What Google Chairman Eric Schmidt said before testifying at today’s antitrust hearing

posted at 1:25 pm on September 21, 2011 by Tina Korbe

Google Chairman Eric E. Schmidt will testify at an antitrust hearing today before a Senate Judiciary subcommittee. The subject of the hearing: “The Power of Google: Serving Consumers or Threatening Competition?” Not surprisingly, Google competitors — at least three of whom are also expected to testify — say the latter, claiming the company limits its competitors by favoring its own affiliated websites through its search engine. From my very preliminary reading on the subject (and from my very great reliance on Google on a daily basis), I tend to say the former.

But, for what it’s worth, Schmidt himself doesn’t seem concerned about the hearing whatsoever. He’s even said he’s looking forward to the “opportunity to communicate what [Google is] doing.” More than likely, he’s unconcerned because Google does serve its users well — but he might also be nonchalant because he’s covered his political bases. According to The New York Times:

As antitrust scrutiny has intensified, Google has ramped up its lobbying efforts in Washington and its communications campaigns nationwide. The company has shown television ads in some markets … that trumpet Google’s role in helping small businesses and creating jobs.

Plus, as an outspoken supporter of President Obama, Schmidt just this week hyped the need for short-term stimulus measures of the sort the president has proposed.

“The economy is, today, stuck behind the power curve. It needs a lot of encouragement,” Schmidt told “This Week” anchor Christiane Amanpour. “It needs not just something like the jobs bill, but also significant government stimulation in terms of buying power and investment. Otherwise, we’re set up for years of extraordinarily low growth in the economy and no real solution to the jobless problem.” …

“You have a situation where the private sector sees essentially no growth in demand,” Schmidt said. “The classic solution is to have the government step in and, with short-term initiatives, help stimulate that demand. If they do it right, they’ll invest in income and growth-producing things, like highways and bridges and schools, new opportunities for the private sector to go then build businesses.”

I disagree with Schmidt on the need for short-term stimulus (the definition of insanity and all that), but I did, at least, appreciate the comments he made in favor of creative destruction:

Schmidt dismissed the idea that greater efficiency and new technology have created structural changes to the economy that have replaced workers unable to re-train for new higher-skilled jobs. …

“That’s been true for 100 years. It’s been true of the industrial era for the last, literally, century,” Schmidt said. “And over and over again, American ingenuity has meant that the people who were displaced were able to find new jobs in these new industries.

There’s every reason to believe that if the political system could come to a consensus around stability, solving these short-term problems and get the investment that I’m describing, that we can take care of the rest.”

In other words: No, Mr. President, ATMs did not cause our 9.1 percent unemployment. But Schmidt was careful to couple his praise for industrialization with a call for “investment,” that key word of the president’s. As well he should. He’s got a Democrat-led Senate subcommittee to win over.

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Eric Schmidt….

Gah.

Is there a decent replacement for Google based services? I have a gmail account I’d increasingly like to get rid of. But Hotmail and Yahoo suck. AOL? Don’t get me started. Is there anything else out there?

And Bing, DuckDuckgo, dogpile… can anything replace Google yet? Please?

Vanceone on September 21, 2011 at 1:28 PM

Google: the liberal search engine of 2012.

upinak on September 21, 2011 at 1:29 PM

Yep, if short term stimulus doesn’t work the first time, try, try again.

Cindy Munford on September 21, 2011 at 1:31 PM

He thinks privacy is ludicrous, too.

flyfisher on September 21, 2011 at 1:31 PM

I am waiting for some lawsuit where some defender brings forth evidense they got from google cloud, because google gives ALL it’s info over without a warrent.

fun times ahead.

upinak on September 21, 2011 at 1:32 PM

Google and Progressive Insurance – two products I will not use, to avoid subsidizing the democrat party. BTW, Eric, just getting into a CEO position doesn’t make you an economic analyst.

Vashta.Nerada on September 21, 2011 at 1:33 PM

The classic solution is to have the government step in and, with short-term initiatives, help stimulate that demand.

That’s definitely not the classic solution. At least if I’m reading the code word “initiatives” right.

forest on September 21, 2011 at 1:33 PM

…can anything replace Google yet? Please?

Vanceone on September 21, 2011 at 1:28 PM

I use Hotmail and Bing and have never missed Google. I actually like Bing better. Hotmail, for me, is just a conduit to Outlook anyway.

stvnscott on September 21, 2011 at 1:33 PM

Speaking of Google, I read through a Drudge link that the gay campaign against Rick “Santorum” has finally reached the point they had hoped – instead of snide reactions or not talking about it, Rick is now sending letters to Google’s people telling them to get rid of the first 2-3-4 links that come up with a Google search, saying “they wouldn’t do this to Biden”. Biden? Oh, the VP spot.

Marcus on September 21, 2011 at 1:34 PM

And Bing, DuckDuckgo, dogpile… can anything replace Google yet? Please?

Vanceone on September 21, 2011 at 1:28 PM

Tell that to HotBot, Excite, WebCrawler, Ask Jeeves, Yahoo, AOL, Netscape, AltaVista, Lycos, MSN, go.com, Meta Crawler, and AllTheWeb.

faraway on September 21, 2011 at 1:38 PM

Google’s relationship with the government reminds me of GM’s with the difference that Google is still private for now.

GM has OnStar which continues to track you even after you no longer subscribe to their service.

Google tracks all of your searches and activity to “improve” your search results. So imagine what Uncle Sam would/could do with that info.

VibrioCocci on September 21, 2011 at 1:39 PM

 
Mildly ironic that Google has become the MSM.
 

ignatzk on September 21, 2011 at 1:40 PM

Is there a decent replacement for Google based services? I have a gmail account I’d increasingly like to get rid of. But Hotmail and Yahoo suck. AOL? Don’t get me started. Is there anything else out there?

There are thousands if not millions of other choices out there.

Here’s the big question though. Are you exclusively looking for something that is free?

There is nothing out there for free. If you don’t want all of your data to be monetized and literally used against you, then you’re going to have to get away from the “free” services.

For approximately $20 dollars per year, you can have your own domain and email addresses on your own, and no one can come in and monetize them behind your back or use your own emails against you in advertising.

So what is it exactly that you want?

Jason Coleman on September 21, 2011 at 1:40 PM

can anything replace Google yet? Please?
Vanceone on September 21, 2011 at 1:28 PM

If you want just search results use Scroogle:

http://www.scroogle.org/

It ‘scrapes’ the exact same results that you get from a Google search only Google doesn’t get credit for the hit and there are no Ad links to produce revenue for Google.

Dr. Carlo Lombardi on September 21, 2011 at 1:40 PM

I’ve come to the conclusion that at least some billionaires are probably savants. Others are possibly just lucky or have a clear vision of the future at able to successfully capitalize on that vision. That’s how they get all that money.

I can see no evidence that they are more astute politically or economically.

So, their ramblings about what national policy should be are about as useful as an actor’s or a singer’s opinions.

trigon on September 21, 2011 at 1:40 PM

Google tracks all of your searches and activity to “improve” your search results. So imagine what Uncle Sam would/could do with that info.

VibrioCocci on September 21, 2011 at 1:39 PM

Google also reads your email to “improve” your experience. Then they track your phone’s location to “improve” your something or other.

And I used to think Microsoft was the evil empire…

stvnscott on September 21, 2011 at 1:43 PM

He thinks privacy is ludicrous, too.

flyfisher on September 21, 2011 at 1:31 PM

+1000.

radioboyatl on September 21, 2011 at 1:45 PM

Google is evil. Enough said!

capejasmine on September 21, 2011 at 1:47 PM

Why use Google any way? I don’t buy that it is more helpful. To me it’s a pain because it pulls up crap I didn’t want. It’s way worse than others, such as Bing, for doing this. Bing is good as is Scroogle. As for Email I wouldn’t touch gmail with a ten foot pole, it was nothing but trouble. All of that and the Liberal CEO makes me pass on Google.

Deanna on September 21, 2011 at 1:52 PM

Evil.

the_nile on September 21, 2011 at 1:53 PM

OT: Go over to Right Scoop and see the UN group picture…can that be real..? LOL

d1carter on September 21, 2011 at 1:54 PM

Tin foil hats are on the house!

Ortzinator on September 21, 2011 at 1:55 PM

Google has demonstrated time and again that they will use their corporation to shill for the democratic party. For that one reason we should do all they can to limit their power, regardless of whether they are ‘serving consumers or threatening competition’.

slickwillie2001 on September 21, 2011 at 1:58 PM

Netflix was considered revolutionary in the video rental business and their pants got too big. Pride goeth before the fall. That’s all I’m saying…

RDE2010 on September 21, 2011 at 1:59 PM

d1carter on September 21, 2011 at 1:54 PM

Is it a different one from OOTD?

Cindy Munford on September 21, 2011 at 1:59 PM

Google and Progressive Insurance – two products I will not use, to avoid subsidizing the democrat party. BTW, Eric, just getting into a CEO position doesn’t make you an economic analyst.

Vashta.Nerada on September 21, 2011 at 1:33 PM

I’m interested in knowing more about this Progressive business. What’s up with that? Because I currently use them and, uh, well…

RDE2010 on September 21, 2011 at 2:00 PM

Think of GOOGLE as the Federal Government of the Internet.

Always growing (like the borg) with dreams of even more power over the lives of Individuals.

Do no evil indeed.

PappyD61 on September 21, 2011 at 2:01 PM

Google also reads your email to “improve” your experience. Then they track your phone’s location to “improve” your something or other.

Also remember that anytime you use services like Google docs, anything you create in that document can be used by Google for whatever they see fit.

That’s why a number of research universities have told researchers to NEVER put their data or their work into a Google-Doc. More than one university is fighting patent claims with google over work they’ve done and put into Google services to “aid in collaboration”.

Google lifted their work and filed patents on it. At least one of these patents involves work between USC and Green Cross of Japan that was conducted via google docs for real-time collaboration and now neither can continue their work because Google is claiming infringement.

Once you put ANYTHING into a “free” internet service, you lose almost all rights to it.

Run your business plan through Gmail, they can legally take it and use it. Load plans for your prototype into sketchup, Google now has rights to it.

There’s a great South Park episode about reading User Agreements. I’ll bet that most of the gmail users here have NO IDEA what they agreed to when they signed up.

Free accounts are fine. . . for things like signing up for message boards or frivolous internet activity, but if you’re going to do serious work or make an email address a part of your real identity, it’s best to avoid the “free” services.

Jason Coleman on September 21, 2011 at 2:02 PM

OT: Go over to Right Scoop and see the UN group picture…can that be real..? LOL
d1carter on September 21, 2011 at 1:54 PM

Did you miss todays Obamaturism?

Count to 10 on September 21, 2011 at 2:03 PM

I’m interested in knowing more about this Progressive business. What’s up with that? Because I currently use them and, uh, well…

RDE2010 on September 21, 2011 at 2:00 PM

Look up Peter Lewis’ “philanthropy”

Fezzik on September 21, 2011 at 2:05 PM

Frankly, the only “stimulus” Google seems to offer these days is the type a lonely guy doing an image search under “Nicole Scherzinger’s boobs” is looking for.

pilamaye on September 21, 2011 at 2:06 PM

Jason Coleman on September 21, 2011 at 1:40 PM

How do I go about that? Get my own domain name.

Mirimichi on September 21, 2011 at 2:07 PM

Jason Coleman on September 21, 2011 at 2:02 PM

And don’t forget if you use Google Voice they can listen to any or all of the calls you place, and read your text messages.

Fezzik on September 21, 2011 at 2:08 PM

“It needs not just something like the jobs bill, but also significant government stimulation in terms of buying power and investment.”

This really sounds like someone about to testify in front of a Democratic controlled Senate hearing with the power to put some pain in his wallet…

Seven Percent Solution on September 21, 2011 at 2:10 PM

Alright…well I am about to delete my Google account because all this privacy invasion business is insane. I think a lot of people are unawares because my dad was talking about how they were one of the top businesses to work for. Yea, working for spies is what I want to do.

RDE2010 on September 21, 2011 at 2:12 PM

Schmidt ain’t worried because he has a lot of Democratic politicians in his back pocket. If things start getting dicey, he’ll just drop a dime to his buddy Barry and say “Afraid I’ll have to hold off on those campaign contributions this year……..”

Barry will fill in the blanks.

GarandFan on September 21, 2011 at 2:16 PM

How do I go about that? Get my own domain name.

Mirimichi on September 21, 2011 at 2:07 PM

There are two steps.

1) Find a registrar – this is a company like godaddy, network solutions, or the one I use, webula.

Domains should cost NO MORE than 10 a year, with coupons/specials, you can get them for as low as 3 a year.

That gives you rights to the domain to use as you see fit, nothing more. You own the domain for all respects and purposes.

2) Find a host – a host is someone who will put a server on the net for you and manage it physically. You then associate the domain with the host and you have a working domain of your own on the internet.

There are thousands upon thousands of hosts and resellers (hosts working for hosts) who you can use. Some are bare bones basic, some are fully automated.

Look at the big boys if you’re doing this for the first time, Dreamhost, 1&1 etc.

Note that most domain registrars are also hosts and most hosts also handle domain registration (godaddy and network solutions). I personally find that it’s better (and usually cheaper) to keep hosts and domain registrars separate so there’s less hassle if I want to change providers.

If you have more questions, email me at jason at jasoncoleman dot com.

Jason Coleman on September 21, 2011 at 2:17 PM

He’s a big Obama contributor, so he doesn’t have to worry. He knows no matter what his company does, there won’t be any repercussions.

lonestar1 on September 21, 2011 at 2:18 PM

Jason Coleman on September 21, 2011 at 2:17 PM

Thanks.

Mirimichi on September 21, 2011 at 2:21 PM

Is there a decent replacement for Google based services? I have a gmail account I’d increasingly like to get rid of. But Hotmail and Yahoo suck. AOL? Don’t get me started. Is there anything else out there?

And Bing, DuckDuckgo, dogpile… can anything replace Google yet? Please?
Vanceone on September 21, 2011 at 1:28 PM

For approximately $20 dollars per year, you can have your own domain and email addresses on your own, and no one can come in and monetize them behind your back or use your own emails against you in advertising.

So what is it exactly that you want?
Jason Coleman on September 21, 2011 at 1:40 PM

More reasons to go with Jason’s reply:

1) Get your own dotCOM or dotUS domain from i.e. 1and1.com is British based, gives you some distance from US based ISPs IFKWIM.

2) A cheap plan will give you 10 or more email addresses – but that doesn’t matter, unless you want to parcel them out to family members or segregate business from personal emails.

3) the real beauty is the catchall mailbox. For example, make your personal the catchall; John@mydomain.com. This addy is what your family, friends and trusted correspondents us, all others use a unique addy, see b) below
a) use Thunderbird/Outlook to handle emails via POP3 or IMAP
b) create unique emails on the fly for spam control and rules making. For example, you have accounts with TigerDirect, ChaseBank, HotAir, eBay, UnitedAirlines, Xoom etc. So when you sign up with each online outfit, just use their domain as your email addy specific to their registry as follows (doesn’t matter if it’s one or 10,000 on-the-fly accounts):
–tigerdirect.com@mydomain.com
–chase.com@mydomain.com
–hotair.com@mydomain.com
–ebay.com@mydomain.com
–united.com@mydomain.com
–xoom.com@mydomain.com

If you so wish, as these emails come in via your catchall, you can create rules to direct them into their own folders.

If for example, Xoom sells your addy to marketers or spammers against your wish, you now know who did it. You can jump on Xoom for doing so and set xoom.com@mydomain.com as spam and automatically delete them henceforth. Or in the case of eBay, somehow spammers got a hold of my ebay addy via one of the sellers, so I just changed my ebay addy and set my filter to delete anything addressed to my old addy.

Same thing with a lot of the old-school blogs (they shall remain nameless) where your email addy was exposed to drivebys. I just set the filters to delete any incoming emails addressed to those aliases.

Like Jason said, $20 will bring you full control, privacy and greater peace of mind.

AH_C on September 21, 2011 at 2:22 PM

And don’t forget if you use Google Voice they can listen to any or all of the calls you place, and read your text messages.

Fezzik on September 21, 2011 at 2:08 PM

And Maps tracks your physical location and sells it, Picassa takes your pictures and sells them in stock libraries, Latitude correlates you with other users and associates for common advertisments, Calendar reports who, what and where you are meeting/doing.

The list is just too long to go through each service and explain how google takes whatever you give them and sells it.

People just don’t realize what Google makes it’s money on.

Jason Coleman on September 21, 2011 at 2:25 PM

Look up Peter Lewis’ “philanthropy”

Fezzik on September 21, 2011 at 2:05 PM

I found this
Interesting story really. Pretty quiet man who likes to spend on Dems. He really lost me at ACLU. Apparently the man is a ghost who used to donate to Republicans but has since ceased….a great mystery.

RDE2010 on September 21, 2011 at 2:25 PM

I’m interested in knowing more about this Progressive business. What’s up with that? Because I currently use them and, uh, well…

The name alone should raise a red flag.

http://www.aim.org/media-monitor/who-is-peter-lewis/

single stack on September 21, 2011 at 2:26 PM

this from a company that makes outrageous amounts of money and pays next to no taxes-commenting on what the country needs. it’s not individual millionaires or 250,000- aires that are the problem and pay less than their share of taxes- it’s companies like google who do pay less than your secretary in taxes. seeing how they are people too, according to the likes of willard, how do they get away with it and get away from scrutiny,criticism, and condemnation as fat cats by the left and president pantywaist o’commie?

oh,they contribute to boy-king obama and paid for his inauguration. i see. at least in europe they’re being found in contempt of the civil rights of citizens for spying on them flagrantly, information mining from their robot camera cars and catching people in the all together in their own backyards. they are the liberal Stasi and the american left is them, loves them.

google is satan. all hail satan or you’re a racist.they’re double plus good.

mittens on September 21, 2011 at 2:28 PM

The name alone should raise a red flag.

Yea, I know. Thanks anyways!

RDE2010 on September 21, 2011 at 2:30 PM

wow, two comments in a row got munched

Is there a decent replacement for Google based services? I have a gmail account I’d increasingly like to get rid of. But Hotmail and Yahoo suck. AOL? Don’t get me started. Is there anything else out there?

And Bing, DuckDuckgo, dogpile… can anything replace Google yet? Please?
Vanceone on September 21, 2011 at 1:28 PM

For approximately $20 dollars per year, you can have your own domain and email addresses on your own, and no one can come in and monetize them behind your back or use your own emails against you in advertising.

So what is it exactly that you want?
Jason Coleman on September 21, 2011 at 1:40 PM

More reasons to go with Jason’s reply:

1) Get your own dotCOM or dotUS domain from i.e. 1and1.com is British based, gives you some distance from US based ISPs IFKWIM.

2) A cheap plan will give you 10 or more email addresses – but that doesn’t matter, unless you want to parcel them out to family members or segregate business from personal emails.

3) the real beauty is the catchall mailbox. For example, make your personal the catchall; John@mydomain.com. This addy is what your family, friends and trusted correspondents us, all others use a unique addy, see next post)

AH_C on September 21, 2011 at 2:32 PM

Tin foil hats are on the house!

Ortzinator on September 21, 2011 at 1:55 PM

I see well informed people that are worried about privacy. I guess you just march to the beat of orwell?

upinak on September 21, 2011 at 2:32 PM

Part 2:

a) use Thunderbird/Outlook to handle emails via POP3 or IMAP
b) create unique emails on the fly for spam control and rules making. For example, you have accounts with TigerDirect, ChaseBank, HotAir, eBay, UnitedAirlines, Xoom etc. So when you sign up with each online outfit, just use their domain as your name part of the email addy, specific to their site as follows (doesn’t matter if it’s one or 10,000 on-the-fly accounts):
–tigerdirect.com@mydomain.com

thru

–xoom.com@mydomain.com

If you so wish, as these emails come in via your catchall, you can create rules to direct them into their own folders.

If for example, Xoom sells your addy to marketers or spammers against your wish, you now know who did it. You can jump on Xoom for doing so and set xoom.com@mydomain.com as spam and automatically delete them henceforth. Or in the case of eBay, somehow spammers got a hold of my ebay addy via one of the sellers, so I just changed my ebay addy and set my filter to delete anything addressed to my old addy.

Same thing with a lot of the old-school blogs (they shall remain nameless) where your email addy was exposed to drivebys. I just set the filters to delete any incoming emails addressed to those aliases.

Like Jason said, $20 will bring you full control, privacy and greater.

AH_C on September 21, 2011 at 2:34 PM

Schmidt learned his lessons from Microsoft and Bill Gates very well. When Schmidt was CEO of Novell, Microsoft used their power as a monopoly to bring Novell to it’s knees. Schmidt took what he learned during his failure at Novell and used it at Google to go after Microsoft. Google is just as much a monopoly today as Microsoft was 15 years ago.

huckleberryfriend on September 21, 2011 at 2:34 PM

Out: “Don’t be evil”

In: “Be Machiavellian”

locomotivebreath1901 on September 21, 2011 at 2:46 PM

AH_C on September 21, 2011 at 2:34 PM

I’ll agree with everything he said.

ESPECIALLY with email management. Being able to track the spam coming to you is a VERY difficult task, on-the-fly and company specific emails to your domain is a very good way to find out who’s being good and who’s being bad.

I’ve had some very interesting experiences calling up companies and explaining to them exactly how I was able to conclusively and legally determine that they were A)selling my information and B)spamming me from their partners.

They all try the same defense of “they could have gotten your email from anywhere”, but when confronted with unique emails to their particular service, they are forced to admit defeat.

Dell credited me for the entire cost of a new system with about 20 of work and 3 phone calls on my part to show that they gave my info to HP when I had specifically opted out. It helped that that particular email address I used for the purchase was email_used_only_for_new_dell_july_2010@(redacted domain).com

That last bit requires some more advanced saving of the data that leaves your computer and a bit of advance thinking, but it is possible. With free services it is near to impossible to track back who is doing what with your email/data.

Jason Coleman on September 21, 2011 at 2:49 PM

Well, Eric, Hows about you stop avoiding paying yer’ corporate taxes?

Since you avoided paying 3.1 billion in taxes over the past three years through a maze of questionable tax strategies, why not just come clean and pay what you truly owed?

You know, your “FAIR SHARE”?

That way, Eric, they can pay for your GOLDEN advice of: “The classic solution is to have the government step in and, with short-term initiatives, help stimulate that demand. If they do it right, they’ll invest in income and growth-producing things, like highways and bridges and schools, new opportunities for the private sector to go then build businesses.”

Opposite Day on September 21, 2011 at 2:49 PM

“I’m going to say what ever is necessary to please Obama so he helps my business when I give him money.” Eric E. Schmidt

gitarfan on September 21, 2011 at 2:50 PM

Cindy Munford on September 21, 2011 at 1:59 PM

Could be. I haven’t been near a computer for five days…just got back on for real today. Thanks.

d1carter on September 21, 2011 at 2:53 PM

Google is just as much a monopoly today as Microsoft was 15 years ago.

huckleberryfriend on September 21, 2011 at 2:34 PM

There is no monopoly for Google, nor was there one with regard to Microsoft.

Is there some unfair competition going on, probably yes, but it’s not because of a monopoly.

Rather than being a monopoly problem, the particular issue here is that Google is manipulating results for their own benefit rather than presenting the results as they say they do.

If Google would come out and state that they definitely manipulate results into their favor when it suits them, fine, no problem. Presenting the results as pure search results when you aren’t doing that is the problem.

Jason Coleman on September 21, 2011 at 2:54 PM

Count to 10 on September 21, 2011 at 2:03 PM

OMG, it is for real. I have been away a few days and just catching up. That pic is unbelievable. It is more than amateurism…that is down right moronic. He’s is losing it.

d1carter on September 21, 2011 at 2:58 PM

The twit spent all that money on a new face when he should have bought a brain.

nimrod on September 21, 2011 at 3:34 PM

OMG, it is for real. I have been away a few days and just catching up. That pic is unbelievable. It is more than amateurism…that is down right moronic. He’s is losing it.

d1carter on September 21, 2011 at 2:58 PM

It’s hard to lose something you never had.

RDE2010 on September 21, 2011 at 3:38 PM

Yea, I know. Thanks anyways!

RDE2010 on September 21, 2011 at 2:30 PM

The Chairman of Progressive is Peter Lewis(his father was the co-founder.) Peter is a huge vonor to the Dems and the ACLU. He put as much money into MoveOn.org and America Coming Together as George Soros. He supports legalizing marijuana in a big way.
Let me put it this way, when you pay your Progressive premiums you’re helping all those organizations.

Deanna on September 21, 2011 at 3:47 PM

Since you avoided paying 3.1 billion in taxes over the past three years through a maze of questionable tax strategies, why not just come clean and pay what you truly owed?

You know, your “FAIR SHARE”?

A country’s tax system can’t be based on voluntary payments. That’s never worked in the history of the world and never will. Right wing whining about how left-leaning individuals or companies don’t engage in voluntary tax payments is childish.

Given the amount of profits generated by Google, Apple, and other tech companies with large offshore operations, closing those loopholes would make a significant impact on total revenues collected every year.

bayam on September 21, 2011 at 4:40 PM

Anyone else noticing that google ads on YouTube these days are always plugging Teh Won’s job bill?

Of course, Google has no concerns about anti-trust. Teh Won is in their pocket.

NeighborhoodCatLady on September 21, 2011 at 4:51 PM

Jason Coleman
AH_C

Thank you for the valuable and very interesting information. I have to check into it.

Gang-of-One on September 21, 2011 at 4:56 PM

@Jason Coleman
 
Thank you for the valuable and very interesting information. I have to check into it.
 
Gang-of-One on September 21, 2011 at 4:56 PM

 
+1. I have officially now bookmarked a hotair thread because of useful technical info. Weird.

rogerb on September 21, 2011 at 5:29 PM

Interesting thread. I won’t use Google or anything pertaining to it. Have no problem with Bing and Hotmail.

Google is the one behind Net Neutrality which has nothing to do with anything “neutral”, and behind the FCC’s actions.

As much as I want a Smartphone and love the Droid, because the OS is by Google, I have to pass. Waiting on the Windows Smartphone that runs on the 4G Verizon Network since the Family is all on VZ.

Good Tech info on this site:-)

bluefox on September 21, 2011 at 8:38 PM

“It needs not just something like the jobs bill, but also significant government stimulation in terms of buying power and investment. Otherwise, we’re set up for years of extraordinarily low growth in the economy and no real solution to the jobless problem.” …
“You have a situation where the private sector sees essentially no growth in demand,” Schmidt said. “The classic solution is to have the government step in and, with short-term initiatives, help stimulate that demand.

Stick to your search engine. Your Keynesian 101 economic thoughts are even more pedantic than one would expect, coming from someone who runs a business fueled completely by capitalistic freedom.

“Government stimulation in terms of buying power” ~ Let’s keep this simple. That phrase means money in the hands of someone who plans to spend it, whether a business or an individual. Of course, you get there by taking more of their money in taxes, right? Wrong.

“Otherwise, we’re set up for years of extraordinarily low growth in the economy” ~ Again, low growth in the economy is primarily due to lack of spending, but that does NOT mean government spending, it means capital investments in business expansion, and private consumption of goods.

How did Google grow to include over 25,000 active CPUs, then 50,000 active CPUs, etc? Was it through government manipulated stimulation? No, stupid, it was because there was a DEMAND, one which Google met through their SUPPLY of technological infrastructure. People got the information they craved, advertisers saw that people gathered there, so they invested in Google via advertising, and EVERYBODY gained, with no government involvement at all.

Guys like this run their business as capitalists, but think of everything outside of that through their wishful-thinking worldview. Since that makes them liberal, they side with the Democrats, and then they just have to believe that supply-side economic principles are EVIL, even while they are banking the results of the purely supply-side behavior of their own business.

It truly is a mental disorder.

Freelancer on September 21, 2011 at 8:55 PM

I don’t like Google and don’t use their services, but it seems to me that any company that dares to be successful ends up being investigated by Congress.

I have used Yahoo from their very first day of existence. Their email is far superior to gmail and their spam blocking is as well.

Common Sense on September 21, 2011 at 9:32 PM

+1. I have officially now bookmarked a hotair thread because of useful technical info. Weird.

rogerb on September 21, 2011 at 5:29 PM

Don’t hesitate to ask if you have questions.

I’ve had a good experience with 1&1 for their one-stop solution. All you need is their cheapest package and skip (not use) the webpage stuff, unless you want to fool with maybe hosting photos and stuff which can be done behind a password firewall w/o the whole world seeing it.

There are some free tools via CNET.com to do photo albums and the like for sharing videos, photos, music, even blogging. Again, this way you can control your content. Naturally, you may have to upgrade the package depending on your storage needs.

AH_C on September 21, 2011 at 9:41 PM

Google
I oversee 25 employees. Its a no-no if they use Google and not Bing. Google is clearly POLITICAL whereas Bing isn’t as bad.

CatchAll on September 21, 2011 at 9:41 PM