Did video really kill the radio star?

posted at 12:40 pm on August 1, 2011 by Jazz Shaw

One of the most easily overlooked anniversaries in the midst of all the sound and fury over the debt fight is doubtless this one. It passed at precisely one minute past midnight, eastern standard time. Thirty years ago from that moment, MTV took to the air for the first time and their premiere offering – doubtless intended as a preemptive declaration of victory – was Video Killed the Radio Star by The Buggles.

For better or worse, it launched a new era in entertainment which quickly became an obsession in American culture. DJs had previously been able to hide behind microphones, often in lonely broadcast towers up on hilltops. If you ever saw them at all, it was likely just a press release head shot photo, possibly from their earlier, golden days. It didn’t matter if they were older, fat, balding or wearing a grease stained t-shirt. So long as the voice was right, they determined the fate of musicians across the land. (At least until the payola scandals hit.)

With the launch of MTV, a new generation of VJs became the fascination of young music fans. They had to be bright, glossy and dressed in the hippest way possible. (And now I just realized that nobody says “hip” any more. Dear God, I’ve gotten old.) But that craze just didn’t have the legs of the radio stars they sought to replace. While preparing this column I realized that I couldn’t recall the name of a single one of the original VJs except that there were two girls with the same name. (Don’t bother Googling it. They were Julie Brown and “Downtown” Julie Brown.)

In the end, MTV and their later competitor VH1 seemed to fall by the wayside, choosing to hitch their wagons to an endless stream of reality shows and other pop culture pablum. One frequent joke among folks of my age group includes the phrase, “back when MTV still played music videos.”

But what really killed these entertainment delivery systems, along with many others, was the endless march of technology. The audience is not only fickle, but they have grown into an instant gratification society. They want to hear the songs they’re craving now, not when some DJ or VJ chooses to play them. And with MP3 technology and the entire musical history of man available for download, storage and delivery into their ear buds, there is no need for entertainment gatekeepers any longer.

But let’s look back, either with nostalgia or nausea. (Your choice.) Here’s the music video that started it all.

EDIT: Yes, the originally posted video was a later version. The horror may now end. Here’s the original.

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Comment pages: 1 2

things change

rob verdi on August 1, 2011 at 12:42 PM

Uh….did I accidentally wander into E-Entertainment.com? What is this?

Bishop on August 1, 2011 at 12:44 PM

mtv is satan.

peacenprosperity on August 1, 2011 at 12:44 PM

Best thing about early MTV was the Saturday night concerts.

Mark1971 on August 1, 2011 at 12:44 PM

WTH has happened to HA?

d1carter on August 1, 2011 at 12:46 PM

Thanks for the mind-worm, Jazz!
///
Btw:I like to tell the ‘kids’(especially the members of Generation Whiiiine) in my family that I’m old enough to remember when MTV actually played music.

annoyinglittletwerp on August 1, 2011 at 12:46 PM

My Momma says MTV be the Debil.

coldwarrior on August 1, 2011 at 12:47 PM

Uh….did I accidentally wander into E-Entertainment.com? What is this?

Bishop on August 1, 2011 at 12:44 PM

it’s a fun post that takes me back to my ‘yoot’.
Lighten up…please.

annoyinglittletwerp on August 1, 2011 at 12:48 PM

Second videos for $200, Alex.

Who was Pat Benatar, You Better Run?

Everyone knows the Buggles…

And, I thought Martha Quinn and Nina something or other were original VJs… (To the Google!)

Fallon on August 1, 2011 at 12:48 PM

While preparing this column I realized that I couldn’t recall the name of a single one of the original VJs except that there were two girls with the same name. (Don’t bother Googling it. They were Julie Brown and “Downtown” Julie Brown.)

Neither Brown was an orginal VJ you putz. MTV sucks major a$$ these days, but anyone growing up then does not forget Martha Quinn.

NotCoach on August 1, 2011 at 12:48 PM

Rush Limbaugh also celebrated the 23 anniversary of his national radio show today, so no, video didn’t kill the radio star.

zmdavid on August 1, 2011 at 12:48 PM

Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes (the Buggles) are still going strong. Downes is playing keyboards for “YES” and Horn, a top producer, produced YES’s newly released album “Fly From Here.”

Video didn’t “kill” those two off.

Mojave Mark on August 1, 2011 at 12:49 PM

Allegedly….

ErnstBlofeld on August 1, 2011 at 12:49 PM

WTH has happened to HA?
d1carter on August 1, 2011 at 12:46 PM

Come on now, this is important stuff.

Next up: “Sunbather run over by lifeguard”, complete with a link to the Daytona Beach News Journal.

Bishop on August 1, 2011 at 12:50 PM

My Momma says MTV be the Debil.

coldwarrior on August 1, 2011 at 12:47 PM

The first time this video came on MTV, MY momma was cooing over how cute the monster was. *sigh*

annoyinglittletwerp on August 1, 2011 at 12:50 PM

Funny, I was watching them, followed by these guys yesterday; the latter being very influential on MTV right from the outset.

For all of you sweating it out watching the debt-debacle details last night, I want you to know that it was hot at the show. My shared sacrifice. And my camera is kinda crappy, so sorry for the image quality.

BKeyser on August 1, 2011 at 12:52 PM

NotCoach on August 1, 2011 at 12:48 PM

I can remember the original VJ’s for VH1:
Jon Bowman(Bowser)
Scott Shannon(Meee-OW!)
Frankie Crocker
And…Don Imus.

annoyinglittletwerp on August 1, 2011 at 12:54 PM

Best thing about early MTV was the Saturday night concerts.

Mark1971 on August 1, 2011 at 12:44 PM

HD Net has Concerts all day on Sunday.

PrettyD_Vicious on August 1, 2011 at 12:54 PM

Now, now it’s good to have a thread like this, we’ve been on edge for weeks. And I see more tough weeks to come.

Cindy Munford on August 1, 2011 at 12:55 PM

And this little number was cutting edge computer graphics…

Still has the most recognized opening guitar rif ever.

coldwarrior on August 1, 2011 at 12:57 PM

I can remember the original VJ’s for VH1:
Jon Bowman(Bowser)
Scott Shannon(Meee-OW!)
Frankie Crocker
And…Don Imus.

annoyinglittletwerp on August 1, 2011 at 12:54 PM

And. . .Rosie O’Donnell, when she was actually cute, curvy and funny.

Gottafang on August 1, 2011 at 12:58 PM

Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes (the Buggles) are still going strong. Downes is playing keyboards for “YES” and Horn, a top producer, produced YES’s newly released album “Fly From Here.”

Video didn’t “kill” those two off.

Mojave Mark on August 1, 2011 at 12:49 PM

Amen.

You are absolutely right on about Downes and Horn. They are the genuine article, and masters in their own right.

As for today’s generation, the starving musician has given way to American Idol. Sexualized divas and gangsta goons have the Radio stars not rocking, but rolling over in their graves.

singlemalt 18 on August 1, 2011 at 1:00 PM

The original five VJs were:

Mark Goodman
Alan Hunter
Nina Blackwood
J.J. Jackson
Martha Quinn

The two Julie Browns didn’t show up until later. And no, I’m not proud that I remember any of this.

Jim Treacher on August 1, 2011 at 1:02 PM

Don’t think that was the actual video – that looks like a TV appearance.

I remember a really weird video that played on all the “music video” stations..

Still like the tune!

Tim_CA on August 1, 2011 at 1:03 PM

I always hated that song. Lame.

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:03 PM

Let’s give credit where credit is due, even for something as empty and vapid as the music video.

It was the pioneering work of former Monkees Michael Nesmith and his early groundbreaking cable show POP CLIPS that ushered in the era of music videos, NOT MTV or VH1.

Long before MTV was even thought about, Nesmith and POP CLIPS was introducing music videos to the public, as well as producing some of Nesmith’s own groundbreaking video projects.

If anything, MTV, and VH1, not to mention who knows how many music artists, owe a debt to Michael Nesmith and the work he did.

pilamaye on August 1, 2011 at 1:04 PM

I didn’t know MTV still existed. I know they stopped showing videos many years ago.

Vashta.Nerada on August 1, 2011 at 1:04 PM

Let’s face it. Pop music has been crap for a long time now.

trigon on August 1, 2011 at 1:04 PM

Still has the most recognized opening guitar rif ever.

coldwarrior on August 1, 2011 at 12:57 PM

No, that would be Smoke on the Water or Whole Lotta Love. JMO

Deanna on August 1, 2011 at 1:06 PM

Video KILLED the radio star??? The Buggles, please report to your local DOJ Branch Office for violation of Incivility Code 3a(II)5 Part C.

The Mega Independent on August 1, 2011 at 1:06 PM

The first video I ever saw on MTV? Blue Oyster Cult’s Burnin’ For You.

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:07 PM

The “Julie Brown’s” weren’t originals. You’d have to go back to Martha Quinn, Kurt Loder and… ack, I don’t remember – I can picture a few other faces but can’t come up with the names.

Midas on August 1, 2011 at 1:07 PM

I was in the Air Force and stationed in Japan at that time. I came back to the US on leave. When I walked into the terminal at McChord Air Force Base (near Seattle) they had MTV on in the passenger lounge. My first thought was “what the hell is that?”

Has it really been 30 years? Dang I’m old.

Mangy Scot on August 1, 2011 at 1:07 PM

Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes (the Buggles) are still going strong. Downes is playing keyboards for “YES” and Horn, a top producer, produced YES’s newly released album “Fly From Here.”

Video didn’t “kill” those two off.

Mojave Mark on August 1, 2011 at 12:49 PM

Trevor Horn was also a founding member of my favorite 1980′s Nouveau House group, “Art of Noise.”

gryphon202 on August 1, 2011 at 1:07 PM

Ah, for the days when the sight of Rosie on VH1 did not induce the urge to wretch.

Crusader on August 1, 2011 at 1:08 PM

Don’t think that was the actual video – that looks like a TV appearance.

Tim_CA on August 1, 2011 at 1:03 PM

Holy crap on a stick, you’re right. Jazz even got the video worng.

NotCoach on August 1, 2011 at 1:08 PM

No, that would be Smoke on the Water or Whole Lotta Love. JMO

Deanna on August 1, 2011 at 1:06 PM

Or Deep Purple’s Lazy.

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:09 PM

I was addicted as anyone else to MTV in my teens/twenties. Maybe more than was healthy…

MTV’s time has come and gone. Youtube’s related videos bar finds me more of the music I like than MTV ever could, and if I want to listen to music on the go, I have Pandora on my phone and blip.fm on my computer, and Spotify will soon overtake them both.

MTV has done its job. Now it’s time for the internet to take over.

ExUrbanKevin on August 1, 2011 at 1:09 PM

THIS was the first video.

A neat trip down memory lane, though.

:)

DrAllecon on August 1, 2011 at 1:10 PM

If it hadn’t been for MTV, I’d have never heard of Haircut 101.

Sad, huh?

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:10 PM

Oops, I meant Haircut 100.

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:10 PM

Long before MTV was even thought about, Nesmith and POP CLIPS was introducing music videos to the public, as well as producing some of Nesmith’s own groundbreaking video projects.

If anything, MTV, and VH1, not to mention who knows how many music artists, owe a debt to Michael Nesmith and the work he did.

pilamaye on August 1, 2011 at 1:04 PM

Yep. And The Monkees whole show was really nothing but music videos, not to mention the Beatles movies.

Deanna on August 1, 2011 at 1:11 PM

I never liked MTV and I just never “got it.” However, as vids go this one seems to stand the test of time pretty well.

MJBrutus on August 1, 2011 at 1:12 PM

When Michael Jackson and rap took over, that was the end of MTV for me.

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:12 PM

Let’s face it. Pop music has been crap for a long time now.

trigon on August 1, 2011 at 1:04 PM

IMO pop music peaked in about 1976, well before videos.

Vashta.Nerada on August 1, 2011 at 1:13 PM

If you don’t like the post, DON’T READ IT. It should have been pretty obvious from the title or certainly the first couple of lines of text, what it was about.

BuzzCrutcher on August 1, 2011 at 1:13 PM

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:12 PM

When Rap and Hip-Hop took over I pretty much gave up on pop music in America.

coldwarrior on August 1, 2011 at 1:14 PM

If anything, MTV, and VH1, not to mention who knows how many music artists, owe a debt to Michael Nesmith and the work he did.

pilamaye on August 1, 2011 at 1:04 PM

I’ve been a big Nesmith fan for a long time, going back to the Monkees, and then his First National Band.

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:14 PM

Reality TV killed the video star …

matd on August 1, 2011 at 1:15 PM

Don’t think that was the actual video – that looks like a TV appearance.

Tim_CA on August 1, 2011 at 1:03 PM

Holy crap on a stick, you’re right. Jazz even got the video worng.

NotCoach on August 1, 2011 at 1:08 PM

It was way overplayed – all of the early vid’s were – there just wasn’t that much content around yet.

Must have seen “money for nothing” 5,000 times!!

Tim_CA on August 1, 2011 at 1:16 PM

IMO pop music peaked in about 1976, well before videos.

Vashta.Nerada on August 1, 2011 at 1:13 PM

Remember when you could listen to an AM station, and hear a rock song, a pop song, a soul or R&B tune, and a country crossover hit all in the same hour?

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:17 PM

Actually one of the better “music videos” was one I saw in the theater years ago, when I saw this film clip (the kind they showed in between double features) of the great Acker Bilk performing his classic “Stranger On the Shore” in a kind of surreal setting of him walking on the seashore playing his song while some lovely girl did a kind of ballet in the sand. As corny as it was back then, it was still Acker Bilk and it was still classic!

pilamaye on August 1, 2011 at 1:18 PM

Must have seen “money for nothing” 5,000 times!!

Tim_CA on August 1, 2011 at 1:16 PM

Yeah, I think that MTV made “Money for Nothing” a much bigger hit then it would have been without the station.

NotCoach on August 1, 2011 at 1:18 PM

Remember when you could listen to an AM station, and hear a rock song, a pop song, a soul or R&B tune, and a country crossover hit all in the same hour?

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:17 PM

LMAO!!

93 KHJ – Los Angeles

Those were the days!

Tim_CA on August 1, 2011 at 1:19 PM

Let’s give credit where credit is due, even for something as empty and vapid as the music video.

It was the pioneering work of former Monkees Michael Nesmith and his early groundbreaking cable show POP CLIPS that ushered in the era of music videos, NOT MTV or VH1.

Long before MTV was even thought about, Nesmith and POP CLIPS was introducing music videos to the public, as well as producing some of Nesmith’s own groundbreaking video projects.

If anything, MTV, and VH1, not to mention who knows how many music artists, owe a debt to Michael Nesmith and the work he did.

pilamaye on August 1, 2011 at 1:04 PM

+100

Major Mike Nesmith fan here.

rockmom on August 1, 2011 at 1:19 PM

Must have seen “money for nothing” 5,000 times!!

Tim_CA on August 1, 2011 at 1:16 PM

Remember the name of the fictional band in the video? Magyar.

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:19 PM

Or Deep Purple’s Lazy.

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:09 PM

Or Metallica’s Master of Puppets or to get really old Chuck Berry’s Johnny Be Good.

Deanna on August 1, 2011 at 1:19 PM

Remember when you could listen to an AM station, and hear a rock song, a pop song, a soul or R&B tune, and a country crossover hit all in the same hour?

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:17 PM

Yeah, and I also remember music with harmonies, breaks, and key changes. Those were the days.

Vashta.Nerada on August 1, 2011 at 1:19 PM

+100

Major Mike Nesmith fan here.

rockmom on August 1, 2011 at 1:19 PM

I ran right out and bought the Infinite Rider on The Big Dogma LP as soon as it came out.

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:21 PM

I remember the big blizzard in February 1983, when my roommate and I spent 3 days doing nothing but watching music videos on MTV. Those were the days!

rockmom on August 1, 2011 at 1:21 PM

Rap and other crappy music killed the radio star, not MTV.

rivlax on August 1, 2011 at 1:21 PM

things change

rob verdi on August 1, 2011 at 12:42 PM

Not so much. I think Lady Gaga was wearing the sunglasses from that video last week.

miConsevative on August 1, 2011 at 1:22 PM

Yeah, I think that MTV made “Money for Nothing” a much bigger hit then it would have been without the station.

NotCoach on August 1, 2011 at 1:18 PM

Of course my post is a bit dumb considering without MTV the song would have never been made.

NotCoach on August 1, 2011 at 1:23 PM

Rap and other crappy music killed the radio star, not MTV.

rivlax on August 1, 2011 at 1:21 PM

Which reminds me, why is the “C” silent in Crap Music?

Vashta.Nerada on August 1, 2011 at 1:23 PM

I’m old enough to remember when MTV actually played music.

annoyinglittletwerp on August 1, 2011 at 12:46 PM

I’m old enough to remember no MTV. Ahhh, the good ol’ days!

TugboatPhil on August 1, 2011 at 1:23 PM

Rock and Roll has been going downhill ever since Buddy Holly died.

John Milner

50sGuy on August 1, 2011 at 1:23 PM

I wanna get in Martha Quinn
I wanna be stuffin Martha’s muffin.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yPts1cPQRh8
Content warning for Mojo Nixon.

TABoLK on August 1, 2011 at 1:24 PM

Remember when you could listen to an AM station, and hear a rock song, a pop song, a soul or R&B tune, and a country crossover hit all in the same hour?

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:17 PM

Yeah, and I also remember music with harmonies, breaks, and key changes. Those were the days.

Vashta.Nerada on August 1, 2011 at 1:19 PM

When I was a kid-yoot FM was for music…but AM in Chicago ( Specifically WLS-AM) was reserved for this…

annoyinglittletwerp on August 1, 2011 at 1:25 PM

Martha Quinn

As they say at the HQ: I’ll be in my bunk.

That woman was the subject of many a school boy fantasy.

todler on August 1, 2011 at 1:26 PM

Remember when you could listen to an AM station, and hear a rock song, a pop song, a soul or R&B tune, and a country crossover hit all in the same hour?

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:17 PM

Yes, I can. Which is why having iTunes kicks the butt of MTV, Sirius/XM and everything else. I have my own radio station and it only plays the songs I want.

Mr. D on August 1, 2011 at 1:27 PM

Jim Treacher on August 1, 2011 at 1:02 PM

They’re all working for Sirius/XM on the 80s channel now. Judging from the voices, Martha Quinn hasn’t aged at all, and Nina Blackwood is either 600 years old or smokes five packs a day….

Ahhhhh nostalgia!

PetecminMd on August 1, 2011 at 1:27 PM

Uh….did I accidentally wander into E-Entertainment.com? What is this?

Bishop on August 1, 2011 at 12:44 PM

You’re right. How the hell did this make it on the main page? Headlines I could understand…but really – a whole post?

miConsevative on August 1, 2011 at 1:34 PM

TABoLK on August 1, 2011 at 1:24 PM

Mojo pretty much covered the waterfront when it came to 80s gals, e.g., his eternal classic “Debbie Gibson is Pregnant With My Two-Headed Love Child,” featuring Winona Ryder as la Gibson.

Mr. D on August 1, 2011 at 1:35 PM

And no, I’m not proud that I remember any of this.

Jim Treacher on August 1, 2011 at 1:02 PM

We shouldn’t be.

I wasted so much of my life watching MTV and its equivelants.

For what it’s worth, today’s pop music is 10x worse.

Kids, learn music theory and appreciate music in all its glory. Bach, Brahms, Villa-Lobos, Armstrong, Coltrane, Ellington are timeless. I could name a hundred others.

shick on August 1, 2011 at 1:38 PM

It was the pioneering work of former Monkees Michael Nesmith and his early groundbreaking cable show POP CLIPS

All I remember about that was a cool Nesmith song about Lucy, Ramona and Sunset Sam.

tommyboy on August 1, 2011 at 1:41 PM

First Jazz laments the end of cursive writing and now this?

Good lord, get a grip man.

The Chewbacca Defense on August 1, 2011 at 1:47 PM

Those were the days!

Tim_CA on August 1, 2011 at 1:19 PM

Here in Dallas it was Gordon McLendon’s The Mighty 1190 – KLIF. It got me hooked on Motown.

The weirdest song I ever heard on there? D.O.A., by Bloodrock. I still have the 45rpm KLIF extended version, with extra sirens. Creepy.

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:48 PM

You forgot Martha?…

Gohawgs on August 1, 2011 at 1:48 PM

All I remember about that was a cool Nesmith song about Lucy, Ramona and Sunset Sam.

tommyboy on August 1, 2011 at 1:41 PM

Sam was selling watches from a TV tray…

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:49 PM

Good Lord! This may be the first SONG played on MTV, but it isn’t the first video. None of the first VJs were named Julie. The females were Martha Quinn and Nina Sossaman. And I thought I still carried some residual effects from all the drugs i did back then!

The original Buggles video as shown on MTV:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hiJ9AnNz47Y

Storybec on August 1, 2011 at 1:52 PM

Meh. FM radio died with the first Journey airplay.
I’m pretty sure it was ‘Rock the Boat’ killed AM radio.

bloviator on August 1, 2011 at 1:55 PM

1st, the Buggles then Pat!!!!

Gohawgs on August 1, 2011 at 1:55 PM

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:48 PM

Some of the best songs on the Motown Label came during the evolution of R&B into Funk.

That era’s Motown stood up perfectly with the Rock / Pop songs of the day.

Lot of cross-over back then.

Tim_CA on August 1, 2011 at 1:55 PM

Still has the most recognized opening guitar rif ever.

coldwarrior on August 1, 2011 at 12:57 PM

No, that would be Smoke on the Water or Whole Lotta Love. JMO

Deanna on August 1, 2011 at 1:06 PM

Satisfaction. No contest.

Missy on August 1, 2011 at 1:55 PM

Storybec on August 1, 2011 at 1:52 PM

That’s it!

Told Ya!!

Tim_CA on August 1, 2011 at 1:56 PM

Before MTV went on the air, one of the cable movie channels (forget which one) used to run a show called “Video Concert Hall” just before they started running movies in the evening. This particular channel didn’t run 24/7 at the time.

The opening theme music for VCH was Led Zeppelin’s “Carouselambria” from their In Through The Out Door album. Some of those early videos were…weird.

flipflop on August 1, 2011 at 2:01 PM

The weirdest song I ever heard on there? D.O.A., by Bloodrock. I still have the 45rpm KLIF extended version, with extra sirens. Creepy.

Ward Cleaver on August 1, 2011 at 1:48 PM

I didn’t sleep well for a week after hearing that the first time.

Vashta.Nerada on August 1, 2011 at 2:02 PM

Satisfaction. No contest.

Missy on August 1, 2011 at 1:55 PM

Bingo!

50sGuy on August 1, 2011 at 2:04 PM

Oh, and this video by Split Enz was in heavy rotation on VCH at the time.

flipflop on August 1, 2011 at 2:04 PM

Music is as good as it ever has been, 90% is crap, 10% is good, that’s the way it has been forever. I have played pro for 35 yrs, so I listen to all sorts of musical styles including the Modern Rock/ Emo type stuff,90% crap 10% good,
YMMV
Bob

Bobnormal on August 1, 2011 at 2:05 PM

flipflop on August 1, 2011 at 2:04 PM

LMAO – Yep!!

Talk about a blast from the past.

Tim_CA on August 1, 2011 at 2:07 PM

Headbanger’s Ball is the only thing program that was ever worth watching on that channel.

revolutionismyname on August 1, 2011 at 2:08 PM

Remember when Hot Air had interesting posts that combined political issues of the day with humor? Good times…

rcpjr on August 1, 2011 at 2:09 PM

Remember when Hot Air had interesting posts that combined political issues of the day with humor? Good times…

rcpjr on August 1, 2011 at 2:09 PM

LMAO – Jazz got all of us “old-timers” reminiscing!

Tim_CA on August 1, 2011 at 2:12 PM

flipflop on August 1, 2011 at 2:01 PM

I thought I was the only human alive who remembered Video Concert Hall!!!

There is a tribute page here:

http://videoconcerthall.blogspot.com/

The first actual video I ever saw was at a booth at an entertainer’s convention in Charleston, SC way back in 1978. The little 13″ TV had such a crowd around it that you could rarely get a glimpse of the video… Met Loaf’s Bat Out of Hell.

Storybec on August 1, 2011 at 2:12 PM

Two other music videos are also featured within “Money for Nothing,” to correspond with the lyrics. The Hungarian pop band Első Emelet and their video “Állj Vagy Lövök”(“Stop or I’ll Shoot”) appears as “Baby, Baby” by “First Floor” during the second verse (The name “első emelet” translates to “first floor,” and the song is credited as being on “Magyar Records”: “Magyar” is the native name for Hungary). Első Emelet were extremely popular at the time in Hungary, although their videos might not have appeared on Music Television. The other is a fictional, supposed MTV video for “‘Sally’ by the Ian Pearson Band” (Pearson was one of the animators of the video) which also contains scenes shot in Budapest, Hungary, appearing during the third verse’s line about a female singer “stickin’ in the camera” and continuing as the singer comments on another performer “banging on the bongos like a chimpanzee.” The fictional album for the first video was listed as “Turn Left” and the second was “Hot Dogs.” For the second video, the record company appears as “Rush Records,” perhaps as a reference to Rushes Postproduction.

The Lone Platypus on August 1, 2011 at 2:13 PM

Trevor Horn and Geoff Downes (the Buggles) are still going strong. Downes is playing keyboards for “YES” and Horn, a top producer, produced YES’s newly released album “Fly From Here.”

Now if we can just dump the Benoit guy and get Trevor back on vocals, The Yuggles are reborn! Me feeling the “Machine Messiah” Yes were always underappreciated.

MNHawk on August 1, 2011 at 2:15 PM

My sister and I stayed up all night to watch MTV’s first 24 hours and we were hooked. I remember the original VJs and the rumor that Martha Quinn appeared in J. Geils’ “Angel Is a Centerfold” video (it was a look alike). I also remember Mike Nesmith’s “Elephant Parts” TV special that opened the door to music video as an art form. But I never understood how Nina Blackwood kept her job. She was borderline incoherent.

Because of the scarcity of current videos, early MTV featured an eclectic mix of artists. Rod Stewart and Pat Benatar had so many videos available that they were on nearly every hour. Obscure regional artists like Billy Squier got more exposure than they normally would have. Tech ready artists like Todd Rundgren helped advance the genre beyond the live performance videos so many bands rushed to make to get on MTV (remember 38 Special?). Then you had a great young group like Split Enz whose creative videos introduced them to the American audience.

Within 5 years, MTV became a top 40 channel and the artists I liked were quarantined together on the weekly show “120 Minutes.” But it was a good run while it lasted.

Terrie on August 1, 2011 at 2:18 PM

Never watched, we lived in the country where there was no such thing as cable. I don’t think anyone around us even had a satellite dish till the mid eighties and those were those big ten footers.

lowandslow on August 1, 2011 at 2:21 PM

Yes, video killed the radio star. Before MTV people didn’t usually even know what the singer of a popular song looked like. Before MTV, a group would just play their instruments on stage and sing. After MTV, they had to put on a whole show jumping through hoops and ladders. Music became more a visual medium than a listening experience.

LODGE4 on August 1, 2011 at 2:22 PM

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