Did MLK Jr. dream of equal opportunity or equal results?

posted at 6:00 pm on August 28, 2011 by Tina Korbe

Forty-eight years ago today, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his unforgettably compelling “I Have a Dream” speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. Fittingly, his own memorial, newly finished and dynamic in design, was to have been dedicated today. Hurricane Irene interrupted that plan, but today still seems an appropriate day to honor the memory and explore the legacy of a towering leader of the Civil Rights movement, a man who stood as a symbol of peace and hope for so many.

The Heritage Foundation’s David Azerrad (a friend and former colleague!) explains why the question of how we remember MLK, Jr., is by no means an arbitrary one:

Martin Luther King is rightly remembered for his dream, first articulated on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial 48 years ago this Sunday, that the principles embodied in “the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence” would one day be vindicated and applied to all men, regardless of “the color of their skin.” Fewer remember that in the ensuing years before his untimely death in 1968, King gradually abandoned the dream of equal rights and sought instead “the realization of equality” through government redistribution of wealth.

How fitting, then, that the new Martin Luther King Memorial, unveiled Monday on the National Mall in Washington, DC, should stand between the Lincoln and FDR memorials—the former a tribute to the greatest champion of the Founders’ vision of equality, the latter a monument to the President who redefined rights and expanded the reach of government like no one else.

The location of the MLK Memorial testifies to the two incompatible conceptions of equality and rights that King, at different times, defended. In commemorating his legacy however, King’s earlier words and accomplishments should take precedence. …

King’s true legacy lies in his struggle for civil rights and in his defense of the American ideal of self-improvement through work. This is why we speak of “Martin Luther King’s Conservative Legacy,” of  “The Conservative Virtues of Dr. Martin Luther King” and of “King’s Conservative Mind.”

As Azerrad rightly points out, King’s two conceptions of equality and rights — one rooted in the desire for the risky freedom of self-government, one rooted in the desire for the unearned security of an entitlement system — are incompatible. As one expands, the other contracts. The battle between those two conceptions rages today — and who takes what side has nothing to do with race or creed. To choose the former is to express the desire to “let freedom ring” from every mountainside of America — that desire so eloquently, so unremittingly, so achingly expressed in that speech Dr. King delivered so many years ago today.

Will we be a free people, willing to forsake the treats falsely promised us by politicians? Will we be a free people, willing to work hard to live content on the fruits of our labors? Will we be a free people, respectful of the rights and personhood of others, generous to a fault with those in need, knowing the time will come when we ourselves will need something of others?

For in the end, this great experiment of self-government that has characterized our country from the Constitutional Convention of 1787 (and even before that!) depends for its success on the willingness of each of us, quite simply, to govern ourselves. King asked for “dignity and discipline” from his listeners — and it’s what we need a little more of today, too. The discipline he spoke of was self-discipline — and it’s what will free us from the prison of looking to the government for every last little solution.

When this happens, we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:

Free at last! Free at last! Thank God almighty, we are free at last!

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Did you know his family charged the government $800K to use his image and quotes?

Disgusting.

ramrants on August 28, 2011 at 6:03 PM

Made in China by free folks.

Limerick on August 28, 2011 at 6:04 PM

He looks like Mao.

Blake on August 28, 2011 at 6:08 PM

King would be reviled by democrats today, he wanted equality for all and for all to sit at the same table together, that sentiment became anathema to the left not long after king was assassinated.

Speakup on August 28, 2011 at 6:11 PM

Why’s he white? Isn’t that a insult to our president?

Tommy_G on August 28, 2011 at 6:13 PM

King would be reviled by democrats today, he wanted equality for all and for all to sit at the same table together, that sentiment became anathema to the left not long after king was assassinated.

Speakup on August 28, 2011 at 6:11 PM

Then. why do blacks still worship him and still vote Democrat? Seems a paradox, if what you say is true.

a capella on August 28, 2011 at 6:16 PM

In London, “Free at Last” means something else

RBMN on August 28, 2011 at 6:17 PM

Will we be a free people, willing to forsake the treats

Will we be a free people, … generous to a fault with those in need,

Don’t many of the “treats” you’re referencing account to being generous with those in need? I understand your first statement was meant to ensure that things like “welfare” no longer see the light of day, but aren’t there people in legitimate need receiving things like food stamps?

ernesto on August 28, 2011 at 6:18 PM

Equal rights or equal results? I do not know. Perhaps his view changed over time. Perhaps he felt that one would lead to the other.

But this I do know:

His monument makes him look like Han Solo.

But at least he resembled his future monument; The Washington Monument looks nothing like George Washington.

apostic on August 28, 2011 at 6:19 PM

But at least he resembled his future monument; The Washington Monument looks nothing like George Washington.

apostic on August 28, 2011 at 6:19 PM

Not according to Martha.

Limerick on August 28, 2011 at 6:20 PM

King would be labelled a racist by brutha Jesse and brutha Al for suggesting colored people should do for themselves.

BobMbx on August 28, 2011 at 6:21 PM

But at least he resembled his future monument; The Washington Monument looks nothing like George Washington.

apostic on August 28, 2011 at 6:19 PM

Not according to Martha.

Limerick on August 28, 2011 at 6:20 PM

BobMbx on August 28, 2011 at 6:22 PM

“In the making of history, God uses some very strange and inappropriate creatures.” – General Vladimir, from Smiley’s People by John le Carré

Knott Buyinit on August 28, 2011 at 6:24 PM

He looks like Mao.

Blake

What would you expect? Made in China!

honsy on August 28, 2011 at 6:29 PM

If MLK is alive today, there is even chance that he continues to live up to the mythical standard we created for a martyr or he behaves like another Al Sharpton.

bayview on August 28, 2011 at 6:30 PM

What the government “gives you”, the government can “take away from you”.

GarandFan on August 28, 2011 at 6:30 PM

I believe the Chinese vendor from MASH made the statue in his likeness.

trs on August 28, 2011 at 6:40 PM

Don’t many of the “treats” you’re referencing account to being generous with those in need? I understand your first statement was meant to ensure that things like “welfare” no longer see the light of day, but aren’t there people in legitimate need receiving things like food stamps?

ernesto on August 28, 2011 at 6:18 PM

http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/275679/desperation-deprivation-myth-mark-steyn#

a capella on August 28, 2011 at 6:40 PM

MADE IN CHINA.

maineconservative on August 28, 2011 at 6:41 PM

Made in China

 

 

*snicker*

FlatFoot on August 28, 2011 at 6:44 PM

Who cares?

MLK’s tactics legitimized and romantized mob rule and lawbreaking. And this legacy persists.

Now every tranny who wants to use the ladies room thinks s/he’s Rosa Parks. Everyone with a half-baked victim story just has to say the magic words “Martin Luther King” and everybody shuts up, because they don’t want to be on the wrong side of history.

Is America really a better place for all the glamorized chaos of the Civil Rights Movement, and the bitter resentments that persist to this day because of it.

Desegregation was making its way (truly) peacefully through the courts. Yes it was slow. If I was black and American I’d have been ticked off.

But in hindsight, is it really a great idea to idolize a man who inadvertently made it ok to break the law.

And then there’s the adultery, and the plagiarism.

ConservativeTalkRadio on August 28, 2011 at 6:44 PM

ha. i shoulda refreshed comments first.

but just goes to show that great minds think alike ;)

FlatFoot on August 28, 2011 at 6:45 PM

Then. why do blacks still worship him and still vote Democrat? Seems a paradox, if what you say is true.

a capella on August 28, 2011 at 6:16 PM

If you really want an answer to that question, I will answer it for you. But I suggest you do some research first.

BierManVA on August 28, 2011 at 6:50 PM

ConservativeTalkRadio on August 28, 2011 at 6:44 PM

Lots of nonsense. King did use the courts. He and the NAACP appealed the conviction of Rosa Parks to the Supreme Court and won. In the mean time they boycotted the Montgomery buses (google Montgomery Improvement Association) which is perfectly legal. Even in the Selma March King stopped when an injunction was issued by a segregationist judge (google Turn Around Tuesday). The sit ins were more SNCC than the SCLC. If he was arrested as in Albany, it was for exercising the rights of any American to peacefully assemble and petition their government for redress of greivances.

King was a lefty in foreign policy and economic policy. That became more prominent in the later years when he had the bread marches and protested Vietnam. It’s hard to say what he would think of Obama, but I think he’d probably support high taxes and social welfare spending. King was not the whole of the Civil Rights movement. James Meredith, who integrated Ole Miss, is right wing/libertarian. He worked as a staffer for Jesse Helms. Roy Wilkins was a prominent anti-Communist. The movement had divergent points of view.

Ted Torgerson on August 28, 2011 at 6:59 PM

Then. why do blacks still worship him and still vote Democrat? Seems a paradox, if what you say is true.

a capella on August 28, 2011 at 6:16 PM

Walking around money and lifestyle payment checks on the government’s largesse… The Plantation Party has perfected it since LBJ’s Great Society…

Khun Joe on August 28, 2011 at 7:13 PM

a capella on August 28, 2011 at 6:16 PM

JFK is revered by Dems too but he wouldn’t make it today’s highly Marxist liberal party either.

The Dems have not walked but run to the left since the sixties.

Its the neo com indoctrination, no American would have been thought of as anything but a Soviet sympathizer if they talked like this President does daily 50 years ago or not even that long.

Speakup on August 28, 2011 at 7:18 PM

MLK’s memory has been exploited and debased. And that is one really horrible monument.

curved space on August 28, 2011 at 7:24 PM

I believe that MLK was a humble Hero.

He was inspiring; he was encouraging. He was brave. He was forthright. He was a man of purpose and Integrity. He was a man who empowered people of all walks of life to better themselves through personal empowerment.

Much to Obama’s chagrin.

Key West Reader on August 28, 2011 at 7:30 PM

BierManVA on August 28, 2011 at 6:50 PM

Help me out.

a capella on August 28, 2011 at 7:30 PM

Actually, the statue of King is very beautiful and very well conceived.

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 7:31 PM

MLK’s memory has been exploited and debased. And that is one really horrible monument.

curved space on August 28, 2011 at 7:24 PM

Obama wanted a 30 foot statue devoted to him. He’ll never get it. The best ObaMichelle can hope for is .. eh.
Nothing.

Key West Reader on August 28, 2011 at 7:31 PM

Actually, the statue of King is very beautiful and very well conceived.

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 7:31 PM

It is, but it’s 30 feet tall and made in China. I’m not sure what MLK would say.

All I know, is that his dream came true; little black girls and little black boys enjoy going to school with little white girls and little white boys. His dream was achieved.

Until Obama came along with is ACORN buddies and his community agitator agenda; his rip America to Her Seams agenda and tear her apart. The Obama Agenda has failed. Hear the door slam.

Key West Reader on August 28, 2011 at 7:35 PM

Well, if King was a socialist, he has received my praise for the very last time.

csdeven on August 28, 2011 at 7:37 PM

Key West Reader on August 28, 2011 at 7:35 PM

I agree. And I’m not sure about it’s palcement either. But the symbolism of it fits King and his life to a tee. And his face is beautifully rendered. It’s just a beautiful piece of art.

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 7:38 PM

Obama wanted a 30 foot statue devoted to him. He’ll never get it. The best ObaMichelle can hope for is .. eh.
Nothing.

Key West Reader on August 28, 2011 at 7:31 PM

A Chia head from Walgreen’s?

slickwillie2001 on August 28, 2011 at 7:41 PM

We’re only as free as we are independent.

beatcanvas on August 28, 2011 at 7:52 PM

MJK whole thing about judging people by the character of their heart and not the color of their skin has been completely rejected by Democrats and liberals today. Of course, they never really embraced it to begin with.

JellyToast on August 28, 2011 at 7:57 PM

Newsbusters

At a ceremony to honor the opening of the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in our nation’s capital Friday, the late civil rights leader’s daughter Bernice made an historical error that would evoke tremendous ridicule and derision if she were a conservative.

BERNICE KING: But as I close, I close with the recognition that daddy is standing, Lincoln is seated. Lincoln remembered for signing the Declaration of Independence. Daddy being remembered as standing up for truth and standing up for justice and standing up for righteousness and standing up for peace and standing up for freedom. Daddy is now standing on the National Mall in our nation’s capital.

Del Dolemonte on August 28, 2011 at 7:57 PM

I agree. And I’m not sure about it’s palcement either. But the symbolism of it fits King and his life to a tee. And his face is beautifully rendered. It’s just a beautiful piece of art.

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 7:38 PM

It is. I, personally believe that MLK would have wanted something smaller as a monument.

What MLK acheived was something huge. He was so brave, unafraid, thoughtful, forceful and articulate. MLK liberated the black population. Obama re-enslaved them at the hands of the DNC.

I challenge DWS of the DNC to pair “Obama” to MLK. There is no comparison.

Key West Reader on August 28, 2011 at 8:00 PM

Actually, the statue of King is very beautiful and very well conceived.

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 7:31 PM

A matter of opinion for sure, after all it’s “art” and there are no agreed-upon criteria these days. But the conception is simple-minded. The attached-to-a-slice-of-emerging-mountain idea is barely worthy of a middle-schooler. No offense meant to middle-school sculptors everywhere. And in execution it looks like a joke. The figure itself looks more like Eddie Murphy than any image of the man I can google. Being attached to the rock like that implies that he was rigid rather than stolid. And in his famous speech, if that’s what the artist was riffing on, he referred to a mountaintop not a mountainside. He didn’t say “We have some difficult days ahead. But it really doesn’t matter to me now, because I have been attached to the mountainside. And I don’t mind.” Maybe something was lost in translation. The color of the rock has been mentioned as an objection but it may actually be pretty close to his skin tone. Neither-here-nor-there but the stone drawing attention to color without somehow echoing the man’s stated goal of racial harmony is a failure. And so making a representational figure at all may be a wrong choice. The one inadvertent truth the artist may have hit on with that emerging business is that, yes, MLK’s ghost is rolled out anytime a politician (of any race) feels like hammering his/her audience with racial guilt. In that interpretation, then yes, it’s a success.

curved space on August 28, 2011 at 8:10 PM

Yes, Lincoln signed the Declaration of Independence in huge letters:

JOHN HANCOCK

BobMbx on August 28, 2011 at 8:14 PM

curved space on August 28, 2011 at 8:10 PM

That’s the great thing about art, isn’t it?

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 8:24 PM

Newsbusters

At a ceremony to honor the opening of the new Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in our nation’s capital Friday, the late civil rights leader’s daughter Bernice made an historical error that would evoke tremendous ridicule and derision if she were a conservative.

BERNICE KING: But as I close, I close with the recognition that daddy is standing, Lincoln is seated. Lincoln remembered for signing the Declaration of Independence. Daddy being remembered as standing up for truth and standing up for justice and standing up for righteousness and standing up for peace and standing up for freedom. Daddy is now standing on the National Mall in our nation’s capital.

Del Dolemonte on August 28, 2011 at 7:57 PM

That would be a neat trick, seeing how the Declaration of Independence, was ratified in July 4, 1776. Abraham Lincoln wasn’t born until February 12, 1809. SMILE.

Dr Evil on August 28, 2011 at 9:00 PM

I agree. And I’m not sure about it’s palcement either. But the symbolism of it fits King and his life to a tee. And his face is beautifully rendered. It’s just a beautiful piece of art.

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 7:38 PM

You think so? I don’t think it looks like him at all. It looks like something out of the USSR or China. I can’t stand it.

Missy on August 28, 2011 at 9:01 PM

Sadly MLK would be right at the front of the line like Jackson and Sharpton.

He would probably be impressed that Jackson smeared MLKs blood on Jacksons shirt.

MLK was a human not a Saint.

PappyD61 on August 28, 2011 at 9:05 PM

This is what we are up against folks: Electricity Was Free In Africa

There’s a reason the progs want to control K-12 yet don’t want to fix it, and this is the reason.

slickwillie2001 on August 28, 2011 at 9:16 PM

Missy on August 28, 2011 at 9:01 PM

Like I said above, that’s the great thing about art.

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 9:38 PM

MLK probably wanted equal results deep down…but was realistic enough to demand equal opportunity.

Uncle Sams Nephew on August 28, 2011 at 9:45 PM

He was an admitted socialist with several communist connections….not much different than the current resident of the White House. His image has been sanitized for many years and several of my fellow conservatives just don’t want to profess exactly what he stood for…. he was a radical left winger.

Big Orange on August 28, 2011 at 9:46 PM

Did MLK Jr. dream of equal opportunity or equal results?

He was wise enough to realize that absent the former, the latter is impossible. Present the former, the latter becomes possible.

To this day he is right.

Fewer remember that in the ensuing years before his untimely death in 1968, King gradually abandoned the dream of equal rights and sought instead “the realization of equality” through government redistribution of wealth.

Nowhere in this book does the phrase ‘redistribute wealth’ occur. With respect to equality he seems to be speaking to equality of opportunity.

For the vast majority of white Americans, the past decade-the first phase-had been a struggle to treat the Negro with a degree of decency, not of equality. White America was ready to demand the Negro be spared the lash of brutality and course degradation, but it had never been truly committed to helping him out of poverty, exploitation or all forms of discrimination.

As Azerrad rightly points out, King’s two conceptions of equality and rights — one rooted in the desire for the risky freedom of self-government, one rooted in the desire for the unearned security of an entitlement system — are incompatible.

Azerrad does rightly point out that self government and an entitlement system are polar opposites. However, he failed to link King’s conception of equality as the desire for the unearned security of an entitlement system.

rukiddingme on August 28, 2011 at 10:49 PM

We can only guess what Martin Luther King, Jr. would think about todays Democrats. Blacks today, have the same complaints they had in the 60′s. The Democrats have successfully entrapped them on the liberal plantation and have their votes locked down so why solve any problems. If you solve problems, people don’t really need you any more, they can vote for whoever they want.

I have no clue what Martin Luther King, Jr. believed, outside of the speeches I’ve read, but I do know he wanted results and the Democratic Party has not delivered results. I believe, had he lived, he would have been appalled that the Democrats were still getting votes, and accomplishing nothing. The token victories weren’t designed to make blacks more prosperous and more independent, the programs of the Democrats destroyed the black family and made them more dependent than ever on government.

Vote Republican and only be called a racist one more time.

bflat879 on August 28, 2011 at 10:52 PM

Who cares?

I do, for one. I am certain there are others.

MLK’s tactics legitimized and romantized mob rule and lawbreaking. And this legacy persists.

His mob was peaceful and broke the laws written by the mob that was not peaceful.

Now every tranny who wants to use the ladies room thinks s/he’s Rosa Parks. Everyone with a half-baked victim story just has to say the magic words “Martin Luther King” and everybody shuts up, because they don’t want to be on the wrong side of history.

Was not aware every tranny thinks they are Rosa Parks.

Nevertheless, if one is on the wrong side of history, it is probably best to shut up.

Is America really a better place for all the glamorized chaos of the Civil Rights Movement, and the bitter resentments that persist to this day because of it.

Since the bitter resentment lies at the feet of those yearning for the old days, the answer is yes.

Desegregation was making its way (truly) peacefully through the courts.

That must be the reason the courts upheld segregation as constitutional for nearly 100 years.

Yes it was slow.

Nearly 100 years slow.

If I was black and American I’d have been ticked off.

But you are not, so you were not. You seem to be ticked off now though.

But in hindsight, is it really a great idea to idolize a man who inadvertently made it ok to break the law.

Since he is not responsible for those that hijack his ideas to use for their own nefarious purposes, the answer is yes.

And then there’s the adultery, and the plagiarism.
ConservativeTalkRadio on August 28, 2011 at 6:44 PM

Because he was not a perfect human being his ideas and accomplishments are invalid. Got it.

rukiddingme on August 28, 2011 at 10:54 PM

Did you know his family charged the government $800K to use his image and quotes?

Did not. Thanks for the information.

Disgusting.

ramrants on August 28, 2011 at 6:03 PM

Agreed. They should have charged 10 times that amount.

rukiddingme on August 28, 2011 at 10:56 PM

As Azerrad rightly points out, King’s two conceptions of equality and rights — one rooted in the desire for the risky freedom of self-government, one rooted in the desire for the unearned security of an entitlement system — are incompatible.

Did MLK Jr. dream of equal opportunity or equal results?

The more important question: who cares? MLK is not any authority on…anything, really, except the evils of racism.

This is no slight on the man, who is not responsible for his own sainthood and the mantle of infallibility foisted on him by the secular sophomores and the pathetic flower children who lionized the Kennedys.

Suffice it to say that that MLK was not born of a virgin, nor was his coming accompanied by favorable celestial signs, nor was very much of his life auspiciously lived. He deserves respect for his stirring dissertations, but he would not have made a very good political leader, much less an expert on any concrete topic (a much higher threshold than political leader).

Trying to reclaim MLK for conservatism is no less foolish than canonizing him. Of course he would be a liberal if he were alive today. Then again, he would probably also be a kook. Blessings often go unappreciated.

HitNRun on August 28, 2011 at 11:34 PM

Agreed. They should have charged 10 times that amount.

rukiddingme on August 28, 2011 at 10:56 PM

You believe his family should have been paid almost a million bucks for the nation to immortalize him in stone and put him on the National Mall?

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 11:47 PM

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 11:47 PM

Scratch that, 8 million?

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 11:48 PM

Because he was not a perfect human being his ideas and accomplishments are invalid. Got it.

rukiddingme on August 28, 2011 at 10:54 PM

Whiny and bitchy is way to go through life, Race Card. I like your new name, though.

King was a mess and discredited himself in many ways, not the least of which was his later years slide into the sewer of wealth redistribution on the basis of skin color. He also toyed with Marxism, the other favorite hiding place of black victimhood, in addition to being a general fraud as a “minister” and a serial adulterer, or as you would have it — “not a perfect human being”.

His great speech was, indeed, great, but it apparently made a passionate call for something he didn’t actually want — freedom from the slavery of racial bonds. And learning about his intellectual failure helps me understand why so few blacks of this era think anything about his “dream” that one day we will all be judged by the content of our character and not the color of our skin.

It would seem that all involved would much rather be judged by the color of their skin. No, thanks.

Jaibones on August 29, 2011 at 12:15 AM

Is it finished? What about that big ole stone on his back?

p40tiger on August 29, 2011 at 12:18 AM

Star Parker always good

Schadenfreude on August 29, 2011 at 1:30 AM

The fact that a Maoist artist was commissioned to make the statue, and it sure looks like Mao’s with MLK’s head, s/b the eternal shame for the U.S.

Sorry MLK that you have to weep from your grave about your land.

Obama is achieving the reverse of what you fought for.

Schadenfreude on August 29, 2011 at 1:32 AM

ernesto on August 28, 2011 at 6:18 PM

When over 50% pay zero taxes and receive returns, when 44 million are on one or the other dole, the country is hardly free, and went to hell a while ago.

Wake up!

Schadenfreude on August 29, 2011 at 1:34 AM

The day Martin Luthor King, Jr. died is the day the civil rights movement stopped being about individual rights, and started being about racial vengeance.

And it’s just a tiny bit impossible to believe that was a coincidence.

logis on August 29, 2011 at 2:11 AM

What the government “gives you”, the government can “take away from you”.

GarandFan on August 28, 2011 at 6:30 PM

Actuall, what the government gives you, has already been taken from someone else.

Larr
USN – Ret

Larr on August 29, 2011 at 6:30 AM

Larr on August 29, 2011 at 6:30 AM

Stealing that.

hawkdriver on August 29, 2011 at 6:48 AM

Dr. Martin Luther King had a dream for equality of opportunity, not of outcomes. He knew that given equal access and opportunity the Black Community could be successful as the White had been. This Welfare State would be most offensives to him. It is sad that after forty-eight years we are still at this stage of the game.

old war horse on August 29, 2011 at 7:06 AM

Larr on August 29, 2011 at 6:30 A

That is going right next to my Kinky Friedman/Obama/pantyhose bumper sticker.

Extrafishy on August 29, 2011 at 7:15 AM

Dr. King will always be a polarizing figure, but his human failings shouldn’t totally discount the good he tried to do. I will cling to the good, not to excuse the negative, but to build on the positive. This should be true of any man who has fallen short of the greatness of God. Remember that the monument is to the ideal, not the man.

SKYFOX on August 29, 2011 at 7:49 AM

It’s just a beautiful piece of art.

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 7:38 PM

Usually I’m on the same page w/u on everything, but I see this statue as gaudy, and tacky both in it’s size and supposed “deep” meaning.

With his arms crossed he looks like a stern commie erected to oversee the peasants working in the fields ensuring rice on the collective table. King, as described to me by Dick Gregory, would have been a more open arms kinda guy.

This statue looks like a 1/2 finished Mao piece this dude had laying around in his marble yard when funding dried up, so he just put a fro on it to cut his losses and now he’s snickering at the scam he pulled.

To me it represents everything about libs today: overpriced, half thought through, graceless,unfinished,(seriously, lop that big chunk of rock off his hind side) mcMansioned just to draw attention (it’s the UN HQ of statues), classless, and “made in China”.

Just my opinion though.

Alden Pyle on August 29, 2011 at 8:01 AM

Honestly, it looks like one of those former Stalin or Lenin statues over in Red Square…

Very unimpressive…

PatriotRider on August 29, 2011 at 8:10 AM

His ideals do live on..they form the SEIU!

shov74 on August 29, 2011 at 9:22 AM

You believe his family should have been paid almost a million bucks for the nation to immortalize him in stone and put him on the National Mall?

hawkdriver on August 28, 2011 at 11:47 PM

Of course not, hawkdriver.

I was being sarcastic in attempting to convey my disagreement with ramrants disgust.

rukiddingme on August 29, 2011 at 10:50 AM

Just my opinion though.

Alden Pyle on August 29, 2011 at 8:01 AM

Mine too. I say we continue to leave the disageement to art then.

rukiddingme on August 29, 2011 at 10:50 AM

Got me hook, line and sinker.

hawkdriver on August 29, 2011 at 3:00 PM

He looks like Mao.

Blake on August 28, 2011 at 6:08 PM

The Chicom sculptor obviously just recycled an old Mao plinth by recarving the face to look vaguely like MLK glaring fiercely down upon the Long March Selma.

profitsbeard on August 29, 2011 at 4:17 PM

I’ve been reading some reviews and folks are really split. The ones who do not like the statue cite some of the very things a lot of you have said are reasons you don’t particularly like it.

hawkdriver on August 29, 2011 at 7:21 PM