Cantor says no to an all-or-nothing approach to the president’s jobs plan

posted at 10:05 am on September 16, 2011 by Tina Korbe

Few people are enthused about the the president’s jobs plan, as Obama’s low approval and climbing disapproval rates attest, but Republicans have said they’re willing to work with him on some of his proposals. House Budget Chairman Paul Ryan, for example, has said his vision and the president’s vision might overlap in the territory of corporate tax reform. That doesn’t mean, however, that House leadership concedes the importance of comprehensively passing the president’s bill with all the urgency Obama has sought to make seem imperative. In fact, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) said today on CNBC that Republicans are very unlikely to pass the bill in its entirety.

“I reject the all-or-nothing approach that the president has laid out,” Cantor said Friday on CNBC. “I mean nobody works like that. Washington certainly doesn’t. That creates the conflict. That creates and brings on the rancor. We want to work together, we want to find places that we agree on and not dwell on the big differences.”

Since Obama unveiled his $447 billion American Jobs Act a little more than a week ago he has been strongly urging Congress to swiftly take action to move the legislation into law. The White House has insisted that Obama wants to see all aspects of the bill put into law and, although Obama would prefer to pass his plan as one piece of legislation, he would push to pass the plan in individual parts if need be.

Cantor’s statements underscore how politically calculating the president’s proposal was in the first place. Far from seeking to introduce transcendent, innovative and effective ideas that might actually stand a chance of passage, the president chose instead to reiterate tired ideas he knew Republicans would not support.

After the president submitted his bill, Republicans were left with three options: (1) To pass the bill in its entirety, knowing additional stimulus spending will only add to the debt and fail to create jobs, (2) To pass parts of the bill, knowing the president will take full credit for any economic improvements that resulted and cast blame for any stagnation (“If Republicans had agreed to my plan in its entirety …”) or (3) To flat-out reject the bill, knowing that, absent any action at all, the jobs crisis will continue until November 2012 and the president will blame Republicans for it. Not one of those options is positive for Republicans, politically speaking, but the first option is by far the worst as it would both exacerbate the country’s economic problems and cost Republicans seats in 2012. Conservatives would be disappointed in the spineless leadership of Republicans and independents would be disgusted at a second round of stimulus spending after the first stimulus package proved so abysmally ineffective.

Thankfully, Cantor has rightly rejected that on principle. Between the latter two alternatives, either will be workable for Republicans in 2012. But from now until November, leadership’s real job must be to continue to hammer the solutions that would work, educating as much of the electorate as possible about the merits and necessity of entitlement reform and the ongoing importance of deficit reduction.


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Hey, let’s compromise.

We’ll pass all the parts of the bill that cut taxes and reduce regulation, and leave out everything else.

Bipartisan!

fossten on September 16, 2011 at 10:09 AM

leadership’s real job must be to continue to hammer the solutions that would work, educating as much of the electorate as possible about the merits and necessity of entitlement reform and the ongoing importance of deficit reduction

the problem is dear leader has the lsm on his side and they continue to bash the gop along with him and not giving them a megaphone to hammer there points…

frustrating as all get out…

cmsinaz on September 16, 2011 at 10:11 AM

“Nobody works like that.”

Um, you do when you’re dealing with THE ONE!

Compromise? That’s racist.

inviolet on September 16, 2011 at 10:13 AM

fossten on September 16, 2011 at 10:09 AM

The challenge is FINDING parts of the bill that cut taxes and reduce regulation.
Good luck widdat.

But, PASS IT NOW !!

Oy.

pambi on September 16, 2011 at 10:13 AM

Cantor doesn’t love PBHO.

Bishop on September 16, 2011 at 10:15 AM

Since Obama unveiled his $447 billion American Jobs Act a little more than a week ago he has been strongly urging Congress to swiftly take action to move the legislation into law.

If I remember correctly, the last time Obama wanted a piece of legislation passed swiftly, I was promised I could keep my doctor and health insurance if I wanted to. How’s that working out?

dirtseller on September 16, 2011 at 10:16 AM

Bipartisanship is useless objective when the Dems are demonstrably wrong…and dishonest.

BuckeyeSam on September 16, 2011 at 10:18 AM

We want to work together, we want to find places that we agree on and not dwell on the big differences.”

Eric, Eric, Eric. You still don’t get it. We want Congress Critters to understand that this person in the White House must be stopped. There is no negotiating with him or Democrats. Stop the notion that we all want you to get along with him. We don’t. We want you to stop him.

BetseyRoss on September 16, 2011 at 10:20 AM

Cantor doesn’t love PBHO.

Bishop on September 16, 2011 at 10:15 AM

Cantor to Obama: “Yeah, Pharaoh tried an all-or-nothing approach, too. Let my people go.”

BuckeyeSam on September 16, 2011 at 10:21 AM

Just pass the payroll tax cut extension first. And see what Reid and the Senate Dems do. If they reject that, then the GOP knows they’re not dealing with serious people and they’ll be absolved from the inevitable blame game that’s coming in 2012.

Doughboy on September 16, 2011 at 10:21 AM

I like the “or nothing” part. See? I’m willing to work with the President.

zmdavid on September 16, 2011 at 10:24 AM

Far from seeking to introduce transcendent, innovative and effective ideas

Sounds like the sum of Obama’s presidency.

VibrioCocci on September 16, 2011 at 10:25 AM

Good approach. I’m assuming they will gradually ramp it up as time goes by and Obama continues to refuse negotiation on his POS bill.

forest on September 16, 2011 at 10:28 AM

“I reject the all-or-nothing approach that the president has laid out,” Cantor said Friday on CNBC. “I mean nobody works like that. Washington certainly doesn’t. That creates the conflict. That creates and brings on the rancor. We want to work together,

Obama has himself in a pretty tight spot with the majority of the country wanting compromise but his leftist base demanding he “get angry and stomp on Republicans”…liberals want “blood on the floor”.

Pretty much setting this up as Obama’s plan being “more of the same failed stimulus policies” and Republicans looking like the “adults in the room” by talking compromise.

I would still like to see Republican leaders repeating the many job bills and the budget they have passed while the democrats have done nothing.

Baxter Greene on September 16, 2011 at 10:29 AM

“I reject the all-or-nothing approach that the president has laid out,” Cantor said Friday on CNBC.

Awwwww c’mon Eric……where’s the love?

Rovin on September 16, 2011 at 10:35 AM

Let my people paycheck go.”

BuckeyeSam on September 16, 2011 at

Fixed.

mchristian on September 16, 2011 at 10:35 AM

Dear Republicans:

If you don’t stop trying to negotiate with this freedom destroying Marxist regime, you will be thrown out with them. Grow some GD spines and fight to save this nation. I will never, ever, contribute another dime to the republican party until they reform to strict conservative values. They need to be carefully watched when/if they take over Congress and the Presidency. The old way of doing things are over…either get with the program or get out!

trs on September 16, 2011 at 10:36 AM

“I reject the all-or-nothing approach that the president has laid out,” Cantor said Friday on CNBC.

Well Obama is going to have a hard time pushing his “my way or the highway” routine when his own party is disagreeing with him:

(via drudge)

Senator Casey Breaks With President Over Jobs Bill

http://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2011/09/15/senator-casey-breaks-with-president-over-jobs-bill/

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) — Pennsylvania’s senior Democratic official is breaking away from President Obama when it comes to his jobs bill.

U.S. Sen. Bob Casey says the president’s legislative strategy won’t work

.

This of course is a clear sign that Obama’s tactics are not going over well within his caucus and internal polling.

Baxter Greene on September 16, 2011 at 10:37 AM

Baxter Greene on September 16, 2011 at 10:29 AM

He’s banking heavily upon the media successfully portraying the Republicans as the ones who are unreasonable. He’s making it pretty difficult on them by coming right out and saying he won’t accept any changes or negotiation, but like an abused wife, the MSM will stick with him.

forest on September 16, 2011 at 10:38 AM

attaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaack waaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaatch you Mr Cantor!

gatorboy on September 16, 2011 at 10:38 AM

http://www.nytimes.com/cwire/2011/09/16/16climatewire-parties-clash-on-disaster-funding-as-house-s-29471.html?partner=rss&emc=rss

Disaster funding became a key point in the budget battle after Republicans released a plan late Wednesday stripping $1.5 billion from a program advancing electric and hybrid cars in exchange for providing $1 billion in emergency aid to states reeling from natural catastrophes.

The record floods, fires, droughts, and storms that have ravaged our nation are exactly what climate scientists have been predicting,” Rep. Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) said in a statement. “If we want to avoid future weather disasters, we need to increase — not cut — investments in clean vehicles and other clean energy technologies.”

William Amos on September 16, 2011 at 10:40 AM

Baxter Greene on September 16, 2011 at 10:37 AM

Whoa, Bob Casey? I could see Altmire, Critz or Holden backing away with the districts they are in, but I didn’t expect Casey to dump him.

This is a BFD. Internal polling in PA must be brutal.

forest on September 16, 2011 at 10:41 AM

Just pass the payroll tax cut extension first. And see what Reid and the Senate Dems do. If they reject that, then the GOP knows they’re not dealing with serious people and they’ll be absolved from the inevitable blame game that’s coming in 2012.

Doughboy on September 16, 2011 at 10:21 AM

I’d also suggest that the House add a six month extension of unemployment insurance, (instead of Obama’s full year) to your suggestion DB. Then, if Harry rejects it, “the game” is over.

Rovin on September 16, 2011 at 10:41 AM

The GOP elites will cave as always…..

ultracon on September 16, 2011 at 10:42 AM

I think the Republicans are trying to throw Obama’s false bipartisan/working together meme back at him.

Fallon on September 16, 2011 at 10:46 AM

Thank you, Mr. Cantor. I am closer to earning my AttackWatch armband. I originally hoped for the brown beauty. But with unhinged rants like this, Mr. Cantor, I just might earn my red armband yet.

cyclown on September 16, 2011 at 10:47 AM

Cantor’s statements underscore how politically calculating the president’s proposal was in the first place.

Of course it was. If this bill would actually create a meaningful number of jobs, one would think (hope) that the president would have made this proposal his first year in office……rather than the “stimulus” boondoggle that was foisted on the American people.

tgharris on September 16, 2011 at 10:49 AM

After what just transpired in NY-9 and NV-2 “the GOP elites” had better think twice about submission. This election cycle can work both ways, including the elites getting “primarried” (sp).

Rovin on September 16, 2011 at 10:52 AM

Thank you, Mr. Cantor. I am closer to earning my AttackWatch armband. I originally hoped for the brown beauty. But with unhinged rants like this, Mr. Cantor, I just might earn my red armband yet.

cyclown on September 16, 2011 at 10:47 AM

It is quite obvious , comrade that you are not a true believer in our most highly favored leader’s cause. If you were-you would not rest(nor eat) until you had the black einsatzgruppen death’s head weird skull-thingy in your grip.
You are no patriot. You must be one of those treasonous Joooos in NY 9.
I denounce you!

annoyinglittletwerp on September 16, 2011 at 10:58 AM

Dang! Push emphasis rather than strike.
No-matter.
Everything I wrote…is truth for the Fatherland!

annoyinglittletwerp on September 16, 2011 at 10:59 AM

After the president submitted his bill, Republicans were left with three options: (1) To pass the bill in its entirety, knowing additional stimulus spending will only add to the debt and fail to create jobs, (2) To pass parts of the bill, knowing the president will take full credit for any economic improvements that resulted and cast blame for any stagnation (“If Republicans had agreed to my plan in its entirety …”) or (3) To flat-out reject the bill, knowing that, absent any action at all, the jobs crisis will continue until November 2012 and the president will blame Republicans for it.

Here’s a thought. Maybe it is time for passing a bill fully defined by Congress and targeted in ways the Congress wants. Yes, I’m talking about PORK. If Obama wants to spend $450B, then each Congressman and Senator get’s to earmark $841M for their district/state to put to good use for the purpose of stimulating the economy and creating jobs and let them stand or fall on those decisions. One proviso: none of the money can be used to offset current state/local monies/deficits.

Dusty on September 16, 2011 at 11:51 AM

I like the “or nothing” part. See? I’m willing to work with the President.

[zmdavid on September 16, 2011 at 10:24 AM]

LOL.

Dusty on September 16, 2011 at 11:56 AM

Just pass the payroll tax cut extension first. And see what Reid and the Senate Dems do. If they reject that, then the GOP knows they’re not dealing with serious people and they’ll be absolved from the inevitable blame game that’s coming in 2012.

Doughboy on September 16, 2011 at 10:21 AM

I think that’s an excellent plan.

Missy on September 16, 2011 at 12:04 PM

so which is it? either he does not know or does not care that the president cant dictate to or scold the congress or court when they dont do his biding?

chasdal on September 16, 2011 at 12:22 PM

When are the republicans going to get smart (hah!) and stop passing large, all-encompassing bills. Instead, pass a small bill, pick something that Obama suggested that’s not too awful (if there is anything) and just pass that small item. Put pressure on the Dems and Senate to reject it.

happi on September 16, 2011 at 12:33 PM

I support the American Jobs Act. We should pass this bill right now.

It’s HB 2911, right?

Jason Coleman on September 16, 2011 at 2:17 PM

After the president submitted his bill, Republicans were left with three options: (1) To pass the bill in its entirety, knowing additional stimulus spending will only add to the debt and fail to create jobs, (2) To pass parts of the bill, knowing the president will take full credit for any economic improvements that resulted and cast blame for any stagnation (“If Republicans had agreed to my plan in its entirety …”) or (3) To flat-out reject the bill, knowing that, absent any action at all, the jobs crisis will continue until November 2012 and the president will blame Republicans for it. Not one of those options is positive for Republicans, politically speaking..

Ummmmm….who made it law that these are the only possible options-outcomes?

xblade on September 16, 2011 at 2:32 PM

Republicans should say “We’ll pass Obama’s jobs bill when he gives us a jobs bill, but so far, what he’s given us has nothing to do with creating jobs”.

xblade on September 16, 2011 at 2:38 PM

To all of you die-hards who want Cantor to strike a more defiant tone: you don’t get politics. (I’m actually surprised that even Rush doesn’t see what is going on here)

Defiant tone might be red-meat for the ideological base, but it LOSES independents and conservative Democrats. Believe it or not, elections are popularity contests, and Cantor would be playing EXACTLY into Obama’s hand if he didn’t at least pretend to be seeking common ground.

Obama says all or nothing. Cantor tries to seize on any areas that are close enough that the House Republicans can pass a bill with the conservative version of those solutions, and gets to say, see, look how hard we tried to find common ground. We have passed a bill that incorporates much of what Obama proposed. If Obama now rejects what we passed out of hand, he is the one that doesn’t care about jobs, and his entire my-way-or-the-highway partisanship is why we can’t create jobs. It is political jujitsu, and it is very smart.

It all comes down to if Cantor really caves on principle. The base needs to be smart enough to recognize that a huge # of people are turned off by the political fights. I can’t tell you how often I hear the lament why can’t the politicians put their heads together and put aside partisanship and do what’s best for the country. Cantor is doing exactly the right thing to avoid presenting a tone that screams partisanship and plays right into the attacks Obama has been making against Republicans.

You can’t win elections by shedding 15% of the electorate just to rev up the people that are voting for you anyway. That is reality.

willamettevalley on September 16, 2011 at 4:46 PM