Boehner, McConnell say deal may be on the way

posted at 5:44 pm on July 30, 2011 by Ed Morrissey

National Journal reports on this ray of (limited) sunshine after a case of dueling chambers killed off the only two proposals on the table to the debt-ceiling impasse.  John Boehner and Mitch McConnell told reporters that talks on a compromise have suddenly improved, mainly because the “right people” have come to the table and have started taking things seriously.  Want to guess who the “right people” are — or more precisely, is?

Immediately after the House rejected a Democratic proposal for raising the debt ceiling, House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., appeared before reporters to say they are in negotiations with President Obama and that a deal will be reached before a critical Aug. 2 deadline.

“Our country is not going to default for the first time in history,” McConnell said as he posed with Boehner in the Speaker’s Capitol Hill office on the 2nd floor. “That is not going to happen. We now have a level of seriousness with the right people at the table that we needed. We’re going to get a result.”

Boehner concurred: “Despite our differences, we are dealing with reasonable, responsible people who want this crisis to end as quickly as possible and I think we will.”

The AP answers the question:

After weeks of intense partisanship, the White House and congressional leaders made a desperate, last-minute stab at compromise Saturday to avoid a government default threatened for early next week. “There is very little time,” declaredPresident Barack Obama.

Obama met with top Democrats at the White House and spoke by phone with Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell.

“He needs to indicate what he will sign, and we are in those discussions,” McConnell said of the president. He added he had also spoken with Vice President Joe Biden, who played a prominent role in earlier attempts to break the gridlock that has pushed the country to the verge of an unprecedented default.

“The right people at the table” isn’t a reference to Joe Biden.  Biden has no role other than advisory in this or any other negotiation.  Obama has to sign any agreement reached by Congress, and it appears that Obama has decided that a failure to get some sort of agreement will damage his standing even further than the crisis has already.

For the two Republican leaders, this is likely a response to the events of last weekend, at least from their perspective.  The GOP insists that they cut a deal with Reid along the lines of the bill Boehner tried to pass on Thursday, but that when Reid took it to Obama, he pushed Reid into reneging.  In that context, neither Boehner nor McConnell have much to gain anymore from haggling with Reid, who could have stood up to Obama and passed the compromise earlier in the week.  Instead, the two GOP leaders want Obama to get serious and to deal directly with them, which is apparently what happened.

The White House downplayed the statement, but didn’t deny it either:

Communications Director Dan Pfeiffer used the social networking site Twitter to declare: “RE GOP presser: 1) Both McConnell and Reid have said there was no agreement 2) House GOP couldn’t even pass the bill they think was agreed to.”

My prediction is that we will see a deal structured in two installments of the debt-ceiling hike using the McConnell mechanism, which combined will hit the amount Reid wanted, and with the cuts and assumptions built into the Boehner proposal (with possibly a few changes, which should be checked), with a commitment for a balanced-budget amendment vote in the Senate included.  A package like that could get a grudging majority in both chambers, and if it did, Obama would have little choice but to sign it.  I suspect we’ll see an announcement before midnight tonight on something along those lines — or on a short-term debt-ceiling hike of no more than $100 billion to give them a little more time to get there.

Breaking on Hot Air

Blowback

Note from Hot Air management: This section is for comments from Hot Air's community of registered readers. Please don't assume that Hot Air management agrees with or otherwise endorses any particular comment just because we let it stand. A reminder: Anyone who fails to comply with our terms of use may lose their posting privilege.

Trackbacks/Pings

Trackback URL

Comments

Comment pages: 1 2 3

Small business is the major provider of jobs in the United States, and it produces half of the goods and services in our economy (excluding government) each year. But its contribution to our prosperity is far larger and in some ways far more important: It is the “R&D” of the economy.

None of our famous corporate nameplates started off with billions of dollars in sales and profits.

Wal-Mart? A single store in Arkansas.

Microsoft? A consultant to Commodore Computers.

McDonald’s, Ford, Dell, a list of the “who’s who” in corporate America, each started as a “small business.” By using resources (labor and capital) to serve consumers well, these companies succeeded.

INC on July 30, 2011 at 8:50 PM

What happened to Southerblogger? He was supposed to tell us about his plan.

Bugler on July 30, 2011 at 8:50 PM

It isn’t about the guys at the top, but keeping the bottom open so that new entrants are not impeded from getting into the market.

Let me tell you about a meeting I recently had with higher up people from the ad industry. In their opinion, the middle class has been so gutted by events over the past decade that their strategy with most major brands it to focus advertising on the top 40% of American households. The disposable income of everyone else is such a lost cause that unless the brand is selling beverages or consumer packaged goods, the new strategy is to ignore the bottom 60%.

If you want to keep the bottom open, then protect the middle class so that the next Steve Jobs actually has the option to start a company. The last decade has witnessed a huge transfer of wealth from the middle class to the upper class- what some like to call redistribution. Oddly enough, this trend accelerated when taxes that target the wealthy, such as taxes on dividends, fell drastically.

Large companies don’t like to be challenged, and yet the way of the market is that of new entrants finding new ways to compete against larger and less nimble companies.

These are not scions of small business, and that is where the business of America is and small businesses account for the bulk of the employment in this Nation.

Don’t fall too much in love with the myth of the small business leading to American economic greatness. A couple business school studies have found that many small business jobs actually represent net jobs lost from larger companies. And in too many cases, small business jobs are part of a fixed labor pool. For example, imagine that the genius of Joe the Plumber if finally unleashed and he starts a plumbing company that grows to 10 employees. Unless an external event such as housing boom is underway, it’s extremely unlikely that those new plumbing jobs represent any kind of real job growth.. Instead, there’s simply been a net transfer of jobs from one plumbing company to another.

Jobs and Gates had to start as a small business in a very rough field, and Jobs would head Apple towards niches while Gates had his dream of every computer running a Microsoft operating system. In 1979.

So ask them, please, if they could start such businesses TODAY.

Google was started over 10 years ago, when another Dem was in the White House. Today it’s a global powerhouse. The next generation of great biotech and tech companies are under development today in NY, Texas, and silicon valley. Not sure what you’re talking about- and none of the great entrepreneur capitalists has followed the Tea Party line about ‘regulations’ holding this country back. You only hear that kind of talk from people who fail to understand the lasting effects of a once in a lifetime, massive recession on the economy. But it’s not a complaint coming out of the great entrepreneurs.

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 8:52 PM

I’ve never heard of anyone taking macroeconomic advice from someone in the ad industry. The ad industry is notoriously a reactive industry that is exposed to few, if any, economic indicators

The top ad agencies in NYC and other major cities close follow every major cultural and socioeconomic trend and direct the ad strategies of major brands accordindly. But you may be right that it’s reactive, and it’s reacting to data that reveals how much duress the middle class is under today. No one said that anger directed at DC doesn’t have a real and powerful cause and that it’s not coming from the middle class.

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 9:07 PM

AH, hahahahahahaahahaha!!!

dueling Republicans

james23 on July 30, 2011 at 9:11 PM

The last decade has witnessed a huge transfer of wealth from the middle class to the upper class- what some like to call redistribution. Oddly enough, this trend accelerated when taxes that target the wealthy, such as taxes on dividends, fell drastically.

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 8:52 PM

Actually, the data suggests otherwise. The data suggests that more middle class transitioned to the upper class than any other time in history.

blink on July 30, 2011 at 9:05 PM

You’re trying to find a corner case to justify today’s harsh reality of a poorer and distressed middle class after a decade of Bush tax cuts on stock dividends and other perks for the wealthy. Funny thing how the data presented by WSJ, FT, and other sources reach a different conclusion:

http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/The-Daily-Reckoning/2010/0804/The-bygone-middle-class-golden-era

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/2/1a8a5cb2-9ab2-11df-87e6-00144feab49a.html#axzz1TdoRt96t

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 9:14 PM

One hard lesson the Tea Party learned in 2010…

Unless you change leadership, majorities mean zilch!

katy on July 30, 2011 at 6:04 PM

No, the lesson is, unless your own TP people are in the lead, you will get nothing from an alliance with the KY Republicans.

james23 on July 30, 2011 at 9:15 PM

…So ask them, please, if they could start such businesses TODAY.

ajacksonian on July 30, 2011 at 8:31 PM

Here’s another one: Home Depot Co-Founder: Obama Is Choking Recovery

“But (Bernie) Marcus says Home Depot “would never have succeeded” if it launched today due to onerous regulation. He recently helped launch the Job Creators Alliance, a Dallas-based nonprofit of CEOs and entrepreneurs dedicated to preserving the free enterprise system. IBD recently spoke to him about jobs and the economy.”

slickwillie2001 on July 30, 2011 at 9:15 PM

Hey, what happened to all of the Republican idiots who promised that if the “Boehner Plan” was passed, we’d be playing a much stronger hand.

Those people are liars. Remember who they are.

james23 on July 30, 2011 at 9:17 PM

But I like how you continually quote others instead of thinking for yourself.

blink on July 30, 2011 at 9:14 PM

Thinking for yourself involves objectively evaluating data, as opposed to inventing facts. For you, evaluating facts is clearly not a strength. Perhaps your received a third world education? And I’m sure you’re right, the largest brand manufacturers in this country are all idiots when compared to your mastery of middle class spending power.

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 9:21 PM

JohnInCA on July 30, 2011 at 7:32 PM

Thank you very much, John, for the compliment.

You see, the problem with politicians like Boehner, McConnell and the other Big Govt. Republicans is that, while I do not question their patriotism or love for the country, they do NOT believe Big Govt. is as bad as we conservatives/tea partiers make it to be. They believe they can harness the power of Govt. to advance Republican (not necessarily conservative) priorities.

Unfortunately, in the game of cat and mouse that Big Govt. Repubs and Dems have been playing for ages, the Dems always come out on top. Allowing Big Govt. to continue its growth unfettered will cause the US to become like Greece. Another example is California.

Dems fight hard to get the public hooked to big Govt. programs and then politicians are reduced to promising who would give more goodies when elected. Such an outcome would result in the end of America as we know it.

TheRightMan on July 30, 2011 at 9:28 PM

bayam

How sad to see someone so completely and woefully ignorant as you are. It just never ends; post after post from you is full of so much ridiculous bullsqueeze, it really begins to make one despair at the prospects of intellectual discourse.

I’d feel slightly better about it (though annoyed) if I thought you were simply intentionally misstating fact and being willfully obtuse just to further an agenda, but I do, in fact, think you really believe the nonsense you regurgitate here. So it’s actually not so much annoyance as it is pity that I feel for you.

Hope springs eternal that someday you’ll come to some sense of a grip with reality rather than the obvious dementia that afflicts you today – though, alas, I doubt it.

Midas on July 30, 2011 at 9:30 PM

…So ask them, please, if they could start such businesses TODAY.

ajacksonian on July 30, 2011 at 8:31 PM
Here’s another one: Home Depot Co-Founder: Obama Is Choking Recovery

“But (Bernie) Marcus says Home Depot “would never have succeeded” if it launched today due to onerous regulation. He recently helped launch the Job Creators Alliance, a Dallas-based nonprofit of CEOs and entrepreneurs dedicated to preserving the free enterprise system. IBD recently spoke to him about jobs and the economy.”

slickwillie2001 on July 30, 2011 at 9:15 PM

Go to any major innovation hub and you’ll find hundreds if not thousands of potential high growth companies underway. Investors are pouring cash into startups today- the regulation that has suddenly emerged in recent years is apparently lost on venture capital investors and startup companies. Venture capital investing bottomed in 2008 and has shown very strong growth since then.

http://www.pwc.com/us/en/press-releases/2011/venture-capital-investments-rise.jhtml

This data and the booming economy in silicon valley paints a far different picture.

However, there’s no doubt that some types of industries are more affected by certain types of regulation than others. And there’s absolutely zero question that for the last decade plus, manufacturing jobs have been fleeing the US for China and other countries with far lower labor costs (thanks in large part to our policy of semi-trade with China, in my opinion).

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 9:30 PM

Google was started over 10 years ago, when another Dem was in the White House. Today it’s a global powerhouse.

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 8:52 PM

I’m surprised that you’re not complaining about how Google has stolen jobs from the traditional advertisement and software development industries. Don’t you know anyone that lost their Yellowpages job?

blink on July 30, 2011 at 9:17 PM

You’re right, innovation often leads to lost jobs. All that innovation in e-commerce, online travel, and online advertising leads to job loss. It’s the way of the world.

As for Google, it’s a company that ultimately lowers the US deficit through its offshore operations. It’s pitiful to see the government allow China get away with excluding our internet companies- which today should be generating tens of billions of dollars in profits today to offset.

Hope springs eternal that someday you’ll come to some sense of a grip with reality rather than the obvious dementia that afflicts you today – though, alas, I doubt it.

Midas on July 30, 2011 at 9:30 PM

My reality is informed by my experiences and I’m sure that yours are different. But I couldn’t read HotAir if I disagreed with everything written here. I hope that you too will eventually see things differently.

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 9:38 PM

Where does the money come from to pay for most biotech products? Medicare? Do most biotech products contribute towards insurance premium increases? Have you ever evaluated a macroeconomic analysis regarding this issue

You’re asking somewhat unrelated questions while making different point and I don’t entirely disagree with you. It’s very hard to see where today’s innovations will lead healthcare and its costs.

For example, new stem cell biotech advances, that in clinical trials repair heart tissue damage after a heart attack to reverse the onset of congestive heart failure, do increase the upfront cost of treatment. But over a patient’s lifetime, it promises to greatly decrease the high cost of treating heart failure.

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 9:49 PM

Billionaire Steve Wynn:

There are… a host of opportunities to create tens of thousands of jobs in Las Vegas… But I’m afraid to do anything in the current political environment in the United States….

This administration is the greatest wet blanket to business and progress and job creation in my lifetime… I could spend the next three hours giving you examples of all of us, in this marketplace, that are frightened to death about all the new regulations, our healthcare costs escalate, regulations coming from left and right, a President that… keeps using that word ‘redistribution’.

Well, my customers, and the companies that provide the vitality for the hospitality and restaurant industry, in the United States of America, they are frightened of this administration. And it makes you slow down and not invest your money.

What was the name of the MA medical equipment company that’s closing down or moving overseas?

INC on July 30, 2011 at 9:49 PM

Where does the money come from to pay for most biotech products? Medicare? Do most biotech products contribute towards insurance premium increases? Have you ever evaluated a macroeconomic analysis regarding this issue
You’re asking somewhat unrelated questions while making different point and I don’t entirely disagree with you. It’s very hard to see where today’s innovations will lead healthcare and its costs.

For example, new stem cell biotech advances, that in clinical trials repair heart tissue damage after a heart attack to reverse the onset of congestive heart failure, do increase the upfront cost of treatment. But over a patient’s lifetime, it promises to greatly decrease the high cost of treating heart failure.

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 9:49 PM

The money comes from private investors. It also is ADULT STEM CELL REASEARCH. Forget that part,Barryboy?

katy the mean old lady on July 30, 2011 at 9:55 PM

COMPLETE THIS SENTENCE.

If the right person at the table is JOE BIDEN……

PappyD61 on July 30, 2011 at 10:02 PM

What was the name of the MA medical equipment company that’s closing down or moving overseas?

INC on July 30, 2011 at 9:49 PM

Boston Scientific. Moving to less-restrictive environments.

massrighty on July 30, 2011 at 10:03 PM

If the right person at the table is JOE BIDEN……

PappyD61 on July 30, 2011 at 10:02 PM

Then you’re just looking for someone to pick up the check!

(What did I win?)

massrighty on July 30, 2011 at 10:04 PM

I’m sure Allen West still has fans here at Hot Air, even among tea partiers, and if you’re one of them, I would just like to say that I don’t think he will have any problem raising money from the establishment anymore. Please donate money to the honor roll of 22 instead. They will probably not receive any money from the establishment.

FloatingRock on July 30, 2011 at 6:54 PM

This

The establishment got to him.

The GOP will betray you

True_King on July 30, 2011 at 10:07 PM

I don’t know if I’d call it booming. This is investment capital specifically for Silicon Valley. 2010 wasn’t back to 2006 levels. Remember, none of these numbers are inflation adjusted.

I never claimed that VC investment levels has returned to their 2006 level. But why don’t you Google the state of the tech economy or ask anyone in silicon valley if it’s harder now than in 2007 to hire people. You’ll only hear one answer.

Anyway, those numbers don’t reflect all sources of investment dollars, including angel investors- or institutional and hedge funds now investing through secondary markets (such as SecondMarket). In many cases, venture capital is being replaced by other sources.

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 10:09 PM

Many liberals have lamented (and some conservatives boasted) that Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s (D., Nev.) deficit plan consists entirely of spending cuts. Hardly. To start, Reid’s plan proposes to set revenue levels according the Congressional Budget Office baseline, which follows current law, as opposed to current policy. Current law, of course, assumes the expiration of certain business tax extenders, the Alternative Minimum Tax patch, and the Bush tax rates. So in effect, Reid’s plan assumes an overall tax hike of about $3.5 trillion to $3.8 trillion over ten years.

Not only that, but a Republican source tells me that Democrats are currently negotiating for automatic tax increases as part of a trigger mechanism that will go into effect if the bipartisan committee called for in Reid’s (and Boehner’s) plan fails to reach an agreement on an additional $1.2 trillion to $1.8 trillion in deficit reduction. Several GOP Senators confirm that this is the primary hang-up in the ongoing negotiations. Meanwhile, Senate Budget Committee chairman Kent Conrad (D., N.D.) has been shuttling back and forth between Reid and Mitch McConnell’s offices in an effort to negotiate a solution, but tells reporters there’s still no deal.

NRO as of 8:30 pm.

So all the Dems on the committee have to do is be obstructionist and the committee’s failure to reach an agreement on cuts triggers automatic tax increases? Do Boehner and McConnell actually think the Dems would act in good faith? Like the Dems ever have?

Wethal on July 30, 2011 at 10:13 PM

Breaking news: Harry Reid says there are compromise talks going on. Yawn.

Philly on July 30, 2011 at 10:14 PM

No, this is not true. It leads to job growth the way it has throughout the centuries. Or are you actually implying that fewer people were employed in the world prior to all of the innovation that has occurred since the year 1490?

blink on July 30, 2011 at 9:59 PM

The reason it’s more of an issue today stems from the type of jobs created by innovation, often jobs that require skills not common in the broad labor pool. You generally can’t take just anyone and retrain them to improve Google’s search algorithms or to build software that operates the machine tools that automate a warehouse or factory line.

Eventually, advancements in energy tech and other fields will produce more jobs for people who otherwise find themselves without the right skills.

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 10:15 PM

Default is inevitable. Enough of the kabuki. No more debt. Get it over with, so we can start rebuilding the country.

shaken on July 30, 2011 at 10:32 PM

The reason it’s more of an issue today stems from the type of jobs created by innovation, often jobs that require skills not common in the broad labor pool. You generally can’t take just anyone and retrain them to improve Google’s search algorithms or to build software that operates the machine tools that automate a warehouse or factory line.

Eventually, advancements in energy tech and other fields will produce more jobs for people who otherwise find themselves without the right skills.

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 10:15 PM

Wait, so you support less Federal funding for the arts?

fossten on July 30, 2011 at 10:32 PM

Boston Scientific. Moving to less-restrictive environments.

massrighty on July 30, 2011 at 10:03 PM

Thank you. I remember reading about it, but I couldn’t remember the name.

INC on July 30, 2011 at 10:41 PM

“There’s no comparison between what the great entrepreneur capitalists in this country have achieved and what the Koch boys did with their inheritance money.
bayam on July 30, 2011 at 8:36 PM”

LOL I knew you would come back with some bogus comparison about creativity blah, blah. Bill Gates was a rapacious capitalist pig until the DOJ got all over his case for “monopolizing” the computer market. Then he started talking leftist politics and contributing to leftist causes and now he’s no longer an evil capitalist. The Koch brothers are just one example, I could give others, but you’d rationalize any others I named too as not creative or warm or fuzzy or whatever. Say, it must rub you raw that all your lefty billionaires don’t just go ahead and send much more $$$ to DC to back up their socialist ‘I need a tax incease’ talk. How do you rationalize their hypocrisy? Shouldn’t they do it for the cause. Remember, FDR had “Dollar a year” men who literally worked for $1.00/yr. Why aren’t Jobs, Gates, Buffett, Soros et al doing that and giving up 99% of their riches. Even after 99% given away, they’d still be loaded.

JimP on July 30, 2011 at 10:45 PM

My reality is informed by my experiences and I’m sure that yours are different. But I couldn’t read HotAir if I disagreed with everything written here. I hope that you too will eventually see things differently.

bayam on July 30, 2011 at 9:38 PM

Reality is neither yours nor mine – it simply is.

‘Your reality’ is just your perception, and it, as you offer, is based on your experience. That is, of course, the same limited perception of reality that informed the folks who insisted that the earth was flat and the center of the universe, and that modern man is responsible for global cooling global warming climate change.

Someday you may discover that there are wiser folk out there that strive to get beyond the blinders of their own limited experience and seek to understand and learn more – through observation and study of the experiences of others – through investigation of demonstrated, documented and repeatable cause and effect, reading and understanding history, etc. This discovery may one day bring you to an understanding that you’re not actually as clever as you obviously think you are, and the realization that your perception of reality is not reality at all will, hopefully, help you improve yourself and those around you, rather than simply espousing your own limited knowledge as fact when most everyone around you knows from history that what you’re suggesting is rubbish. Many of them – friends, family, and similarly deluded mental patients – may love you and simply smile and nod in a knowing way at how cute your silliness is (“oh, look – little bayam has his underwear on his head again – isn’t that adorable!”), while most of the rest of us will thank you not to pick up anything sharp, not to procreate, and certainly not to find yourself in a position to harm us or our families with your mindless drivel.

Midas on July 30, 2011 at 11:02 PM

Thinking for yourself involves objectively evaluating data, as opposed to inventing facts.

bayam

So says the moron who believes lowering taxes on dividends somehow magically oppresses the middle class and keeps them from getting ahead.

Retard, lol.

xblade on July 30, 2011 at 11:04 PM

PappyD61 on July 30, 2011 at 10:52 PM

If true, the credit rating is going down. They wanted 4 trillion or more in cuts.

derft on July 30, 2011 at 11:09 PM

yeah, and the $1.8 trillion is over how long? 10 years?

But they get the $2.8 trillion immediately?

let’s see…..we’re OVERspending $1.6 trillion a year and we’re going to cut $200 billion over 10 years? MMMMM, That would mean we’d be $16 trillion MORE IN DEBT. But we’d have to take $2.8 trillion off that total.

So, the net is we’ll still be $13 trillion MORE IN DEBT (on top of the $14 trillion already).

So, what are these loons smoking up there in D.C.?

And if they aren’t stupid then they are ALL trying to crash the economy of the U.S.

What other explanation is there?

And the Joe Biden win entitles the winner of the best answer to what the Democrats do best.

I’ll call you a “terrorist” and “hostage taker”.

PappyD61 on July 30, 2011 at 11:41 PM

Boehner, McConnell say deal may be on the way

BOHICA

Fighton03 on July 30, 2011 at 11:42 PM

Fox news is reporting Reid has postpones vote until 1PM Sunday.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid says he’s hoping for last-minute compromise to raise the debt ceiling and delays vote on debt until 1 p.m. Sunday to give negotiators ‘as much room as possible to do their work.’

bluefox on July 30, 2011 at 11:46 PM

“We now have a level of seriousness with the right people at the table …”

Yes, the right people for a criminal organization. Liars and thieves.

Lon Chaney on July 31, 2011 at 12:54 AM

COMPLETE THIS SENTENCE.

If the right person at the table is JOE BIDEN……

PappyD61 on July 30, 2011 at 10:02 PM

You are one third of the way to a Three Stooges episode.

Lon Chaney on July 31, 2011 at 1:03 AM

“Our country is not going to default for the first time in history,”

Bwahahahahahahahahahahahahahahah… 1st time in History

so da GubRmint will now honor all those silver certificates they wrote…….uhhhhhhh… they opened da Gold window again……

hahahahahahahahahahahahah

yeah…… like they never reneged on da citizens before……….

How’s bout FDR force’n Americans to turn over their gold for 20 bucks and some change…. then setting the price of gold at 35 bucks and ounce………. yep…… honest abe and all that crap…

roflmao

donabernathy on July 31, 2011 at 1:54 AM

“I’m sure Allen West still has fans here at Hot Air, even among tea partiers, and if you’re one of them, I would just like to say that I don’t think he will have any problem raising money from the establishment anymore. Please donate money to the honor roll of 22 instead. They will probably not receive any money from the establishment.

FloatingRock on July 30, 2011 at 6:54 PM
This

The establishment got to him.
The GOP will betray you
True_King on July 30, 2011 at 10:07 PM”

Lol, sure I will take your word for it. I may disagree with his vote, but he still is one of us. I love those who make assumptions and try to determine exactly what happened with no facts whatsoever. He is one of the few fighters who will actually take liberals to task and that is not the behavior of an establishment Republican.

Africanus on July 31, 2011 at 1:57 AM

Ok, ok, everyone quit throwing history at each other and answer a simple question without a lot of smarmyness and namecalling…..

What do you want Congress to do?
A. Tax increases and massive cuts?
B. Massive cuts and no tax increases?
C. Anything with a balanced budget amendment?
D. Any combination of the above.

Frankly, I’m tired of hearing, “This guy caved, or this guy is unreasonable, or this guy isn’t perfect”. What do you want that you reasonably think can be accomplished?

gordo on July 31, 2011 at 2:42 AM

I really am enjoying the dog and pony show that Congress is putting on and I’m waiting for the “Oscar” to be awarded. The “Show” is equal to a couple of lawyers screaming and threatening each other while in the court room and then retiring to the local pub for some beers afterwards. The ceiling will be raised and forget the cuts to the government payroll.

Not one word about the 330 billion spent each year on the coddling of the illegals or closing the Dept. of Energy that has not done its job for over thirty years with a budget this year alone of 23.3 billion. This information is available to the public and it drives our politicians crazy, why do you think they want control of the internet?

mixplix on July 31, 2011 at 4:43 AM

Are you kidding me: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SGyVNippvA

Dasher on July 31, 2011 at 8:25 AM

Why don’t you all just wee wee on people’s backs and tell them it is raining? They’d believe that before believing that things are under budget control in Washington DC

kens on August 1, 2011 at 12:12 PM

Comment pages: 1 2 3