Breaking: Tsunami warnings for Japan after 7.4 aftershock

posted at 11:24 am on April 7, 2011 by Ed Morrissey

As if Japan hadn’t suffered enough over the last few weeks.   Another earthquake hit just off the northeastern coast of Honshu near the Miyagi prefecture, a 7.4 magnitude aftershock to last month’s 9.0 catastrophic quake..  Warnings have been issued for a potential six-foot tsunami in an area already battered by massive tsunamis and flooding, not to mention the nuclear crisis to the south:

Japan was rattled by a strong aftershock and tsunami warning Thursday night nearly a month after a devastating earthquake and tsunami flattened the northeastern coast.

The Japan meteorological agency issued a tsunami warning for a wave of up to 6 feet (two meters). The warning was issued for a coastal area already torn apart by last month’s tsunami, which is believed to have killed some 25,000 people and has sparked an ongoing crisis at a nuclear power plant.

Officials say Thursday’s aftershock was a 7.4-magnitude and hit 25 miles (40 kilometers) under the water and off the coast of Miyagi prefecture. The quake that preceded last month’s tsunami was a 9.0-magnitude.

Reports of damage are so far minimal, but all power was lost in Ichinoseki, and it’s not clear whether that was deliberate or the result of damage to power transmission systems.   The government has already issued an evacuation order for the northeastern coast.   This time, though, the tsunami is not expected to pose a threat to Hawaii or the US west coast region:

U.S. officials say a 7.4-magnitude earthquake off the coast of Japan is not expected to create a tsunami threat in Hawaii or the West Coast.

Federal agencies say that area includes Hawaii, California, Oregon, Washington, Alaska and British Columbia, Canada.

Initial reports indicated that the government may have evacuated the already-critical Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station, but a later report backed away from that claim.   We’ll keep our eyes on the story as it unfolds, but hopefully the damage will be limited by the earlier destruction.


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Lord help the people of Japan.

ted c on April 7, 2011 at 11:27 AM

Like I said in the headline thread:

Poor Japan. My hearts go out to them.

Vanceone on April 7, 2011 at 11:28 AM

That sucks….

Ltlgeneral64 on April 7, 2011 at 11:28 AM

I don’t want to be insensitive about this. But folks, when you live in such an acitve seismic zone like they do, this is what you can expect.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:28 AM

My prayers are certainly with these people.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:29 AM

The Japanese should take Celine Dion’s advice and get a kayak.

Bishop on April 7, 2011 at 11:30 AM

It’s now been downgraded to 7.1. But still. Prayers sent.

IronDioPriest on April 7, 2011 at 11:30 AM

Just can’t get a break over there.

Tim_CA on April 7, 2011 at 11:31 AM

They are saying it’s an aftershock of the 9.0 quake. Also Only Japan may see a tsunami and probably not more than about 3 feet high. Bad, yes but waaaay weaker than the other.

cartooner on April 7, 2011 at 11:32 AM

They are reporting there were 2 quakes, each around 7.4, and that Mexico just had a 6.4.

di butler on April 7, 2011 at 11:34 AM

You can have aftershocks for years.
Those who lost everything may very well consider not coming back to the shoreside.
Like Katrina.
There’s a reason all of those ancient warning stones were found in various places in Japan, warning descendants about where & how to live.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:35 AM

di butler on April 7, 2011 at 11:34 AM

USGS only has one (that i can see):
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsww/Maps/10/145_40.php

gh on April 7, 2011 at 11:36 AM

This would be a good time for the Japanese to return illegally abducted American children back to their American families.

Sorry, but while I do feel deep sympathy for the human tragedy the earthquakes and tsunamis have caused, I’m having a difficult time feeling anything but contempt for the Japanese government until they sign the Hague Treaty and stop condoning international child abductions.

CliffHanger on April 7, 2011 at 11:37 AM

7.4 or 7.1 is usually the biggie one, with smaller aftershocks. When a 7+ earthquake is an aftershock you know the main event was huge. Looks like the Pacific rim is heating up. What’s next, a big volcano somewhere?

rbj on April 7, 2011 at 11:37 AM

What’s next, a big volcano somewhere?

rbj on April 7, 2011 at 11:37 AM

Keep an eye on Yellowstone

Ugly on April 7, 2011 at 11:39 AM

I don’t want to be insensitive about this. But folks, when you live in such an acitve seismic zone like they do, this is what you can expect.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:28 AM

Every region of the world has its own set of natural dangers. Where I live it’s tornadoes. A century ago, you could have added killer blizzards to that, but that’s one natural disaster we’ve managed to control down to a manageable size. There are no safe zones.

Or to put it more succinctly: “p*ss off”.

PackerBronco on April 7, 2011 at 11:39 AM

http://www.jma.go.jp/en/tsunami/

Japan Meteorological Agency tsunami forecast

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 11:42 AM

http://www.jma.go.jp/en/quake/20110407234633391-072332.html

Japan Meteorological Agency quake detail. Both links are in English.

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 11:43 AM

What’s next, a big volcano somewhere?

rbj on April 7, 2011 at 11:37 AM

A platoon of Gorts’ walking around?

BobMbx on April 7, 2011 at 11:44 AM

di butler on April 7, 2011 at 11:34 AM
USGS only has one (that i can see):
http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsww/Maps/10/145_40.php

gh on April 7, 2011 at 11:36 AM

I was just going off of Reuters and the BBC. Who knows what’s really going on over there……..

di butler on April 7, 2011 at 11:44 AM

Unbelievable!!!!!

grapeknutz on April 7, 2011 at 11:44 AM

If that tsunami forecast is accurate, things shouldn’t be TOO bad as long as people evacuate the shore rapidly. This one was closer to land than the March 11 9.0 quake though.

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 11:45 AM

Or to put it more succinctly: “p*ss off”.

PackerBronco on April 7, 2011 at 11:39 AM

I assume you are telling me to pi$$ off.
I assume you missed my comment directly below that when I indicated my genuine sympathy for these afflicted people.
Perhaps it is possible you are too much of a dick to understand my clinical observation. By stating the obvious doesn’t make me any less caring.
But whatever. You can kindly go eff yourself if that is the kind of man you are.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:45 AM

USGS has it at 7.1

J_Crater on April 7, 2011 at 11:45 AM

I’m beginning to think if I don’t visit Japan in the next week or two, there won’t be a Japan left to visit.

MadisonConservative on April 7, 2011 at 11:45 AM

Keep an eye on Yellowstone

Ugly on April 7, 2011 at 11:39 AM

A sleeping giant. Or perhaps the huge lava lake below the surface will slowly cool & crystalize quietly without a hitch.
One never knows.
Perhaps the Japanese will learn from this terrible tragedy & not attempt to live in risky area & focus their rebuilding efforts on ‘safer’ higher ground.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:47 AM

I moved from the Seattle area for this very reason. I did not want to be caught in that unprepared, highly populated area if & when a big one struck.
Bcs there is a high possibility W. WA Puget Sound area will experience a nasty quake.
Plus the people are all CA folks now.
It’s basically like another CA.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:49 AM

Bring them over here. Their birth/aging demographics suck and we could use the infusion of hard working, educated, family oriented people. Cross breeding vigor. Leave their gangsters there but bring all the baseball players.

a capella on April 7, 2011 at 11:49 AM

I AM a little worried about our troops at Sendai Airport. There are a lot of them there directing ops and logistics and that airport, as we know, is very close to the ocean.

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 11:51 AM

Perhaps the Japanese will learn from this terrible tragedy & not attempt to live in risky area & focus their rebuilding efforts on ‘safer’ higher ground.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:47 AM

There’s not a lot of land suitable for building on there that isn’t already built on.

DarkCurrent on April 7, 2011 at 11:51 AM

Never mind. Correct link here:

Sendai Airport a symbol of U.S. forces’ cooperation in disaster recovery

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 11:52 AM

Bring them over here.
a capella on April 7, 2011 at 11:49 AM

I don’t have a problem with that. All of the immigrant Japanese I have ever known are extremley hard working, polite people.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:52 AM

There’s not a lot of land suitable for building on there that isn’t already built on.

DarkCurrent on April 7, 2011 at 11:51 AM

Then a change in scenery? Immigration?
At some point, what can these people do but move away & not come back?
It breaks my heart to see people building & living in such high risk areas.
Bcs this will most assuredly happen again & again.
Unless they can find a way to build a superstructure.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:54 AM

Has this been blamed on global warming or Bush yet?

cktheman on April 7, 2011 at 11:54 AM

DarkCurrent on April 7, 2011 at 11:51 AM

How do the Japanese view this situation?
Is it a risk they understand & do not complain about?

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:55 AM

Excellent! All tsunami alerts and advisories cancelled.

Via NHK.

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 11:56 AM

cktheman on April 7, 2011 at 11:54 AM

I’m waiting for Iranian nutbag DinnerJacketBoy to accuse the US of pushing their Earthquake Device button again.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:56 AM

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 11:56 AM

THANK GOD.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:56 AM

I’m waiting for Iranian nutbag DinnerJacketBoy to accuse the US of pushing their Earthquake Device button again.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:56 AM

Good call!

cktheman on April 7, 2011 at 11:57 AM

Tsunami Warning/Advisory

Issued at 00:55 JST 08 Apr 2011

Tsunami Warnings and/or Advisories have been cancelled.

*******************Text********************
Tsunami Warnings have been cancelled for the following coastal regions of Japan:
MIYAGI PREF.
The above-mentioned Tsunami Warnings/Advisories have been cancelled.

Tsunami Advisories have been cancelled for the following coastal regions of Japan:
IWATE PREF.
FUKUSHIMA PREF.
PACIFIC COAST OF AOMORI PREF.
IBARAKI PREF.
The above-mentioned Tsunami Warnings/Advisories have been cancelled.

*******Tsunami Warning/Advisory now in effect********
No Tsunami Warnings and Advisories are currently in effect.

******* Earthquake Information ********
Occurred at 23:32 JST 07 Apr 2011
Region name MIYAGI-KEN OKI
Latitude 38.2N
Longitude 142.0E
Depth about 40 km
Magnitude 7.4

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 11:57 AM

Plus the people are all CA folks now.
It’s basically like another CA.

Badger40

Not really. The PacNorWest is over a subduction zone, California is mostly on a strike-slip fault. The amount of energy that can build up in a subduction zone is greater than a strike-slip. Also, volcanoes form in a subduction zone.

chimney sweep on April 7, 2011 at 11:57 AM

Excellent! All tsunami alerts and advisories cancelled.

Via NHK.

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 11:56 AM

Awesome, no upward or downward ocean floor displacement.

cktheman on April 7, 2011 at 11:58 AM

Ugh…

Jaibones on April 7, 2011 at 11:58 AM

whew. Thank the Lord.

ted c on April 7, 2011 at 11:59 AM

Then a change in scenery? Immigration?
At some point, what can these people do but move away & not come back?
It breaks my heart to see people building & living in such high risk areas.
Bcs this will most assuredly happen again & again.
Unless they can find a way to build a superstructure.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:54 AM

I think most Japanese would much prefer to stay in Japan, even if it is geologically unstable.

DarkCurrent on April 7, 2011 at 12:00 PM

There’s not a lot of land suitable for building on there that isn’t already built on.

DarkCurrent

Nonsense. Farmers and old land holders have been able to prevent development up and down the Japanese island chain. If you’ve spend a single day traveling anywhere in Japan you’d see miles of undeveloped land.

chimney sweep on April 7, 2011 at 12:00 PM

Also, volcanoes form in a subduction zone.

chimney sweep on April 7, 2011 at 11:57 AM

I dunno if the Yellowstone caldera is in a subduction zone or not (I’m no geologist, lol), but when it goes & blows, it will be massive. The land over the dome continues to rise, slowly.

/also, I used to do chimney sweeping in VA ;)

Ugly on April 7, 2011 at 12:03 PM

Nonsense. Farmers and old land holders have been able to prevent development up and down the Japanese island chain. If you’ve spend a single day traveling anywhere in Japan you’d see miles of undeveloped land.

chimney sweep on April 7, 2011 at 12:00 PM

I’ve spent 9 years living there.

DarkCurrent on April 7, 2011 at 12:04 PM

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 11:57 AM

Thanks for the update!

Ugly on April 7, 2011 at 12:04 PM

I dunno if the Yellowstone caldera is in a subduction zone or not (I’m no geologist, lol), but when it goes & blows, it will be massive. The land over the dome continues to rise, slowly.

No, it’s over a continental hot spot.

Bob's Kid on April 7, 2011 at 12:05 PM

Ugly on April 7, 2011 at 11:39 AM

You do realize that if Yellowstone really goes (not just a little hiccup) that the United States and the world is done, don’t you? Yellowstone is what is know as a ‘Super Volcano’. It’s caldera is almost 1600 square miles and the last time it erupted fully 640k years ago, it spread its ash from 20ft nearby and as far as Utah to a foot as far away as Missouri and Texas. If it erupts, global temperatures for the survivors would be up to 20 degrees lower in average for 10 years, more than enough to trigger another Ice Age. Oh, historically, it erupts on a 600 thousand year cycle…

Wolftech on April 7, 2011 at 12:06 PM

chimney sweep on April 7, 2011 at 11:57 AM

I was alluding to WA being like CA in that the people have started running it like they ran CA into the ground, govt-wise.
I do understand the geo situation there.
I have a major in geology.;)

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 12:06 PM

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:49 AM

Well speaking with a couple Geo’s, this isn’t an aftershock. They spoke with some of the YWC guys and it looks like it is another nice earthquake.

Hawaii is being pounded right now with a nasty storm that is flooding some areas. I hope they don’t get to big a wave this time around.

upinak on April 7, 2011 at 12:08 PM

Reports of damage are so far minimal

No sarcasm intended, but after that 9.0 shake and tsunami, is there anything left TO DAMAGE?

GarandFan on April 7, 2011 at 12:09 PM

Oh, historically, it erupts on a 600 thousand year cycle…

Wolftech on April 7, 2011 at 12:06 PM

I personally don’t put much stock in eruptions or earthquakes being cyclical.
It’s an assumption that may or may not be true.
Those are just rough avgs of eruptive cycles.
I think quite a few geologists consider the idea of these things being cyclical highly suspect.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 12:09 PM

If you are so inclined, here is a concrete way to help. Send one box of stuff you already have:

http://www.thesleepytimegal.com/for-the-children-of-ishinomaki-japan/comment-page-1/#comment-3863

Kristamatic on April 7, 2011 at 12:10 PM

Oh, historically, it erupts on a 600 thousand year cycle…

Wolftech on April 7, 2011 at 12:06 PM

OMG IT’S OVERDUE! It’s gonna erupt TOMORROW!

drudgefoxnewsallbritishtabloids/

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 12:10 PM

You do realize that if Yellowstone really goes (not just a little hiccup) that the United States and the world is done, don’t you?
Wolftech on April 7, 2011 at 12:06 PM

No it is not. There are places like that all over the world. They “blow” and release gas all the time. The media and discovery is hyping it to freak you out. No one, including geologists or seismologist, will ever be able to predict anything concerning earthquakes or volcano’s.

Here is an actually GOOD wiki about caldera’s, the names and where they are.

upinak on April 7, 2011 at 12:11 PM

Ugly on April 7, 2011 at 12:03 PM

No, like Hawaii, it is on what is known as a hot spot. Also, like Hawaii, the hot spot under Yellowstone moves (or more accurately, the crust moves over the hot spot as the continents drift). Granted, this movement is over millions of years, so the current Yellowstone caldera will be where it is for a little while longer.

Wolftech on April 7, 2011 at 12:12 PM

is there anything left TO DAMAGE?

GarandFan on April 7, 2011 at 12:09 PM

Imagine having a stout building survive the biggie, only to fall after a nasty aftershock.
Adding insult to injury.

it’s over a continental hot spot.

Bob’s Kid on April 7, 2011 at 12:05 PM

I think the hot spot theory is very interesting.
I also find it interesting that when Mt St Helen’s erupted, a dinky eruption, geysers in Y-stone were affected.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 12:13 PM

so the current Yellowstone caldera will be where it is for a little while longer.

Wolftech on April 7, 2011 at 12:12 PM

And the the Canadians can have it.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 12:13 PM

this isn’t an aftershock. They spoke with some of the YWC guys and it looks like it is another nice earthquake.

upinak on April 7, 2011 at 12:08 PM

Interesting.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 12:14 PM

I think the hot spot theory is very interesting.
I also find it interesting that when Mt St Helen’s erupted, a dinky eruption, geysers in Y-stone were affected.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 12:13 PM

But that happens everywhere. The last time a volcano blew up here, the water table dropped and many people were having issues with the water wells. The volcao was over 300 miles away. It is quite normal actually. Some geo students are trying to find out where the water goes when an earthquake and a earuption happens. I am letting them use our water well for a test subject…. but if they screw up the well they have to have another one dug and put in. Contracts are great. ;)

upinak on April 7, 2011 at 12:16 PM

I don’t want to be insensitive about this. But folks, when you live in such an acitve [sic] seismic zone like they do, this is what you can expect.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:28 AM

..you’re not; they do; and they will [survive]. They’re tough people. (I married one of ‘em.) This ain’t New Orleans after all.

The War Planner on April 7, 2011 at 12:16 PM

Perhaps the Japanese will learn from this terrible tragedy & not attempt to live in risky area & focus their rebuilding efforts on ‘safer’ higher ground.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:47 AM
There’s not a lot of land suitable for building on there that isn’t already built on.

DarkCurrent on April 7, 2011 at 11:51 AM

All things considered, the Japanese people have been remarkably resilient in dealing with this crisis. Their buildings (and nuclear plants) have been built “earthquake proof” for decades, because they know that earthquakes are frequent there.

The previous 9.0 earthquake was so devastating, not only due to its strength, but also WHERE it occurred, only a few tens of miles offshore, in the worst possible place to generate a tsunami. A quake of the same magnitude under land might have toppled a few buildings and bridges, but would not have generated a tsunami. A quake further offshore would have generated a smaller tsunami, since a tsunami’s strength and height decreases with distance from the quake.

About the only lack of foresight that could be blamed on “people building in risky areas” would be the failure of the builders of the Fukushima nuclear plant to locate their emergency cooling water pumps and generators on high ground or on roofs of buildings, where they could function after a tsunami. Probably no one ever predicted that such an enormous tsunami could occur there, since none had ever occured during the lifetimes of the people who designed the plant.

But the Japanese are not the only ones guilty of poor pump planning. When the levees broke during Hurricane Katrina, there was no way to start pumps behind the levee remotely, from atop an intact part of the levee, and it took several days to start the pumps. It’s not clear whether the pumps could have removed water faster than it flowed through the breached levee, but if the pumps had been running from the start, the maximum water level would have been lower, and the flood would not have lasted as long as it did.

Steve Z on April 7, 2011 at 12:19 PM

This ain’t New Orleans after all.

The War Planner on April 7, 2011 at 12:16 PM

Thanks. Are you there?
And isn’t it amazing how some communities deal with such tragedies very well, & how some instantly fall apart?
I am amazed at the stiff upper lip these people have.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 12:23 PM

Well speaking with a couple Geo’s, this isn’t an aftershock. They spoke with some of the YWC guys and it looks like it is another nice earthquake.

upinak on April 7, 2011 at 12:08 PM

I would tend to disagree with their designation of that quake.

After the 9.0 moved a good portion of an island arc system approximately 8 feet plus, horizontally, it’s likely that the subducting portion of the plate put quite a dimple in the mantle. That means a lot of adjustment of the zone remains to be accomplished and this 7.1, with the focal point and depth that is being indicated, would be an aftershock.

Yoop on April 7, 2011 at 12:24 PM

Yoop on April 7, 2011 at 12:24 PM

Umm, you can disagree all you want. But when it comes to earthquakes and sinces they are a 24/7 agency and see many seismic events from around the world all the time, even from Alaska, I tend to believe the experts.

upinak on April 7, 2011 at 12:26 PM

All things considered, the Japanese people have been remarkably resilient in dealing with this crisis. Their buildings (and nuclear plants) have been built “earthquake proof” for decades, because they know that earthquakes are frequent there.

Agreed.

A quake of the same magnitude under land might have toppled a few buildings and bridges, but would not have generated a tsunami.

Steve Z on April 7, 2011 at 12:19 PM

The Great Hanshin (Kobe) Earthquake of 1995 was on land and only a realatively small 6.8. It still did some very serious damage and killed over 6,000 people.

DarkCurrent on April 7, 2011 at 12:28 PM

Steve Z on April 7, 2011 at 12:19 PM

I think Japan’s aftermath shows how well planned they were for such a thing.
Katrina was always a terrible disaster just waiting in the wings.
When I visited New Orleans 2 years before Katrina (for the 1st time), I was shocked by how vulnerable that city was.
It was such a dump, too.
Here in ND, I know the only disasters I have are bad blizzards & tornadoes.
And I certainly plan for them.
It’s too bad more people don’t plan better in their lives when they can.
I applaud the Japanese for being able to withstand this.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 12:28 PM

Yoop on April 7, 2011 at 12:24 PM

I assumed that in the 1st place. But maybe these guys know something we don’t.
I still think it’s quite plausible enough to be an aftershock.
But then they don’t pay me the big bucks, either.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 12:29 PM

Umm, you can disagree all you want. But when it comes to earthquakes and sinces they are a 24/7 agency and see many seismic events from around the world all the time, even from Alaska, I tend to believe the experts.

upinak on April 7, 2011 at 12:26 PM

Um-m-m, that’s OK.

I’ll go with my 50 years as a professional geologist, with a bit of it working with a number of private and government seismologists. I suspect I know what they would call it.

I do know what the USGS is calling it.

Yoop on April 7, 2011 at 12:35 PM

I do know what the USGS is calling it.

Yoop on April 7, 2011 at 12:35 PM

I am not trying to argue with you Yoop. This is what they are saying it is. Since there is a change in the guard (as it is only 8:37 AM here) the other seismologists are probably going in or are there now, and most of south central is having blizzard like conditions… we are moving slow. This was also told to my geo’s around 7 ish this morning. And you and I both know it is usually the lowest or interns that monitor at night for these types of agencies.

upinak on April 7, 2011 at 12:41 PM

They are reporting there were 2 quakes, each around 7.4, and that Mexico just had a 6.4.

di butler on April 7, 2011 at 11:34 AM

Is it just me, or does it seem like the frequency of catastrophic earthquakes is way up?

I mean, just in the last few years we’ve had them in Haiti, China, Iran, Turkey, Chile, Mexico, New Zealand and Japan.

Maybe the Mayans are on to something?

Norwegian on April 7, 2011 at 12:48 PM

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:45 AM

Your first comment was insensitive. Your second comment was appropriate. In any case, my admonishment to you was inappropriate and I apologize.

PackerBronco on April 7, 2011 at 12:49 PM

Didn’t Glennbeckadamus forsee this?

PappyD61 on April 7, 2011 at 12:52 PM

I assumed that in the 1st place. But maybe these guys know something we don’t.
I still think it’s quite plausible enough to be an aftershock.
But then they don’t pay me the big bucks, either.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 12:29 PM

I worked the last 20 years attempting too understand the history of some Archean and Proterozoic subduction zones and their influence upon the location metallic mineral deposits. That forced me to learn what I could about presently active subduction zones and related vulcanism by watching what they do and how the crust reacts after.

Check out the focal point of this one against the array of quakes since the 9.0. Note the depth and location on a dip projection of the plane of subduction.

It could be they are seeing something we aren’t privy to, but the guys at the USGS are pretty good, once they have done their final resolution.

Yoop on April 7, 2011 at 12:52 PM

Maybe the Mayans are on to something?

Norwegian on April 7, 2011 at 12:48 PM

information on the minute.. not on the year?

upinak on April 7, 2011 at 12:54 PM

This quake was an aftershock and was well within the zone of deformation and consistent with the pattern of aftershocks for main shocks of this size. Revisit the 2004 Sumatra sequence of events and you’ll see what I mean. This was a subduction zone EQ as well.

CliffHanger on April 7, 2011 at 1:00 PM

Here’s the link… http://www.emsc-csem.org/Doc/SUMATRA_261204/SUMATRA_and_HISTO.jpg

CliffHanger on April 7, 2011 at 1:00 PM

I moved from the Seattle area for this very reason. I did not want to be caught in that unprepared, highly populated area if & when a big one struck.
Bcs there is a high possibility W. WA Puget Sound area will experience a nasty quake.
Plus the people are all CA folks now.
It’s basically like another CA.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 11:49 AM

Very wise! Not only do they have faults all over, they also have active volcanoes. If Mt. Rainier goes all bets are off. The types of volcanoes up there are prone to pyroclastic flow and lahars. Check out this crazy report from 2004 from the government about how dangerous it is, seismically, up there.

Washington State has five major volcanoes in the Cascade Range – Mount Baker,
Glacier Peak, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens and Mount Adams….. Because people are moving into areas near these mountains at a rapid pace, the state’s
volcanoes are among the most dangerous in the United States.

So many people live on the old lahars of previous Rainier eruptions.

My heart goes out to the Japanese.

NTWR on April 7, 2011 at 1:01 PM

upinak on April 7, 2011 at 12:11 PM

Go look at the geologic record of the last 3 major eruptions of the Yellowstone Caldera and then get back to me. A lot of the ‘docudrama’ shows on Yellowstone portray and eruption equal to the Huckleberry Ridge Tuft eruption of Yellowstone 2.1 million years ago. The last eruption, the Lava Creek Tuft eruption 640 thousand years ago (which is the one I referenced for the ash levels) was a VEI of 8(or Volcanic Explosivity Index, a measure of how much matter is released) which is at least 1000 cubic kilometers of ash and rock ejected from the eruption.

I wasn’t saying a super volcano eruption WOULD happen. I was stating the effects of one, if it did. While you are correct and no one can predict when an eruption would occur(and the comment about being overdue was for dramatic effect, since you can not devise a frequency of any accuracy from a small number of occurrences), we would see the signs of it coming in advance (Uplift, increase in temperatures of geothermic features, a change in the gasses seeping from the earth at the hotspot).

Wolftech on April 7, 2011 at 1:11 PM

Thanks. Are you there?
And isn’t it amazing how some communities deal with such tragedies very well, & how some instantly fall apart?
I am amazed at the stiff upper lip these people have.
Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 12:23 PM

I hear ya

Sonosam on April 7, 2011 at 1:17 PM

PackerBronco on April 7, 2011 at 12:49 PM

And I withdraw my a$$hat response to you.
I value your opinions. So I think it’s good for us to be friendly. ;)

Maybe the Mayans are on to something?

Norwegian on April 7, 2011 at 12:48 PM

I prefer to not go there.
People with no understanding of such things in relation to the Earth’s history tend to get all worked up over absolutely nothing.
Coincidences? I doubt it. I just think it’s selective attention.

Wolftech on April 7, 2011 at 1:11 PM

I’m not quite sure why my comment made you so testy.
I do not think that this kind of activity should be assumed to be cyclical.
Sometimes we tend to wish to see patterns where often there is none.
I also did not indicate you were saying it would erupt.
I was inserting my scientific opinion on the subject of cyclical seismic activities.
And I do understand these things have predictive signs.
But uplift, outgassing, etc. in the Y-stone area may or may not be a predictive sign of an eruption.
A resurgent caldera is a very unpredictable beast. And yes, I’m very familiar with Y-stone’s eruptive behavior. I use it as a case study for my dual credit geology class.
But it is a fascinating one.
Hopefully it never erupts in our lifetime.
That would be nasty.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 1:46 PM

So many people live on the old lahars of previous Rainier eruptions.

My heart goes out to the Japanese.

NTWR on April 7, 2011 at 1:01 PM

When I was living in the Fall City area back in the 90s, I remember there was a series of several earthquakes.
And there was a fault discovered under the gravels near Monroe I believe.
To me, the Puget Sound area has so many unknowns, & coupled with the high poulation densities, numerous water inlets/bodies, & older structures, not to mention the fact that a lot of the Seattle waterfront is built upon landfill seds (liquifaction!), I just found it prudent to leave.
And when you look at the volcanic hazards, well, Mt Ranier is not dead yet, & while it’s probably unlikely it’ll erupt, you just never know.
Better to visit than live there, IMHO.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 2:02 PM

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 1:46 PM

There is some debate about cycles in geology referring to earthquake and volcanic nature. While I can see their point on earthquakes, some volcanic activity can be tied to a cycle, especially due to a hot spot. Besides, everything else in the natural world relies on a cycle, why not the very earth itself?

And I thought my comments were directed to upinak, not to you Badger.

BTW, just to quantify my statements, I am not a geologist or vulcanologist and only have a hobbyist interest in the subject.

Wolftech on April 7, 2011 at 2:09 PM

And I thought my comments were directed to upinak, not to you Badger.

Wolftech on April 7, 2011 at 2:09 PM

And you are right. I’m blind. And blonde.
Double whammy ;)

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 2:20 PM

And you are right. I’m blind. And blonde.
Double whammy ;)

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 2:20 PM

Ya Damnity! *smiles*

BTW, just to quantify my statements, I am not a geologist or vulcanologist and only have a hobbyist interest in the subject.

Wolftech on April 7, 2011 at 2:09 PM

Nothing wrong with that. Many geologists, seismologist and geological engineers vary on opinion because of what others (like you) say and give them a reason to doubt.

I don’t look at Y-Stone, because of where I live. I have no real reason too. I have Katmi National Park which is more active than Y-stone but not publicized nearly as much, unless we are talking bears fishing in a river.

upinak on April 7, 2011 at 2:25 PM

Better to visit than live there, IMHO.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 2:02 PM

Wimp

DarkCurrent on April 7, 2011 at 2:30 PM

Wimp

DarkCurrent on April 7, 2011 at 2:30 PM

Heh. I live in the middle of the Campi Flegrei volcano in Italy. Does that qualify?

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 2:40 PM

Wimp

DarkCurrent on April 7, 2011 at 2:30 PM

I confess. I am. I can also see the Federales coming for miles here in the flatlands of ND.
It will be an asset when they come for my guns.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 3:24 PM

fiatboomer on April 7, 2011 at 2:40 PM

Neapolitan Yellow Tuff
Funny name for tuff. I can only think of ice cream.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 3:54 PM

I confess. I am. I can also see the Federales coming for miles here in the flatlands of ND.
It will be an asset when they come for my guns.

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 3:24 PM

They can see you too.

DarkCurrent on April 7, 2011 at 3:59 PM

If people built only in “safe” areas, we wouldn’t have Washington DC, which only exists because it was swampland that nobody wanted!!

…and recently it seems to be swampier…

landlines on April 7, 2011 at 4:53 PM

They can see you too.

DarkCurrent on April 7, 2011 at 3:59 PM

LOL!
But I’ve drawn the 1st bead!

Badger40 on April 7, 2011 at 5:26 PM