Herman Cain wins the Florida straw poll, and, all of a sudden, his dance card is full. Next week will be a particularly busy one for the candidate.

He’ll meet Monday with the Donald, only the third out-and-out candidate to do so. (Rick Perry met with him earlier this year and Mitt’s meeting with him today.) Why that should matter, I’m not quite sure, except that Donald Trump is adept at stirring media attention and also, just like Sarah Palin, must at all costs be dissuaded from a third-party run (which has always been a remote possibility for Trump, but a possibility nevertheless).

The next day, he’ll confer with Ed Koch, who as Politico’s Maggie Haberman put it, “has once again emerged in a national context after he drove a pro-Israel message as a cudgel against President Obama in NY-9.” (If that’s true, kudos to Mr. Koch, but I think that’s giving Koch a little too much credit. If Obama unequivocally supported Israel, his foreign policy would be unable to wielded as a cudgel. Obama only has himself to blame for the loss of NY-9.) Koch has plenty of means at his disposal to help Cain if he so chooses, though, so the meet-up must be an exciting opportunity for the former Godfather’s pizza CEO, who surely knows a thing or two about a business meeting.

Wednesday, Cain’s book comes out. Media frenzy ensues! (Well, maybe not a “frenzy,” but the book should at least help Cain’s name stay in headlines.)

And, at some later date, the bold and fresh Dennis Miller will headline a fundraiser in L.A. for Cain. Does it get any better than that? (Seriously! I love Dennis Miller!)

Gotta say this for Herman Cain: He truly believes in his own candidacy — and he won’t be giving up any time soon. It’s not hard to see why he won the Florida straw poll. In debates, he’s upbeat and on-point. The more people know him, the more they like him. Pundits like Matt Lewis and Kathleen Parker have warned not to underestimate him, reminding readers of his persistent positive intensity score and his observable ability to learn from his mistakes. But it’s also not hard to see why he’s perceived as unelectable: First and foremost, he lacks political experience. For that reason alone, despite the increased attention this week, Cain remains unlikely to capture the nomination. But, until the party does pick its nominee, watching Cain run for president is a pleasure.

Update: This post originally mistakenly referred to Ed Koch, former mayor of New York City, as one of the Koch brothers (David and Charles Koch) of Wichita, Kan. The post has been corrected above.