sunday, and the beginning of Respect Life month, I wanted to talk about one woman who did respect life – and her choice has made a difference in the life of virtually every person in this church.
Her name is Joanne Schiebel. In 1954, she was a young unmarried college student who discovered that she was pregnant. In the 1950s, her options were limited. She could have had an abortion…She could have gotten married, but she wasn’t ready and didn’t want to interrupt her education. Joanne opted, instead, to give birth to the baby and put him up for adoption.
And so it was that in 1955, a California couple named Paul and Clara Jobs adopted a baby boy, born out of wedlock, that they named Steven.
We know him today as Steve Jobs.
It would not be overstating things to say that Steve Jobs is my generation’s Thomas Edison. As one observer put it, he knew what the world wanted before the world knew that it wanted it.
If you have an iPhone or an iPad or an iPod, or anything remotely resembling them, you can thank Steve Jobs.
If your world has been transformed by the ability to hear a symphony, send a letter, pay a bill, deposit a check, read a book and then buy theater tickets on something roughly the size of a credit card…you can thank Steve Jobs.
And you can thank Joanne Schiebel.

itsnotaboutme on October 5, 2011 at 9:32 PM

I hear the Lord will announce the ‘iHeaven’ release date soon.

locomotivebreath1901 on October 5, 2011 at 9:33 PM

Buying my first iPhone next week, and one for my daughter. Bought a MacBook for my college freshman this year. Never could afford them before, but now it seems stupid to buy anything else.

I hope we see the likes of Steve Jobs again, but I fear that in this age of fear and risk-aversion, we won’t.

rockmom on October 5, 2011 at 9:34 PM

Not many people know this, but Steve Jobs was adopted. His birth mother, an unmarried college student, chose not to have an abortion. Instead, she carried the baby to term, and put her new son up for adoption. Abortions were not legal in 1954 when she became pregnant, but they were still available.

http://www.patheos.com/community/deaconsbench/2011/10/01/homily-for-october-2-2011-27th-sunday-in-ordinary-time/

blogpre on October 5, 2011 at 9:34 PM

From a church publication just a few days ago:
Since this is Respect Life Sunday, and the beginning of Respect Life month, I wanted to talk about one woman who did respect life – and her choice has made a difference in the life of virtually every person in this church.
Her name is Joanne Schiebel. In 1954, she was a young unmarried college student who discovered that she was pregnant. In the 1950s, her options were limited. She could have had an abortion…She could have gotten married, but she wasn’t ready and didn’t want to interrupt her education. Joanne opted, instead, to give birth to the baby and put him up for adoption.
And so it was that in 1955, a California couple named Paul and Clara Jobs adopted a baby boy, born out of wedlock, that they named Steven.
We know him today as Steve Jobs.
It would not be overstating things to say that Steve Jobs is my generation’s Thomas Edison. As one observer put it, he knew what the world wanted before the world knew that it wanted it.
If you have an iPhone or an iPad or an iPod, or anything remotely resembling them, you can thank Steve Jobs.
If your world has been transformed by the ability to hear a symphony, send a letter, pay a bill, deposit a check, read a book and then buy theater tickets on something roughly the size of a credit card…you can thank Steve Jobs.
And you can thank Joanne Schiebel.

itsnotaboutme on October 5, 2011 at 9:32 PM

Wonderful story.

carbon_footprint on October 5, 2011 at 9:34 PM

I’ll agree that Jobs was a good businessman. I’m sorry he’s passed. May he rest in peace.

I’m not sure I buy the transformative change stuff.

The apple desktop/notebook platform is a proprietary system that doesn’t offer near the flexibility or variety that other platforms do.

The iPad – tablets have been around of for a while. I have touchscreen tablets that still work that shipped in the Win95 days.

The iPhone – beat it’s competitors to market, but they were coming anyway. I don’t see much in terms of iPhone superiority when compared to my atrix. My girl has a iPhone4 so I can compare them side by side. The atrix wins pretty much hands down, is cheaper, has more memory, better processor, better antenna, I could go on.

Siri – Android phones can already set up to do everything they say Siri will do.

Jobs and Gates both basically did the same things from opposite directions of the industry. Apple made proprietary hardware and put stickers on software, Microsoft made proprietary software and put stickers on hardware.

Microsoft stole from IBM, so did Apple.

There’s nothing my Apple desktops can do that my PC’s can’t do just as well and far cheaper. There’s plenty that my PC’s can do that Apples just can’t without MAJOR expense.

So can someone please tell me exactly what it was that puts Jobs on par with Ford or Edison? I just don’t see it.

I’ve always viewed Apple as more of a “design house” than anything else.

After first Apple 1, what did Apple “invent” that wasn’t already out there. Even the Apple 2 was just a locked down platform for people who didn’t want have to bother with programming themselves. They weren’t the first in that case either.

Again, I like Jobs, I’m not trying to piss on his grave before he’s in it, but the comparisons I’m seeing out there just aren’t valid.

It’ll suck to be holding Apple stock tomorrow.

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 9:35 PM

I hear the Lord will announce the ‘iHeaven’ release date soon.

locomotivebreath1901 on October 5, 2011 at 9:33 PM

:)

carbon_footprint on October 5, 2011 at 9:35 PM

I hear the Lord will announce the ‘iHeaven’ release date soon.

locomotivebreath1901 on October 5, 2011 at 9:33 PM

I said to my friend Emily earlier:

If there’s a Heaven, he’s definitely there.

To which she replied:

Yea, and he’s probably already developed some sort of super efficient Heaven. Got to the Pearly Gates and said: “Listen guys, this isn’t gonna work..”

blatantblue on October 5, 2011 at 9:39 PM

Prayers for the soul of Mr. Jobs and the comfort of his family. I do most of my best profit-making work listening to my Ipod, an invention for which I am truly thankful.

Mutnodjmet on October 5, 2011 at 9:39 PM

Again, I like Jobs, I’m not trying to piss on his grave before he’s in it, but the comparisons I’m seeing out there just aren’t valid.

It’ll suck to be holding Apple stock tomorrow.

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 9:35 PM

Part of being a great capitalist is being a great marketer. Who cares that IBM actually invented the PC? They sucked at design and marketing, and eventually got run out of the business. Henry Ford didn’t invent the automobile either, and he didn’t even invent mass production, he just put the two together and marketed the hell out of it. Even Edison was a great marketer and a ruthless competitor.

rockmom on October 5, 2011 at 9:40 PM

Allahpundit, you should move the headline comments down here.

Cindy Munford on October 5, 2011 at 9:40 PM

I hear the Lord will announce the ‘iHeaven’ release date soon.

locomotivebreath1901 on October 5, 2011 at 9:33 PM

:)

Mutnodjmet on October 5, 2011 at 9:40 PM

iSorry.

itsspideyman on October 5, 2011 at 9:42 PM

He’s on the iCloud now.

lonestar1 on October 5, 2011 at 9:42 PM

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 9:35 PM

The other touch screen phones aren’t as nimble and sensitive as the iPhone. Does Android do a lot of awesome things? Yes, but Apple developed this whole App Store idea.

Gesture system on Lion OSX? People will be trying to copy that.

People copy the keyboard design now on tons of non Apple laptops.

The battery life, the design of the product, the intuitive nature of the operating system, the sheer beauty of the operating system. Apple isn’t doing well for no reason.

I could go on and on.

blatantblue on October 5, 2011 at 9:42 PM

What a scourge disease, all this technology and we still can’t completely beat it.

RIP, Jobs, you were a visionary.

Bishop on October 5, 2011 at 9:44 PM

Now, Thunderbolt.

apple developed the Thunderbolt port, which transfers files so quickly.

Apple TV, Mac Mini, the iPad (then everyone else comes out with one), the iPhone (then everyone else comes out with one), iTunes, the iPod.

The ease of synching products.

I mean on and on and on.

Everyone else follows and imitates.

blatantblue on October 5, 2011 at 9:45 PM

Strange coincidence. Apple was supposed to release the Iphone 5 today but instead they decided to give away free I3′s.

Spooky. Or not. Whatever.

Bishop on October 5, 2011 at 9:46 PM

I had a Dell laptop in college. The thing sucked. I had to replace literally every piece of that damn laptop at one point or another (fortunately, all under warranty). So when the Dell finally breathed its last pathetic breath, I got a Macbook. I’m still amazed at how fast it is, at all the little things that make a Mac a Mac. I have to use a Dell and Windows at work. Every day I get frustrated at how slow my work computer is, compared to my lovely Mac.

Steve Jobs revolutionized so much about technology. He was probably the greatest innovator of the past 50 years.

Yossarian on October 5, 2011 at 9:48 PM

Steve Jobs……..was he Pro-Life?

Great story.

This comment brought to you from the keyboard of Steve Jobs hard work.

PappyD61 on October 5, 2011 at 9:48 PM

:( I am a former Apple employee, and still have a lot of Apple people on my Facebook. A very sad day for all of us.

Sekhmet on October 5, 2011 at 9:52 PM

he knew what the world wanted before the world knew that it wanted it.

That pretty much sums it up.

from my iPhone.

SlaveDog on October 5, 2011 at 9:53 PM

Part of being a great capitalist is being a great marketer.

Ok, fine, he’s a good capitalist and good marketer.

Earlier in the post, someone quoted an asinine statement comparing the iPhone to the Motorola brick. Ok . . . I’ll play.

Adjust for today’s dollars and impact. Now just TRY to compare Jobs with the inventory of the assembly line, Ford.

Jobs is a punter compared to Ford as a capitalist and a marketer. Ditto Edison.

Great design, yes, you can put him up there with anyone. Great capitalist and marketer a la Ford and Edison? NOT EVEN CLOSE.

Who cares that IBM actually invented the PC?

Without IBM’s contribution, Jobs and Woz would have had nothing to play with in their garage. Don’t even begin to suggest that Jobs and Woz would have developed their computer from scratch, both admit they would not have. But, that’s not what they stole. They stole the operating system and the GUI. Which IBM gave up on because they wanted to focus on hardware, which they did, and which they still DOMINATE.

They sucked at design and marketing, and eventually got run out of the business.

They don’t make shiny plastic boxes, but they market to their customer base very well, they still dominate their sector.

Henry Ford didn’t invent the automobile either, and he didn’t even invent mass production, he just put the two together and marketed the hell out of it.

Who said he invented the automobile? Not me. He invented and mastered the moving assembly line. A FAR FAR FAR more important innovation than anything Apple has done

Even Edison was a great marketer and a ruthless competitor.

Please tell me one thing that Apple invented that isn’t dependent on Edison?

Adjust for today’s dollars and markets, Edison wipes the floor with Jobs.

I’m all for people giving the guy his props, he’s due quite a few, but stating things like “greater than Edison or Ford” (Comment on another article) is ludicrous beyond measure. Comparing the iPhone to the Motorola brick??? Motorola and The Brick will ALWAYS win in an honest comparison.

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 9:54 PM

Never purchased any apple products. Always been a Microsoft guy myself. That said, I didn’t have anything against the guy. Sad to see him go.

Vegi on October 5, 2011 at 9:27 PM

Not a matter of preference. You can admire Henry Ford and never drive a Ford.

slickwillie2001 on October 5, 2011 at 9:55 PM

Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living someone else’s life. Don’t be trapped by dogma — which is living with the results of other people’s thinking. Don’t let the noise of others’ opinions drown out your own inner voice.

It can be argued that most people using his products do just that.

Christien on October 5, 2011 at 9:57 PM

Allahpundit, you should move the headline comments down here.

Cindy Munford on October 5, 2011 at 9:40 PM

I hate that it doesn’t happen automatically.

slickwillie2001 on October 5, 2011 at 9:58 PM

I hope we see the likes of Steve Jobs again, but I fear that in this age of fear and risk-aversion, we won’t.

rockmom on October 5, 2011 at 9:34 PM

Don’t know. One of the founders of Home Depot said just last month that they could not have done it in today’s business and regulatory environment.

slickwillie2001 on October 5, 2011 at 10:00 PM

The other touch screen phones aren’t as nimble and sensitive as the iPhone. Does Android do a lot of awesome things? Yes, but Apple developed this whole App Store idea.

Apple didn’t invent “this whole App Store idea”, they may have invented the name “App Store” but the idea of a centralized location for software delivery for a proprietary platform over a network is NOT by any means a new idea.

Gesture system on Lion OSX? People will be trying to copy that.

When and if that happens and when and if that sticks for a century, then you can claim it.

People copy the keyboard design now on tons of non Apple laptops.

More don’t. The Apple keyboard design on their laptop is also not an Apple innovation. Tandy and many, many others had it long before Apple.

The battery life, the design of the product, the intuitive nature of the operating system, the sheer beauty of the operating system. Apple isn’t doing well for no reason.

I could go on and on.

blatantblue on October 5, 2011 at 9:42 PM

I’ve already granted the design of Apple products are good to great, and if one wants to make a case for Jobs as the best industrial designer of the late 20th century have at it.

No credit given for “battery life”.

“Intuitive nature of the operating system” Partial credit at best, but not sufficient to claim Jobs as equal to Ford or Edison.

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 10:02 PM

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 10:02 PM

Apple brings about new ideas, and other companies copy it.

Apple takes up old ideas, and makes them new again. Makes them cleaner, better.

Didn’t say he was a Ford or Edison, but he deserves a shit load of credit.

blatantblue on October 5, 2011 at 10:04 PM

I used Windows my entire life until 2005 when I purchased an iBook G4. Never looked back. Thanks, Steve.

blatantblue on October 5, 2011 at 10:05 PM

Huh. Even in this there are some folks who can’t keep a lid on their bitterness and instead troll/flame a remembrance thread.

To me that adds another dimension to the sadness od Jobs’ passing.

JohnTant on October 5, 2011 at 10:05 PM

Apple brings about new ideas, and other companies copy it.

Can you name one?

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 10:07 PM

When Apple forced him out, he went on to help found Pixar. He was a true visionary. The Macintosh was born after he visited Xerox’s Palo Alto Research Center and saw their work on a graphic user interface, the first mouse and the first laser printers. Xerox was doing nothing with these ideas but he put them into Apple’s computers, first the Lisa and then the Mac.

I remember that liquid crystal displays were invented by RCA, but their execs saw no value in them. The Japanese Sharp company immediately licensed the technology and developed it to the point where lcds took over. America has become the birthplace for new ideas which are then developed elsewhere.

flataffect on October 5, 2011 at 10:07 PM

And people can sit there oh “you’re a fanboy.”

No, people use Apple products because they simply WORK as they should.

I haven’t missed the BSOD, or Ctrl-Alt-Del. I haven’t missed the freezing, the awful looking operating systems, etc etc.

Hell, I remember when the first Macbook air didn’t come with an optical drive, but it let you wirelessly install programs from your desktop’s optical drive.

It’s things like that which make Apple great. Innovation, fresh ideas, and fresh takes on old ideas. HAtaz can suck it

blatantblue on October 5, 2011 at 10:07 PM

Again, I like Jobs, I’m not trying to piss on his grave before he’s in it, but the comparisons I’m seeing out there just aren’t valid.

It’ll suck to be holding Apple stock tomorrow.

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 9:35 PM

It’s the marketing aspect. All this stuff existed, but few people wanted it before Steve Jobs used his advertising magic to convince people that they wanted an iEverything.

There have always been tech geeks who would buy the newest stuff no matter what, but Steve Jobs made an empire out of convincing everyone from 12 year old girls to AP-aged beta hipsters that their life won’t be complete until they have the newest Apple product. That drive innovation, because other companies have to do even better than they would in an Apple-less market.

Good Solid B-Plus on October 5, 2011 at 10:09 PM

A word of prayer for his family, friends, and the Apple organization…

We won’t see his likes again.

StarLady on October 5, 2011 at 10:09 PM

I’ve never drank the apple kool-aid, never owned a darn thing they made except a few laptops that I sold as fast as I could fix them. I do respect what Steve Jobs accomplished, but no one gives any credit to his early partner Steve Wozniak, I’ve even heard he’s not allowed at the home offices by some kind of buy out agreement. Jobs will be missed, but he designed none of the ipod or iphone software or hardware as far as I know. I’m sure the overarching idea was his and that he had final approval over any and all changes, but that’s not the same, at least to me. His company’s products did change the way a lot of things in this world work.

Mini-14 on October 5, 2011 at 10:10 PM

And people can sit there oh “you’re a fanboy.”

No, people use Apple products because they simply WORK as they should.

I haven’t missed the BSOD, or Ctrl-Alt-Del. I haven’t missed the freezing, the awful looking operating systems, etc etc.

Hell, I remember when the first Macbook air didn’t come with an optical drive, but it let you wirelessly install programs from your desktop’s optical drive.

It’s things like that which make Apple great. Innovation, fresh ideas, and fresh takes on old ideas. HAtaz can suck it

blatantblue on October 5, 2011 at 10:07 PM

I think you’re living a bit in the past. Haven’t had a single BSOD since installing Windows 7.

Not that Apple doesn’t have its advantages, but never Windows platforms aren’t really unstable at all.

Also, to Jobs’s credit, I think most of Apple’s terrible failures occurred when he was gone. Anyone remember the Apple Bandai Pippin? Probably not, since it was a miserable failure. Pretty sure Jobs wasn’t there when they released that piece of trash.

Good Solid B-Plus on October 5, 2011 at 10:12 PM

I bought my first Mac on release day in 1984. Steve Jobs will go down as one of America’s greatest inventors, and joins the ranks of Bell, Edison and Singer. Long live Apple.

Jocundus on October 5, 2011 at 9:02 PM

Agree entirely.

We had an IBM PC-XT in the office where I worked back in 1984. I could not for the life of me fathom what was going on in the thing, which had to be accessed with arcane white-letter commands on a green screen.

Then in 1987 a new employee insisted on a Macintosh SE. She knew a ‘Mac designer’ who could do layouts and typography on the screen, without pasteboards and Linotronic typesetters. Even a used SE at that time was quite expensive, but we got one, with a 20 MB hard drive. It was a revelation to me; the Graphical User Interface open the door to me with the desktop metaphor, on which one could see the various drives and their hierarchical contents. I never looked back, getting more SEs, toting one in a large shoulder back on trips. I learned desktop publishing, spreadsheets, and databases, and of course abandoned my typewriters; I ran a small business on that computer, later graduating to Mac IIs and the others to come. I’m writing this on my gorgeous iMac 27″, running Snow Leopard.

Yes, Steve and company borrowed ideas for the Macintosh from a Xerox lab, but the team that developed the Mac under his direction produced innovation after innovation. Read Steven Levy’s Insanely Great: The Life and Times of Macintosh, the Computer that Changed Everything.

Steve Jobs changed everything for me.

MrLynn on October 5, 2011 at 10:12 PM

flataffect on October 5, 2011 at 10:07 PM

All of those technologies, were used by their inventors for the markets they served.

Jobs was one of a few who took those inventions and marketed them to consumers rather than B2B.

I’ll grant that Jobs is a good-to-great marketer.

I can’t grant that Jobs was a great inventor, I can’t grant that Jobs contributed anything on the lines of what Edison or Ford have.

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 10:12 PM

Evidently Barack put out a nice word too.

Bob's Kid on October 5, 2011 at 10:13 PM

I’m gonna exit before I get too frustrated with the people that feel the need to come here and shit on this man’s company right now.

I’ll leave with this:

I’ve never had a computer from Apple freeze on first boot.

Had it with two windows based products.

My Apple products run smoothly, and reliably. The Dells, Gateways, and Sonys I’ve had since I was young? They all ended up running like crap.

G’night and RIP Steve.

blatantblue on October 5, 2011 at 10:15 PM

I’m saving my grief for when the Japanese guy who invented ‘Space Invaders’ dies.

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on October 5, 2011 at 10:15 PM

I think most of Apple’s terrible failures occurred when he was gone.

Lisa, Newton, 2C, Mac TV

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 10:15 PM

Can you name one?

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 10:07 PM

Well, technically Xerox invented the mouse-driven GUI, but Apple made it the industry standard. My grandpa has an Apple IIgs that still runs quite well. :)

Good Solid B-Plus on October 5, 2011 at 10:15 PM

Condolences to his family. He was one of those few people for which the word “visionary” is truly appropriate.

One of my favorite stories about Jobs was how he developed the Mac against the wishes of the Apple Board. He rented a place across the street from Apple, selected the people he wanted to work on the project, and in the kickoff for the project, stated, “Microsoft is not the enemy! IBM is not the enemy! The enemy is right there (gesturing across the street)!” That mentality stuck, to the point that the Mac development team flew a Jolly Roger over their headquarters during the development effort. The point was that even companies like Apple could become too big and inertia could set in. It took a small group, separated from the main company, to come up with a truly disruptive and innovative product. Jobs was visionary and willing to take the arrows to keep innovation going.

He will be missed.

AZfederalist on October 5, 2011 at 10:17 PM

There’s nothing my Apple desktops can do that my PC’s can’t do just as well and far cheaper. There’s plenty that my PC’s can do that Apples just can’t without MAJOR expense.
Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 9:35 PM

Job’s passing is sad in a “for whom the bell tolls” way, but I agree that some people will display a disproportionate sense of loss. It’s pretty human to, upon the death of most anyone, go a little heavy on how great the person was.

whatcat on October 5, 2011 at 10:18 PM

My personal phone is an Android – an HTC EVO 4G and I think it’s a fantastic phone, the voice command features are great, the app marketplace is convenient and the phone blazes for browsing and has a very nice design, a huge screen and is overall a great phone.

For work I got an iPhone a couple months back.

It’s interesting to me that just this afternoon I was noting that even with the much larger screen, faster internet speeds, etc. I hardly pick up the Droid these days.

I mention this because I think it speaks to one of the bits of genius that Jobs brought to Apple. The products have a warmth to them, they look good but more importantly they feel good. And the products have a certain sense of art to them; they’re functional but beautiful designs. They feel good in your hands and draw you to them. I suppose perhaps products designed with the seemingly simple goal to “make something wonderful” would tend to be that way.

The functional beauty of the products is clear, but there’s a perhaps intangible quality to the products and to the company itself that makes them somehow seem more fun to me.

RDuke on October 5, 2011 at 10:18 PM

Bought my first Macintosh SE in 1988 and have never used anything but Apple and have converted my entire extended family over the years.

I get the sad feeling that we’re going to miss out of some great inventions that will now never be thought of. You’ll be missed, Steve.

parteagirl on October 5, 2011 at 10:19 PM

Lisa, Newton, 2C, Mac TV

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 10:15 PM

According to wiki, he was forced out of the Lisa project before it was released. Incidentally, Trip Hawkins was also on the marketing team for the Lisa. Trip’s more of a hit or miss entrepreneur. He founded Electronic Arts (huge hit), then left to found the 3DO company (ouch).

Good Solid B-Plus on October 5, 2011 at 10:19 PM

Glad he is no longer suffering, and I hope the great innovator meets his Creator above.

Christien on October 5, 2011 at 10:20 PM

Look, I’ll bow out, because obviously some are going to get personally offended, I can almost understand that.

I’m personally offended that that the inventor of the mobile phone is being placed beneath the guy who reskinned the iPaQ, but so be it.

I’ll admit that if that asinine comparison between the Brick and the iPhone wasn’t up there, I probably wouldn’t have said a thing.

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 10:21 PM

Besides, it’s not always who comes first.

The Famicom was released 11 years after the Odyssey, and the NES wasn’t released in the US until 1985. It wasn’t the best or most powerful system of its generation, but it transformed the industry. Video games are a multi-billion dollar industry today almost solely because of Nintendo’s contribution to the market in the 1980′s.

Good Solid B-Plus on October 5, 2011 at 10:24 PM

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 9:35 PM

Very well said. I’ve been in the tech industry for 20 years, and I will give Jobs the respect he obviously deserves for being an innovator. But magical? Transformative? That’s a little over the top. Apple is a company that makes good gadgets, but for pure workhorse capabilities, whether you want to admit it or not, you simply cannot beat a Windows based PC.

Consider this – Apple was in real danger of going under until they introduced the iPod. It wasn’t their computers that got people hooked.

crazy_legs on October 5, 2011 at 10:25 PM

It’ll suck to be holding Apple stock tomorrow.

Jason Coleman on October 5, 2011 at 9:35 PM

Actually, I bought some today at $375/share and it was a bargain. Been undervalued for some time now. Most projections are around $525. Besides, the Auburn grad has been running the show for years now.

RIP Steve

MechEng5by5 on October 5, 2011 at 10:26 PM

I haven’t missed the BSOD, or Ctrl-Alt-Del. I haven’t missed the freezing, the awful looking operating systems, etc etc.

Say that again the next time you get the little happy spinning rainbow.

crazy_legs on October 5, 2011 at 10:28 PM

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