Poll: More than 9 in 10 Americans continue to believe in God

posted at 5:22 pm on June 3, 2011 by Tina Korbe

According to a Gallup poll released today, 92 percent of Americans say “yes” when asked the basic question, “Do you believe in God?” In nearly 70 years, that belief has remained relatively stable. In 1944, when Gallup first asked the question, 96 percent said yes.

That’s not to say American believers experience no doubts. Respondents wavered a little bit when given more than just “yes” and “no” choices. Fourteen percent, for example, said they think God “probably exists, but have a little doubt.” An additional 5 percent said they think God “probably exists, but have a lot of doubt.” Even so, a robust 73 percent still said they are “convinced” God exists.

Not surprisingly, belief varied among different age groups and across regions. Among my peers, just 84 percent say they believe in God. Southerners are 10 points more likely to say they believe in God than Easterners.

To me, this poll comes as hopeful news — a much-needed reminder that the basic fabric of American belief hasn’t changed all that much, countless cultural signs to the contrary. But I’m comforted by more than just the continuity of the tradition. I’m comforted, too, by what it suggests Americans seek. Maybe this is an extrapolation, but it seems to me the American readiness to admit a belief in God says something about our willingness to risk foolishness for the sake of truth — a worthy risk, I think.

Maybe I’ve been in doubt as to how open the American mind actually is to truth because I’m a relatively recent college graduate — and, all too often, I fear, the university experience encourages the deconstruction of “social constructs” more than it encourages the courageous acceptance of reality “in the totality of its factors.”

Or maybe I’ve just been thinking along these lines since I read the article, “Thinking Critically About Critical Thinking,” in this month’s issue of First Things. R.R. Reno writes:

Clear-minded and scrupulous analysis clears the underbrush of error — a very good thing to do — but it cannot plant the seeds of truth; it burns away the weeds but won’t fertilize the fields. To do so we must be receptive rather than cautious. We need to develop the habit of credulity, which literally means the capacity and willingness to accept or believe, for that is the only way truth can enter into our minds. To hold anything as true we have to be able to say, “Yes, I think that’s true.” Critical reasoning, by contrast, trains us to hesitate, interrogate and withdraw our assent: “Hmm, I wonder if that’s true. Perhaps it’s false? How do I know it isn’t?” We don’t so much seek as wait — wait for compelling evidence or solid proofs.

Therein lies the danger of our enthusiasm for “critical thinking.” If we fear error too much and thus overvalue critical reason, we develop a mind active and able in doubt but largely untrained to move toward belief, which is, after all, the main work of the mind. A mentality too quick to find reasons not to nurture convictions runs the risk of ending up more empty than accurate.

“More empty than accurate.” Now, that’s not a risk worth taking. More than I fear inaccuracy, more than I fear foolishness, I fear emptiness — and I don’t think I’m alone in that.

None of this is an apologetic for God — but it is a statement of pride and relief in the results of this poll and in what it says about the bravery of Americans who still dare to profess belief in a postmodern world.


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Amen

Roy Rogers on June 3, 2011 at 5:24 PM

Thank God.

aunursa on June 3, 2011 at 5:24 PM

9 out of 10 believe in God.

over 5 in 10 supported/voted for a President in 2008 that supports the uninhibited murder of the unborn.

IRONY ALERT anyone?

PappyD61 on June 3, 2011 at 5:24 PM

Allahpundit hardest hit.

steebo77 on June 3, 2011 at 5:25 PM

Hallelujah…!

Seven Percent Solution on June 3, 2011 at 5:27 PM

Geez …

doufree on June 3, 2011 at 5:28 PM

Allahpundit hardest hit.

steebo77 on June 3, 2011 at 5:25 PM

Only because Tina scooped him on this, so she’s going to get credit for all the page hits when the thread degrades.

malclave on June 3, 2011 at 5:28 PM

Just wish ALL of those were praying for our nation’s survival about now.
Couldn’t hurt, right ?

pambi on June 3, 2011 at 5:28 PM

PappyD61 on June 3, 2011 at 5:24 PM

Glad I’m not the only party pooper around here who thought of that right off. ;)

pannw on June 3, 2011 at 5:28 PM

Look, the answer to this question is problematic–particularly when you see the widespread depravity of the culture that this “90%” belongs to. Most people probably feel that saying “No” to this question is sufficiently self-incriminating that it just might damn them to hell for eternity, so, for the price of a poll, there’s no way they’ll say no. Then again, just ask the question a different way…..hold a gun to their head and tell them that if they say “Yes” they’ll get a bullet, but they’ll live if they say “no”. You just might get closer to the truth of who actually believes.

ted c on June 3, 2011 at 5:29 PM

CONSENSUS!!

HondaV65 on June 3, 2011 at 5:29 PM

Our home is in that 9%. One wonders then why the other 1% can stop all mention of God in schools, our public buildings, on public land, and even in our military or private cemeteries? The 1% see’s to it the 9% cave to them and that is not right. Oh well, the 1% will never stop my faith. I will not submit to any other God but THE God.
L

letget on June 3, 2011 at 5:30 PM

So 73% are totally convinced of something for which there is not a shred of evidence. That’s worse than the numbers for the belief in global warming and we at Hotair mock those who believe in that. In both of these religions, the common denominator is a desire to believe because it suits the believers’ worldview.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:32 PM

92% finally some news of hope this year.

Tommy_G on June 3, 2011 at 5:34 PM

back in the day…this would’ve been a red meat thread. I’m not taking that bait.

ted c on June 3, 2011 at 5:34 PM

AllahPundit = “Atheist Fringe”
AllahPundit = “Extremist”

I’m just poking fun, because I can.

DaydreamBeliever on June 3, 2011 at 5:35 PM

9 out of 10 believe in God.

over 5 in 10 supported/voted for a President in 2008 that supports the uninhibited murder of the unborn.

IRONY ALERT anyone?

PappyD61 on June 3, 2011 at 5:24 PM

Theoretical theists; pratical atheists.

God is not amused; God is not mocked, for whatever a man sows that is what he shall reap.

davidk on June 3, 2011 at 5:36 PM

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:32 PM

The way I look at, we who believe can NOT prove there is a God, and those who DO NOT believe can not prove there isn’t a God! It comes down to ones faith, you believe or you do not. If you ktc doesn’t want to believe, that is your choice. The only way one will be sure is with death and then it it too late to change your mind.
L

letget on June 3, 2011 at 5:36 PM

which god?

offroadaz on June 3, 2011 at 5:37 PM

So 73% are totally convinced of something for which there is not a shred of evidence.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:32 PM

We are talking about God, not evolution.

davidk on June 3, 2011 at 5:38 PM

So 73% are totally convinced of something for which there is not a shred of evidence.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:32 PM

There are lots of things in life for which there isn’t a shred of evidence. Many of the most important aspects of human life cannot be quantified.

sharrukin on June 3, 2011 at 5:38 PM

Jill Abramson believes in the New York Times.

portlandon on June 3, 2011 at 5:39 PM

letget on June 3, 2011 at 5:36 PM

I hope there isn’t an afterlife, sometimes.

Why live forever?

I’ll get bored. I’m being serious. What the hell am I going to do for eternity? Walk around with a smile on my face? Who knows. What if I can’t get a good salami sandwich? What’s the point of heaven then?

I don’t know, you tell me. I think the dead end theory is most acceptable to me personally.

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 5:39 PM

letget on June 3, 2011 at 5:36 PM

So you are taking Pascal’s wager, then? My point is that it is disingenuous to mock believers in global warming, and then not mock those who believe in other things for which no evidence can be produced. I’m an equal opportunity mocker. I call BS wherever I see it. Of course a belief in god is not as damaging as a belief in global warming. But it is just as silly.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:40 PM

Allahpundit hardest hit.

steebo77 on June 3, 2011 at 5:25 PM

It looks like AP’s position has picked up from 1% to 7% since the last poll. Still a minority, but a much bigger one than before.

dedalus on June 3, 2011 at 5:41 PM

BINO
Believers in name only

Many may believe but what do they do to prove it. Another question is do you need to do anything to prove it or just saying it is enough.

tjexcite on June 3, 2011 at 5:42 PM

letget on June 3, 2011 at 5:36 PM

If one’s believe in God is not based on evidence then that faith is shallow.

For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities—his eternal power and divine nature—have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that people are without excuse. Romans 1:20 NIV

davidk on June 3, 2011 at 5:42 PM

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:32 PM

NOT speaking for anyone else, here, but you can get back to me AFTER you, too, are knocked from your horse, and hear the Voice.
I have my own empirical evidence, and I’m sure many others do too.
Of course, even God doesn’t interfere with your right to believe as you do, but I’d be careful about telling others they believe in fairytales, until you’ve walked in my (our?) shoes, dude.

pambi on June 3, 2011 at 5:42 PM

Allahpundit hardest hit.

steebo77 on June 3, 2011 at 5:25 PM

Yeah, I figured Mr. ’1 in 10′ would have written this post. He’ll come back to it later. It’s not in his DNA to let this one slide….

joejm65 on June 3, 2011 at 5:43 PM

pambi on June 3, 2011 at 5:42 PM

LOL. So let me get this straight. You fell off your horse and now you hear voices?

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:44 PM

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:40 PM

A lot of believers feel a personal connection with God. People don’t feel a personal connection with global warming.

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 5:45 PM

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:40 PM

You want to believe life just happened and everything in nature is just random happenstance, then knock yourself out. That is by far more of a fairytale to me.

Southernblogger on June 3, 2011 at 5:45 PM

It’s a scriptural reference, sonny.

pambi on June 3, 2011 at 5:46 PM

What the hell am I going to do for eternity? Walk around with a smile on my face?

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 5:39 PM

That’s what God asked Himself too

DarkCurrent on June 3, 2011 at 5:47 PM

Well it seems I did plow up a snake giving my view of my faith and how I feel. No way either my views or others can ever be proved. I just keep plowing along with what I believe. You know the 9% of us.
L

letget on June 3, 2011 at 5:47 PM

So 73% are totally convinced of something for which there is not a shred of evidence.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:32 PM

Absence of evidence does not equal evidence of absence.

fossten on June 3, 2011 at 5:47 PM

You want to believe life just happened and everything in nature is just random happenstance, then knock yourself out. That is by far more of a fairytale to me.

Southernblogger on June 3, 2011 at 5:45 PM

+10

I am not a believer of the “From Goo, to You!” hypothesis.

portlandon on June 3, 2011 at 5:48 PM

People don’t feel a personal connection with global warming.

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 5:45 PM

Oh, but they do. For them, it is a moral crusade. And they believe that it is a sin, and to address this sin, we must live our lives a certain way, or else we will pay a terrible price.

Sound familiar?

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:48 PM

That’s what God asked Himself too

DarkCurrent on June 3, 2011 at 5:47 PM

I came to see if DarkCurrent would arrive.

I leave knowing.

portlandon on June 3, 2011 at 5:48 PM

Yeah, they belive in God alright, but which God? Ever since God created man in His image, man has been play the Hellish game of re-creating God in his image. As in:

Is it those believers who love Separation of Church and state? God gets the doghouse and sex gets the mansion.

Or, as in “I’m a Catholic leader of the house and I believe it’s moral to kill God’s innocent babies, if we first call it choice….”

All those on the left who think envy is cool as in, soak the rich.

Then we have those who love sloth as in I’m a victim of white man’s oppression so I’ll vote for those Democratic men and ignore the fact that they’ll enable the killing of more black babies more than white babies…”

or Notre Dame – let’s honor the biggest pro-destroyer of God’s innocent life in presidential history.

Or how about those priests and Baptist ministers who would talk about God as social justice and atheistic Marxist liberation theology.

This nation has turned against God radically in all that it does -it’s culture-its politics -its control of His people -it’s failure to have dominion over all of creation -calling themselves just another species -no better -noworse than a cockroach, and worshipping trees and rocks.

9 of 10? Where are they hiding?

53 % of Catholics voted for Obama the pro-abortion poster child.

Religion -it depends what you mean by the term, doesn’t it

Don L on June 3, 2011 at 5:48 PM

call BS wherever I see it. Of course a belief in god is not as damaging as a belief in global warming. But it is just as silly.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:40 PM

A little faith is never a bad thing. By saying it is not as damaging, you saying there is damage caused by the belief in God. That’s nonsense, especially when you see all the wonderful things that have been brought forth by a belief in God. This country we live in is the best examples. Founded by men of faith. Equal rights for all, the emancipation of women, the end of slavery, great charitable organizations. The list is boundless and all brought to you by christianity.

Tommy_G on June 3, 2011 at 5:49 PM

I’m starting to think they hired Tina Korbe to counter balance Allahpundit’s atheist posts.

DanStark on June 3, 2011 at 5:50 PM

Absence of evidence does not equal evidence of absence.

fossten on June 3, 2011 at 5:47 PM

Exactly, which is why the logical belief is to be agnostic. I believe god may exist. Or he may not. And if he does, I have no idea what his views are. Which is why it is ridiculous for anyone to believe, without any doubt, that a god does exist – especially the god they want to exist, and not some other god. So for those 73%, critical thought is not being applied to this question.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:50 PM

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:48 PM

But the information is not something discovered internally. It is something that comes about through indoctrination.

Now, one might respond by saying that belief in God is something only implanted through indoctrination, but belief in God is an internal manifestation, an understanding of the world around a person.

Maybe I’m not explaining myself correctly. Blah

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 5:51 PM

Romans 1:25 on unbelievers:

“They exchanged the truth of God for a lie, and worshiped and served created things rather than the Creator–who is forever praised. Amen”

Food for thought.

DaydreamBeliever on June 3, 2011 at 5:52 PM

That’s what God asked Himself too

DarkCurrent on June 3, 2011 at 5:47 PM

What the hell is forever, man?!

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 5:53 PM

I came to see if DarkCurrent would arrive.

I leave knowing.

portlandon on June 3, 2011 at 5:48 PM

I don’t like living here in your head. Sure, the rent’s free, but the furniture is shabby and the wiring’s dangerously faulty.

DarkCurrent on June 3, 2011 at 5:53 PM

To me, this poll comes as hopeful news — a much-needed reminder that the basic fabric of American belief hasn’t changed all that much, countless cultural signs to the contrary.

Hasn’t changed all that much? One would think that Obama’s election would have shaken that belief. Would not even his reelection do that?

HalJordan on June 3, 2011 at 5:54 PM

Americans still believe that we have a purpose that is of a higher calling than just being alive for awhile and then dying.

We don’t always agree on who God is, but we do agree we exhist for a greater purpose than just living well and being nice to each other.

We may tollerate secular hedonisim, to a fault at times, but we don’t actually place those ideals ahead of our faith in a higher calling.

Lawrence on June 3, 2011 at 5:55 PM

Thanks for the post, Tina. God Bless.

All I have seen teaches me to trust the Creator for all I have not seen.

Ralph Waldo Emerson.

kingsjester on June 3, 2011 at 5:55 PM

I don’t like living here in your head. Sure, the rent’s free, but the furniture is shabby and the wiring’s dangerously faulty.

DarkCurrent on June 3, 2011 at 5:53 PM

So YOU are the reason why we can’t have nice things?

portlandon on June 3, 2011 at 5:55 PM

To me, this poll comes as hopeful news — a much-needed reminder that the basic fabric of American belief hasn’t changed all that much, countless cultural signs to the contrary.

I wouldn’t take comfort. The religious are capable of many evils, too. We still slaughter babies, wholesale.

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 5:55 PM

So what we have here is a survey suggesting that when asked if they believe in God, most people still feel the socially acceptable answer is, “Yes.”

By their fruits you shall know them.

Dee2008 on June 3, 2011 at 5:56 PM

“Nietzsche is dead.”

- God

NickDeringer on June 3, 2011 at 5:56 PM

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 5:51 PM

I would say though that a belief in a particular god is externally planted. Myself, I was raised that way until I started to question the logic of the biblical stories. And since I don’t believe in the Hindu gods or the Islamic god or any Polynesian god, I had no real reason to believe in the god I went to church for.

However, there would still be a widespread belief in the supernatural and some religious structure because man is programmed to believe in a higher power. As Voltaire said, if god didn’t exist, it would be necessary for man to invent him. From the days of the caveman to today, that has been a constant. What has changed are the details. Religions come and go but the need for a belief is only human.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:58 PM

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:50 PM

From your postings, it appears you DO believe in god, and strongly.
Prollum is, your god seems to be man’s logic.
Now we know.

pambi on June 3, 2011 at 5:59 PM

Looks like the numbers dip during war and bad economy. Makes sense. When you lose everything, faith is tested. I bet if they had asked the question during the Great Depression, it would have been less than 90 percent.

andy85719 on June 3, 2011 at 5:59 PM

Ralph Waldo Emerson.

kingsjester on June 3, 2011 at 5:55 PM

Inspirational writer, but not someone most Christian believers would ultimately agreement with.

dedalus on June 3, 2011 at 5:59 PM

9 out of 10 believe in God.

over 5 in 10 supported/voted for a President in 2008 that supports the uninhibited murder of the unborn.

IRONY ALERT anyone?

PappyD61 on June 3, 2011 at 5:24 PM

And 99 out of 100 politicians say they are honest.

As Groucho said, “If you want to know if a man is honest just ask him. If he says he is then you know you are dealing with a crook!”

HalJordan on June 3, 2011 at 6:01 PM

Looks like the numbers dip during war and bad economy. Makes sense. When you lose everything, faith is tested. I bet if they had asked the question during the Great Depression, it would have been less than 90 percent.

andy85719 on June 3, 2011 at 5:59 PM

You’d bet wrong.

There are no atheists during incoming

Roy Rogers on June 3, 2011 at 6:01 PM

Inspirational writer, but not someone most Christian believers would ultimately agreement with.

dedalus on June 3, 2011 at 5:59 PM

Perhaps not, but that quote’s a keeper.

kingsjester on June 3, 2011 at 6:04 PM

Roy Rogers on June 3, 2011 at 5:54 PM

Yeeeehaaaa !!
May God continue to bless my Texas !!!

pambi on June 3, 2011 at 6:05 PM

NickDeringer on June 3, 2011 at 5:56 PM

Heh

Southernblogger on June 3, 2011 at 6:06 PM

Yeah it’s indoctrination and illogical to believe in God.

Men like GK Chesterton, Augustine, Aquinas, Copernicus, -such simpletons -it’s unfortunate that they didn’t have the advantage of being schooled by the likes of some of the brilliant philsophical anti-God bigots here.

Don L on June 3, 2011 at 6:08 PM

I wonder what Dr. Death Jack Kevorkian believes right about now?

PappyD61 on June 3, 2011 at 6:08 PM

From the days of the caveman to today, that has been a constant. What has changed are the details. Religions come and go but the need for a belief is only human.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:58 PM

Indeed. Many ancient Egyptians – (perhaps more than 90%?) – living during the 5th Dynasty of the Old Kingdom believed in Ra, who figures in the picture Tina chose to accompany this thread.

DarkCurrent on June 3, 2011 at 6:09 PM

What the hell is forever, man?!

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 5:53 PM

I’m not qualified to answer that so I found someone who was:

“‎”Eternity is without succession, a simultaneous possession of all joys. To those who live toward Eternity, it really is not something at the end; it is that which influences every moment of the now.”
— Fulton J. Sheen

Tommy_G on June 3, 2011 at 6:13 PM

God is NOT a religion !!
He preached against the ‘religious’, peeps.

pambi on June 3, 2011 at 6:13 PM

So 73% are totally convinced of something for which there is not a shred of evidence.
keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:32 PM

Perhaps you find no evidence because you’ve searched in the wrong places.

zoyclem on June 3, 2011 at 6:14 PM

I wonder what Dr. Death Jack Kevorkian believes right about now?

PappyD61 on June 3, 2011 at 6:08 PM

That he was wrong and that hopefully people are praying for his soul.

Tommy_G on June 3, 2011 at 6:15 PM

I wonder what Dr. Death Jack Kevorkian believes right about now?

PappyD61 on June 3, 2011 at 6:08 PM

“Dang it’s hot.”

davidk on June 3, 2011 at 6:15 PM

My point is that it is disingenuous to mock believers in global warming, and then not mock those who believe in other things for which no evidence can be produced. I’m an equal opportunity mocker. I call BS wherever I see it.
keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:40 PM

Ah, so then you do join the commenter and others in likewise dismissing the Darwinian monkey-to-man hoax as an absurd fantasy? Appreciate the consistency!

whatcat on June 3, 2011 at 6:15 PM

pambi on June 3, 2011 at 6:05 PM

GOD BLESS TEXAS!! YIPPEE KI YAY

Roy Rogers on June 3, 2011 at 6:16 PM

As others noted above there is way too much cognitive dissonance between this poll and life in America.

Jesus said, “Why do you call me Lord, and do not do as I say?”

INC on June 3, 2011 at 6:17 PM

NOT speaking for anyone else, here, but you can get back to me AFTER you, too, are knocked from your horse, and hear the Voice.

LOL. So let me get this straight. You fell off your horse and now you hear voices?

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:44 PM

It’s a reference to Paul’s conversion in Chapter 9 of the Acts of the Apostles, the fifth book in the Christian New Testament. Paul was a Pharisee and Roman citizen from the city of Tarsus (in what is now the Republic of Turkey), and he wrote thirteen letters which are included as part of the canon of the New Testament.

You may be aware of some, perhaps many–but not all–of these facts, but your writing doesn’t show it. In other words, your mockery would be more effective if you spent any time engaged in serious study of what you were mocking. That’s what made Voltaire reasonably effective. Even though he’s not a mocker, that’s what makes Robert Spencer an effective critic of pathologies in the Islamic world.

The lack of the same is what makes Richard Dawkins’ forays into religion near occasions of hilarity, as Terry Eagleton pointed out in his scathing review of The God Delusion:

Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology. Card-carrying rationalists like Dawkins, who is the nearest thing to a professional atheist we have had since Bertrand Russell, are in one sense the least well-equipped to understand what they castigate, since they don’t believe there is anything there to be understood, or at least anything worth understanding. This is why they invariably come up with vulgar caricatures of religious faith that would make a first-year theology student wince. The more they detest religion, the more ill-informed their criticisms of it tend to be. If they were asked to pass judgment on phenomenology or the geopolitics of South Asia, they would no doubt bone up on the question as assiduously as they could. When it comes to theology, however, any shoddy old travesty will pass muster. These days, theology is the queen of the sciences in a rather less august sense of the word than in its medieval heyday.

Sadly, that describes too many of the atheist commenters here. To a “t.”

DRPrice on June 3, 2011 at 6:17 PM

My point is that it is disingenuous to mock believers in global warming…

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:40 PM

No, it’s not.

We are merely performing a much needed intervention on your psychosis.

Roy Rogers on June 3, 2011 at 6:18 PM

PappyD61 on June 3, 2011 at 6:08 PM

He probably believes that it’s awfully hot.

kingsjester on June 3, 2011 at 6:19 PM

Seriously though:

What do you eat in heaven?

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 6:19 PM

what it says about the bravery of Americans who still dare to profess belief in a postmodern world.

Hmmmph.
Bravery? To agree with the vast majority that there’s a grandfatherly creator out there somewhere who doesn’t hate sin takes bravery?
Oh, that might be in their creed, but it’s in the way most people live.
This is an ungodly nation. Not as ungodly as most others, to be sure, but our

basic fabric of American belief

is nothing to take

pride and relief

in.
When we stop slouching toward Gomorrah, when we stop killing millions of our kids, when we stop exporting Hollywood profanity & porn all over the world, then perhaps we can be contented with our spirituality.

itsnotaboutme on June 3, 2011 at 6:19 PM

What do you eat in heaven?

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 6:19 PM

You want to see the menu?

Roy Rogers on June 3, 2011 at 6:20 PM

So you are taking Pascal’s wager, then? My point is that it is disingenuous to mock believers in global warming, and then not mock those who believe in other things for which no evidence can be produced. I’m an equal opportunity mocker. I call BS wherever I see it. Of course a belief in god is not as damaging as a belief in global warming. But it is just as silly.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:40 PM

Keep the change.

Perhaps your unaware that global warming caused by man is but faith in science – a measurable branch of knowledge -measurable repeatable proof is possible.(Spatial temporal knowledge)

God, however, is spirit and unmeasurable (Faith/revelation)-so comparing the two as similiar is flunking philosphy 110. research epistomology first -it’ll help with your arguments or dare I say -convert you.

Don L on June 3, 2011 at 6:21 PM

Roy Rogers on June 3, 2011 at 6:16 PM

You betcha !!
And, we get to hear that @ every one of our Ranger games !!
Sure fires me up !
LOL

pambi on June 3, 2011 at 6:21 PM

You want to see the menu?

Roy Rogers on June 3, 2011 at 6:20 PM

Heck yes

If I can’t get a good cannoli, what’s the point?

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 6:22 PM

So 73% are totally convinced of something for which there is not a shred of evidence. That’s worse than the numbers for the belief in global warming and we at Hotair mock those who believe in that. In both of these religions, the common denominator is a desire to believe because it suits the believers’ worldview.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 5:32 PM

Believe me, there’s far more than a shred of evidence.

Collected posts of my apologetics for my belief that Jesus is Lord.

INC on June 3, 2011 at 6:23 PM

Imagine someone holding forth on biology whose only knowledge of the subject is the Book of British Birds, and you have a rough idea of what it feels like to read Richard Dawkins on theology. Card-carrying rationalists like Dawkins, who is the nearest thing to a professional atheist we have had since Bertrand Russell, are in one sense the least well-equipped to understand what they castigate, since they don’t believe there is anything there to be understood, or at least anything worth understanding. This is why they invariably come up with vulgar caricatures of religious faith that would make a first-year theology student wince. The more they detest religion, the more ill-informed their criticisms of it tend to be. If they were asked to pass judgment on phenomenology or the geopolitics of South Asia, they would no doubt bone up on the question as assiduously as they could. When it comes to theology, however, any shoddy old travesty will pass muster. These days, theology is the queen of the sciences in a rather less august sense of the word than in its medieval heyday.

DRPrice on June 3, 2011 at 6:17 PM

Well said.

itsnotaboutme on June 3, 2011 at 6:25 PM

DRPrice on June 3, 2011 at 6:17 PM

+++++++++

pambi on June 3, 2011 at 6:26 PM

DRPrice on June 3, 2011 at 6:17 PM

The God Delusion [by Richard Dawkins] makes me embarrassed to be an atheist.”
~Dr. Michael Ruse

davidk on June 3, 2011 at 6:27 PM

We are merely performing a much needed intervention on your psychosis.

Roy Rogers on June 3, 2011 at 6:18 PM

You must be new here if you don’t that KTC rails against the global warming scam. My point was that if we mock AGW believers, it is only fair we mock all the other religions equally.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 6:28 PM

INC on June 3, 2011 at 6:23 PM

Despite the abundance of evidence for faith in the Biblical God, they will continue to insist that there’s absolutely no evidence.
Where’s the evidence for their confident assertion that there is no god of any kind? They have an abundance of faith, but not evidence.

itsnotaboutme on June 3, 2011 at 6:28 PM

DRPrice on June 3, 2011 at 6:17 PM

Excellent points about Dawkins (Hitchens too)

Such highly intellegent men we are told by their non-beliveing fans in the media. Why would someone with the slightest intelligence spend their entire life and energy fighting a God that they are certain doesn’t exist? Unless…they know well that He exists and have failed to convince themselves that he doesn’t, and just refuse to serve Him. Either way they are inarguably, fools.

Don L on June 3, 2011 at 6:28 PM

If I can’t get a good cannoli, what’s the point?

blatantblue on June 3, 2011 at 6:22 PM

“Each one will receive His own reward ACCORDING TO HIS OWN LABOR.” (1 Corinthians 3:8)

I guess you are going to Hell
Good luck with that.

Roy Rogers on June 3, 2011 at 6:29 PM

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 6:28 PM

That’s no point at all.

Everyone knows the Global Warming Scam is a manifestation of the mental illness caused by liberalism.

algore is no god at all.

Roy Rogers on June 3, 2011 at 6:31 PM

My point was that if we mock AGW believers, it is only fair we mock all the other religions equally.

keep the change on June 3, 2011 at 6:28 PM

“All the other religions” aren’t trying to use their beliefs to strangle our economy, dimbulb.

Uncle Sams Nephew on June 3, 2011 at 6:31 PM

Why would someone with the slightest intelligence spend their entire life and energy fighting a God that they are certain doesn’t exist? Unless…they know well that He exists and have failed to convince themselves that he doesn’t, and just refuse to serve Him. Either way they are inarguably, fools.

Don L on June 3, 2011 at 6:28 PM

Well said!

Roy Rogers on June 3, 2011 at 6:32 PM

PappyD61 on June 3, 2011 at 5:24 PM

There are not a few who oppose abortion but don’t think it’s the government’s business to say what you can and can’t do with your body. I agree with them in spirit, but I don’t want the government funding abortions with my tax money, and there we have a problem!

Uncle Sams Nephew on June 3, 2011 at 6:33 PM

… since they don’t believe there is anything there to be understood, or at least anything worth understanding. This is why they invariably come up with vulgar caricatures (of her). The more they detest (her), the more ill-informed their criticisms of it tend to be …

DRPrice on June 3, 2011 at 6:17 PM

Am I the ONLY one who notices the similarity to the Sarah Palin phenomena ?? (MY adjustments to the text)
Gee, wonder why that is ??? SURELY NOTHING to do with her beliefs !!
/

pambi on June 3, 2011 at 6:34 PM

I think a better question would be to ask what “level” of God do you believe in? Do you believe that God is intimately involved in your life, or, for you, is he somewhere up there just observing it all?

SouthernGent on June 3, 2011 at 6:36 PM

99% of the people in Pakitan beleive in a god.

The specifics are kinda important.

mankai on June 3, 2011 at 6:37 PM

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