Video: Nanny of the Month is …

posted at 3:30 pm on May 31, 2011 by Ed Morrissey

I confess to having mixed feelings about Reason TV’s Nanny of the Month, Terry Pierce of North Carolina. Pierce recently declared that he would begin enforcing a statute passed almost 20 years in his state that forbids restaurants from serving hamburger patties rare. The law doesn’t apply to people grilling their own burgers, but the new enforcement policy will keep consumers at eateries from getting it “their way.” Is this a nanny-state overreach, or good public policy based on a real problem?

May’s biggest busybodies are taking it to poker players and teen tanners, but the nation’s top nag has lovers of pink-in-the-middle burgers seeing red.

In a stunning blow to all that is juicy and delicious, the Tar Heel state actually prohibits restaurants from serving rare or medium-rare hamburgers. (And if this crime against meat freedom seems especially un-American, keep in mind that it comes from the same state that once banned Old Glory at public rallies.)

Presenting Reason.tv’s Nanny of the Month for May 2011: Terry Pierce of the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources!

Unlike other busybody issues, this one actually has a basis for government action. Over the past couple of decades, a number of people have died from E-coli outbreaks linked to undercooked ground beef in restaurants. The most well-known case involved Jack in the Box restaurants in the 1980s, but they’re hardly alone. The problem originates in contamination that gets missed in USDA inspections and is easily resolved by fully cooking ground beef — or in producing one’s own ground beef from better cuts of meat. (Irradiation at the meatpacker source would also solve the problem, but the US has balked at using that method for safety for entirely baseless fears of radiation.)

Jack in the Box responded to the lawsuits by increasing its cooking time and temperature of meat patties, and some states and lower-level jurisdictions passed bans on rare burgers.  The enforcement on those bans is probably next to nil, but few restaurateurs will want to set themselves up for liability if a customer gets sick from a bad hamburger by defying those laws.  Most restaurants these days refuse to serve burgers rare with or without enforcement.

I’d be more inclined to vote for the terrorist surveillance that busted a poker game, but that’s just me.  There are also good medical reasons to restrict tanning salons to adults only, but considering the fact that the government demands access to abortion for underaged girls without parental consent, I’d call that one a qualified entrant as well.    What do you think?  Take the poll:

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Pretty soon the law will apply to backyard grills…

PatriotRider on May 31, 2011 at 3:33 PM

There are also good medical reasons to restrict tanning salons to adults only

Less tax money for ObamaCare?

WashJeff on May 31, 2011 at 3:34 PM

The law doesn’t apply to people grilling their own burgers,

We must close the “burger-show loophole”.

scrubjay on May 31, 2011 at 3:35 PM

I would suppose E-coli can live on utensils or prep surfaces from rare meat and contaminate the next guy’s burger who wants it well done, so I don’t know, this may be an ok thing.

I’ll wait for the more germ-informed people to opine and see what I find out.

Bishop on May 31, 2011 at 3:35 PM

Bullshiite, you should be able to order a RAW burger like Jim Carey in ”Once Bitten” if you want to!

Tony737 on May 31, 2011 at 3:36 PM

Man that burger looks delicious. Me thinks I will be BBQing tonight. Mmmmm

angryed on May 31, 2011 at 3:36 PM

Rather than ban a style of cooking food that has been around as long as cooking, I’d rather see (if they must to protect themselves from lawsuits) a disclaimer on a menu that ordering your meat rare includes a potential risk.

If people still order their meat rare, so be it. But telling somone they can’t get their food cooked their way seems nanny-ish to me.

There are risks in eating raw fish, too. Will Sushi bars/restaurants be banned as well?

DrAllecon on May 31, 2011 at 3:40 PM

Anything with the name “Department of Environment and Natural Resources” is a nanny by definition and should be banned!

cartooner on May 31, 2011 at 3:41 PM

I would suppose E-coli can live on utensils or prep surfaces from rare meat and contaminate the next guy’s burger who wants it well done, so I don’t know, this may be an ok thing.

This problem is not addressed. Even if you cook each burger to well done, the utensils and surfaces might touch raw meat then a cooked burger.

vermin on May 31, 2011 at 3:43 PM

Never again to enjoy steak tartar, that’s a good enough reason to boycott North Carolina.

Tommy_G on May 31, 2011 at 3:43 PM

I was in a French rail station and ordered, well it does not matter because I received a plate of raw ground beef with a pile of capers, onions minced, and toast. It wasn’t bad with wine. Carpaccio.

Marcus on May 31, 2011 at 3:45 PM

‘Pink in the middle’ is not ‘rare’ or ‘medium rare’. A bit of pink remaining in the middle of a burger or steak is defined as ‘medium’. If no pink is allowed, that means ‘well done’.

slickwillie2001 on May 31, 2011 at 3:46 PM

I like my beef rare, thank you, and if I’m willing to take the risks of ordering it that way, I don’t need some .gov parasite taking that choice away from me.

Freedom!

glockomatic on May 31, 2011 at 3:46 PM

As I recall from when I lived there, rare burgers have been illegal in Maryland since I was knee high to Jiminy Cricket.

But we used to eat it raw baby! That’s right, on Pumpernickel with salt and pepper and a slice of onion. Then we found out about the e coli and all.

The problem originates in contamination that gets missed in USDA inspections and is easily resolved by fully cooking ground beef — or in producing one’s own ground beef from better cuts of meat.

That’s not really accurate. Meat that passes inspection could cause e coli poisoning when ground.

The reason why you can have a rare steak w/o worrying about e coli is that the e coli -spilled from the beef’s gut during slaughter- is on the surface of the meat, which is burned clean when cooked even a little.

BUT if you grind that same piece of meat, the outside is now on the inside and if you don’t cook it thoroughly, you could get sick and die.

Akzed on May 31, 2011 at 3:47 PM

If a good veterinarian can resuscitate it, my steak is just rare enough. :-)

glockomatic on May 31, 2011 at 3:47 PM

This problem is not addressed. Even if you cook each burger to well done, the utensils and surfaces might touch raw meat then a cooked burger.
vermin on May 31, 2011 at 3:43 PM

Well you have a point, and that’s what I like about this place, lots of good insight.

I like raw beef, I subscribe to the idea that you knock the horns off, wipe its rear and throw it on a bun.

Bishop on May 31, 2011 at 3:48 PM

(Irradiation at the meatpacker source would also solve the problem, but the US has balked at using that method for safety for entirely baseless fears of radiation.)

You’re an expert on this?

Rode Werk on May 31, 2011 at 3:49 PM

I would suppose E-coli can live on utensils or prep surfaces from rare meat and contaminate the next guy’s burger who wants it well done, so I don’t know, this may be an ok thing.

I’ll wait for the more germ-informed people to opine and see what I find out.

Bishop on May 31, 2011 at 3:35 PM

Does E-coli exist only on uncooked meat?

Was there some mass E-coli outbreak in NC that was traced back to a rare hamburger?

Talon on May 31, 2011 at 3:50 PM

Raw in the middle, burnt around the edges for me.

vermin on May 31, 2011 at 3:50 PM

vermin on May 31, 2011 at 3:43 PM

This is usually addressed in health codes & inspections.

I’m sure this rule if violated, but also sure it exists & is enforced.

cs89 on May 31, 2011 at 3:51 PM

Rather than ban a style of cooking food that has been around as long as cooking, I’d rather see (if they must to protect themselves from lawsuits) a disclaimer on a menu that ordering your meat rare includes a potential risk.

That’s the exact kind of language displayed at restaurants like Cracker Barrel serving hamburger steak as well as seafood restaurants serving shellfish such as raw oysters.

teke184 on May 31, 2011 at 3:52 PM

Would this apply to barbecue?

Insert witty screen name here on May 31, 2011 at 3:53 PM

If you know how to grill, you can make juicy, well-done burgers.

The key is the slap. You can’t just mush em flat with your hands, you gotta spank them bad boys, slap em real hard, which forms a sort of a seal on the surface that keep them juices in.

And close the lid when you flip em, and move them off the flame. Then the insides cook and the surface don’t burn.

I gotta tell you people everything.

Akzed on May 31, 2011 at 3:53 PM

Would this apply to barbecue? Insert witty screen name here on May 31, 2011 at 3:53 PM

No, cause it’s thoroughly cooked.

Akzed on May 31, 2011 at 3:55 PM

Why don’t we eliminate all the risk in living? That’s right we would all have to commit suicide to do that. Is there a risk involved with eating rare meats? Yes. The problem is that the risk is much closer to 0 than it is to 1 (1 being 100%). You have a higher risk of catching a MRSA from visiting the hospital than you do of getting E. coli poisoning from eating rare meats.

chemman on May 31, 2011 at 3:57 PM

Check it out. He’s on FB too.

Akzed on May 31, 2011 at 3:57 PM

Menus out here in CA have a warning that undercooked meat, poultry and eggs can contain harmful bacteria.

We’re still allowed to order it how we want it.

There are plenty of potentially dangerous things (such as driving cars) that people are allowed to engage in on a daily basis. Unless the risk of getting e.coli from undercooked beef is so great that there’s a compelling reason to ban it entirely, I don’t think the government should do anything beyond making sure people are aware of the risks.

Does anyone happen to know the risk of getting e.coli from a rare burger? Is it greater than the risk of dying in a car accident? Or risk of death from a backyard swimming pool? I’m curious as to whether or not relative risk levels are even considered when a government agency decides to ban one ‘dangerous’ thing but leave other ‘dangerous’ things legal.

As for me, I’m a medium well type of girl. My meat is always cooked thoroughly and then drowned in ketchup (if a burger) or steak sauce (if something classier than a burger).

JadeNYU on May 31, 2011 at 3:58 PM

Talon on May 31, 2011 at 3:50 PM

You tell me, something I addressed in the very post you quoted.

Which you read, I presume.

Bishop on May 31, 2011 at 3:59 PM

Government is not the solution to our problem; government is the problem. — Ronaldus Magnus

petefrt on May 31, 2011 at 3:59 PM

Had a coupla’ rare burgers yesterday and I am still here to talk about it…

OmahaConservative on May 31, 2011 at 3:59 PM

That’s the exact kind of language displayed at restaurants like Cracker Barrel serving hamburger steak as well as seafood restaurants serving shellfish such as raw oysters.

teke184 on May 31, 2011 at 3:52 PM

See, I’d much rather support that. Of course, nothing at all would be better, but until people vote out nanny-staters, that’s at least better than banning the customer’s food choice completely.

DrAllecon on May 31, 2011 at 3:59 PM

Bishop on May 31, 2011 at 3:48 PM

LOL. My kind of person. If it doesn’t try to get off the plate and run away then it ain’t worth eating.

chemman on May 31, 2011 at 4:01 PM

No, cause it’s thoroughly cooked.

Akzed on May 31, 2011 at 3:55 PM

It still might sometimes look pink inside – at least as I recall.

Insert witty screen name here on May 31, 2011 at 4:03 PM

The key is the slap. You can’t just mush em flat with your hands, you gotta spank them bad boys, slap em real hard, which forms a sort of a seal on the surface that keep them juices in.

Akzed on May 31, 2011 at 3:53 PM

So you are recommending spanking your meat?

Interesting.

sharrukin on May 31, 2011 at 4:03 PM

cs89 on May 31, 2011 at

You might be right. I only have limited burger-flipper experience and it was 10 years ago, but I used the same flipper for all the burgers.

In any case, if that problem is already addressed by inspections it shouldn’t matter if some of the burgers are taken off the grill while still rare.

vermin on May 31, 2011 at 4:04 PM

They ought to do one about the USDA Rabbit Police.

Socratease on May 31, 2011 at 4:04 PM

JadeNYU on May 31, 2011 at 3:58 PM

Most government agencies wouldn’t know how to calculate risk to determine the relative risk of anything. In order to calculate the risk we would need to know the total number of servings of rare meats each year, the number of people who contract an E. coli infection from that rare meat and the number who required medical intervention as a result of the infection. That would allow you to assign a risk of infection requiring medical intervention.

chemman on May 31, 2011 at 4:08 PM

I’d hate to get e.coli leading to TSS and when I awake from my coma, assuming that I wake up at all, and find out they had to amputate my arms and legs. I’ll take my meat medium.

Blake on May 31, 2011 at 4:15 PM

The most well-known case involved Jack in the Box restaurants in the 1980s, but they’re hardly alone

No no.. let’s be honest here, Jack in the Box NEVER lets you order a burger rare or even medium rare and always serve their burgers well done. The problem was that the meat supply got contaminated before or AFTER cooking (pre-cooked patties anyone?) and they never did figure out what the exact problem was.

Cooking is one way to ensure safety, sure… but a restaurant should know how to handle food properly. If the state’s aren’t enforcing basic sanitary laws in restaurants (and they aren’t) enforcing cooking times isn’t going to help.

Skywise on May 31, 2011 at 4:19 PM

My ancestors came to this country to avoid governments telling them how to live their lives……..

Vashta.Nerada on May 31, 2011 at 4:29 PM

I live in NC and, for many years, the only choice we have been offered when ordering a hamburger in a restaurant is medium-well or well done. Of course, there have been many times my ‘medium-well’ burger has been red in the middle, so I don’t complain. As long as it isn’t a hockey puck, I am happy with it.

ConservativeMom on May 31, 2011 at 4:32 PM

Most restaurants these days refuse to serve burgers rare with or without enforcement.

I feel sorry for you, the places you eat at must be terrible, I have never been in a place where I could not get a Medium Steak or Burger. there is NOTHING worse than a over cooked slab of beef….

the_ancient on May 31, 2011 at 4:42 PM

It still might sometimes look pink inside – at least as I recall. Insert witty screen name here on May 31, 2011 at 4:03 PM

That’s ok, like I said, rare roasts and steaks are ok when moderately cooked because the e coli from the feces which was inevitably splashed all over the outsides of the meat is killed in the cooking.

If that same roast was ground, its outside -containing the traces of e coli- are now on the inside and failure to cook it through and through leaves live e coli in the middle of yer burger.

Akzed on May 31, 2011 at 4:44 PM

So you are recommending spanking your meat? Interesting. sharrukin on May 31, 2011 at 4:03 PM

It’s from the Anthony Weiner School of Culinary and Photographic Arts.

Akzed on May 31, 2011 at 4:46 PM

This reminds me of the controversy several years ago surrounding eggs. Because there was a remote chance of acquiring salmonella or some other nasty bacteria from raw eggs, it was proposed that the restaurants be forced to serve eggs only with the yolk cooked completely. I remember one restaurant talked about having people sign waivers. I want my over-easy eggs, so I would’ve gladly signed a waiver.

I don’t know if it’s a state law, a local law, or otherwise, but all restaurant menus around here have the disclaimer on them that eating raw or undercooked food can be dangerous. Why can’t that be enough?

JannyMae on May 31, 2011 at 4:47 PM

My ancestors came to this country to avoid governments telling them how to live their lives…….. Vashta.Nerada on May 31, 2011 at 4:29 PM

Hey, mine too! Maybe we’re related!

Akzed on May 31, 2011 at 4:47 PM

Most of the restaurants here in Colorado just include a warning on the menu about rare or undercooked meats, eggs, and seafood. Basically an “eat at your own risk” notice.

Common Sense on May 31, 2011 at 4:50 PM

I’ve thought for a long time that we should require all meat and other fresh foods to be irradiated before being sold to consumers. It kills all bacteria contamination, makes the product stay fresh longer and is well worth the cost, given the number of e. coli cases people get from eating meat, even lettuce, and the amount of food being recalled.

Irradiation doesn’t make the food radioactive or change its taste other than to keep it less likely to rot.

Other than that, grinding their own ground beef on site from the various cuts of meat gives the restaurant greater control and makes the hamburger taste better. Of course, that means the restaurant would have to steam clean its grinding equipment and sanitize all surfaces and tools used in preparation.

flataffect on May 31, 2011 at 4:57 PM

Finally, the government enforces something righteous. Nuke beef till it glows and shoot it in the dark.

J.E. Dyer on May 31, 2011 at 5:02 PM

I like my meat med-well and I am annoyed by this.

If you like raw meat, It is best to buy from a kosher butcher. The salt water rinse, washes away most of the harmful bacteria off.

Slowburn on May 31, 2011 at 5:09 PM

I like my steak as rare as possible. But I like my burgers medium to medium-well. Here’s why…

A steak may have bacteria on the outside, which are easily killed by a little heat. The bacteria cannot penetrate the meat, so they are not inside. The rare inside of the steak is safe to eat. (This is not true of pork, which can have Trichinella parasites inside the meat.)

If you take that same steak with E coli on the outside and grind it up, you now have bacteria throughout the meat. If the inside is not cooked, you can consume live bacteria and find yourself quite ill.

If we have to have nanny laws, this is a good one to have.

stvnscott on May 31, 2011 at 5:11 PM

Jack in The Box was late 1992 – most of 1993.

Safe Tables Our Priority – S.T.O.P. is the non profit organization formed and continues to educate on food safety today, of which the misses is a Board member.

Odie1941 on May 31, 2011 at 6:11 PM

This is not true of pork, which can have Trichinella parasites inside the meat.)

Hmm the USDA just revised its recommended temps for pork because it found the “pork scare” to have about as much validity as “Reefer Madness”

the_ancient on May 31, 2011 at 6:12 PM

I would suppose E-coli can live on utensils or prep surfaces from rare meat and contaminate the next guy’s burger who wants it well done, so I don’t know, this may be an ok thing.

I’ll wait for the more germ-informed people to opine and see what I find out.

Bishop on May 31, 2011 at 3:35 PM
Does E-coli exist only on uncooked meat?

Was there some mass E-coli outbreak in NC that was traced back to a rare hamburger?

Talon on May 31, 2011 at 3:50 PM

Most recent e Coli outbreaks in America have been produce, though tainted and distributed meat is also a factor.

See the German E Coli outbreak over the past few weeks, along with Taco Bell (green onion), mixed salads, spinach, etc, etc.

How do veggies get contaminated? Largely due to fecal runoff and shared veggie irrigation systems.

Odie1941 on May 31, 2011 at 6:13 PM

What’s next, banning cold cuts?

madmonkphotog on May 31, 2011 at 6:16 PM

What’s next, banning cold cuts?

madmonkphotog on May 31, 2011 at 6:16 PM

Nice snark on a serious issue, you know – because my wife almost DIED from E Coli… but anyway moron – cold cuts are processed, filled with gelatin, salt and other groovy crap to ensure its “edible”…

Odie1941 on May 31, 2011 at 6:19 PM

What’s next, banning cold cuts?

madmonkphotog on May 31, 2011 at 6:16 PM

All none cooked fresh food….

Everything must be Cooked, and Filled with Preservatives, for your own good…..

Personally I think we should do away with all food, and get a government prepared paste that contains all of the vitamins, minerals and other items the body needs. After all we cant be trusted with our own food choices, we over eat, under cook, and choose fries over apple slices, it is time for the madness to end

the_ancient on May 31, 2011 at 6:19 PM

What’s next, banning cold cuts?

madmonkphotog on May 31, 2011 at 6:16 PM

Nice snark on a serious issue, you know – because my wife almost DIED from E Coli… but anyway moron – cold cuts are processed, filled with gelatin, salt and other groovy crap to ensure its “edible”.

Know where she got E Coli????? a restaurant hamburger on U of Alabama campus

Odie1941 on May 31, 2011 at 6:21 PM

Most people here are missing the point. The issue with E-coli is here for one reason and one reason only. Cattle feed lots that feed corn to cattle exclusively.

Cows are supposed to eat grass, not grain. Much like our human food supply that has too much corn in it; too much corn causes problems.

Naturally grass-fed beef has almost no E-coli risk. It’s the large agra-businesses that have made E-coli a way of life.

Sad.

BierManVA on May 31, 2011 at 6:31 PM

(Irradiation at the meatpacker source would also solve the problem, but the US has balked at using that method for safety for entirely baseless fears of radiation.)

*head-to-desk*
*head-to-desk*
*head-to-desk*

Count to 10 on May 31, 2011 at 7:55 PM

Odie1941 on May 31, 2011 at 6:21 PM

My cousin’s son nearly died of E. coli poisoning as well but, his came from a salad they got in a diner. Proper food handling counts just as much as cooking. However, as has been stated, cooking well doesn’t mean it will stop the bacteria from spreading to other surfaces if it’s not handled properly.

boomer on May 31, 2011 at 8:21 PM

I’m so glad the government is here to take care of me. I don’t know what I would do without their infinite wisdom.

Big Orange on May 31, 2011 at 9:10 PM

Nice snark on a serious issue, you know – because my wife almost DIED from E Coli… but anyway moron – cold cuts are processed, filled with gelatin, salt and other groovy crap to ensure its “edible”.

All issues are serious to someone. If you’re going to get butthurt and call names when it happens to be your turn, you might consider staying off the Internet.

And there have been cases of e coli and a bunch of other bacterial infections from cold cuts.

vermin on May 31, 2011 at 9:37 PM

I ordered a medium rare hamburger steak at Waffle House and they had me sign a waiver. Isn’t that a simple enough solution? We don’t need more freaking laws.

GnuBreed on May 31, 2011 at 9:44 PM

Talon on May 31, 2011 at 3:50 PM

You tell me, something I addressed in the very post you quoted.

Which you read, I presume.

Bishop on May 31, 2011 at 3:59 PM

I should have mentioned that I was agreeing with you and just adding a couple points.

Talon on May 31, 2011 at 9:49 PM

My mother used to let me eat raw hamburger, and when she made steak, drink the blood from a shot glass. The downside is I’ll never need Viagra and will defend my right to eat whatever I decide is right.

Hening on May 31, 2011 at 10:01 PM

The two large hamburger breakouts I recall were caused by mass produced ground beef from a Vons/Safeway commercial plant and another similar commercial production facility. The problem in both cases was hard to clean gears or grinders that incubated the bacteria and contaminated the meat.

Just like the poison paint from China and the melamine cat food it’s the large corporate dealers who cause the problem yet the government’s solutions always serve to dis proportionally punish the small local operators so as to benefit the guys who caused the problem in the first place.

Regardless what the Feds say Burger King will never allow “your way” to include a rare burger. Neither will any of the other fast food joints because they know their food is more susceptible to e coli problems. Their insurance dept will make sure there is no pink meat coming off those grills. No law is necessary to rein them in.

If a local business has a clean, fresh source that allows them with confidence to grind and grill rare burgers than what the hell business is it of any government to tell them to cease and desist? What these laws do is remove an advantage the local niche restaurants have over the fast food giants. Another joy-less, job killing, puritanical scam to raise money from their lobbyist clients. Make no mistake this is all about cash flow for elected goons.

rcl on May 31, 2011 at 10:21 PM

Regardless what the Feds say Burger King will never allow “your way” to include a rare burger. Neither will any of the other fast food joints because they know their food is more susceptible to e coli problems. Their insurance dept will make sure there is no pink meat coming off those grills. No law is necessary to rein them in.

Actually insurance is not the reason fast food places will not serve a less than well done burger, Many places have timers, or very hot grills that will sear the meat strait though effectively cooking both sides at the same time, thus making it impossible for the “cook” to do anything other than well done, in the case of burger king their meat is cooked on a conveyor belt though a flame grill with ZERO control by the person “cooking”. Further very few fast food places, I can think of only 2 regional chains around here, there cook their meet “to order” most of the big boys have a dedicated station that cooks meat all day, that meat is then put in to a bin and a separate person assembles the sandwich “to order” meaning toppings only can be customized at order. This has nothing to do with food borne illness and everything to do with SPEED.

the_ancient on May 31, 2011 at 11:38 PM

Raw watermelon is pink inside. Go for it boefore it is too late.

seven on June 1, 2011 at 8:18 AM

I have to confess I think I may be a vampire-I love nearly raw burgers dripping with blood, am most active at night and absolutely despise garlic (it smells like somebody deposited a juicy beer fart on your food.)

But regardless of my likes and dislikes-within reason-people have the right to eat whatever they like( including raw slugs)without busybody interference.

MaiDee on June 1, 2011 at 8:40 AM

Nice snark on a serious issue, you know – because my wife almost DIED from E Coli… but anyway moron – cold cuts are processed, filled with gelatin, salt and other groovy crap to ensure its “edible”.
All issues are serious to someone. If you’re going to get butthurt and call names when it happens to be your turn, you might consider staying off the Internet.

And there have been cases of e coli and a bunch of other bacterial infections from cold cuts.

vermin on May 31, 2011 at 9:37 PM

When I need a morons advice, I will ask you.
And if you are going to talk tough on the internet to certain people, may I suggest staying off the internet.

Odie1941 on June 1, 2011 at 9:19 AM

Right, I humbly beg your pardon for suggesting you might consider behaving like an adult rather than a forth-grader.

vermin on June 1, 2011 at 12:32 PM

As for me, I’m a medium well type of girl. My meat is always cooked thoroughly and then drowned in ketchup (if a burger) or steak sauce (if something classier than a burger).

JadeNYU on May 31, 2011 at 3:58 PM

Cook those babies rare or medium rare and you can throw the ketchup and steak sauce away!

mwdiver on June 1, 2011 at 12:43 PM